Overview of content related to 'university of leicester' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/13802/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en KAPTUR the Highlights: Exploring Research Data Management in the Visual Arts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author1">Leigh Garrett</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author2">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author3">Carlos Silva</a> and <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author4">Anne Spalding</a> describe the exploration of the importance and nature of research data in the visual arts and requirements for their appropriate curation and preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>KAPTUR (2011-13) [<a href="#1">1</a>], funded by Jisc and led by the Visual Arts Data Service, was a collaborative project involving four institutional partners: the Glasgow School of Arts; Goldsmiths, University of London; University for the Creative Arts; and the University of the Arts London.&nbsp;Research data have in recent years become regarded as a valuable institutional resource and their appropriate collection, curation, publication and preservation as essential. This has been driven by a number of internal and external forces, and all UK Research Councils now require it as a condition of funding [<a href="#2">2</a>]. As a result, a network of data repositories has emerged [<a href="#3">3</a>], some funded by research councils and others by institutions themselves. However, at the outset of the project, research data management practice within the visual arts appeared to operate rather <em>ad hoc</em> with none of the specialist arts institutions within the UK having either implemented research data management policies [<a href="#4">4</a>] or established research data management systems.&nbsp; KAPTUR sought to:</p> <ul> <li>investigate the nature of visual arts research data;</li> <li>make recommendations for its effective management;</li> <li>develop a model of best practice applicable to both specialist institutions and arts departments within multidisciplinary institutions; and</li> <li>apply, test and refine the model of best practice across the four institutional partner institutions.</li> </ul> <p>This paper outlines the background and context of the project; explores the nature of visual arts research data; details the outcomes of the user and technical review; and describes the work which underwent within the partner institutions around policy formation and staff engagement.</p> <p>Led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), in collaboration with the Glasgow School of Art, Goldsmiths College, University of the Arts London and University for the Creative Arts, and funded by Jisc, KAPTUR [<a href="#1">1</a>] sought to ‘...discover, create and pilot a sectoral model of best practice in the management of research data in the [visual] arts.’ [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-garrett-et-al/logo-2.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 210px;" title="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" /></p> <p>Recent years have witnessed an increasing recognition across the Higher Education sector that research data are a valuable resource and therefore its appropriate curation and preservation are essential.&nbsp; In addition, wider societal and political forces meant that research councils, teams and researchers were coming under increasing pressure to make publicly funded data freely available.&nbsp; As such the publication of research data was increasingly becoming a requirement of funding, for example the Arts and Humanities Research Council [<a href="#6">6</a>] and Medical Research Council [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Equally important was the need for increased data transparency, and to enable researchers to access existing datasets to test the validity and reliability of the data and associated research methods; to reinterpret the data; and to preserve the data for future scrutiny. In response, many universities, for example the University of Edinburgh, had established institutional research data management systems to support the deposit and preservation of research data, whilst others were in the process of piloting services, for example the University of Leicester, and establishing policies and procedures which actively support researchers to manage their data effectively, such as Canterbury Christ Church University and Northumbria University. In addition, many of the research councils themselves had established repositories, for example the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex, which curates research data in the social sciences and humanities, and the Natural Environment Research Council, which supports a network of data centres across its disciplinary areas.</p> <p>However, given the emerging landscape, at the outset of the project it was clear that very little was known about the collection, curation and usage of research data in the visual arts:&nbsp;none of the specialist arts institutions had research data management policies or infrastructure in place and evidence collected at the time indicated that practice was at best, <em>ad hoc</em>, left to individual researchers and teams with limited support or guidance. Little work had been undertaken to understand the distinctive and varied nature of research data in the visual arts, and even less to understand how these data could be collected, curated, preserved and exploited, or their potential impact assessed.</p> <p>By its very nature, research in the visual arts is highly complex and varied, often comprising a wide variety of outputs and formats which present researchers, repository managers and institutions with many discipline-specific difficulties. The methods and processes which generate this research are just as varied and complex.&nbsp; Research endeavour in the visual arts relies heavily on the physical artefact: sketchbooks, logbooks, journals, and workbooks.&nbsp; Alongside these data, a wide range of related project documentation and protocols are also created.&nbsp; While technology may offer considerable potential to support the safe storage and preservation of research and related data, and to enhance access, the highly distinctive nature of the visual arts and its research methods also present enormous technical problems with regard to formats, standards, roles and responsibilities, and policies.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article anne spalding carlos silva leigh garrett marie-therese gramstadt ahrc canterbury christ church university courtauld institute of art datacite dcc falmouth university glasgow school of art goldsmiths college hefce jisc northumbria university uk data archive university for the creative arts university of bath university of birmingham university of edinburgh university of essex university of leicester university of london university of the arts london vads kaptur keepit mrc scarlet archives augmented reality blog cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set digitisation eprints framework higher education infrastructure metadata oer open access preservation repositories research semantic web software video Mon, 01 Jul 2013 17:50:23 +0000 lisrw 2461 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: University Libraries and Space in the Digital World http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/murphy-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/murphy-rvw#author1">Hugh Murphy</a> reviews a collection of essays which charts the development and impact of the physical library space and its use in our digital world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Despite the economic adversity faced by many academic bodies and their libraries, there are still some institutions lucky enough to be in a position to refurbish, extend or commission a new building. <em>University Libraries and Space in the Digital World</em> is undoubtedly for the many people involved in such projects, but is quite clearly designed for a wider readership too. This is a good thing, as it would be hard to think of a library user or staff member who is not affected by the issue of library space.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/murphy-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review hugh murphy national university of ireland university college dublin university of leicester university of melbourne internet explorer national library prism research resource description social networks web 2.0 Wed, 26 Jun 2013 21:23:02 +0000 lisrw 2454 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2012: Big Data, Big Deal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> attended the annual Eduserv Symposium on 10 May 2012 at the Royal College of Physicians, London to find out what are the implications of big data for Higher Education Institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The annual Eduserv Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] was billed as a ‘must-attend event for IT professionals in Higher Education’; the choice of topical subject matter being one of the biggest crowd-drawers (the other being the amazing venue: the Royal College of Physicians). The past few years have seen coverage of highly topical areas such as virtualisation and the cloud, the mobile university and access management.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report marieke guy amazon cetis dcc eduserv google jisc orcid oreilly oxford internet institute ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of california berkeley university of leicester university of oxford webtrends wellcome trust dealing with data impact project accessibility algorithm big data blog cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation gis google analytics google trends hadoop higher education infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer irods learning analytics mobile nosql oer open data open source remote working research twitter usb Mon, 30 Jul 2012 17:48:45 +0000 lisrw 2370 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataCite UK User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 2nd UK User Group meeting for DataCite, held at the British Library in London, in April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="top" id="top"></a></p> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>DataCite [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an international not-for-profit organisation dedicated to making research data a normal, citable part of the scientific record. It is made up of a membership of 15 major libraries and data centres, which, along with four associate members, represent 11 different countries across four continents. The approach taken by DataCite currently centres on assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to datasets; it is a member of the International DOI Foundation and one of a handful of DOI registration agencies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report alex ball badc british library d-lib magazine datacite dcc google mimas orcid science and technology facilities council uk data archive ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of leicester university of oxford erim fishnet sagecite accessibility api archives bibliographic data cataloguing curation data data set digital curation digital preservation doi framework guid higher education identifier metadata national library open data preservation repositories research schema usability web resources Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1627 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Digital Consumers - Reshaping the Information Professions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/rafiq-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/rafiq-rvw#author1">Muhammad Rafiq</a> offers us a detailed review of a work which examines digital consumers from both an historical and future perspective.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This book is a collection of articles by the members of the Centre for Information Behaviour and the Evaluation of Research (CIBER), at University College London (UCL) and associates, such as Dr Tom Dobrowolski of Warsaw University, Professor Michael Moss of the University of Glasgow, Professor Barrie Gunter of the University of Leicester.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/rafiq-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 review muhammad rafiq google university college london university of glasgow university of leicester collection development data set html information retrieval research resource discovery search technology social web Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1502 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The 2008 Mashed Museum Day and UK Museums on the Web Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/ukmw08-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/ukmw08-rpt#author1">Mia Ridge</a> reports on the Mashed Museum day and the Museums Computer Group UK Museums on the Web Conference, held at the University of Leicester in June 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Following the success of the inaugural event last year [<a href="#1">1</a>], the Mashed Museum day was again held the day before the Museums Computer Group UK Museums on the Web Conference. The theme of the conference was 'connecting collections online', and the Mashed Museum day was a chance for museum ICT staff to put this into practice.</p> <h2 id="The_Mashed_Museum_Day">The Mashed Museum Day</h2> <p>Earlier this year I received an email that read:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/ukmw08-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 event report mia ridge bbc ibm library of congress massachusetts institute of technology museum of london oai university of leicester europeana freebase romeo wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives blog cataloguing copyright csv data data set data visualisation database digital library digital media digitisation exif file format flickr foi framework geospatial data gis ict infrastructure metadata ontologies rdf rdfa repositories research resource description rss search technology semantic web standardisation syndication twitter video visualisation vocabularies web 2.0 web services xml Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1415 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 24 Hour Museum: From Past to Future http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/pratty <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>As 24 Hour Museum rebuilds and looks outwards to new partnerships, <a href="/issue52/pratty#author1">Jon Pratty</a> looks at challenges faced over the last seven years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>24 Hour Museum [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a successful and sustainable cultural Web site. Type the word 'museum' into Google UK and up it pops as a top five search result. Unlike the other top sites, all national museums or galleries, 24HM's remit covers the whole country, in eclectic subject areas, reaching a wide variety of audiences with simple and accessible content.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/pratty" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article jon pratty ahrc bbc google mla oai university of cambridge university of leicester wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives content management data database digital media further education html infrastructure interoperability knowledge management metadata portal research rss search technology semantic web soap software syndication tagging url vocabularies web 2.0 web services widget windows xml Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1331 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Foundation Symposium 2007: Virtual Worlds, Real Learning? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/eduserv-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/eduserv-rpt#author1">Paul Walk</a> reports on the Eduserv Foundation Symposium which took as its theme 'Virtual Worlds, Real Learning?' and which was primarily concerned with educational uses for Second Life.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/eduserv-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 event report paul walk eduserv ibm linden lab ukoln university of bath university of edinburgh university of leicester accessibility avatar data database e-learning intranet privacy research second life software video visualisation Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1341 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Second Digital Repositories Programme Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/jisc-repositories-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/jisc-repositories-rpt#author1">Julie Allinson</a> and <a href="/issue47/jisc-repositories-rpt#author2">Mahendra Mahey</a> report on a 2-day JISC Digital Repositories Meeting focusing on project clusters working together and other related issues held by JISC in Warwick, UK over 27-28 March 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) Digital Repositories Programme [<a href="#1">1</a>] held its second Programme meeting towards the end of March. Following in the collaborative tradition set by last October's joint Programme meeting with the Digital Preservation and Asset Management Programme [<a href="#2">2</a>], this gathering was themed around the cluster groups established by the Digital Repositories Programme [<a href="#3">3</a>] and included many guests from other JISC areas of work and beyond.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/jisc-repositories-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 event report julie allinson mahendra mahey cetis dcc jisc oai oais open university ordnance survey sherpa ukoln university of bath university of hull university of leicester university of southampton university of worcester wellcome trust cd-lor claddier ebank uk geoxwalk grade project iemsr iesr iri scotland jisc information environment jorum midess opendoar perx preserv prowe r4l repomman repository bridge romeo sherpa plus sherpa romeo stargate archives browser copyright curation data data management data set database digital curation digital media digital object identifier digital preservation digital repositories doi drm e-learning electronic theses eprints fedora commons geospatial data gis handle system identifier infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability learning objects metadata metadata schema registry multimedia oai-pmh open access open archives initiative preservation repositories research resource management schema search technology service registry standards thesaurus uddi uri web services wiki xml Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1238 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Accessibility Revealed: The Museums, Libraries and Archives Council Audit http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/petrie-weisen <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue44/petrie-weisen#author1">Marcus Weisen</a>, <a href="/issue44/petrie-weisen#author2">Helen Petrie</a>, <a href="/issue44/petrie-weisen#author3">Neil King</a> and <a href="/issue44/petrie-weisen#author4">Fraser Hamilton</a> describe a comprehensive Web accessibility audit involving extensive user testing as well as automatic testing of Web sites.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2004, the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) commissioned a Web accessibility audit from City University London. MLA is the national development agency working for and on behalf of museums, libraries and archives in England and advising government on policy and priorities for the sector. The audit was inspired by a study conducted by City University London in 2003/2004 on the accessibility of 1,000 general Web sites for the Disability Rights Commission (DRC) [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/petrie-weisen" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue44 feature article fraser hamilton helen petrie marcus weisen neil king alt city university london mla ukoln university of leicester web accessibility initiative accessibility archives browser data digitisation e-government framework graphics higher education html ict plain text research software wcag web development web services windows Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1162 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk