Overview of content related to 'google maps' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/13922/0?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hydra UK: Flexible Repository Solutions to Meet Varied Needs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the Hydra UK event held on 22 November 2012 at the Library of the London School of Economics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hydra, as described in the opening presentation of this event, is a project initiated in 2008 by the University of Hull, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and DuraSpace to work towards a reusable framework for multi-purpose, multi-functional, multi-institutional repository-enabled solutions for the management of digital content collections [<a href="#1">1</a>]. An initial timeframe for the project of three years had seen all founding institutional partners successfully implement a repository demonstrating these characteristics.&nbsp; Key to the aims of the project has always been to generate wider interest outside the partners to foster not only sustainability in the technology, but also sustainability of the community around this open source development.&nbsp; Hydra has been disseminated through a range of events, particularly through the international Open Repositories conferences [<a href="#2">2</a>], but the sphere of interest in Hydra has now stimulated the holding of specific events in different countries: Hydra UK is one of them.</p> <p>The Hydra UK event was held on 22 November 2012, kindly hosted by the Library at the London School of Economics.&nbsp; Representatives from institutions across the UK, but also Ireland, Austria and Switzerland, came together to learn about the Hydra Project, and to discuss how Hydra might serve their digital content collection management needs.&nbsp; 29 delegates from 21 institutions were present, representing mostly universities but also the archive, museum and commercial sectors.&nbsp; Five presentations were given on Hydra, focusing on the practical experience of using this framework and how it fits into overall system architectures, and time was also deliberately given over to discussion of more specific topics of interest and to allow delegates the opportunity to voice their requirements.&nbsp; The presentations were:</p> <ul> <li>Introduction to Hydra</li> <li>Hydra @ Hull</li> <li>Hydra @ Glasgow Caledonian University</li> <li>Hydra @ LSE</li> <li>Hydra @ Oxford</li> </ul> <h2 id="Introduction_to_Hydra">Introduction to Hydra</h2> <p>Chris Awre from the University of Hull gave the opening presentation.&nbsp; The starting basis for Hydra was mutual recognition by all the founding partners that a repository should be an enabler for managing digital content collections, not a constraint or simply a silo of content.&nbsp; Digital repositories have been put forward and applied as a potential solution for a variety of use cases over the years, and been used at different stages of a content lifecycle.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure1-hydra-rpt-lse-library.jpg" style="width: 178px; height: 178px;" title="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: LSE Library</strong><br /><small>(Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)</small></p> <p>To avoid producing a landscape of multiple repositories all having to be managed to cover these use cases, the Hydra Project sought to identify a way in which one repository solution could be applied flexibly to meet the requirements of different use cases. The idea of a single repository with multiple points of interaction came into being – Hydra – and the concept of individual Hydra ‘head’ solutions.</p> <p>The Hydra Project is informed by two main principles:</p> <ul> <li>No single system can provide the full range of repository-based solutions for a given institution’s needs,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet sustainable solutions require a common repository infrastructure.</li> <li>No single institution can resource the development of a full range of solutions on its own,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet each needs the flexibility to tailor solutions to local demands and workflows.</li> </ul> <p>The Hydra Project has sought to provide the common infrastructure upon which flexible solutions can be built, and shared.</p> <p>The recognition that no single institution can achieve everything it might want for its repository has influenced the project from the start. &nbsp;To quote an African proverb, ‘If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far, go together’. Working together has been vital.&nbsp; To organise this interaction, Hydra has structured itself through three interleaving sub-communities, the Steering Group, the Partners and Developers, as shown by Figure 2.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/hydra-community-structure-v4.jpg" style="width: 661px; height: 506px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><p>The concept of a Hydra Partner has emerged from this model of actively working together, and the project has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) process for any institution wishing to have its use of, and contribution and commitment to Hydra recognised.&nbsp; Starting with the original four partners in 2008, Hydra now has 11 partners, with two more in the process of joining.&nbsp; All have made valuable contributions and helped to make Hydra better.&nbsp; Hydra partnership is not the only route to involvement, though, and there are many in the Hydra developer community who are adopters of the software, but who have not reached a stage where partnership is appropriate.</p> <p>The technical implementation of Hydra was supported through early involvement in the project by MediaShelf, a commercial technical consultancy focused on repository solutions.&nbsp; All Hydra software is, though, open source, available under the Apache 2.0 licence, and all software code contributions are managed in this way.&nbsp; The technical implementation is based on a set of core principles that describe how content objects should be structured within the repository, and with an understanding that different content types can be managed using different workflows.&nbsp; Following these principles, Hydra could be implemented in a variety of ways: the technical direction taken by the project is simply the one that suited the partners at the time.</p> <p>Hydra as currently implemented is built on existing open source components, and the project partners are committed to supporting these over time:</p> <ul> <li>Fedora: one of the digital repository systems maintained through DuraSpace [<a href="#3">3</a>]</li> <li>Apache Solr: powerful indexing software now being used in a variety of discovery solutions [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Blacklight: a next-generation discovery interface, which has its own community around it [<a href="#5">5</a>]</li> <li>Hydra plugin: a collection of components that facilitate workflow in managing digital content [<a href="#6">6</a>]</li> <li>Solrizer: a component that indexes Fedora-held content into a Solr index</li> </ul> <p>These components are arranged in the architecture shown in Figure 3.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure3-hydra-architecture-v4.jpg" style="width: 543px; height: 258px;" title="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 3: Hydra architecture</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><p>A common feature of the last three components in the list above is the use of Ruby on Rails as the coding language and its ability to package up functionality in discrete ‘gems’.&nbsp; This was consciously chosen for Hydra because of its agile programming capabilities, its use of the MVC (Model–View–Controller) structure, and its testing infrastructure.&nbsp; The choice has been validated on a number of occasions as Hydra has developed.&nbsp; However, it was noted that other coding languages and systems could be used to implement Hydra where appropriate.&nbsp; This applies to all the main components, even Fedora.&nbsp; Whilst a powerful and flexible repository solution in its own right, Fedora has proved to be complex to use: Hydra has sought in part to tap this capability through simpler interfaces and interactions.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report chris awre bbc bodleian libraries california digital library duraspace glasgow caledonian university jisc london school of economics sakai stanford university university of hull university of oxford university of virginia hydra jisc information environment remap project apache api archives authentication cataloguing content management data data management data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination eprints fedora commons framework google maps infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata multimedia open source preservation repositories research ruby search technology sharepoint software solr streaming video vle Thu, 13 Dec 2012 19:24:07 +0000 lisrw 2411 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Third Annual edUi Conference 2011 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/edui-2011-rpt#author1">Danielle Cooley</a> reports on the third annual edUi Conference, held over 13-14 October 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA, an opportunity for Web professionals in colleges, universities, libraries, museums, etc to discuss the latest developments in Web trends and technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third annual edUi Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held October 13-14, 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The sold-out event saw 225 ‘Web professionals serving colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and beyond’ join together to discuss the latest and greatest in Web trends and technologies. The all-volunteer conference was presented by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and major sponsors included Microsoft, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University.</p> <p>The two-day event consisted of four tracks [<a href="#2">2</a>]:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report danielle cooley google happy cog kansas state university microsoft university of virginia wikipedia accessibility aggregation android archives blog browser cataloguing css data framework google docs google maps graphics higher education html html5 metadata mis mobile research responsive design search technology twitter usability video web standards widget windows xhtml youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 22:26:07 +0000 lisrw 2241 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Saving the Sounds of the UK in the UK SoundMap http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author1">Maureen Pennock</a> and <a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author2">Chris Clark</a> introduce an innovative initiative from the British Library to map a 12-month soundscape of the UK.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><p>The impact of the digital age upon libraries has been profound, changing not only the back office, services, and the range of materials available to users, but also the public face of libraries and the relationship between the library and its users. Within this changed relationship, collaboration, participation, and online social networks play an increasingly important role in the user experience, especially in large university and national libraries. At the same time, a shift is taking place in the type of collection items held in libraries, and the percentage of born-digital materials acquired is increasing on a daily basis.</p> <p>The British Library is no exception, making use of a wide range of online services and tools to engage with users and enhance access to the collections, both digitised and born-digital. Numerous initiatives are currently taking place across the Library to engage with users and address these changes, and one in particular has sought to capitalise on both the increase in participatory networks and the opportunities afforded by born-digital material. This initiative is the <em>UK SoundMap</em>, an online crowd-sourcing activity driven by the British Library in partnership with the Noise Futures Network to engage and build the community in development of a new born-digital audio-visual research resource [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Unlocking_and_Integrating_Audio-Visual_Content_at_the_British_Library">Unlocking and Integrating Audio-Visual Content at the British Library</h2> <p>The UK SoundMap is being carried out as part of a wider project by the British Library's Sound &amp; Vision Department: Unlocking &amp; Integrating Audio Visual Content (UIAVC). The UIAVC project seeks to address changing user needs in a multi-media research environment by establishing the building blocks for a redefined and integrated sound and moving image service within the Library. Other, complementary initiatives in the project include:</p> <ul> <li>Modernising and enhancing interactive features in the existing Archival Sound Recordings (ASR) portal, which currently provides access to over 45,000 selected recordings of music, spoken word, and human and natural environments [<a href="#3">3</a>].</li> <li>Establishing a New Music Network to select and capture content from musicians whose work is produced outside the usual commercial channels</li> <li>Exploring and piloting new R&amp;D Tools to improve resource discovery through new search and analysis tools for speech and music [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Increasing the amount of digital audio and video content accessible to users at the Library (i.e. onsite), and remotely</li> </ul> <p>Overall, the project is key to meeting the Library's audio-visual strategy, which aims to unlock and integrate audio-visual content across the library according to user needs. The initiatives interrelate to a significant degree as they each follow the content path from acquisition to curation to integrated delivery. They each focus on digital content (both born-digital and digitised analogue content), they embrace both onsite and remote (Web) access, and collectively they express the commitment the Library now has towards integrating audio-visual media within the research experience.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article chris clark maureen pennock british library google android archives browser copyright curation data data set digital audio flac geospatial data gis google maps iphone metadata mobile mobile phone mp3 portal preservation privacy research resource discovery rss search technology sms social networks twitter video Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1609 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 65: Ariadne in Search of Your Views http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 65.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may have already noted in the editorial section of this issue a link to the Reader Survey which I ask you seriously to consider completing, whether you are a frequent <em>Ariadne</em> reader or are reading the Magazine for the first time. Moves are afoot to give <em>Ariadne</em> some effort towards improvements in your experience of the publication and I cannot emphasise enough the value I place on suggestions and comments from you. I am very keen to know what readers value and dislike in <em>Ariadne</em>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 editorial richard waller dcc google griffith university jisc queensland university of technology university of oregon university of oxford wellcome trust devcsi eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih aggregation ajax archives browser curation data data management data set database digital archive droid e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service interoperability ipad javascript metadata mobile multimedia ontologies open source preservation provenance repositories research resource description and access schema search technology software tagging taxonomy uri visualisation web 2.0 web portal xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1647 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk What Is a URI and Why Does It Matter? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/thompson-hs#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> describes how recent developments in Web technology have affected the relationship between URI and resource representation and the related consequences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>URI stands for Uniform Resource Identifier, the official name for those things you see all the time on the Web that begin <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'http:'</font> or <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'mailto:'</font>, for example <span class="style1">http://<em>www.w3.org</em>/</span>, which is the URI for the home page of the World Wide Web Consortium [<a href="#1">1</a>]. (These things were called URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) in the early days of the Web, and the change from URL to URI is either hugely significant or completely irrelevant, depending on who is talking—I have nothing to say about this issue in this article. If you have never heard of URIs (or IRIs, the even more recent fully internationalised version), but are familiar with URLs, just think 'URL' whenever you see 'URI' below.)</p> <p>Historically, URIs were mostly seen as simply the way you accessed Web pages. These pages were hand-authored, relatively stable and simply shipped out on demand. More and more often that is no longer the case; in at least three different ways:</p> <ul> <li>Web pages for reading have been complemented by pictures for viewing, videos for watching and music for listening;</li> <li>The Web is now more than a conduit for information, it is a means to a variety of ends; we use it to <em>do</em> things: purchase goods and services, contribute to forums, play games;</li> <li>The things we access on the Web are often not hand-authored or stable, but are automatically synthesised from 'deeper' data sources on demand. Furthermore, that synthesis is increasingly influenced by aspects of the way we initiate the access.</li> </ul> <p>It is against this background that I think it is worth exploring with some care what URIs were meant to be, and how they are being used in practice. In particular, I want to look at what is to be gained from a better understanding of how other kinds of identifiers work.</p> <h2 id="The_Official_Version">The Official Version</h2> <p>Insofar as there are definitive documents about all this, they all agree that URIs are, as the third initial says, <strong>identifiers</strong>, that is, names. They identify <strong>resources</strong>, and often (although not always) allow you to access <strong>representations</strong> of those resources. (Words in <strong>bold</strong> are used as technical terms—their ordinary language meaning is in many cases likely to be more confusing than helpful.)</p> <p>'Resource' names a role in a story, not an intrinsically distinguishable subset of things, just as 'referent' does in ordinary language. Things are resources because someone created a URI to identify them, not because they have some particular properties in and of themselves.</p> <p>'Representation' names a pair: a character sequence and a media type. The <strong>media type</strong> specifies how the character string should be interpreted. For example JPG or HTML or MP3 would be likely media types for representations of an image of an apple, a news report about an orchard or a recording of a Beatles song, respectively.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article henry s. thompson apple google ietf university of edinburgh w3c wikipedia aggregation ajax algorithm browser cataloguing cookie data framework gif google maps html hypertext identifier javascript jpg metadata mp3 png rfc search technology semantic web uri url web 2.0 web app xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1589 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Infrastructure for Research Data Management at the University of Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author1">James A. J. Wilson</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author2">Michael A. Fraser</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author3">Luis Martinez-Uribe</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author4">Paul Jeffreys</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author5">Meriel Patrick</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author6">Asif Akram</a> and <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author7">Tahir Mansoori</a> describe the approaches taken, findings, and issues encountered while developing research data management services and infrastructure at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><p>The University of Oxford began to consider research data management infrastructure in earnest in 2008, with the 'Scoping Digital Repository Services for Research Data' Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Two further JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee)-funded pilot projects followed this initial study, and the approaches taken by these projects, and their findings, form the bulk of this article.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article asif akram james a. j. wilson luis martinez-uribe meriel patrick michael a. fraser paul jeffreys tahir mansoori ahds dcc google hefce ibm jisc microsoft oxford university computing services research information network uk data archive university of east anglia university of essex university of melbourne university of oxford university of southampton datashare eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih algorithm archives bibliographic data browser cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital asset management digital curation digital repositories e-research flash framework geospatial data gis google maps ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service intellectual property interoperability j2ee jpeg metadata multimedia open access portal preservation provenance qt repositories research research information management schema search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml xml schema Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1590 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Fringe 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> (and friends) report on the Repository Fringe "unconference" held at the National e-Science Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, over 2-3 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>2010 was the third year of Repository Fringe, and slightly more formally organised than its antecedents, with an increased number of discursive presentations and less in the way of organised chaos! The proceedings began on Wednesday 1 September with a one-day, pre-event SHERPA/RoMEO API Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project team.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report martin donnelly cetis dcc duraspace edina google jisc open university sherpa ukoln university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of hull university of southampton university of st andrews addressing history crispool datashare depositmo hydra jorum memento repomman reposit repositories support project romeo sharegeo sneep wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data blog content management content negotiation csv curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi dspace eprints fedora commons file format framework geospatial data gis google maps hashtag html hypertext identifier infrastructure institutional repository ipad kml learning objects mashup metadata national library oer ontologies open access open source preservation repositories research rss search technology social networks solr standards tagging twitter uri video visualisation wordpress yahoo pipes Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1592 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Library Mashups http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw#author1">Aldalin Lyngdoh</a> reviews a book on the basics of mashups and how they have been used in libraries worldwide.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This book is intended for readers who have some knowledge of computers, computer programming and libraries.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review aldalin lyngdoh british medical association google api browser cataloguing computer programming data database flickr google maps library data mashup opac repositories search technology web 2.0 web services yahoo pipes Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1556 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Pro Web 2.0 Mashups http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/levan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/levan-rvw#author1">Ralph LeVan</a> looks at a comprehensive work on how to consume and repurpose Web services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- 2008-11-11 REW v2; final editing from re-read --><!-- 2008-11-11 REW v2; final editing from re-read --><p>Raymond Yee has produced a comprehensive book on how to consume and repurpose Web services, even for Web sites that do not intentionally expose Web services. The book is broken into four sections; understanding how to use Web content, understanding Web services, combining the data from multiple services (mashups) and detailed examples of specific mashup opportunities.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/levan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 review ralph levan google microsoft oclc ajax api atom blog data flickr google maps javascript json mashup microformats microsoft office openoffice php python research rss search technology soap syndication tagging url web 2.0 web services xml Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1446 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 56: More Light Than Heat http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 56.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I am greatly indebted to <strong>Gráinne Conole</strong> for a number of reasons. It has been my intention for some time to commission something from the OU in respect of learning technologies given the wealth of expertise that resides there. For a variety of reasons it has taken me a while, but the wait has been more than worthwhile in the light of Gráinne's contribution.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 editorial richard waller google ims jisc loughborough university ukoln jisc information environment vif accessibility data database framework google maps identifier internet explorer library management systems multimedia remote working repositories research resource discovery rss search technology social networks software visualisation web 2.0 Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1404 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Search Engines: Google Still Growing http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> finds it difficult to ignore some of the latest developments from Google - particularly the ones that are actually quite good.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article phil bradley google microsoft wikipedia adobe archives ark blog cataloguing creative commons data database digital media flash flickr google docs google maps google search html search technology url video web 2.0 youtube Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2008: The Great Debate http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt#author1">Adrian Tribe</a> reports on a three-day conference designed for professionals involved in the provision of institutional Web services, organised by UKOLN and held at King's College, University of Aberdeen in July 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Aberdeen??!! Make sure you take some woolly jumpers and a sou'wester then.'</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 event report adrian tribe british antarctic survey edge hill university eduserv google jisc microsoft ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of birmingham university of bradford university of glasgow university of kent university of london university of southampton iwmw accessibility api archives blog browser content management css data facebook flash flickr framework google analytics google docs google maps higher education institutional repository javascript mashup microformats mobile open source personalisation php portal preservation repositories research rss schema search technology second life social networks software twitter usability video web 2.0 web app web development web services wiki wordpress xcri xcri-cap xml xml schema youtube Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1414 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The KIDMM Community's 'MetaKnowledge Mash-up' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kidmm-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/kidmm-rpt#author1">Conrad Taylor</a> reports on the KIDMM knowledge community and its September 2007 one-day conference about data, information and knowledge management issues.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="About_KIDMM">About KIDMM</h2> <p>The British Computer Society [<a href="#1">1</a>], which in 2007 celebrates 50 years of existence, has a self-image around engineering, software, and systems design and implementation. However, within the BCS there are over fifty Specialist Groups (SGs); among these, some have a major focus on 'informatics', or the <em>content</em> of information systems.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kidmm-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 event report conrad taylor anglia ruskin university bsi google library of congress nhs ordnance survey the national archives ukoln university of bolton university of london university of manchester wikipedia adobe algorithm archives ascii born digital browser cataloguing controlled vocabularies csv cybernetics data data management data mining data set database digital archive digital asset management dublin core e-government e-learning ead eportfolio foia framework geospatial data gis google maps identifier information retrieval information society interoperability location-based services metadata mis named entity recognition ontologies portfolio preservation provenance repositories research search technology sgml software standards tagging text mining thesaurus vocabularies wiki xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1358 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Take a Peek Beneath the EPrints V3 Wrappers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>With v3 officially launched at the Open Repositories Conference in San Antonio last week, <a href="/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt#author1">William Nixon</a> and <a href="/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt#author2">Peter Millington</a> report on the EPrints 3 pre-launch briefing in London, 8 December 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 event report peter millington william nixon google jisc oai sherpa university of glasgow university of nottingham university of southampton romeo zetoc apache api archives atom bibliographic data data database digital library dspace dublin core eprints flash gif google maps javascript ldap metadata mets multimedia mysql quicktime refworks repositories research rss search technology software usability video wiki windows xml Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1298 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Google Hacks http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/bradley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue50/bradley-rvw#author1">Phil Bradley</a> looks at a work offering programming 'know-how' to create resources that will do things with the search engine that might otherwise prove difficult or impossible.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The subtitle for the book is 'Tips and tools for finding and using the world's information' which does neatly sum up its content. This is the third edition, so it is clearly popular, and has been updated to include information and hacks for Google maps, talk and desktop. As with any O'Reilly title, it is very clearly laid out, easy to read, with extremely good illustrations, small icons to indicate tips or notes of caution, plus an in-depth and thorough index. Each hack is clearly indicated by typography, an icon and the top corner of each page indicates the numbered hack.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/bradley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 review phil bradley google oreilly google maps html javascript perl python search technology web 2.0 Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1302 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk IWMW 2006: Quality Matters http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/iwmw-2006-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/iwmw-2006-rpt#author1">Adrian Stevenson</a> reports on the 10th Institutional Web Management Workshop held at the University of Bath over 14-16 June 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 10th Institutional Web Management Workshop (<a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/webmaster-2006/">IWMW 2006</a>) [<a href="#1">1</a>] returned to its spiritual home in Bath this year, headquarters of the workshop organisers UKOLN [<a href="#2">2</a>] and the venue of the fourth IWMW workshop held in 2000. It was the first workshop to be chaired by Marieke Guy following nine years with Brian Kelly at the helm from its inception in 1997.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/iwmw-2006-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 event report adrian stevenson amazon cetis eduserv google harvard university iso jisc london school of economics ncsa newcastle university oclc oss watch robert gordon university talis terminalfour ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of huddersfield university of leeds university of manchester university of wales university of york w3c e-framework iwmw jisc information environment wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax archives blog browser cataloguing content management cookie creative commons data database digital repositories e-government e-learning e-research firefox flickr framework further education gif google maps google scholar gopher graphics html instant messaging intellectual property interoperability intranet mailbase marc mashup metadata microformats moodle multimedia open source opml podcast portal research rss search technology semantic web smil sms soa software standards streaming sword protocol tagging usability video vle web 2.0 web app web development web services wiki xcri xhtml xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1255 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Rustle of Digital Curation: The JISC Annual Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author1">Julie Allinson</a>, <a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author2">Marieke Guy</a> and <a href="/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt#author3">Maureen Pennock</a> find themselves contemplating e-frameworks, digital curation and repositories at the JISC Annual Conference.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On 14 March 2006 we found ourselves back at the Birmingham International Convention Centre (ICC) for the 2006 JISC Conference. The annual conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] is both an opportunity for JISC to platform the variety of activities it funds and for delegates to learn about the full range of JISC's work by participating in seminars, debates, workshops and demonstrations. This report tries to capture the air of the event through a series of session snapshots.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/jisc-conf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 event report julie allinson marieke guy maureen pennock british library cclrc coalition for networked information dcc dest digital preservation coalition edina google hefce intute jisc jisc collections london school of economics mimas ogc open geospatial consortium sherpa ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of southampton wellcome trust cd-lor claddier e-framework jisc information environment jorum romeo api archives blog cataloguing copyright curation data data set database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories digitisation e-learning e-research eportfolio eprints flash framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict infrastructure institutional repository interoperability learning design learning objects metadata open access open source preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology text mining vocabularies wireless wms xml Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1235 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web 2.0: Building the New Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/miller#author1">Paul Miller</a> explores some of the recent buzz around the concept of 'Web 2.0' and asks what it means for libraries and related organisations.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Web 2.0' is a hot story out on the blogosphere right now, with an army of advocates facing off against those who argue that it is nothing new, and their allies with painful memories of Dot Com hysteria in the 1990s. Even respectable media outlets such as <em>Business Week</em> are getting excited, and an expensive conference in San Francisco at the start of October had to turn people away as it passed over 800 registrations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 feature article paul miller amazon bbc cni coalition for networked information google oreilly talis university of hull wikipedia api blog browser data flickr foi framework google maps html interoperability podcast portal privacy research search technology software technorati uri web 2.0 web browser web services wsrp Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1184 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk