Overview of content related to 'birmingham city university' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/14105/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Editorial Introduction to Issue 71 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 71.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As I depart this chair after the preparation of what I thought would be the last issue of <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], I make no apology for the fact that I did my best to include as much material&nbsp; to her ‘swan song’ as possible. With the instruction to produce only one more issue this year, I felt it was important to publish as much of the content in the pipeline as I could.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 editorial richard waller amazon birmingham city university digital repository federation jisc loughborough university oclc oregon state university ukoln university for the creative arts university of huddersfield university of oxford university of sussex wellcome library jusp kaptur scarlet accessibility agile development api archives augmented reality authentication big data blog bs8878 cataloguing content management controlled vocabularies curation data data management data set database digital library digitisation diigo ebook educational data mining framework google docs higher education html html5 infrastructure jquery learning analytics metadata mets mobile native apps open access open source portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology software solr standardisation standards sushi tagging twitter url video wcag web 2.0 web app widget xml schema Wed, 17 Jul 2013 19:01:02 +0000 lisrw 2493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk SUSHI: Delivering Major Benefits to JUSP http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author1">Paul Meehan</a>, <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author2">Paul Needham</a> and <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author3">Ross MacIntyre</a> explain the enormous time and cost benefits in using SUSHI to support rapid gathering of journal usage reports into the JUSP service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A full-scale implementation of the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) would not be possible without the automated data harvesting afforded by the Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol. Estimated time savings in excess of 97% compared with manual file handling have allowed JUSP to expand its service to more than 35 publishers and 140 institutions by September 2012. An in-house SUSHI server also allows libraries to download quality-checked data from many publishers via JUSP, removing the need to visit numerous Web sites. The protocol thus affords enormous cost and time benefits for the centralised JUSP service and for all participating institutions. JUSP has also worked closely with many publishers to develop and implement SUSHI services, pioneering work to benefit both the publishers and the UK HE community.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/jusp-logo.png" style="width: 145px; height: 133px;" title="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" /></p> <h2 id="JUSP:_Background_to_the_Service">JUSP: Background to the Service</h2> <p>The management of journal usage statistics can be an onerous task at the best of times. The introduction of the COUNTER [<a href="#1">1</a>] Code of Practice in 2002 was a major step forward, allowing libraries to collect consistent, audited statistics from publishers. By July 2012, 125 publishers offered the JR1 report, providing the number of successful full-text downloads. In the decade since COUNTER reports became available, analysis of the reports has become increasingly important, with library managers, staff and administrators increasingly forced to examine journal usage to inform and rationalise purchasing and renewal decisions.</p> <p>In 2004, JISC Collections commissioned a report [<a href="#2">2</a>] which concluded that there was a definite demand for a usage statistics portal for the UK HE community; with some sites subscribing to more than 100 publishers, just keeping track of access details and downloading reports was becoming a significant task in itself, much less analysing the figures therein. There followed a report into the feasibility of establishing a ‘Usage Statistics Service’ carried out by Key Perspectives Limited and in 2008 JISC issued an ITT (Invitation To Tender). By early 2009 a prototype service, known as the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) had been developed by a consortium including Evidence Base at Birmingham City University, Cranfield University, JISC Collections and Mimas at The University of Manchester; the prototype featured a handful of publishers and three institutions. However, despite a centralised service appearing feasible [<a href="#3">3</a>], the requirement to download and process data in spreadsheet format, and the attendant time taken, still precluded a full-scale implementation across UK HE.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="COUNTER" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/counter-header.png" style="width: 640px; height: 45px;" title="COUNTER" /></p> <p>Release 3 of the COUNTER Code of Practice in 2009 however mandated the use of the newly-introduced Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol [<a href="#4">4</a>], a mechanism for the machine-to-machine transfer of COUNTER-compliant reports; this produced dramatic efficiencies of time and cost in the gathering of data from publishers. The JUSP team began work to implement SUSHI for a range of publishers and expanded the number of institutions. By September 2012, the service had grown significantly, whilst remaining free at point of use, and encompassed 148 participating institutions, and 35 publishers. To date more than 100 million individual points of data have been collected by JUSP, all via SUSHI, a scale that would have been impossible without such a mechanism in place or without massive additional staff costs.</p> <p>JUSP offers much more than basic access to publisher statistics, however; the JUSP Web site [<a href="#5">5</a>] details the numerous reports and analytical tools on offer, together with detailed user guides and support materials. The cornerstone of the service though is undeniably its SUSHI implementation, both in terms of gathering the COUNTER JR1 and JR1a data and - as developed more recently - its own SUSHI server, enabling institutions to re-harvest data into their own library management tools for local analysis.</p> <h2 id="JUSP_Approach_to_SUSHI_Development_and_Implementation">JUSP Approach to SUSHI Development and Implementation</h2> <p>Once the decision was made to scale JUSP into a full service, the development of SUSHI capability became of paramount importance. The team had been able to handle spreadsheets of data on a small scale, but the expected upscale to 100+ institutions and multiple publishers within a short time frame meant that this would very quickly become unmanageable and costly in staff time and effort - constraints that were proving to be a source of worry at many institutions too: while some sites could employ staff whose role revolved around usage stats gathering and analysis, this was not possible at every institution, nor especially straightforward for institutions juggling dozens, if not hundreds, of publisher agreements and deals.</p> <p>Two main issues were immediately apparent in the development of the SUSHI software. Firstly, there was a lack of any standard SUSHI client software that we could use or adapt, and, more worryingly, the lack of SUSHI support at a number of major publishers. While many publishers use an external company or platform such as Atypon, MetaPress or HighWire to collect and provide usage statistics, others had made little or no progress in implementing SUSHI support by late 2009 - where SUSHI servers were in place these were often untested or unused by consumers.</p> <p>An ultimate aim for JUSP was to develop a single piece of software that would seamlessly interact with any available SUSHI repository and download data for checking and loading into JUSP. However, the only client software available by 2009 was written and designed to work in the Windows environment, or used Java, which can be very complex to work with and of which the JUSP team had limited expertise. The challenge therefore became to develop a much simpler set of code using Perl and/or PHP, common and simple programming languages which were much more familiar to the JUSP team.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article paul meehan paul needham ross macintyre birmingham city university cranfield university elsevier intute jisc jisc collections mimas niso university of manchester university of oxford jusp nesli pirus2 zetoc archives authentication csv data data set database digital library dublin core html identifier interoperability java multimedia openurl passwords perl php portal raptor repositories research shibboleth software standards sushi windows xml Wed, 05 Dec 2012 17:54:19 +0000 lisrw 2396 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk WebWatch: Surfing Historical UK University Web Sites http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue35/web-watch <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue35/web-watch#author1">Brian Kelly</a> outlines strategies for choosing appropriate standards for building Web sites.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It has been said that those who ignore history, are condemned to repeat it. In the Web world we can be so excited by new developments that we may forget approaches we have taken in the past and fail to learn from our mistakes. This article describes how the WayBack Machine <a href="#ref-01">[1]</a> was used to look at the history of UK University Web sites.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue35/web-watch" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue35 tooled up brian kelly birkbeck college birmingham city university central school of speech and drama courtauld institute of art de montfort university edinburgh college of art glasgow school of art goldsmiths college google imperial college london kings college london leeds metropolitan university liverpool john moores university london business school london school of economics manchester metropolitan university nottingham trent university open university queens university belfast robert gordon university rose bruford college royal academy of music royal agricultural college royal college of art royal college of music royal conservatoire of scotland royal holloway royal northern college of music royal veterinary college royal welsh college of music and drama school of oriental and african studies south bank university surrey institute of art & design ukoln university college london university of bath university of cambridge university of central lancashire university of east london university of london university of oxford university of surrey university of the west of england university of wales university of west london internet archive archives browser digital preservation flash higher education internet explorer intranet java javascript preservation research search technology standards url wayback machine Tue, 29 Apr 2003 23:00:00 +0000 editor 953 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Watch: A Survey of Web Server Software Used by UK University Web Sites http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue34/web-watch <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue34/web-watch#author1">Brian Kelly</a> with an update of his survey of server software used by central Web sites in UK Universities.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A survey of Web server software used on UK University Web sites was carried out in October 1997 and the findings were reported in <em>Ariadne</em> issue 12 <a href="#ref-01">[1]</a>. The survey was repeated in September 2000 and the updated findings published in <em>Ariadne</em> issue 21 <a href="#ref-02">[2]</a>.</p> <p>The survey was repeated in November 2002 and the findings are published in this article.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue34/web-watch" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue34 tooled up brian kelly apache software foundation birkbeck college birmingham city university central school of speech and drama courtauld institute of art de montfort university edinburgh college of art glasgow school of art goldsmiths college imperial college london kings college london leeds metropolitan university liverpool john moores university london business school london school of economics manchester metropolitan university microsoft ncsa nottingham trent university open university queens university belfast robert gordon university rose bruford college royal academy of music royal agricultural college royal college of art royal college of music royal conservatoire of scotland royal holloway royal northern college of music royal veterinary college royal welsh college of music and drama school of oriental and african studies south bank university surrey institute of art & design ukoln university college london university of bath university of cambridge university of central lancashire university of dundee university of east london university of london university of oxford university of surrey university of the west of england university of wales university of west london gnu apache browser cookie higher education interoperability linux php pics privacy research software url windows Wed, 15 Jan 2003 00:00:00 +0000 editor 932 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Watch: An Accessibility Analysis of UK University Entry Points http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue33/web-watch <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue33/web-watch#author1">Brian Kelly</a> reports on the accessibility of entry points of UK University Web sites.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Special Educational Needs and Disability Act (SENDA) came into effect on 1 <sup>st</sup> September 2002. The Act removes the previous exemption of education from the Disability Discrimination Act (1995), ensuring that discrimination against disabled students will be unlawful. Institutions will incur additional responsibilities in 2003, with the final sections of legislation coming into effect in 2005 <a href="#ref-01">[1]</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue33/web-watch" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue33 tooled up brian kelly alt bbc birkbeck college birmingham city university central school of speech and drama courtauld institute of art de montfort university edinburgh college of art glasgow school of art goldsmiths college imperial college london kings college london leeds metropolitan university liverpool john moores university london business school london school of economics manchester metropolitan university nottingham trent university open university queens university belfast robert gordon university rose bruford college royal academy of music royal agricultural college royal college of art royal college of music royal conservatoire of scotland royal holloway royal northern college of music royal veterinary college royal welsh college of music and drama school of oriental and african studies south bank university surrey institute of art & design ukoln university college london university of bath university of bristol university of cambridge university of central lancashire university of east london university of london university of oxford university of sheffield university of surrey university of the west of england university of wales university of west london w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility browser data dtd flash higher education html identifier javascript research software url web resources Wed, 09 Oct 2002 23:00:00 +0000 editor 918 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eVALUEd: An Evaluation Model for e-Library Developments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue31/evalued <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue31/evalued#author1">Becky Hartland-Fox</a> and <a href="/issue31/evalued#author2">Pete Dalton</a> on a project to develop a transferable model for e-library evaluation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!--<h1 id="Contributed_by:Research_Assistant">Contributed by:<STRONG>Research Assistant</STRONG></h1><h1 id="header-1"></h1><P><I>, CIRT Research Development Manager</I></P><P><I>Centre for Information Research (CIRT), University of Central England</I></P><h1 id="Birmingham_B42_2SU_UK">, Birmingham, B42 2SU, UK</h1><h1 id="Contact:_Rebecca.Hartland-Foxuce.ac.uk">Contact: Rebecca.Hartland-Fox@uce.ac.uk</h1>--><!--<h1 id="Contributed_by:Research_Assistant-2">Contributed by:<STRONG>Research Assistant</STRONG></h1><h1 id="header-3"></h1><P><I>, CIRT Research Development Manager</I></P><P><I>Centre for Information Research (CIRT), University of Central England</I></P><h1 id="Birmingham_B42_2SU_UK-4">, Birmingham, B42 2SU, UK</h1><h1 id="Contact:_Rebecca.Hartland-Foxuce.ac.uk-5">Contact: Rebecca.Hartland-Fox@uce.ac.uk</h1>--><h3 id="Project_background">Project background</h3> <p>eVALUEd is a HEFCE funded project, based at the University of Central England. It has been set-up to develop a transferable model for e-library evaluation in Higher Education and to provide dissemination and training in e-library evaluation.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue31/evalued" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue31 feature article becky hartland-fox pete dalton birmingham city university hefce data digital library dissemination higher education research url Wed, 10 Apr 2002 23:00:00 +0000 editor 872 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Establishing a Digital Library Centre http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/kirriemuir <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue29/kirriemuir#author1">John Kirriemuir</a> outlines some of the issues for the establishment of digital library centres in UK Higher Education institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article discusses some of the issues that arise when an academic department, unit or institution moves from possessing a few digital library projects and services, to possessing an integrated digital library centre.</p> <p>The article is based on:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/kirriemuir" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue29 feature article john kirriemuir birmingham city university british library cerlim edina ilrt jisc manchester metropolitan university south bank university ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of strathclyde dner eevl elib sosig archives cataloguing copyright data database digital library digitisation dissemination e-learning further education higher education ict infrastructure metadata rae research resource discovery rslp standards subject gateway url Tue, 02 Oct 2001 23:00:00 +0000 editor 822 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Newsline: News You Can Use http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue24/news <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Foraging_for_a_Good_Read:_Book_Forager_Goes_Live">Foraging for a Good Read: Book Forager Goes Live</h2> <p><br />It is August 2000; the UK is enjoying the driest, sunniest summer this century. You are in the library trying to find a book which isunorthodox, very realistic but also quite funny, set in Spain. You go over to the public access terminal and input details of the kind of read you need to match your mood, and the computer comes up with ten suggestions for you to try.<br /></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue24/news" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue24 news and events philip hunter birmingham city university british library cranfield university jisc jisc collections library of congress mpeg oxford university press south bank university university of oxford dner archives bibliographic data bibliographic database data database digital audio digital library digitisation further education geospatial data gif gis higher education jpeg library management systems licence mp3 preservation realaudio research software standards thesaurus url wav Thu, 22 Jun 2000 23:00:00 +0000 editor 719 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Focus: The Role of the Web Editor http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/web-focus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue18/web-focus#author1">Brian Kelly</a> asks, does 'web editor' mean Unix guru or an HTML coder?</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue18/web-focus" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue18 regular column brian kelly birkbeck college birmingham city university cardiff university jisc kings college london library association microsoft newcastle university nhs oxford brookes university sheffield hallam university ucisa ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of edinburgh university of leeds university of nottingham university of oxford university of plymouth university of southampton university of the west of england university of york york university niss accessibility archives content management data data management database framework gopher graphics higher education html intranet java javascript licence mailbase perl research resource management search technology software url web development web resources web services Sat, 19 Dec 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 573 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Public Libraries Corner http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue16/pub-lib <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue16/pub-lib#author1">Sally Criddle</a> reports on Resurrection: a new life for powerful public libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue16/pub-lib" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue16 regular column sally criddle birmingham city university library association ukoln university of east anglia cataloguing cd-rom database ict metadata research resource discovery software Sat, 18 Jul 1998 23:00:00 +0000 editor 518 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk TAPin http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue15/tapin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue15/tapin#author1">Kay Flatten</a> outlines the aims of the TAPin project, which is now approaching the publication of its "Impact Study".</p> </div> </div> </div> <p> <title></title> </p> <p>TAPin is now in the final stages of a wide dissemination process, culminating in the publication of The Impact Study. The main aim of the project was to enhance the expertise of academic staff in the exploitation of networked information resources while also underpinning the network competencies of library and academic staff. The IT cultures within specific disciplines were researched, and the extent and nature of IT resources in the collaborating institutions were then established as a means of facilitating the development and delivery of materials.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue15/tapin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue15 project update kay flatten birmingham city university elib copyright data dissemination research Mon, 18 May 1998 23:00:00 +0000 editor 492 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Newsline: News You Can Use http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue15/news <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2><a name="govt"> </a></h2><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue15/news" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue15 news and events philip hunter becta birmingham city university jisc sheffield hallam university ukoln university of essex university of manchester elib heron nesli copac copyright data set database higher education infrastructure jena licence multimedia opac research software Mon, 18 May 1998 23:00:00 +0000 editor 503 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Music Libraries Online http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue13/music <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue13/music#author1">Celia Duffy</a> describes a virtual music catalogue.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue13/music" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue13 project update celia duffy birmingham city university guildhall school of music and drama hefce leeds college of music royal academy of music royal college of music royal conservatoire of scotland royal northern college of music elib archives bibliographic data cataloguing data software standards z39.50 Mon, 19 Jan 1998 00:00:00 +0000 editor 442 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Revolutionaries and Captives in the Information Society http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue10/captives <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue10/captives#author1">Trevor Haywood</a> on the shackles that bind us to the information revolution.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Every generation believes that it is at a seminal point on the time-line of technological progress. It is either the age of iron, the age of the train, the age of flight or, in our case, the information age. We can thus always say that we stand at an interesting moment in the development of technology. Nowhere does this 'interesting moment' look more intriguing than our current location on the map of rapidly evolving information technology, particularly networking technology.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue10/captives" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue10 feature article trevor haywood birmingham city university microsoft infrastructure software windows Fri, 18 Jul 1997 23:00:00 +0000 editor 353 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk