Overview of content related to 'refworks' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/13989/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Redeveloping the Loughborough Online Reading List System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author1">Jon Knight</a>, <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author2">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author3">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the redevelopment of Loughborough University’s open source reading list system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Loughborough Online Reading Lists System (LORLS) [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been developed at Loughborough University since the late 1990s.&nbsp; LORLS was originally implemented at the request of the University’s Learning and Teaching Committee simply to make reading lists available online to students.&nbsp; The Library staff immediately saw the benefit of such a system in not only allowing students ready access to academics’ reading lists but also in having such access themselves. This was because a significant number of academics were bypassing the library when generating and distributing lists to their students who were then in turn surprised when the library did not have the recommended books either in stock or in sufficient numbers to meet demand.</p> <p>The first version of the system produced by the Library Systems Team was part of a project that also had a ‘reading lists amnesty’ in which academics were encouraged to provide their reading lists to the library which then employed some temporary staff over the summer to enter them into the new system.&nbsp; This meant that the first version of LORLS went live in July 2000 with a reasonable percentage of lists already in place.&nbsp; Subsequently the creation and editing of reading lists was made the responsibility of the academics or departmental admin staff, with some assistance from library staff.</p> <p>LORLS was written in Perl, with a MySQL database back-end.&nbsp; Most user interfaces were delivered via the web, with a limited number of back-end scripts that helped the systems staff maintain the system and alert library staff to changes that had been made to reading lists.</p> <p>Soon after the first version of LORLS went live at Loughborough, a number of other universities expressed an interest in using or modifying the system. Permission was granted by the University to release it as open source under the General Public Licence (GPL)[<a href="#2">2</a>].&nbsp; New versions were released as the system was developed and bugs were fixed. The last version of the original LORLS code base/data design was version 5, which was downloaded by sites worldwide.</p> <h2 id="Redesign">Redesign</h2> <p>By early 2007 it was decided to take a step back and see if there were things that could be done better in LORLS.&nbsp; Some design decisions made in 1999 no longer made sense eight years later.&nbsp; Indeed some of the database design was predicated on how teaching modules were supposed to work at Loughborough and it had already become clear that the reality of how they were deployed was often quite different.&nbsp; For example, during the original design, the principle was that each module would have a single reading list associated with it.&nbsp; Within a few years several modules had been found that were being taught by two (or more!) academics, all wanting their own independent reading list.</p> <p>Some of the structuring of the data in the MySQL database began to limit how the system could be developed.&nbsp; The University began to plan an organisational restructuring shortly after the redesign of LORLS was commenced, and it was clear that the simple departmental structure was likely to be replaced by a more fluid school and department mix.</p> <p>Library staff were also beginning to request new features that were thus increasingly awkward to implement.&nbsp; Rather than leap through hoops to satisfy them within the framework of the existing system, it made sense to add them into the design process for a full redesign.</p> <p>It was also felt that the pure CGI-driven user interface could do with a revamp.&nbsp; The earlier LORLS user interfaces used only basic HTML forms, with little in the way of client-side scripting.&nbsp; Whilst that meant that they tended to work on any web browser and were pretty accessible, they were also a bit clunky compared to some of the newer dynamic web sites.</p> <p>A distinct separation of the user interface from the back-end database was decided upon to improve localization and portability of the system as earlier versions of LORLS had already shown that many sites took the base code and then customised the user interface parts of the CGI scripts to their own look and feel.&nbsp; The older CGI scripts were a mix of user interaction elements and database access and processing, which made this task a bit more difficult than it really needed to be.</p> <p>Separating the database code from the user interface code would let people easily tinker with one without unduly affecting the other.&nbsp; It would also allow local experimentation with multiple user-interface designs for different user communities or devices.</p> <p>This implied that a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) would need to be defined. As asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)[<a href="#3">3</a>] interactions had been successful applied in a number of recent projects the team had worked on, XML was chosen as the format to be used.&nbsp; At first simple object access protocol (SOAP) style XML requests was experimented with, as well as XML responses, but it was soon realised that SOAP was far too heavy-weight for most of the API calls, so a lighter ‘RESTful’ API was selected.&nbsp; The API was formed of CGI scripts that took normal parameters as input and returned XML documents for the client to parse and display.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper jon knight google harvard university loughborough university microsoft gnu access control ajax api archives authentication bibliographic data blog cache chrome cookie data database digital library e-learning framework google books gpl html javascript jquery json library management systems licence metadata moodle mysql open source perl refworks restful schema shibboleth soap software sql standards web browser xml z39.50 zip Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:32:55 +0000 lisrw 2354 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 66: Sanity Check http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 66.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With institutions searching to increase the impact of the work they do, and conscious of the immediate impact of any event they organise, many will be interested to read of <a href="/issue66/guy/">10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event</a> in which <strong>Marieke Guy</strong> provides a raft of suggestions to enhance the participants' experience of and involvement in, the event they are attending.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 editorial richard waller british library google jisc ukoln university of pretoria e-curator keepit zetoc aggregation archives blog browser copyright curation data database digital audio digital preservation digital repositories file format flickr framework geospatial data gis identifier institutional repository learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone netvibes open access open source personalisation podcast preservation privacy refworks repositories research resource description and access rss search technology software streaming tagging twitter usability video web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1602 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk RefShare: A Community of Practice to Enhance Research Collaboration http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for postgraduate students in phytomedicine using RefShare, to enhance collaborative research.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article tertia coetsee ifla university of melbourne university of pretoria jisc information environment bibliographic data copyright data database digital preservation dissemination e-research electronic theses ict infrastructure open data preservation privacy refworks research search technology web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1605 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Supporting Research Students http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a work which helps Library and Information Science Staff at Higher Education Institutions to support their research students.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The purpose of this book is to support Library and Information Science (LIS) professionals at Higher Education institutions (HEIs) who may be involved with doctoral students. <em>Supporting Research Students</em> emanates from Dr Allan's own experience in gaining a PhD and as a Senior Lecturer in Student Learning and Management Learning at the University of Hull. She thus has considerable expertise in seeing postgraduate research from the student point of view and from support provision by LIS staff. I came to this review with interest and I should lay out my own credentials.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review brian whalley google microsoft queens university belfast university of hull wikipedia bibliographic data data gis google scholar higher education hypertext multimedia ontologies open source refworks research virtual research environment web 2.0 Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1557 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Xerxes at Royal Holloway, University of London http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/grigson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author1">Anna Grigson</a>, <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author2">Peter Kiely</a>, <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author3">Graham Seaman</a> and <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author4">Tim Wales</a> describe the implementation of an open source front end to the MetaLib federated search tool.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4. completion of author details: institution - 2010-02-22-10-30- rew --><!-- v4. completion of author details: institution - 2010-02-22-10-30- rew --><p>Rarely is software a purely technical issue, though it may be marketed as 'technology'. Software is embedded in work, and work patterns become moulded around it. Thus the use of a particular package can give rise to an inertia from which it can be hard to break free.</p> <p>Moreover, when this natural inertia is combined with data formats that are opaque or unique to a particular system, the organisation can become locked in to that system, a potential victim of the pricing policies or sluggish adaptability of the software provider. The speed of change in the information world in recent years, combined with the actual or expected crunch in library funding, has made this a particular issue for library management system (LMS) users. While there is general agreement on the direction to take - more 'like Google' - LMS suppliers' moves in this direction can prove both slow and expensive for the user.</p> <p>Open source software has often been suggested as an alternative, but the nature of lock-in means that the jump from proprietary to open system can be all or nothing; in effect too big (and complex) a risk to take. No major UK university libraries have yet moved to Koha, Evergreen, or indeed any open source LMS [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The alternative, which brings its own risks, is to take advantage of the pressures on LMS suppliers to make their own systems more open, and to use open source systems 'around the edges' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This has the particular benefit of creating an overall system which follows the well-established design practice of creating a clean separation of 'view' (typically the Web interface) from 'model' (here the LMS-managed databases) and 'controller' (the LMS core code). The 'view' is key to the user experience of the system, and this separation gives the ability to make rapid changes or to integrate Web 2.0 features quickly and easily, independently of the system back-end. The disadvantage of this approach is that it is relatively fragile, being dependent on the willingness of the LMS supplier to provide a detailed and stable application programming interface (API).</p> <p>There are several current examples of this alternative approach. Some, like the Vufind OPAC, allow the use of plug-ins which adapt the software to a range of different LMSs. Others, like Xerxes, are specialised front-ends to a single system (MetaLib from ExLibris [<a href="#3">3</a>]). This has an impact on evaluating the software: in particular, the pool of active developers is likely to be smaller in the latter case.</p> <h2 id="Royal_Holloway_Library_Services">Royal Holloway Library Services</h2> <p>Within this general context, Royal Holloway Library Services were faced with a specific problem. The annual National Student Survey had given ratings to the Library well below those expected, with many criticisms centred on the difficulty in using the Library's MetaLib federated search system.</p> <p>MetaLib is a key access point to the Library's e-resources, incorporating both A-Z lists of major online databases available to library users, and a federated search tool. Feedback showed that many users found the interface less than satisfactory, with one user commenting that:</p> <blockquote><p><em>'MetaLib is possibly the worst and most confusing library interface I have ever come across'</em></p></blockquote> <p>The Library Management Team decided to remedy this as a matter of urgency and set a deadline of the start of the 2009 Autumn term. There was no funding available to acquire an alternative discovery system so the challenge was to identify a low-cost, quick-win solution for the existing one. With this work in mind, the incoming Associate Director (E-Strategy) had already recruited two new colleagues over the Summer vacation: a systems officer with Web development experience, the other an experienced e-resources manager.</p> <p>The first possible route to the improvement of MetaLib was modification of the existing MetaLib Web interface. This was technically possible but presented several major difficulties: the underlying ExLibris designs were based on the old HTML 4.0 and pre-dated current stylesheet-based design practice; the methods to adapt the designs were opaque and poorly documented, based on numbered variables with semantics that changed depending on context; and perhaps most importantly, the changes were to be made over the summer months, giving no time for user feedback on the details of the changes to be made.</p> <p>The second possibility was the use of Xerxes [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Xerxes offered the advantage of an interface design which had been user-tested on a range of (US) campuses, partially solving the user feedback issue. It was not, however, entirely cost-free, as ExLibris charges an annual maintenance fee for the MetaLib X-server API on which Xerxes depends.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/grigson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article anna grigson graham seaman peter kiely tim wales google jisc jisc collections kingston university microsoft royal holloway sconul university of london gnu api authentication data database ebook ejournal free software gpl html interoperability library management systems licence linux mysql opac open source php portal refworks repositories research search technology sfx software solaris standards stylesheet vufind web 2.0 web development web services wiki xml xslt Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1525 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Librarians' Information Literacy Annual Conference (LILAC) 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt#author1">Rosie Jones</a> reports on a three-day conference about Information Literacy held by CILIP CSG Information Literacy Group at Cardiff University over 30 March - 1 April 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>LILAC celebrated its fifth birthday in style in what proved to be a fantastic venue, Cardiff University. This occasion was commemorated with tour t-shirts available for all the delegates. The conference proved more popular than ever with a record number of presentations submitted and over 240 delegates from across the UK and worldwide. There were also seven funded places for Library students to attend, a fantastic investment in the profession for the future.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 event report rosie jones american library association cardiff university college of new jersey google imperial college london jisc london metropolitan university loughborough university manchester metropolitan university princeton university sconul university of birmingham university of cambridge university of leeds university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of the west of england university of worcester argosi itunes u jorum wikipedia aac blog database e-learning flash framework higher education information retrieval itunes learning objects marc multimedia podcast refworks research search technology social software twitter video vle youtube Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1474 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Implementing Ex Libris's PRIMO at the University of East Anglia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/lewis <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/lewis#author1">Nick Lewis</a> outlines the University of East Anglia's experience of implementing Ex Libris's Primo, a new search and retrieval interface for presenting the library catalogue and institutional databases and e-resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/lewis" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 feature article nick lewis amazon british library google ifla oai oclc ukoln university of east anglia university of glasgow university of strathclyde aquabrowser worldcat ajax algorithm amazon web services authentication bibliographic data browser cataloguing data data management database digital repositories dublin core ejournal facebook frbr google scholar institutional repository interoperability javascript ldap library management systems linux marc metadata mobile open access portal refworks repositories resource discovery rss search technology sfx shibboleth software solaris standards tagging url web 2.0 web services xml Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1390 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Take a Peek Beneath the EPrints V3 Wrappers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>With v3 officially launched at the Open Repositories Conference in San Antonio last week, <a href="/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt#author1">William Nixon</a> and <a href="/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt#author2">Peter Millington</a> report on the EPrints 3 pre-launch briefing in London, 8 December 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/eprints-v3-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 event report peter millington william nixon google jisc oai sherpa university of glasgow university of nottingham university of southampton romeo zetoc apache api archives atom bibliographic data data database digital library dspace dublin core eprints flash gif google maps javascript ldap metadata mets multimedia mysql quicktime refworks repositories research rss search technology software usability video wiki windows xml Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1298 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk