Overview of content related to 'harvard university' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/13859/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Seb Schmoller Replies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Stepping down from his pivotal role as CEO at ALT, <a href="/issue70/schmoller#author1">Seb Schmoller</a> kindly answers a few questions from <em>Ariadne</em> on his perspective on online learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Ariadne</em>: Seb, please tell us a little about yourself.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article seb schmoller alt harvard university jisc sheffield college university of cambridge university of southampton yale university wikipedia adl archives blog content licence copyright course design e-learning further education higher education ict licence mooc research software twitter video Fri, 07 Dec 2012 12:27:42 +0000 lisrw 2404 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog collection development copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Redeveloping the Loughborough Online Reading List System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author1">Jon Knight</a>, <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author2">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author3">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the redevelopment of Loughborough University’s open source reading list system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Loughborough Online Reading Lists System (LORLS) [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been developed at Loughborough University since the late 1990s.&nbsp; LORLS was originally implemented at the request of the University’s Learning and Teaching Committee simply to make reading lists available online to students.&nbsp; The Library staff immediately saw the benefit of such a system in not only allowing students ready access to academics’ reading lists but also in having such access themselves. This was because a significant number of academics were bypassing the library when generating and distributing lists to their students who were then in turn surprised when the library did not have the recommended books either in stock or in sufficient numbers to meet demand.</p> <p>The first version of the system produced by the Library Systems Team was part of a project that also had a ‘reading lists amnesty’ in which academics were encouraged to provide their reading lists to the library which then employed some temporary staff over the summer to enter them into the new system.&nbsp; This meant that the first version of LORLS went live in July 2000 with a reasonable percentage of lists already in place.&nbsp; Subsequently the creation and editing of reading lists was made the responsibility of the academics or departmental admin staff, with some assistance from library staff.</p> <p>LORLS was written in Perl, with a MySQL database back-end.&nbsp; Most user interfaces were delivered via the web, with a limited number of back-end scripts that helped the systems staff maintain the system and alert library staff to changes that had been made to reading lists.</p> <p>Soon after the first version of LORLS went live at Loughborough, a number of other universities expressed an interest in using or modifying the system. Permission was granted by the University to release it as open source under the General Public Licence (GPL)[<a href="#2">2</a>].&nbsp; New versions were released as the system was developed and bugs were fixed. The last version of the original LORLS code base/data design was version 5, which was downloaded by sites worldwide.</p> <h2 id="Redesign">Redesign</h2> <p>By early 2007 it was decided to take a step back and see if there were things that could be done better in LORLS.&nbsp; Some design decisions made in 1999 no longer made sense eight years later.&nbsp; Indeed some of the database design was predicated on how teaching modules were supposed to work at Loughborough and it had already become clear that the reality of how they were deployed was often quite different.&nbsp; For example, during the original design, the principle was that each module would have a single reading list associated with it.&nbsp; Within a few years several modules had been found that were being taught by two (or more!) academics, all wanting their own independent reading list.</p> <p>Some of the structuring of the data in the MySQL database began to limit how the system could be developed.&nbsp; The University began to plan an organisational restructuring shortly after the redesign of LORLS was commenced, and it was clear that the simple departmental structure was likely to be replaced by a more fluid school and department mix.</p> <p>Library staff were also beginning to request new features that were thus increasingly awkward to implement.&nbsp; Rather than leap through hoops to satisfy them within the framework of the existing system, it made sense to add them into the design process for a full redesign.</p> <p>It was also felt that the pure CGI-driven user interface could do with a revamp.&nbsp; The earlier LORLS user interfaces used only basic HTML forms, with little in the way of client-side scripting.&nbsp; Whilst that meant that they tended to work on any web browser and were pretty accessible, they were also a bit clunky compared to some of the newer dynamic web sites.</p> <p>A distinct separation of the user interface from the back-end database was decided upon to improve localization and portability of the system as earlier versions of LORLS had already shown that many sites took the base code and then customised the user interface parts of the CGI scripts to their own look and feel.&nbsp; The older CGI scripts were a mix of user interaction elements and database access and processing, which made this task a bit more difficult than it really needed to be.</p> <p>Separating the database code from the user interface code would let people easily tinker with one without unduly affecting the other.&nbsp; It would also allow local experimentation with multiple user-interface designs for different user communities or devices.</p> <p>This implied that a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) would need to be defined. As asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)[<a href="#3">3</a>] interactions had been successful applied in a number of recent projects the team had worked on, XML was chosen as the format to be used.&nbsp; At first simple object access protocol (SOAP) style XML requests was experimented with, as well as XML responses, but it was soon realised that SOAP was far too heavy-weight for most of the API calls, so a lighter ‘RESTful’ API was selected.&nbsp; The API was formed of CGI scripts that took normal parameters as input and returned XML documents for the client to parse and display.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper jon knight google harvard university loughborough university microsoft gnu access control ajax api archives authentication bibliographic data blog cache chrome cookie data database digital library e-learning framework google books gpl html javascript jquery json library management systems licence metadata moodle mysql open source perl refworks restful schema shibboleth soap software sql standards web browser xml z39.50 zip Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:32:55 +0000 lisrw 2354 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Has Second Life Lived up to Expectations? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/gorman#author1">Paul Gorman</a> examines to what degree Second Life has justified the claims made for it by its evangelists with particular regard to education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Second Life (SL) is a virtual world created and owned by a company called Linden Lab and was launched in 2003. By 2006, SL was increasingly visible in the UK media and by 2007 SL had secured over 600 mentions in UK newspapers and magazines [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, media interest in SL evaporated rapidly with references to it dropping by more than 40% in 2008 and even further since. During this peak period SL attracted large investment in virtual land from multi-national corporations, businesses and also attracted significant interest from educational institutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article paul gorman bbc city of glasgow college glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc linden lab university of edinburgh avatar blog e-learning facebook graphics instant messaging research second life twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2224 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Image 'Quotation' Using the C.I.T.E. Architecture http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author1">Christopher Blackwell</a> and <a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author2">Amy Hackney Blackwell</a> describe with examples a digital library infrastructure that affords canonical citation for 'quoting' images, useful for creating commentaries, arguments, and teaching tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Quotation is the heart of scholarly argument and teaching, the activity of bringing insight to something complex by focused discussion of its parts. Philosophers who have reflected on the question of quotation have identified two necessary components: a name, pointer, or citation on the one hand and a reproduction or repetition on the other. Robert Sokolowski calls quotation a 'curious conjunction of being able to name and to contain' [<a href="#1">1</a>]; V.A. Howard is more succinct: quotation is 'replication-plus-reference' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. We are less interested in the metaphysical aspects of quotation than in the practical ones.</p> <p>The tools and techniques described here were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0916148 &amp; No. 0916421. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).</p> <h2 id="Quotation">Quotation</h2> <p>Quotation, when accompanied by citation, allows us to bring the reader's attention to bear on a particular part of a larger whole efficiently and without losing the surrounding context. A work of Biblical exegesis, for example, can quote or merely cite 'Genesis 1:29' without having to reproduce the entire Hebrew Bible, or even the Book of Genesis; a reader can resolve that citation to a particular passage about the creation of plants, and can see that passage as a discrete node at the bottom of a narrowing hierarchy: Hebrew Bible, Genesis, Chapter 1, Verse 29. We take this for granted.</p> <p>Quoting a text is easy. But how can we quote an image? This remains difficult even in the 21st century where it is easy to reproduce digital images, pass them around through networks, and manipulate them on our desks.</p> <p>A scholar wishing to refer to a particular part of an image will generally do something like this: She will open one version of an image in some editing software, select and 'cut' a section from it, and 'paste' that section into a document containing the text of her commentary or argument. She might add to the text of her argument a reference to the source of the image. The language that describes this process is that of mechanical work&nbsp;– cutting and pasting&nbsp;– rather than the language of quotation and citation. The process yields a fragment of an image with only a tenuous connection to the ontological hierarchy of the object of study. The same scholar who would never give a citation to '<em>The Bible</em>, page 12' rather than to 'Genesis 1:29' will, of necessity, cite an image-fragment in a way similarly unlikely to help readers find the source and locate the fragment in its natural context.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article amy hackney blackwell christopher blackwell clemson university furman university google harvard university national academy of sciences national science foundation university of virginia gnu homer multitext archives browser creative commons css data digital library doi dublin core firefox free software html identifier infrastructure java licence metadata namespace openoffice research safari schema software standards stylesheet tei thesaurus url urn vocabularies web browser xhtml xml xsl xslt zip Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1620 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Special Collections Digitisation in the Age of Mass Scanning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author1">Constance Rinaldo</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author2">Judith Warnement</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author3">Tom Baione</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author4">Martin R. Kalfatovic</a> and <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author5">Susan Fraser</a> describe results from a study to identify and develop a cost-effective and efficient large-scale digitisation workflow for special collections library materials.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a consortium of 12 natural history and botanical libraries that co-operate to digitise and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global 'biodiversity commons.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] The participating libraries hold more than two million volumes of biodiversity literature collected over 200 years to support the work of scientists, researchers and students in their home insti</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article constance rinaldo judith warnement martin r. kalfatovic susan fraser tom baione american museum of natural history california digital library harvard university ifla library of congress new york botanical garden oclc smithsonian institution university of cambridge university of oxford internet archive open library wikipedia archives bibliographic data cataloguing csv data database digital library digitisation dublin core framework infrastructure intellectual property librarything metadata opac open access repositories research tagging url video web services wiki z39.50 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1624 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Preparing Collections for Digitization http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a recently published book on the selection and preparation of archive and library collections for digitisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the past 20 years a great deal of information and guidance has been published to support cultural heritage organisations interested in undertaking digitisation projects. It is well over a decade now since the seminal Joint National Preservation Office and Research Libraries Group Preservation Conference on <em>Guidelines for digital imaging</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>] and standard introductory texts on digitisation like Anne Kenney and Oya Rieger's <em>Moving theory into practice</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>] and Stuart Lee's <em>Digital imaging: a practical handbook</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] are of a similar age - although still extremely useful. More up-to-date guidance is also available from services like JISC Digital Media [<a href="#4">4</a>] and the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --></p><p>Into this mix comes this new book on the preparation of collections for digitisation by Anna Bülow and Jess Ahmon, respectively Head of Preservation and Preservation Officer at The National Archives in Kew, London. The book claims to fill a gap in the existing literature, covering the practical aspects of safeguarding collections during image capture. It is perhaps worth noting upfront that the main focus of the book is on textual resources and documentary records, meaning that it would seem to be most useful for those working in the libraries and archives sectors.</p> <p>The first chapter provides some essential context, linking digitisation initiatives to the ongoing collection management practices of archives and libraries. It makes the general point that collection management has three main aspects: the <em>development</em>, <em>use</em> and <em>preservation</em> of collections.</p> <blockquote><p>Collection management involves making well informed decisions in order to prioritise actions and optimise the allocation of resources to maintain as much accessible value as possible. (p. 5)</p></blockquote> <p>Bülow and Ahmon argue that digital technologies have created new challenges for collection management, e.g. being partly responsible for a shift in attention from the development and <em>preservation</em> role to the development and <em>use</em> role. In practice, however, the link between the roles can be more nuanced. For example, in some cases digitisation may benefit conservation aims by helping to reduce the physical handling of fragile materials. In general, however, the authors feel that while the long-term sustainability challenges of digital content remain unresolved, "digitization of any book or document cannot be seen as a preservation measure for the original itself." (p. 8). The chapter concludes with a brief outline of the four phases of digitisation, each of which is made up of multiple steps. Of these, this book focuses primarily on the first two stages, covering all of the tasks that need to be done prior to imaging (e.g. selection, rights clearance, document preparation) as well as those associated with the digitisation process itself (imaging, quality assurance, transcription, metadata creation). The remaining two stages, chiefly facilitating use and sustainability, are not dealt with in any detail by this book.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review michael day harvard university jisc jisc digital media library association the national archives ukoln university of bath algorithm archives digital media digital preservation digitisation file format interoperability metadata preservation provenance research resource description standards tiff Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1633 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Characterising and Preserving Digital Repositories: File Format Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> and <a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author2">David Tarrant</a> show how file format profiles, the starting point for preservation plans and actions, can also be used to reveal the fingerprints of emerging types of institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article david tarrant steve hitchcock amazon google harvard university jisc microsoft mpeg the national archives university of illinois university of northampton university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome library jisc information environment keepit wikipedia accessibility adobe archives bibliographic data blog cloud computing css csv curation data data management database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination document format droid eprints file format flash flash video framework gif graphics html hypertext identifier institutional repository java jpeg latex linked data metadata mpeg-1 open access open source photoshop php plain text preservation quicktime repositories research schema semantic web software standards vector graphics video web 2.0 wiki windows windows media xml xml schema Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1608 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Years of Zetoc http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/ronson#author1">Jane Ronson</a> looks at how Zetoc has developed and what the future holds for the service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, Zetoc [<a href="#1">1</a>] provides quality-assured, comprehensive journal table of contents data for resource discovery that users can search and have delivered straight to their in-box or desktop. In a nutshell, Zetoc is all about convenience, current awareness and comprehensive coverage. In a recent survey, one academic commented: 'This is a "one-stop shop" for relevant literature'. What is Zetoc, what has it achieved and where is it going? In this article I will look at the history of the service and how it has developed over the past decade.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/ronson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article jane ronson british library google harvard university heriot-watt university hewlett-packard jisc loughborough university mimas national library of wales nhs sconul stanford university university of chester university of manchester university of surrey dner my references suncat tictocs zetoc aggregation authentication bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing copac data database further education google scholar higher education identifier national library open access openurl personalisation repositories research resource discovery rss search technology shibboleth soap software sru tag cloud z39.50 Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1610 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Why UK Further and Higher Education Needs Local Software Developers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mahey-walk <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/mahey-walk#author1">Mahendra Mahey</a> and <a href="/issue65/mahey-walk#author2">Paul Walk</a> discuss the work of the Developer Community Supporting Innovation (DevCSI) Project which focuses on building capacity for software developers in UK Further and Higher Education to support innovation in the sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Software developers are important to Further (FE) and Higher Education (HE). They are needed to develop and implement local FEI (Further Education Institution) and HEI (Higher Education Institution) solutions, to build e-infrastructure, and to innovate and develop ideas and prototypes that can be exploited by others. They also play an important part in the development and uptake of open standards and interoperability.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mahey-walk" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article mahendra mahey paul walk bbc google harvard university jisc oracle ukoln university of bath university of london devcsi list8d accessibility blog data digital repositories disruptive innovation eprints further education google docs higher education infrastructure interoperability metadata python rdf rdfa repositories research software ulcc video Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1587 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making Datasets Visible and Accessible: DataCite's First Summer Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt#author1">Tom J Pollard</a> and <a href="/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt#author2">J Max Wilkinson</a> report on DataCite's First Summer Meeting, a two-day event focused on making datasets visible and accessible, held in Hannover, Germany, in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report j max wilkinson tom pollard british library datacite elsevier harvard university microsoft open planets foundation university of the west of england ddi archives blog browser cataloguing copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data mining data set digital repositories doi e-research facebook foi framework graphics infrastructure interoperability java mashup metadata open access open source portal privacy repositories research search technology standards syndication visualisation vocabularies Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1574 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intranet Management: Divine Comedy or Strategic Imperative? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/white#author1">Martin White</a> suggests that a failure to recognise the value of intranets is a symptom of a failure to recognise information as a strategic asset.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to Dante in his Divine Comedy the inscription above the door to Hades reads "Abandon hope all ye who enter here". For many this could also be the sign on the home page of their organisation's intranet as, with business-critical decisions to make, they begin the daily hunt for information that they are sure should be somewhere in the application. It could just as easily be the sign on the door of the intranet manager of the organisation, though this door usually also carries a number of other job descriptions, all of which seem to be given more priority by the organisation than the care and development of the intranet. Most organisations of any size will have a full-time web manager, often with a support team, but this is rarely the case with the intranet.</p> <p>There are a substantial number of intranets in the UK. Statistics from the Office for National Statistics indicate that 22% of all businesses have an intranet [<a href="#1">1</a>]. As the size of the business increases so does the level of penetration, and most businesses of more than 500 people will now have some form of intranet. Given the number of businesses in the UK the author estimates that there are probably around 300,000 intranets in the commercial sector, and at a guess a further 100,000 in the public sector, charities, Higher Education institutions (HEIs) and other organisations. Only over the last few years has any reliable statistical information become available on intranet use and development, and this is a in-depth global survey of only around 300 intranets [<a href="#2">2</a>]. In the UK HEI sector a major opportunity was lost in a survey commissioned in 2009 by Eduserv into the management of web content in the HEI sector as no account of intranet use of CMS applications was included in the scope of the survey [<a href="#3">3</a>]. A survey of SharePoint use in HEIs undertaken for Eduserv in late 2009 [<a href="#4">4</a>] did indicate that a number of institutions were using SharePoint for intranet applications but the survey did not look in detail at intranet implementation.</p> <p>It is also only over the last few years have forums been set up in which intranet managers are able to share experiences and challenges with others. The work of the Intranet Benchmark Forum [<a href="#5">5</a>] is focused on providing services to large organisations, but there are also other virtual and physical discussion forums, such as the Intranet Forum [<a href="#6">6</a>] run by UKeiG for its members. It is probably reasonable to suggest that the majority of intranet managers have seen very few intranets from which to gain a sense of good practice, whereas web managers have an almost unlimited supply of sites from which to gain ideas for their own use. This is as true in the HEI sector as in other sectors. Given the installed base of intranets in the UK it is also surprising that there is no 'intranet conference' event even though intranet management does feature in events such as Online Information [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Most countries in northern Europe have an intranet conference [<a href="#8">8</a>], often with several hundred delegates, so why there is no equivalent in the UK is a mystery.</p> <h2 id="Intranets_Are_Different">Intranets Are Different</h2> <p>All too often an intranet is regarded as an internal web site. The reality is that about the only commonality between an intranet and a web site is the use of web browser technology. Many very successful intranets do not even use a web content management application but instead are based on Notes technology or portal applications. Intranet content contribution is usually highly distributed, with individual members of staff publishing content direct to the intranet perhaps only a few times a year. This means that the web content management system has to be highly intuitive, and enable Word documents to be rendered into clean HTML code to create web pages. The teams supporting public web sites are using the systems every working day, working often in HTML and having a much more limited range of content to cope with. Many of the problems that arise in keeping content current on an intranet are a result of staff having to use a complex Web publishing system that was specified for Web site management and not intranet management.</p> <p>Another factor to be considered is that increasingly intranets are federated applications [<a href="#9">9</a>]. This is often the situation in HEIs where each department wants to have its own intranet, and on top of all these individual intranets there is some form of top-level 'corporate' home page and navigation. Often there is no central coordination of these intranets, and so each adopts some or none of the visual design standards of the HEI.</p> <p>As far as enterprise applications are concerned, intranets are different because they are not based on business processes or work-flow. Finance, registry, personnel and most other applications support well-defined processes, usually within a specific department, and where the content requirements are usually specified in database terms. Anything approaching text content is usually relegated to a single field in the database. Intranets exist because there is a substantial amount of information in any organisation that is not based on business processes and cannot be managed within a formal database structure, such as policies, procedures, campus maps, events, staff notices and hundreds of other information formats produced by every department and location within the organisation.</p> <p>As a result the intranet becomes an information dumping ground. Under-resourced intranet managers do not have the resources to maintain content quality, and so multiple versions of documents with no visible ownership or provenance proliferate. Employees leave or change responsibility but the intranet is based on a 'file-and-forget' principle and no effort is taken to ensure that document ownership is transferred to another member of staff. Very quickly the information architecture of the intranet, based usually on the structure of the organisation at the time of the last WCMS (Web content management system) deployment, is not fit for purpose. The decision is taken to implement a search engine, and only then does the scale of the problem of information decay become apparent. It can also be an interesting exercise to search for 'Confidential' and see just how many documents are returned!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article martin white eduserv google harvard university ibm intranet focus ltd jisc microsoft open university university of sheffield adobe blog content management creative commons data database dissemination document management drupal foi higher education html ict information architecture intellectual property intranet knowledge management licence metadata mobile open source passwords portal privacy provenance repositories research rss schema search technology sharepoint standards taxonomy usability web 2.0 web browser wiki Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1530 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt#author1">Dave Puplett</a> reports on the conference Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context held at the British Library in January 2010. The conference launched Economists Online (EO), an innovative economics subject repository.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Institutional repositories are now common in Higher Education, but successful examples of subject repositories, which cater to an entire discipline, are much rarer. The Subject Repositories conference taught some key lessons about the role of transnational collaboration in setting up a subject repository. The conference drew on the expertise of renowned specialists in the field and the two and a half-year-long development process of Economists Online [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report dave puplett cni coalition for networked information google harvard university jisc london school of economics monash university tilburg university university college london repec bibliographic data data data management data set database digital preservation digitisation e-research framework google scholar higher education information society infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability metadata national library open access portal preservation repositories research research information management resource discovery search technology software sword protocol usability video Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1534 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="th_International_Digital_Curation_Conference_Moving_to_Multi-Scale_Science:_Managing_Complexity_and_Diversity">5th International Digital Curation Conference – Moving to Multi-Scale Science: Managing Complexity and Diversity</h3> <p>Millennium Gloucester Hotel, Kensington, London<br />2-4 December 2009<br /><a href="http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/">http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/</a></p> <p>The International Digital Curation Conference is an established annual event reaching out to individuals, organisations and institutions across all disciplines and domains involved in curating data for e-science and e-research.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 news and events richard waller american library association arl association of research libraries bbc british library coalition for networked information dcc digital preservation coalition harvard university jisc library of congress london school of economics mla monash university national library of finland national library of wales national science foundation northumbria university oclc research information network talis uk data archive ukoln university college dublin university of bath university of edinburgh university of essex university of strathclyde europeana aggregation archives blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation e-learning e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure interoperability iphone mashup metadata mets mobile moodle national library open access open source podcast portal preservation remote working repositories research search technology semantic web social networks software standards url video web development xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1517 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The REMAP Project: Steps Towards a Repository-enabled Information Environment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/green-awre <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/green-awre#author1">Richard Green</a> and <a href="/issue59/green-awre#author2">Chris Awre</a> investigate what role a repository can play in enabling and supporting the management and preservation of its own digital content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2 following receipt of authorial byline : REW --><!-- version 2 following receipt of authorial byline : REW --><p>This article describes the recently completed REMAP Project undertaken at the University of Hull, which has been a key step toward realising a larger vision of the role a repository can play in supporting digital content management for an institution. The first step was the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC)-funded RepoMMan Project that the team undertook between 2005 and 2007 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/green-awre" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article chris awre richard green glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc kings college london stanford university the national archives university of hull university of virginia clif hydra jisc information environment remap project repomman archives browser content management data digital preservation doc droid dublin core fedora commons framework information architecture institutional repository metadata mods preservation repositories rss schema search technology software standards tiff url web services Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1466 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Desk Too Far?: The Case for Remote Working http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> examines both the benefits and the pitfalls of working remotely from the standpoint of both employees and their organisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article marieke guy coventry university harvard university jisc ukoln university of bath university of oxford liw wikipedia blog data e-business e-learning higher education infrastructure instant messaging mobile remote working research rss standards video web 2.0 wiki Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1409 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Being Wired Or Being Tired: 10 Ways to Cope With Information Overload http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/houghton-jan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/houghton-jan#author1">Sarah Houghton-Jan</a> explores different strategies for managing and coping with various types of informational overload.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>What is information overload? 27 instant messages. 4 text messages. 17 phone calls. 98 work emails. 52 personal emails. 76 email listserv messages. 14 social network messages. 127 social network status updates. 825 RSS feed updates. 30 pages from a book. 5 letters. 11 pieces of junk mail. 1 periodical issue. 3 hours of radio. 1 hour of television. <em>That</em>, my friends, is information overload.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/houghton-jan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article sarah houghton google harvard university microsoft san jose public library university of london archives blog cataloguing data digital media facebook instant messaging itunes microsoft office mobile mobile phone mp3 multimedia podcast research rss search technology social networks software twitter video Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk KIM Project Conference 2008 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/kim-conf-2008-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Alexander Ball provides an overview of the Knowledge and Information Management Through Life Project Conference held in April, 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/kim-conf-2008-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 event report alex ball harvard university heriot-watt university imperial college london loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of cambridge university of lancaster university of leeds university of reading university of strathclyde archives controlled vocabularies data database dublin core framework identifier infrastructure intranet knowledge base knowledge management repositories research rfid software text mining video vocabularies xml xslt Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1393 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk RepoMMan: Delivering Private Repository Space for Day-to-day Use http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/green-awre <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/green-awre#author1">Richard Green</a> and <a href="/issue54/green-awre#author2">Chris Awre</a> describe work undertaken at the University of Hull to place Web services at the heart of its personalised digital repository provision.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the spring of 2005, the University of Hull embarked on the RepoMMan Project [<a href="#1">1</a>], a two-year JISC-funded [<a href="#2">2</a>] endeavour to investigate a number of aspects of user interaction with an institutional repository. The vision at Hull was, and is, of a repository placed at the heart of a Web services architecture: a key component of a university's information management.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/green-awre" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article chris awre richard green glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc sakai university of hull remap project repomman authentication bpel browser data digital preservation fedora commons file format ftp higher education infrastructure institutional repository jstor ldap metadata open access open source portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research rich internet application soap software uportal vocabularies web services Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1369 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk MCN 2007: Building Content, Building Community - 40 Years of Museum Information and Technology http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/mcn-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/mcn-rpt#author1">Guenter Waibel</a> and Jean Godby report on the Museum Computer Network annual meeting, held 7-10 November, 2007 in Chicago, Illinois.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Museum Computer Network (MCN) celebrated its 40th anniversary during its annual meeting, this year held at the Holiday Inn Chicago Mart Plaza. In 1967, museum professionals in New York City gathered to discuss the utility of computers in museum settings. This initial meeting provided the seed for what would become the Museum Computer Network [<a href="#1">1</a>]. 40 years later, 310 delegates from 14 countries and 32 states in the US gathered to take stock of successes and issues in the networked museum.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/mcn-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 event report guenter waibel jean godby andrew w mellon foundation harvard university mcn oai oclc wikipedia worldcat aggregation archives blog cataloguing cdwa copyright data data set database digital library dissemination dublin core ead framework infrastructure intellectual property interoperability licence marc metadata mp3 oai-pmh open access open source research schema search technology software standards ulan xml xml schema Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1376 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Using Blogs for Formative Assessment and Interactive Teaching http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/foggo <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/foggo#author1">Lisa Foggo</a> provides a case-study of using a blog for formative assessment. Its interactivity engaged participants and permitted measurement of student expectations and satisfaction with library sessions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This case study shows how students were taught the skills they need to find information relevant to their subject area. As groups of students are generally seen once only, measures to assess the effectiveness of teaching are needed, i.e. to determine the skills the students have acquired. Blogs were used as a tool for formative assessment and were used to measure student expectations before teaching, and their level of satisfaction with the session afterwards.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/foggo" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article lisa foggo bbc british library cilip harvard university northumbria university ukoln university of york archives bibliographic data blog database e-learning framework higher education information society licence privacy research rss search technology url visualisation vocabularies web 2.0 wiki wireless application profile Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1309 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Limits to Information Transfer: The Boundary Problem http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/lervik-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue50/lervik-et-al#author1">Jon E. Lervik</a>, <a href="/issue50/lervik-et-al#author2">Mark Easterby-Smith</a>, <a href="/issue50/lervik-et-al#author3">Kathryn Fahy</a> and <a href="/issue50/lervik-et-al#author4">Carole Elliott</a> discuss the challenges in integrating knowledge across boundaries between specialised knowledge communities within an organisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/lervik-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 feature article carole elliott jon e. lervik kathryn fahy mark easterby-smith harvard university oxford university press university of cambridge university of illinois university of oxford browser database dissemination framework gis hypertext ict infrastructure knowledge management ontologies repositories research visualisation vocabularies web browser Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1292 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Ambient Findability http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> reviews a book with interesting content despite a few rough edges.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Ambient Findability</em> is to all external appearances an O'Reilly book. It boasts the familiar line drawing of an animal, on this occasion a Verreaux's sifaka, a large and engagingly thoughtful-looking lemur. Judging the book by its cover would suggest that it be placed on the shelf together with O'Reilly's classic line of reference books, upon which developers all over the world depend for sparsely presented, accurate information and advice. But this book is of a different breed.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 review emma tonkin georgia institute of technology harvard university microsoft oreilly university of bath lemur wikipedia bibliographic data blog framework git identifier interoperability metadata mobile python research rfid search technology semantic web video wireless Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1283 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Foundation for Automatic Digital Preservation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/ferreira-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author1">Miguel Ferreira</a>, <a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author2">Ana Alice Baptista</a> and <a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author3">Jose Carlos Ramalho</a> propose a Service-Oriented Architecture to help cultural heritage institutions to accomplish automatic digital preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Efforts to archive a large amount of digital material are being developed by many cultural heritage institutions. We have evidence of this in the numerous initiatives aiming to harvest the Web [<a href="#1">1-5</a>] together with the impressive burgeoning of institutional repositories [<a href="#6">6</a>]. However, getting the material inside the archive is just the beginning for any initiative concerned with the long-term preservation of digital materials.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/ferreira-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article ana alice baptista jose carlos ramalho miguel ferreira carnegie mellon university d-lib magazine dcc digital preservation coalition google harvard university ieee ifla library of congress oais oasis oclc premis the national archives university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of minho crib reposit algorithm archives ascii bibliographic data controlled vocabularies data data set database digital archive digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digital record object identification digital repositories dissemination document format drm droid dspace dublin core eprints fedora commons file format framework google trends graphics identifier interoperability java jstor knowledge base licence metadata open source operating system preservation preservation metadata repositories research semantic web service oriented architecture service registry soa soap software standards taxonomy uddi video vocabularies wayback machine web services wsdl xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1254 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk IWMW 2006: Quality Matters http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/iwmw-2006-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/iwmw-2006-rpt#author1">Adrian Stevenson</a> reports on the 10th Institutional Web Management Workshop held at the University of Bath over 14-16 June 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 10th Institutional Web Management Workshop (<a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/webmaster-2006/">IWMW 2006</a>) [<a href="#1">1</a>] returned to its spiritual home in Bath this year, headquarters of the workshop organisers UKOLN [<a href="#2">2</a>] and the venue of the fourth IWMW workshop held in 2000. It was the first workshop to be chaired by Marieke Guy following nine years with Brian Kelly at the helm from its inception in 1997.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/iwmw-2006-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 event report adrian stevenson amazon cetis eduserv google harvard university iso jisc london school of economics ncsa newcastle university oclc oss watch robert gordon university talis terminalfour ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of huddersfield university of leeds university of manchester university of wales university of york w3c e-framework iwmw jisc information environment wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax archives blog browser cataloguing content management cookie creative commons data database digital repositories e-government e-learning e-research firefox flickr framework further education gif google maps google scholar gopher graphics html instant messaging intellectual property interoperability intranet mailbase marc mashup metadata microformats moodle multimedia open source opml podcast portal research rss search technology semantic web smil sms soa software standards streaming sword protocol tagging usability video vle web 2.0 web app web development web services wiki xcri xhtml xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1255 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digital Preservation Coalition Forum on Web Archiving http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/dpc-web-archiving-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/dpc-web-archiving-rpt#author1">Maureen Pennock</a> and <a href="/issue48/dpc-web-archiving-rpt#author2">Manjula Patel</a> report on the Digital Preservation Coalition's second Web Archiving Forum which took place at the British Library in London on 12 June 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/dpc-web-archiving-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 event report manjula patel maureen pennock british library dcc digital preservation coalition harvard university national library of wales the national archives ukoln university of bath university of bristol wellcome trust internet archive archives browser collection development content management copyright data database digital asset management digital curation digital preservation framework infrastructure intellectual property jstor national library preservation privacy research software Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1259 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The (Digital) Library Environment: Ten Years After http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/dempsey <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/dempsey#author1">Lorcan Dempsey</a> considers how the digital library environment has changed in the ten years since Ariadne was first published.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have recently come through several decennial celebrations: the W3C, the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, <em>D-Lib Magazine</em>, and now <em>Ariadne</em>. What happened clearly in the mid-nineties was the convergence of the Web with more pervasive network connectivity, and this made our sense of the network as a shared space for research and learning, work and play, a more real and apparently achievable goal.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/dempsey" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article lorcan dempsey amazon bldsc british library california digital library d-lib magazine dest google harvard university iso jisc microsoft national library of australia oai oclc research information network sakai university of virginia w3c archives hub bath information and data services dner e-framework ebank uk elib irra jisc information environment worldcat aggregation api archives authentication authentication service bibliographic data blog born digital browser cache cataloguing content management copac copyright crm curation data data set database digital asset management digital curation digital identity digital library digital preservation digitisation dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-learning e-research eportfolio firefox flickr framework google scholar higher education html infrastructure instant messaging institutional repository itunes learning management system library management systems metadata national library netvibes network service oai-pmh ontologies open access open source openurl personalisation portal portfolio preservation programmable web rae repositories research resource description resource discovery resource management resource sharing rss schema search technology service registry software sru standardisation tagging taxonomy uportal url visualisation vle vocabularies web 2.0 web resources web services wiki wireless z39.50 Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1207 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Google Challenges for Academic Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/maccoll <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/maccoll#author1">John MacColl</a> analyses the reactions many academic libraries may be having to the range of tools Google is currently rolling out and outlines a strategy for institutions in the face of such potentially radical developments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction:_A_-Googly-_for_Libraries">Introduction: A 'Googly' for Libraries?</h2> <blockquote><p>A googly, or a 'wrong'un', is a delivery which looks like a normal leg spinner but actually turns towards the batsmen, like an off break, rather than away from the bat. (BBC Sport Academic Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Search result found in Google).</p></blockquote> <p>How should we understand Google? Libraries still feel like the batsman at whom something has been bowled which looks familiar, but then turns out to be a nasty threat.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/maccoll" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article john maccoll amazon bbc d-lib magazine google harvard university oclc talis university of edinburgh university of oxford jisc information environment project gutenberg algorithm atom bibliographic data blog copyright database digital library digitisation ebook flash google scholar openurl portfolio research search technology vocabularies Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1210 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Excuse Me... Some Digital Preservation Fallacies? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/rusbridge#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> argues with himself about some of the assumptions behind digital preservation thinking.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Excuse_me...">Excuse me...</h2> <p>I have been asked to write an article for the tenth anniversary of <em>Ariadne</em>, a venture that I have enjoyed, off and on, since its inception in 1996 as part of the eLib Programme, of which I was then Programme Director.</p> <p>Some years ago I wrote an article entitled "After eLib" [<a href="#1">1</a>] for <em>Ariadne</em>. The original suggestion was for a follow-up "even more after eLib"; however, I now work for JISC, and that probably makes it hard to be objective!</p> <p>In "After eLib", I wrote this paragraph about digital preservation:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article chris rusbridge andrew w mellon foundation british library california digital library d-lib magazine dcc harvard university jisc microsoft national library of the netherlands oais the national archives university of edinburgh elib internet archive archives browser curation data digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories file format gopher graphics infrastructure interoperability metadata microsoft office national library open source preservation preservation metadata provenance repositories research software wayback machine web browser Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1211 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trust in Global Virtual Teams http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/panteli <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/panteli#author1">Niki Panteli</a> identifies ways of developing trust within global virtual teams.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>During the last few years there has been an increasing acknowledgement of the importance of trust in business interactions within the management and organisational literatures [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>]. Trust enables cooperation and becomes the means for complexity reduction even in situations where individuals must act with uncertainty because they are in possession of ambiguous and incomplete information. It is not therefore surprising that in the current age of global and digital economy and virtuality [<a href="#3">3</a>] there has been an enormous interest in trust.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/panteli" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 feature article niki panteli harvard university university of bath data open access research videoconferencing Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1137 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Towards Library Groupware With Personalised Link Routing http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/chudnov <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue40/chudnov#author1">Daniel Chudnov</a>, <a href="/issue40/chudnov#author2">Jeremy Frumkin</a>, <a href="/issue40/chudnov#author3">Jennifer Weintraub</a>, <a href="/issue40/chudnov#author4">Matthew Wilcox</a> and <a href="/issue40/chudnov#author5">Raymond Yee</a> describe a potential groupware framework for integrating access to diverse information resources and distributed personal collection development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Library groupware' - a set of networked tools supporting information management for individuals and for distributed groups - is a new class of service we may choose to provide in our libraries. In its simplest form, library groupware would help people manage information as they move through the diversity of online resources and online communities that make up today's information landscape. Complex implementations might integrate equally well with enterprise-wide systems such as courseware and portals on a university campus, and desktop file storage on private individual computers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/chudnov" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue40 feature article daniel chudnov jennifer weintraub jeremy frumkin matthew wilcox raymond yee amazon d-lib magazine google harvard university ims information today massachusetts institute of technology oclc open knowledge initiative oregon state university university of california berkeley yale university archives authentication bibliographic data blog cataloguing collection development content packaging database digital library framework higher education ims content packaging metadata mets personalisation portal repositories research search technology shibboleth software standards technorati uportal url web resources Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1050 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Search Engines: The Google Backlash http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue39/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue39/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> reviews and analyses recent criticisms of the giant and takes an objective view from a broader perspective.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>When I run my courses on advanced Internet searching I always ask the delegates the question 'Which search engine do you tend to use most often?' A few years ago I could always expect to get half a dozen different answers, ranging from AltaVista to Yahoo! with a few others in between. Now however I can almost guarantee that it will be a single answer, and that's 'Google'. We're all aware of the power of Google, and the way in which, in the last couple of years, it has almost totally dominated the search engine scene.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue39/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue39 regular column phil bradley bbc google harvard university microsoft oracle data database portal privacy research search technology sword protocol Thu, 29 Apr 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1036 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Student Searching Behaviour in the JISC Information Environment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue33/edner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue33/edner#author1">Jill R. Griffiths</a> and <a href="/issue33/edner#author2">Peter Brophy</a> report on work in progress and air some initial findings on the EDNER project, which undertakes evaluation of the developing JISC Information Environment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) Information Environment (IE, a development from the <a href="http://www.jisc.ac.uk/dner/development/IEstrategy.html">DNER - Distributed National Electronic Resource</a>) is intended to help users in the UK academic sector maximise the value of published information resources by developing a coherent environment out of the confusing array of systems and services currently available.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue33/edner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue33 feature article jill r. griffiths peter brophy cerlim d-lib magazine google harvard university jisc manchester metropolitan university oai university of sussex dner jisc information environment justeis cataloguing cd-rom data database dublin core e-learning framework higher education hypertext information retrieval infrastructure internet explorer intranet library management systems modelling opac rdf research search technology standards url usability xml z39.50 Wed, 09 Oct 2002 23:00:00 +0000 editor 911 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digitization: Do We Have a Strategy? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue30/digilib <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue30/digilib#author1">David Pearson</a> suggests that the library sector should find a mechanism to put digitisation high on the agenda.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The notion that we are living through times of great change in the communication of information and the transmission of texts is a truism which will bring a weary look to most professionals with any kind of involvement in the area. The digital age, the information age, the electronic age – we’ve all heard these terms so many times and have sat through innumerable discussions, and seen even more documents, trying to sort out what it all means.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue30/digilib" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue30 feature article david pearson bnf british library harvard university jisc sconul ukoln university of cambridge university of oxford wellcome library wellcome trust dner archives bibliographic control bibliographic data born digital cataloguing copyright database digital library digital preservation digitisation framework higher education jstor marc metadata national library preservation research search technology standards url Fri, 25 Jan 2002 00:00:00 +0000 editor 841 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Watch: What's Related to My Web Site? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue27/web-watch <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>What's Related To My Web Site? <a href="/issue27/web-watch#author1">Brian Kelly</a> looks at Netscape's 'What's Related?' facility and reports on the service's findings for institutional Web servers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Netscape-s_What-s_Related_Service">Netscape's What's Related Service</h2> <p>One possibly underused facility in the Netscape browser is its What's Related feature. When viewing a Web page, clicking on the What's Related button in the Netscape toolbar (shown in Figure 1) will display related information about the page being viewing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue27/web-watch" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue27 tooled up brian kelly canterbury christ church university central school of speech and drama de montfort university edinburgh college of art glasgow caledonian university glasgow school of art google harper adams university college harvard university imperial college london kings college london kingston university leeds metropolitan university liverpool john moores university london business school london school of economics manchester metropolitan university nottingham trent university open university robert gordon university rose bruford college royal academy of music royal college of art royal college of music royal conservatoire of scotland royal holloway royal northern college of music royal veterinary college school of oriental and african studies sheffield hallam university south bank university surrey institute of art & design ukoln university college london university of bath university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of liverpool university of manchester university of oxford university of surrey university of wales university of west london yale university internet archive archives browser data google search higher education portal rdf search technology software url web browser Fri, 23 Mar 2001 00:00:00 +0000 editor 784 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Continuity and Collaboration: The Online Bach Bibliography http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue26/bach <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue26/bach#author1">Yo Tomita</a> introduces the single most important online resource for the study of the composer J.S. Bach.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For the majority of musicologists, bibliography is not their main subject of research, but a tool for research, an essential tool to gain quick access to the information with which to pursue their own subject of interest. Bibliography concerns everyone; it is crucially important that we find successfully the most relevant literatures at the earliest possible opportunity, and that we do not miss out any significant research works carried out by other scholars in the field, so that we can get on confidently with the work of our main research interest.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue26/bach" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue26 feature article yo tomita harvard university oclc university of glasgow accessibility bibliographic data cd-rom data database information retrieval research search technology url usability Wed, 10 Jan 2001 00:00:00 +0000 editor 752 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Metadata: Preservation 2000 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue26/metadata <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue26/metadata#author1">Michael Day</a> reports on the Digital Preservation conference held in York in December 2000.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Cedars conference, "Preservation 2000: an International Conference on the Preservation and Long Term Accessibility of Digital Materials," was held at the Viking Moat House Hotel in York on 7-8 December 2000. There were over 150 participants, about one half from outside the UK. As a prelude to the conference proper, a one-day workshop entitled "Information Infrastructures for Digital Preservation" was held at the same venue on the 6 December. This workshop mostly concerned preservation metadata and attracted over 70 participants.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue26/metadata" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue26 event report michael day bbc bnf british library cornell university digital preservation coalition harvard university jisc national library of australia national library of the netherlands oais oclc stanford university ukoln university of bath university of cambridge university of glasgow university of london dner elib accessibility archives cache data data model database dcmes digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dublin core framework identifier intellectual property interoperability licence metadata national library preservation preservation metadata prism provenance repositories research schema software standardisation ulcc url vocabularies xml Wed, 10 Jan 2001 00:00:00 +0000 editor 758 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Virtual Universities: Institutional Issues for Information Professionals http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue25/foster <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue25/foster#author1">Jonathan Foster</a> examines the institutional implications of networked approaches to learning for information professionals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">In 1997 The Dearing Report (NCIHE, 1997) published its review of the British higher education system. Underpinned by principles of inclusion and life-long learning the Report put forward wide-ranging recommendations in all areas of educational provision including students and learning, supporting research and scholarship, staff in higher education and the management and governance of higher education institutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue25/foster" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue25 feature article jonathan foster harvard university hefce open university sheffield hallam university university of cambridge university of oxford university of sheffield elib dissemination e-learning framework higher education infrastructure research url Sat, 23 Sep 2000 23:00:00 +0000 editor 727 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Knowledge Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/knowledge-mgt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue18/knowledge-mgt#author1">Sheila Corrall</a> asks if 'knowledge management' is a new phrase in place of 'information management', or a new concept altogether.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="UKOLN-page-body"> <p>Over the last twelve months Knowledge Management (KM) has become the latest hot topic in the business world. There has been a phenomenal growth in interest and activity, as seen in many new publications, conferences, IT products, and job advertisements (including a post advertised by HEFCE). Various professional groups, notably HR professionals, IT specialists, and librarians, are staking their claims, seeing KM as an opportunity to move centre stage.</p> </div><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/knowledge-mgt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue18 feature article sheila corrall british library harvard university hefce ibm jisc knowledge media institute library association massachusetts institute of technology open university university of cambridge university of leeds university of reading corral ark cataloguing copyright data data mining data set database dissemination document management e-learning framework higher education hypertext infrastructure intellectual property intranet knowledge management library management systems multimedia repositories research resource management search technology social networks software thesaurus url Sat, 19 Dec 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 553 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Metadiversity http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/metadiversity <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue18/metadiversity#author1">Michael Day</a> on a Biodiversity conference in the States interested in Metadata.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="Introduction_and_context">Introduction and context</h3> <div class="UKOLN-page-body"><i>First, we simply need to be moving faster to coordinate the information that already exists, on file cards and computers, scattered around the world's major and minor museums and other collections. ... Second these databases must be widely available and 'customer friendly'. We need to accelerate current efforts for international cooperation and coordination, so that common formats are increasingly agreed and used.</i><br />Robert M. May (1994) <a href="#1">[1]</a>. <p>&nbsp;</p> </div><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/metadiversity" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue18 event report michael day ansi coalition for networked information cornell university harvard university iso national science foundation oxford university press stanford university ukoln university of bath university of cambridge university of oxford university of reading w3c jisc information environment accessibility adl bibliographic data cataloguing data data model data set database digital library dissemination dublin core framework geospatial data gis information society infrastructure interoperability ldap metadata rdf research resource description resource discovery search technology standardisation standards taxonomy z39.50 Sat, 19 Dec 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 576 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk