Overview of content related to 'provenance' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1434/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Launching a New Community-owned Content Service http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/milloy#author1">Caren Milloy</a> describes some of the challenges overcome and lessons learned by JISC Collections during the development of JISC eCollections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>JISC eCollections is a set of e-resource platforms launched in November 2011 by JISC Collections, in partnership with the JISC data centres EDINA and Mimas. The platforms (Figure 1) are JISC MediaHub, JISC Historic Books and JISC Journal Archives; together, they are intended to provide a sustainable, value-for-money alternative to accessing licensed content on publisher platforms, by consolidating and hosting the broad range of historical book, journal archive and multimedia content purchased by JISC Collections on behalf of the UK education community. The vision is to provide a world-class collection that ensures users’ broadest information needs are well met, and to work in partnership with the community to improve and develop the platforms around evolving student and researcher expectations.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The primary role of JISC Collections is the licensing of content on behalf of its UK Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) member organisations. Over the last 10 years, JISC Collections has invested over £40 million in centralised licensing of digital content, in perpetuity, on behalf of all its members. The first agreement was signed in 2002 for ProQuest’s Early English Books Online (EEBO). Since then, national licences have been negotiated for historic books, journal archives and multimedia content (Figure 1), such as documentaries and educational films. In 2010, JISC Collections invested a further £2.5 million in film and image content, representing UK and world history since 1987, specially selected for teaching and learning. The majority of JISC Collections’ member organisations would be unable to afford per-institution subscriptions to these book, journal and multimedia collections, so centralised licensing is critical to broadening access.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-milloy/fig1-jec-platforms.png" style="width: 680px; height: 213px;" title="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service</strong></p> <h2 id="Why_Develop_JISC_eCollections">Why Develop JISC eCollections?</h2> <p>The platforms contain more than 4.5 million resources from over 20 providers. JISC Collections members were previously required to access this content via a range of separate services, each with different user interfaces and administrative requirements, and with a complex funding set-up including both JISC subsidies and publisher access fees payable by each institution. JISC Collections felt that its existing – and future – investments in content would best be protected and preserved by developing an independent service, as an affordable alternative to relying on content providers for access to perpetually licensed content. Such a service would allow the education community to take ownership of its acquisitions and assure it of future control. In 2011 each group of resources was consolidated into one platform to increase discoverability, simplify the user experience (making it more inclusive to users at all academic levels), reduce the administrative burden, and thereby enable maximum value to be derived from the initial content investments.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article caren milloy british library edina google jisc jisc collections middlesex university mimas research information network ubird aggregation archives cataloguing data data mining database ebook further education graphics higher education licence marc metadata multimedia ocr open access optical character recognition passwords portfolio preservation provenance research resource discovery schema search technology Sat, 28 Jul 2012 16:36:05 +0000 lisrw 2356 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Most of a Conference http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/taylor#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> writes about how she made the most of a conference to promote and inform the work of a project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working with repositories in various ways for over five years, so I have, of course, attended the major international conference Open Repositories before. I have never actually presented anything or represented a specific project at the event, though. This year was different. This year I had a mission -&nbsp; to present a poster on the DataFlow Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] and to talk to people about the work we had been doing for the past 12 months and (I hoped) to interest them in using the Open Source (OS) systems we had developed during that period.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article stephanie taylor ukoln university of glasgow university of oxford university of southampton devcsi hydra rsp api archives blog cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital library digital repositories dissemination doi flickr framework hashtag higher education infrastructure javascript licence linked data linux metadata open access open source provenance rdf repositories research research information management software standards sword protocol tagging text mining twitter visualisation widget wiki zip Tue, 31 Jul 2012 15:05:33 +0000 lisrw 2374 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Delivering Open Educational Resources for Engineering Design http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/darlington <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/darlington#author1">Mansur Darlington</a> describes two methods for presenting online OERs for engineering design that were developed and explored as part of the Higher Education Academy/JISC-funded DelOREs (Delivering Open Educational Resources for Engineering Design) Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A great deal of information is accessible on the World Wide Web which might be useful to both students and teachers. This material, however, is of variable quality and usefulness and is aimed at a wide spectrum of users. Moreover, such material rarely appears accompanied by guidance on how it may be most effectively used by potential users. To make information more usable it must be made more readily discoverable and there should be clear – and preferably machine-readable – indications of its provenance and quality and the legitimate uses to which it may be put.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/darlington" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article mansur darlington hea heriot-watt university jisc massachusetts institute of technology university of bath jorum mrc aggregation algorithm blog copyright creative commons data e-learning framework google search higher education html identifier intellectual property json licence metadata microdata oer provenance rdf repositories research resource description resource discovery rss schema search technology software standardisation standards taxonomy ukoer url vocabularies wordpress xhtml xml Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2234 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Future of Archives and Recordkeeping http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews an anthology of perceptive essays on the challenges presented to archival thought and practice by Web 2.0, postmodern perspectives, and cross-disciplinary interchanges.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians, archivists, and records managers do not share identical challenges or controversies in their practical endeavours or theoretical queries. However, a common issue for all the information professions and a dominating topic of discussion in their literature is the fundamental change in the structure and distribution of knowledge caused by mass digitisation. The proliferation of daily digital content, in quantity, reach, and manifestation, is confronting them all with a disquieting role ambiguity. The expanding tools and expectations of Web 2.0 have made this self-questioning a recurrent one, but they have also stimulated invigorating debate on the purpose and direction of these fields. The perception is one of extraordinary change initiated by emerging technologies, unprecedented knowledge production and dissemination, and a new centralised role for the information user. In these galvanising changes leading library and archives practitioners are sensing opportunities for confirming the professions’ relevance, in the estimation of other scholarly disciplines and of society at large, but, perhaps most of all, in their own eyes as well.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review john azzolini clifford chance archives blog cataloguing digital library digitisation dissemination facebook flickr framework knowledge management metadata personalisation preservation provenance research semiotic twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Tue, 08 Nov 2011 14:50:08 +0000 lisrw 1689 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk eSciDoc Days 2011: The Challenges for Collaborative eResearch Environments http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/escidoc-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/escidoc-rpt#author1">Ute Rusnak</a> reports on the fourth in a series of two-day conferences called eSciDoc Days, organised by FIZ Karlsruhe and the Max Planck Digital Library in Berlin over 26-27 October 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>eSciDoc is a well-known open source platform for creating eResearch environments using generic services and tools based on a shared infrastructure. This concept allows for managing research and publication data together with related metadata, internal and/or external links and access rights. Development of eSciDoc was initiated by a collaborative venture between FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz Institute for Information Infrastructure and the Max Planck Digital Library (MPDL) and was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/escidoc-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report ute rusnak fiz karlsruhe jisc archives authentication big data browser copyright curation data data management data set database digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination e-research ebook ejournal fedora commons framework higher education infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge management licence metadata open source preservation provenance repositories research rich internet application soa software virtual research environment visualisation web services Mon, 27 Feb 2012 20:20:52 +0000 lisrw 2239 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk From Link Rot to Web Sanctuary: Creating the Digital Educational Resource Archive (DERA) http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/scaife#author1">Bernard M Scaife</a> describes how an innovative use of the EPrints repository software is helping to preserve official documents from the Web.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>When I started as Technical Services Librarian at the Institute of Education (IOE) in September 2009, one of the first tasks I was given was to do something about all the broken links in the catalogue. Link rot [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the bane of the Systems Librarian's life and I was well aware that you had to run fast to stand still.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article bernard m scaife bbc becta google jisc national library of australia oai the national archives uk data archive university of london university of southampton archives bibliographic data cataloguing collection development content management copyright creative commons data data mining digital preservation digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons higher education html identifier infrastructure interoperability lcsh library management systems licence metadata ms word multimedia national library oai-pmh open access preservation provenance repositories research schema search technology software thesaurus ulcc url xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1625 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk UK Reading Experience Database http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt#author1">Bethan Ruddock</a> reports from the launch event for the UK Reading Experience Database, held at the Betty Boothroyd Library, the Open University, Milton Keynes, on 24 February 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><p>I was invited down to the Open University (OU) Betty Boothroyd Library in Milton Keynes for the launch of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. I had been asked to attend to talk about the LOCAH Project and Linked Data, but I was also looking forward to learning about the RED Project.</p> <p>This was the first of two launch days, and was designed for librarians, archivists, and information managers. A second launch day for teachers in Higher Education was to be held in London the next day.</p> <h2 id="What_Is_UK_RED">What Is UK RED?</h2> <p>The tagline for UK RED is 'the experience of reading in Britain from 1450 to 1945', and the database brings together reading experiences, making them both searchable and browsable. What is a reading experience? It is evidence of anyone alive between the mid-15th and 20thcenturies having read and interacted with a book or other piece of writing, such as magazines, newspapers, letters - even playbills and advertisements. Ownership alone is not enough; there must be something to show that the person in question actually read the work or at least part of it.</p> <p>This information can be found in a number of places - a printed book review would be an obvious example. The RED team also find many entries in diaries. Such entries can range from simple lists of books that someone has read over the course of a year, to detailed descriptions of when and where they read a particular book, and how they felt about it. Often diary entries are not actually about the book; it is mentioned in passing and in the context of a number of other activities.</p> <p>While the owner's name on the flyleaf is not itself enough to justify a 'reading experience', annotations to the text are, as they show that the person has actually interacted with the text. Of course, you then have to consider whether the person whose name is on the flyleaf is the same as the person doing the annotating!</p> <p>RED is much more than a list of 'people who have read books'. The database aims to bring out as much information as possible about the reading experience. The interface to submit a new entry allows you to specify where the reading was taking place, all the way down to a particular room in a particular house. It also aims to identify if the reading was silent or aloud, alone or with other people; whether the book was owned by the reader, a library book, borrowed, or even stolen. All these data are then used to build up a rich database of information on who was reading what (and how!) in Britain.</p> <p>UK RED is not just concerned with reading experiences within Britain: team members also look at the reading experiences of citizens abroad. <strong>Edmund King</strong>, Research Associate, Reading Experience Database, OU, told us that, as a consequence, there are fascinating examples of what captured British soldiers were reading in prisoner-of-war (POW) camps as well as examples of what they were not allowed to read. Books in Welsh and Pakistani were banned, as well as atlases and anything about the Russian revolution. I do not know if there are corresponding records for what prisoners in UK POW camps were forbidden to read, but it would be very interesting to find out.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report bethan ruddock ahrc eduserv jisc mimas newcastle university open university talis ukoln university of manchester university of oxford archives hub dbpedia locah lucero wikipedia apache archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copac copyright data data set database dissemination flickr higher education intellectual property linked data linux open source php provenance research software sparql sql twitter video Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1629 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Open Educational Resources Hack Day http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on a two-day practical hack event focusing on Open Educational Resources (OER), held by DevCSI and JISC CETIS in Manchester on 31 March - 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Open Educational Resources Hack Day event was designed to bring together those interested in rapidly developing tools and prototypes to solve problems related to OER. Whilst there is a growing interest in the potential for learning resources created and shared openly by academics and teachers, a number of technical challenges still exist, including resource retrieval, evaluation and reuse. This event aimed to explore some of these problem areas by partnering developers with the creators and users of OER to identify needs and potential solutions.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report kirsty pitkin cetis google harper adams university college jisc leeds metropolitan university oai open university ukoln university of bolton university of oxford w3c devcsi jorum oerbital xpert accessibility aggregation api authentication blog browser cataloguing creative commons data data set doi drupal facebook identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects licence linked data metadata mobile moodle oai-pmh oer open source openoffice portal provenance repositories resource sharing rss search engine optimisation search technology software storify sword protocol ukoer url video visualisation vle widget wiki wookie wordpress youtube Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1630 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Preparing Collections for Digitization http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a recently published book on the selection and preparation of archive and library collections for digitisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the past 20 years a great deal of information and guidance has been published to support cultural heritage organisations interested in undertaking digitisation projects. It is well over a decade now since the seminal Joint National Preservation Office and Research Libraries Group Preservation Conference on <em>Guidelines for digital imaging</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>] and standard introductory texts on digitisation like Anne Kenney and Oya Rieger's <em>Moving theory into practice</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>] and Stuart Lee's <em>Digital imaging: a practical handbook</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] are of a similar age - although still extremely useful. More up-to-date guidance is also available from services like JISC Digital Media [<a href="#4">4</a>] and the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --></p><p>Into this mix comes this new book on the preparation of collections for digitisation by Anna Bülow and Jess Ahmon, respectively Head of Preservation and Preservation Officer at The National Archives in Kew, London. The book claims to fill a gap in the existing literature, covering the practical aspects of safeguarding collections during image capture. It is perhaps worth noting upfront that the main focus of the book is on textual resources and documentary records, meaning that it would seem to be most useful for those working in the libraries and archives sectors.</p> <p>The first chapter provides some essential context, linking digitisation initiatives to the ongoing collection management practices of archives and libraries. It makes the general point that collection management has three main aspects: the <em>development</em>, <em>use</em> and <em>preservation</em> of collections.</p> <blockquote><p>Collection management involves making well informed decisions in order to prioritise actions and optimise the allocation of resources to maintain as much accessible value as possible. (p. 5)</p></blockquote> <p>Bülow and Ahmon argue that digital technologies have created new challenges for collection management, e.g. being partly responsible for a shift in attention from the development and <em>preservation</em> role to the development and <em>use</em> role. In practice, however, the link between the roles can be more nuanced. For example, in some cases digitisation may benefit conservation aims by helping to reduce the physical handling of fragile materials. In general, however, the authors feel that while the long-term sustainability challenges of digital content remain unresolved, "digitization of any book or document cannot be seen as a preservation measure for the original itself." (p. 8). The chapter concludes with a brief outline of the four phases of digitisation, each of which is made up of multiple steps. Of these, this book focuses primarily on the first two stages, covering all of the tasks that need to be done prior to imaging (e.g. selection, rights clearance, document preparation) as well as those associated with the digitisation process itself (imaging, quality assurance, transcription, metadata creation). The remaining two stages, chiefly facilitating use and sustainability, are not dealt with in any detail by this book.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review michael day harvard university jisc jisc digital media library association the national archives ukoln university of bath algorithm archives digital media digital preservation digitisation file format interoperability metadata preservation provenance research resource description standards tiff Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1633 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Developments in Virtual 3D Imaging of Cultural Artefacts http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/collmann <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/collmann#author1">Richard Collmann</a> describes how experience using a portable Virtual 3D Object Rig in cultural institutions has led to significant improvements in apparatus design and workflow.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The collapsable, portable electromechanical Virtual 3D (V3D) Object Rig Model 1 (ORm1) (Figures 1, 2, 3) was developed to meet an obvious need found after an important Australian cultural artefact - a nineteenth-century post-mortem plaster head-cast of the notorious bushranger Ned Kelly [<a href="#1">1</a>] - was Apple QTVR-imaged (QuickTime Virtual Reality) using a large static object rig at the University of Melbourne over 2003/4. The author requested that this moving and hyperlinked image be constructed as a multimedia component of a conjectured cross-disciplinary undergraduate teaching unit. The difficulties encountered in obtaining permission from the cultural collection involved to transport this object some 400 metres to the imaging rig located on the same geographical campus suggested to the author that a portable object imaging rig could be devised and taken to any cultural collection anywhere to image objects <em>in situ</em>.</p> <p>In the early to mid-19th century these physical records were taken for phrenological research purposes, however by the late-C19 this quasi-science had been largely discredited. The underlying reasons for these practices had been forgotten; the recording and keeping was absorbed by reason of habit into accepted routine procedure; as just a part of the workflow within the State criminal justice execution process. This procedure would be rejected out of hand nowadays, but this 19th century habit of retaining physical artefacts is fortunate for the present-day cross-disciplinary historian.</p> <p>As mentioned, the author wished to use the head cast as the pivotal focus for cross-disciplinary undergraduate teaching purposes with contributions from the perspective of History of Science, Australian Colonial History, Sociology and Criminology. It was considered by the subject contributors that such a cross-disciplinary teaching module could well benefit from a Web-based multimedia approach.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/collmann" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article richard collmann apple university of melbourne e-curator versi archives copyright data data mining data set database digital media dublin core e-research e-science exif fedora commons flash gnome internet explorer metadata multimedia photoshop preservation provenance quicktime repositories research software visualisation windows wireless Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1606 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk International Digital Curation Conference 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 6th International Digital Curation Conference, held on 7-8 December 2010 in Chicago.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><p>The International Digital Curation Conference has been held annually by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] since 2005, quickly establishing a reputation for high-quality presentations and papers. So much so that, as co-chair Allen Renear explained in his opening remarks, after attending the 2006 Conference in Glasgow [<a href="#2">2</a>] delegates from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) offered to bring the event to Chicago.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report alex ball cni coalition for networked information cornell university datacite dcc indiana university johns hopkins university leiden university massachusetts institute of technology michigan state university national library of australia national science foundation research information network rutgers university ukoln university of arizona university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of chicago university of edinburgh university of illinois university of oxford university of sheffield university of southampton datashare i2s2 idmb myexperiment sagecite sudamih aggregation archives ark authentication blog cataloguing collection development content management curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital curation digital library e-science eprints framework identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability irods linked data linux metadata mobile national library ontologies open access open data operating system persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata provenance rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web sharepoint software standards tagging tei text mining twitter video virtual research environment visualisation wiki windows xml Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1611 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Beyond the PDF http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt#author1">Jodi Schneider</a> reports on a three-day workshop about the future of scientific communication, held in San Diego CA, USA, in January 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Beyond the PDF' brought together around 80 people to the University of California San Diego to discuss scholarly communication, primarily in the sciences. The main topic: How can we apply emergent technologies to improve measurably the way that scholarship is conveyed and comprehended? The group included domain scientists, researchers and software developers, librarians, funders, publishers, journal editors - a mix which organiser <strong>Phil Bourne</strong> described as 'visionaries, developers, consumers, and conveyors' of scholarship.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report jodi schneider deri elsevier google microsoft national university of ireland science and technology facilities council w3c archives blog cloud computing copyright data data citation data set dexy epub framework git google scholar html html5 identifier intellectual property linked data metadata open access opm persistent identifier provenance repositories research semantic web social networks software standards streaming text mining twitter video visualisation wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1613 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 65: Ariadne in Search of Your Views http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 65.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may have already noted in the editorial section of this issue a link to the Reader Survey which I ask you seriously to consider completing, whether you are a frequent <em>Ariadne</em> reader or are reading the Magazine for the first time. Moves are afoot to give <em>Ariadne</em> some effort towards improvements in your experience of the publication and I cannot emphasise enough the value I place on suggestions and comments from you. I am very keen to know what readers value and dislike in <em>Ariadne</em>.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 editorial richard waller dcc google griffith university jisc queensland university of technology university of oregon university of oxford wellcome trust devcsi eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih aggregation ajax archives browser curation data data management data set database digital archive droid e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service interoperability ipad javascript metadata mobile multimedia ontologies open source preservation provenance repositories research resource description and access schema search technology software tagging taxonomy uri visualisation web 2.0 web portal xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1647 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Trust Me, I'm an Archivist http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/hilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author1">Christopher Hilton</a>, <a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author2">Dave Thompson</a> and <a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author3">Natalie Walters</a> describe some of the issues of engaging with donors when it comes to transferring born-digital material to the Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!--v2: to reflect final author edits : 2010-11-18-21-54 rew --><!--v2: to reflect final author edits : 2010-11-18-21-54 rew --><p>Born-digital archival material represents the single most important challenge to the archival profession for a generation or more. It requires us to rethink issues and assumptions around acquisition, preservation, cataloguing and reader access. Not least is the problem of getting donors to transfer their born-digital material to us. We have encountered four common scenarios that seem to act as blocks to the transfer of such material. We also need to change the way we engage with donors. This is a challenge that we cannot duck unless we wish to condemn our collection to increasing irrelevance.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem?</h2> <p>Managing born-digital material is difficult. We all have trouble finding, storing and managing the data we create. Yet we have an attachment to this transient and ephemeral stuff that we find hard to relinquish. We seem to have a stronger emotional attachment to digital material than we did with paper. Thus, donors who have happily donated paper archival materials to the Library struggle with the challenges of donating born-digital material, challenges that are not always technical.</p> <h2 id="The_Current_State_of_Play">The Current State of Play</h2> <p>Two previous articles in <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] have reported on the Wellcome Library's engagement with born-digital material: for readers who have not seen these it is appropriate to begin by recapitulating the themes established there.</p> <p>The Wellcome Library is a collecting institution and the majority of its archival holdings are acquired from outside bodies or individuals by purchase, deposit or gift. The Library has no mandate to require an organisation or individual to lodge their records in the Library, and little influence over their use of particular formats or technologies. Conversely the Library is not required to take in any given material. The archivists have the freedom to decide what material to accept or if a particular format is too problematic to acquire when set against the material's informational value.</p> <p>The Library's work with digital material is based on two central principles:</p> <ol> <li>That sound archival practice is wholly appropriate to working with born-digital materials.</li> <li>That if the Library does not acquire born-digital archival material then its future relevance as a research Library is compromised.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/hilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article christopher hilton dave thompson natalie walters wellcome library archives blog born digital cataloguing data digital archive digital curation preservation provenance research software standards Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1586 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Infrastructure for Research Data Management at the University of Oxford http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author1">James A. J. Wilson</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author2">Michael A. Fraser</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author3">Luis Martinez-Uribe</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author4">Paul Jeffreys</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author5">Meriel Patrick</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author6">Asif Akram</a> and <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author7">Tahir Mansoori</a> describe the approaches taken, findings, and issues encountered while developing research data management services and infrastructure at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><p>The University of Oxford began to consider research data management infrastructure in earnest in 2008, with the 'Scoping Digital Repository Services for Research Data' Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Two further JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee)-funded pilot projects followed this initial study, and the approaches taken by these projects, and their findings, form the bulk of this article.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article asif akram james a. j. wilson luis martinez-uribe meriel patrick michael a. fraser paul jeffreys tahir mansoori ahds dcc google hefce ibm jisc microsoft oxford university computing services research information network uk data archive university of east anglia university of essex university of melbourne university of oxford university of southampton datashare eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih algorithm archives bibliographic data browser cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital asset management digital curation digital repositories e-research flash framework geospatial data gis google maps ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service intellectual property interoperability j2ee jpeg metadata multimedia open access portal preservation provenance qt repositories research research information management schema search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml xml schema Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1590 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Data Services for the Sciences: A Needs Assessment http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/westra#author1">Brian Westra</a> describes a data services needs assessment for science research staff at the University of Oregon.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Computational science and raw and derivative scientific data are increasingly important to the research enterprise of higher education institutions. Academic libraries are beginning to examine what the expansion of data-intensive e-science means to scholarly communication and information services, and some are reshaping their own programmes to support the digital curation needs of research staff. These changes in libraries may involve repurposing or leveraging existing services, and the development or acquisition of new skills, roles, and organisational structures [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>Scientific research data management is a fluid and evolving endeavour, reflective of the high rate of change in the information technology landscape, increasing levels of multi-disciplinary research, complex data structures and linkages, advances in data visualisation and analysis, and new tools capable of generating or capturing massive amounts of data.</p> <p>These factors can create a complex and challenging environment for managing data, and one in which libraries can have a significant positive role supporting e-science. A needs assessment can help to characterise scientists' research methods and data management practices, highlighting gaps and barriers [<a href="#2">2</a>], and thereby improve the odds for libraries to plan appropriately and effectively implement services in the local setting [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Methods">Methods</h2> <p>An initiative to conduct a science data services needs assessment was developed and approved in early 2009 at the University of Oregon. The initiative coincided with the hiring of a science data services librarian, and served as an initial project for the position. A researcher-centric approach to the development of services was a primary factor in using an assessment to shape services [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The goals of the project were to:</p> <ul> <li>define the information services needs of science research staff;</li> <li>inform the Libraries and other stakeholders of gaps in the current service structures; and</li> <li>identify research groups or staff who would be willing to participate in, and whose datasets would be good subjects for, pilot data curation projects.</li> </ul> <p>The library took the lead role on the assessment, consulting with other stakeholders in its development and implementation. Campus Information Services provided input on questions regarding campus information technology infrastructure, and to avoid unnecessary overlap with other IT service activities focused on research staff. The Vice President for Research and other organisational units were advised of the project and were asked for referrals to potential project participants. These units provided valuable input in the selection of staff contacts. Librarian subject specialists also suggested staff who might be working with data and interested in participating. Librarians responsible for digital collections, records management, scholarly communications, and the institutional repository were involved in the development of the assessment questions and project plan.</p> <p>The questions used in the assessment were developed through an iterative process. A literature and Web review located several useful resources and examples. These included the University of Minnesota Libraries' study of scientists' research behaviours [<a href="#3">3</a>], and a study by Henty, et al. on the data management practices of Australian researchers [<a href="#5">5</a>]. The Data Audit Framework (DAF - now called the Data Asset Framework) methodology was considered to provide the most comprehensive set of questions with a field-tested methodology and guidelines [<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>][<a href="#8">8</a>][<a href="#9">9</a>][<a href="#10">10</a>][<a href="#11">11</a>]. The stages outlined in the DAF methodology were also instructive, although we elected not to execute a process for identifying and classifying assets (DAF Stage 2), since the organisational structure of our departments and institutes are not conducive to that level of investigation. From the beginning it was recognised that recruitment of scientists was based as much on their willingness to participate as their responsibility for any specific class or type of research-generated data.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article brian westra arl edina imperial college london jisc johns hopkins university microsoft uk data archive university of edinburgh university of essex university of glasgow university of illinois university of oregon university of oxford university of washington archives authentication csv curation data data management data set data visualisation database digital curation digital library drupal e-research e-science file format framework gis higher education infrastructure institutional repository metadata mysql open access provenance repositories research usability visualisation Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1568 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk A Pragmatic Approach to Preferred File Formats for Acquisition http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/thompson#author1">Dave Thompson</a> sets out the pragmatic approach to preferred file formats for long-term preservation used at the Wellcome Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article sets out the Wellcome Library's decision not explicitly to specify preferred file formats for long-term preservation. It discusses a pragmatic approach in which technical appraisal of the material is used to assess the Library's likelihood of preserving one format over another. The Library takes as its starting point work done by the Florida Digital Archive in setting a level of 'confidence' in its preferred formats. The Library's approach provides for nine principles to consider as part of appraisal. These principles balance economically sustainable preservation and intellectual 'value' with the practicalities of working with specific, and especially proprietary, file formats. Scenarios are used to show the application of principles (see <a href="#annex">Annex</a> below).</p> <p>This article will take a technical perspective when assessing material for acquisition by the Library. In reality technical factors are only part of the assessment of material for inclusion in the Library's collections. Other factors such as intellectual content, significance of the material, significance of the donor/creator and any relationship to material already in the Library also play a part. On this basis, the article considers 'original' formats accepted for long-term preservation, and does not consider formats appropriate for dissemination.</p> <p>This reflects the Library's overall approach to working with born digital archival material. Born digital material is treated similarly to other, analogue archival materials. The Library expects archivists to apply their professional skills regardless of the format of any material, to make choices and decisions about material based on a range of factors and not to see the technical issues surrounding born digital archival material as in any way limiting.</p> <h2 id="Why_Worry_about_Formats">Why Worry about Formats?</h2> <p>Institutions looking to preserve born digital material permanently, the Wellcome Library included, may have little control over the formats in which material is transferred or deposited. The ideal intervention point from a preservation perspective is at the point digital material is first created. However this may be unrealistic. Many working within organisations have no choice in the applications they use, cost of applications may be an issue, or there may simply be a limited number of applications available on which to perform specialist tasks. Material donated after an individual retires or dies can prove especially problematic. It may be obsolete, in obscure formats, on obsolete media and without any metadata describing its context, creation or rendering environment.</p> <p>Computer applications 'save' their data in formats, each application typically having its own file format. The Web site filext [<a href="#1">1</a>] lists some 25,000 file extensions in its database.</p> <p>The long-term preservation of any format depends on the type of format, issues of obsolescence, and availability of hardware and/or software, resources, experience and expertise. Any archive looking to preserve born digital archival material needs to have the means and confidence to move material across the 'gap' that exists between material 'in the wild' and holding it securely in an archive.</p> <p>This presents a number of problems: first, in the proliferation of file formats; second, in the use of proprietary file formats, and third, in formats becoming obsolete, either by being incompatible with later versions of the applications that created them, or by those applications no longer existing. This assumes that proprietary formats are more problematic to preserve as their structure and composition are not known, which hinders preservation intervention by imposing the necessity for specialist expertise. Moreover, as new software is created, so new file formats proliferate, and consequently exacerbate the problem.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article dave thompson microsoft mpeg wellcome library aggregation archives born digital cd-rom collection development data database digital archive digital preservation dissemination drm file format framework internet explorer jpeg jpeg 2000 metadata microsoft office open source openoffice preservation provenance real audio repositories software standards tiff usb video xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1547 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Intranet Management: Divine Comedy or Strategic Imperative? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/white#author1">Martin White</a> suggests that a failure to recognise the value of intranets is a symptom of a failure to recognise information as a strategic asset.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to Dante in his Divine Comedy the inscription above the door to Hades reads "Abandon hope all ye who enter here". For many this could also be the sign on the home page of their organisation's intranet as, with business-critical decisions to make, they begin the daily hunt for information that they are sure should be somewhere in the application. It could just as easily be the sign on the door of the intranet manager of the organisation, though this door usually also carries a number of other job descriptions, all of which seem to be given more priority by the organisation than the care and development of the intranet. Most organisations of any size will have a full-time web manager, often with a support team, but this is rarely the case with the intranet.</p> <p>There are a substantial number of intranets in the UK. Statistics from the Office for National Statistics indicate that 22% of all businesses have an intranet [<a href="#1">1</a>]. As the size of the business increases so does the level of penetration, and most businesses of more than 500 people will now have some form of intranet. Given the number of businesses in the UK the author estimates that there are probably around 300,000 intranets in the commercial sector, and at a guess a further 100,000 in the public sector, charities, Higher Education institutions (HEIs) and other organisations. Only over the last few years has any reliable statistical information become available on intranet use and development, and this is a in-depth global survey of only around 300 intranets [<a href="#2">2</a>]. In the UK HEI sector a major opportunity was lost in a survey commissioned in 2009 by Eduserv into the management of web content in the HEI sector as no account of intranet use of CMS applications was included in the scope of the survey [<a href="#3">3</a>]. A survey of SharePoint use in HEIs undertaken for Eduserv in late 2009 [<a href="#4">4</a>] did indicate that a number of institutions were using SharePoint for intranet applications but the survey did not look in detail at intranet implementation.</p> <p>It is also only over the last few years have forums been set up in which intranet managers are able to share experiences and challenges with others. The work of the Intranet Benchmark Forum [<a href="#5">5</a>] is focused on providing services to large organisations, but there are also other virtual and physical discussion forums, such as the Intranet Forum [<a href="#6">6</a>] run by UKeiG for its members. It is probably reasonable to suggest that the majority of intranet managers have seen very few intranets from which to gain a sense of good practice, whereas web managers have an almost unlimited supply of sites from which to gain ideas for their own use. This is as true in the HEI sector as in other sectors. Given the installed base of intranets in the UK it is also surprising that there is no 'intranet conference' event even though intranet management does feature in events such as Online Information [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Most countries in northern Europe have an intranet conference [<a href="#8">8</a>], often with several hundred delegates, so why there is no equivalent in the UK is a mystery.</p> <h2 id="Intranets_Are_Different">Intranets Are Different</h2> <p>All too often an intranet is regarded as an internal web site. The reality is that about the only commonality between an intranet and a web site is the use of web browser technology. Many very successful intranets do not even use a web content management application but instead are based on Notes technology or portal applications. Intranet content contribution is usually highly distributed, with individual members of staff publishing content direct to the intranet perhaps only a few times a year. This means that the web content management system has to be highly intuitive, and enable Word documents to be rendered into clean HTML code to create web pages. The teams supporting public web sites are using the systems every working day, working often in HTML and having a much more limited range of content to cope with. Many of the problems that arise in keeping content current on an intranet are a result of staff having to use a complex Web publishing system that was specified for Web site management and not intranet management.</p> <p>Another factor to be considered is that increasingly intranets are federated applications [<a href="#9">9</a>]. This is often the situation in HEIs where each department wants to have its own intranet, and on top of all these individual intranets there is some form of top-level 'corporate' home page and navigation. Often there is no central coordination of these intranets, and so each adopts some or none of the visual design standards of the HEI.</p> <p>As far as enterprise applications are concerned, intranets are different because they are not based on business processes or work-flow. Finance, registry, personnel and most other applications support well-defined processes, usually within a specific department, and where the content requirements are usually specified in database terms. Anything approaching text content is usually relegated to a single field in the database. Intranets exist because there is a substantial amount of information in any organisation that is not based on business processes and cannot be managed within a formal database structure, such as policies, procedures, campus maps, events, staff notices and hundreds of other information formats produced by every department and location within the organisation.</p> <p>As a result the intranet becomes an information dumping ground. Under-resourced intranet managers do not have the resources to maintain content quality, and so multiple versions of documents with no visible ownership or provenance proliferate. Employees leave or change responsibility but the intranet is based on a 'file-and-forget' principle and no effort is taken to ensure that document ownership is transferred to another member of staff. Very quickly the information architecture of the intranet, based usually on the structure of the organisation at the time of the last WCMS (Web content management system) deployment, is not fit for purpose. The decision is taken to implement a search engine, and only then does the scale of the problem of information decay become apparent. It can also be an interesting exercise to search for 'Confidential' and see just how many documents are returned!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article martin white eduserv google harvard university ibm intranet focus ltd jisc microsoft open university university of sheffield adobe blog content management creative commons data database dissemination document management drupal foi higher education html ict information architecture intellectual property intranet knowledge management licence metadata mobile open source passwords portal privacy provenance repositories research rss schema search technology sharepoint standards taxonomy usability web 2.0 web browser wiki Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1530 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 61: The Double-edged Web http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 61.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Perhaps one of the current benchmarks for gauging when a Web technology has migrated from the cluttered desks of the technorati to the dining tables of the chatterati is if it becomes a topic for BBC Radio 4's <em>The Moral Maze</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>]. More accustomed to discussing matters such as child-rearing or a controversial pronouncement of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the panel members who, over the years have ranged from the liberal to the harrumphing illiberal (and in one case, both at the same time), recently did battle over Twitter [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 editorial richard waller bbc jisc mimas national library of wales sherpa ukoln university of birmingham university of york ojims yodl yodl-ing access control ajax archives blog curation data data set digital library digital repositories digitisation fedora commons framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository javascript ldap mobile national library open access provenance repositories research search technology software technorati twitter web 2.0 xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1505 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Repositories for Creative and Applied Arts Research: The Kultur Project http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/gray <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/gray#author1">Andrew Gray</a> discusses institutional repositories and the creative and applied arts specifically in relation to the JISC-funded Kultur Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Those involved in Higher Education (HE) may have started to sense the approach of Institutional Repositories (IRs). Leaving aside the unfortunate nomenclature, IRs are becoming a fact of life in many educational institutions. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has invested £14million in the Repositories and Preservation Programme [<a href="#1">1</a>] and the recent Repositories and Preservation Programme Meeting in Birmingham [<a href="#2">2</a>] celebrated the end of over 40 individual repository projects under the Start Up and Enhancement [<a href="#3">3</a>] strand.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/gray" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article andrew gray google jisc monash university university for the creative arts university of southampton university of the arts london vads archives avi blog copyright data digital repositories digitisation dissemination eprints flash framework ftp google docs higher education institutional repository intellectual property jpeg metadata mp3 multimedia open access photoshop preservation provenance quicktime rae repositories research schema software standards streaming tiff url usability video wav windows windows media Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1489 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk E-Curator: A 3D Web-based Archive for Conservators and Curators http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/hess-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author1">Mona Hess</a>, <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author2">Graeme Were</a>, <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author3">Ian Brown</a>, <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author4">Sally MacDonald</a>, <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author5">Stuart Robson</a> and <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author6">Francesca Simon Millar</a> describe a project which combines 3D colour laser scanning and e-Science technologies for capturing and sharing very large 3D scans and datasets about museum artefacts in a secure computing environment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction:_The_Evolving_Field_of_Artefact_Documentation">Introduction: The Evolving Field of Artefact Documentation</h2> <p>Digital heritage technologies promise a greater understanding of cultural objects cared for by museums. Recent technological advances in digital photography and image processing not only offer a high level of documentation, they also provide powerful analytical tools for conservation monitoring of cultural objects.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/hess-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article francesca simon millar graeme were ian brown mona hess sally macdonald stuart robson ahrc british museum jisc ukoln university college london university of cambridge ahessc e-curator archives big data cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation dissemination e-science file format gpl graphics identifier infrastructure internet explorer licence metadata multimedia namespace open source preservation provenance rdbms research software standards visualisation Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1491 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Archives 2.0: If We Build It, Will They Come? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/palmer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/palmer#author1">Joy Palmer</a> discusses some of the opportunities and tensions emerging around Archives 2.0, crowd-sourcing, and archival authority.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/palmer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article joy palmer amazon d-lib magazine jisc mimas oclc research information network the national archives university of manchester archives hub wikipedia archives blog cataloguing copac curation data digital archive digital library digitisation ead interoperability metadata preservation provenance research resource discovery search engine optimisation search technology social software software web 2.0 wiki Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1492 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk NSF Workshop on Cyberinfrastructure Software Sustainability http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/nsf-2009-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/nsf-2009-03-rpt#author1">Paul Walk</a> reports on a two-day NSF-sponsored workshop held at Indiana University, on 26-27 March 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I was recently invited to attend a 'Software Sustainability Workshop', organised by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and hosted by Indiana University at its University Place Conference Center in Indianapolis. The invitation, which included a call for position papers, described the event as follows:</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/nsf-2009-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 event report paul walk ibm indiana university johns hopkins university massachusetts institute of technology microsoft national science foundation ncsa sakai ukoln university of bath wikipedia apache cloud computing e-learning e-science framework gpl higher education infrastructure intellectual property licence linux open source operating system provenance repositories research software video Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1478 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Time to Change Our Thinking: Dismantling the Silo Model of Digital Scholarship http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/nichols <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue58/nichols#author1">Stephen G. Nichols</a> argues that humanists need to replace the silo model of digital scholarship with collaborative ventures based on interoperability and critical comparison of content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>There is no longer anything exotic about digital humanities projects. Almost every humanities faculty has at least one. But like humanities disciplines themselves, digital projects too often exist in lonely splendour, each in its own sub-disciplinary silo. Classicists have their project(s), Middle English scholars post Chaucer and Langland manuscripts, while French medievalists have sites for major genres or authors from the troubadours to Christine de Pizan, and beyond. The situation is not appreciably different for digital humanities projects dealing with modern topics.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/nichols" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue58 feature article stephen g. nichols arl bnf johns hopkins university mla national science foundation stanford university university of cambridge accessibility archives cloud computing curation data data set database digital library digitisation graphics interoperability licence provenance repositories research social networks standards Fri, 30 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1455 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Preservation and Archiving Special Interest Group (PASIG) Fall Meeting http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/sun-pasig-2008-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue58/sun-pasig-2008-11-rpt#author1">Paul Walk</a> reports on the Sun-PASIG winter meeting held in Baltimore, USA on 18-20 November 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I had managed to miss the previous two PASIG (Preservation and Archiving Special Interest Group)[<a href="#1">1</a>] meetings, so was delighted to find myself finally able to participate by attending the Fall meeting. Conveniently the event was arranged to follow immediately the SPARC Digital Repositories meeting [<a href="#2">2</a>], also held in Baltimore, and which I also attended.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/sun-pasig-2008-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue58 event report paul walk amazon cni georgia institute of technology library of congress national science foundation pasig stanford university sun microsystems ukoln university of alberta university of bath university of california berkeley university of illinois ndiipp repomman archives cloud computing curation data data management data model data set database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dspace e-science fedora commons flash frbr infrastructure interoperability metadata open access preservation provenance rdf repositories research search technology soa software sparql sword protocol url Fri, 30 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1458 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk OAI-ORE, PRESERV2 and Digital Preservation http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/rumsey-osteen <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/rumsey-osteen#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> and <a href="/issue57/rumsey-osteen#author2">Ben O'Steen</a> describe OAI-ORE and how it can contribute to digital preservation activities.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The new framework for the description and exchange of aggregations of Web resources, OAI-ORE, had its European release in April 2008 [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Amongst its practical uses, OAI-ORE has a role to play in digital preservation and continued access to files. This article describes the basic outline of the framework and how it can support the PRESERV2 project digital preservation model of provision of preservation services and interoperability for digital repositories.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/rumsey-osteen" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article ben osteen sally rumsey jisc oai the national archives university of oxford brii preserv aggregation archives curation data data management data mining dcmi digital preservation digital record object identification digital repositories dissemination droid dspace eprints fedora commons framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability metadata oai-ore oai-pmh ontologies open archives initiative preservation provenance rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web software standards uri url video vocabularies web browser web resources web storage xml Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1435 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk VIF: Version Identification Workshop http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/vif-wrkshp-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/vif-wrkshp-rpt#author1">Sarah Molloy</a> reports on a half-day workshop on the use of the Version Identification Framework, held in Hatton Garden, London on 22 April 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/vif-wrkshp-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 event report sarah molloy jisc science and technology facilities council sherpa university of hull university of leeds university of london university of southampton university of warwick opendoar vif application profile archives data data mining data set database dspace eprints fedora commons framework identifier institutional repository interoperability metadata open access provenance repositories research scholarly works application profile software standards taxonomy Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1396 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Computerization Movements and Technology Diffusion http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> reviews a fascinating introduction to over two decades of research into computerisation movements.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This book is all about computerisation movements – CMs, for short. CMs are social, professional, intellectual and/or scientific movements [<a href="#1">1</a>], collective movements fuelled by a group of people who share a vision of the way that things should be, and are ready to promote that vision. For some readers, this may sound a little abstract, so I will begin with a little descriptive preamble, which others are welcome to <a href="#skip">skip</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 review emma tonkin information today ukoln content management framework infrastructure interoperability open source provenance repositories research semantic web social software software Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1402 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Version Identification: A Growing Problem http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/puplett <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/puplett#author1">Dave Puplett</a> outlines the issues associated with versions in institutional repositories, and discusses the solutions being developed by the Version Identification Framework (VIF) Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/puplett" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article dave puplett jisc london school of economics microsoft niso science and technology facilities council university of leeds datashare geospatial application profile images application profile opendoar vif aggregation application profile bibliographic data data data set dublin core eprints fedora commons framework geospatial data gis identifier learning objects metadata multimedia open access open source preservation provenance repositories research scholarly works application profile search technology software taxonomy video vocabularies Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1371 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk DRIVER: Building the Network for Accessing Digital Repositories Across Europe http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/feijen-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/feijen-et-al#author1">Martin Feijen</a>, <a href="/issue53/feijen-et-al#author2">Wolfram Horstmann</a>, <a href="/issue53/feijen-et-al#author3">Paolo Manghi</a>, <a href="/issue53/feijen-et-al#author4">Mary Robinson</a> and <a href="/issue53/feijen-et-al#author5">Rosemary Russell</a> present an outline of the DRIVER Project and its achievements so far in supporting and enhancing digital repository development in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction:_Why_DRIVER_Is_Needed">Introduction: Why DRIVER Is Needed</h2> <p>OpenDOAR [<a href="#1">1</a>] lists over 900 Open Access repositories worldwide. Approximately half of them are based in Europe, most of which are institutional repositories. Across Europe many more repositories are being set up and supported by national and regional initiatives such as the Repositories Support Project [<a href="#2">2</a>] in the UK and IREL-Open [<a href="#3">3</a>] in Ireland.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/feijen-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article martin feijen mary robinson paolo manghi rosemary russell wolfram horstmann goettingen state and university library oai sherpa surffoundation ukoln university of bath university of nottingham opendoar repositories support project aggregation archives authentication bibliographic data browser cql curation data data management database digital repositories dublin core e-research framework infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability metadata multimedia oai-pmh open access open archives initiative preservation provenance repositories research search technology soap software srw standards web standards wiki Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1349 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Further Experiences in Collecting Born Digital Archives at the Wellcome Library http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/hilton-thompson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/hilton-thompson#author1">Chris Hilton</a> and <a href="/issue53/hilton-thompson#author2">Dave Thompson</a> continue discussing plans for the engagement with born digital archival material at the Wellcome Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/hilton-thompson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article chris hilton dave thompson wellcome library wellcome trust archives born digital data digital archive digital curation digitisation fedora commons framework infrastructure metadata preservation provenance repositories software Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1351 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Googlepository and the University Library http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/manuel-oppenheim <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/manuel-oppenheim#author1">Sue Manuel</a> and <a href="/issue53/manuel-oppenheim#author2">Charles Oppenheim</a> discuss the concept of Google as a repository within the wider context of resource management and provision in Further and Higher Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The development of an increasing array of tools for storing, organising, managing, and searching electronic resources poses some interesting questions for those in the Higher Education sector, not least of which are: what role do repositories have in this new information environment? What effect is Google having on the information-seeking strategies of students, researchers and teachers? Where do libraries fit within the information continuum? And ultimately, what services should they look to provide for their users?</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/manuel-oppenheim" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article charles oppenheim sue manuel alt cetis d-lib magazine dcc google ieee jisc loughborough university massachusetts institute of technology oreilly university of cambridge archives hub jisc information environment midess open library access control aggregation algorithm archives bibliographic data blog born digital cataloguing copyright data database digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination e-learning google search higher education identifier ieee lom information architecture information retrieval learning object metadata learning objects librarything lom metadata multimedia open access preservation provenance repositories research resource discovery search technology social software standards tagging usability web services web standards Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1352 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk DC 2007 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/dc-2007-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/dc-2007-rpt#author1">Ann Apps</a> reports on DC2007, the International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications, held 27-31 August 2007 in Singapore.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The main theme of this year's international conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications was 'Application Profiles: Theory and Practice' [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The conference was hosted by the Singapore National Library Board and held in the Intercontinental Hotel, which was across the road from the superb National Library building.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/dc-2007-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 event report ann apps fao iso jisc mimas national library of new zealand niso oclc university of manchester w3c jisc information environment accessibility application profile archives collection description controlled vocabularies data dcap dcmi digital object identifier digital repositories doi domain model dublin core dublin core metadata initiative framework identifier infrastructure interoperability knowledge management metadata metadata schema registry national library ontologies owl preservation provenance rdf research resource description and access schema semantic web service registry software standards tagging topic map urn video vocabularies web standards wiki xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1354 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The KIDMM Community's 'MetaKnowledge Mash-up' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kidmm-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/kidmm-rpt#author1">Conrad Taylor</a> reports on the KIDMM knowledge community and its September 2007 one-day conference about data, information and knowledge management issues.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="About_KIDMM">About KIDMM</h2> <p>The British Computer Society [<a href="#1">1</a>], which in 2007 celebrates 50 years of existence, has a self-image around engineering, software, and systems design and implementation. However, within the BCS there are over fifty Specialist Groups (SGs); among these, some have a major focus on 'informatics', or the <em>content</em> of information systems.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kidmm-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 event report conrad taylor anglia ruskin university bsi google library of congress nhs ordnance survey the national archives ukoln university of bolton university of london university of manchester wikipedia adobe algorithm archives ascii born digital browser cataloguing controlled vocabularies csv cybernetics data data management data mining data set database digital archive digital asset management dublin core e-government e-learning ead eportfolio foia framework geospatial data gis google maps identifier information retrieval information society interoperability location-based services metadata mis named entity recognition ontologies portfolio preservation provenance repositories research search technology sgml software standards tagging text mining thesaurus vocabularies wiki xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1358 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Capacity Building: Spoken Word at Glasgow Caledonian University http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/wallace-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/wallace-et-al#author1">Iain Wallace</a>, <a href="/issue52/wallace-et-al#author2">Graeme West</a> and <a href="/issue52/wallace-et-al#author3">David Donald</a> give an account of the origins, nature and establishment of Spoken Word Services at Glasgow Caledonian University.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) the <em>Spoken Word</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], a project in the JISC / NSF Digital Libraries in the Classroom (DLiC) programme [<a href="#2">2</a>], was conceived in 2001-2002 in response to a set of pedagogical and institutional imperatives. A small group of social scientists had, since the 1990s, been promoting the idea of using 'an information technology-intensive learning environment' to recapture some of the traditional aspirations of Scottish Higher Education, in particular independent, critical and co-operative learning [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/wallace-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article david donald graeme west iain wallace apple bbc edina glasgow caledonian university google jisc michigan state university mpeg sakai staffordshire university university of chicago university of hull university of oxford university of strathclyde dlic remap project repomman vsm wikipedia accessibility adobe archives atom authentication bibliographic data browser cataloguing copyright curation data data set database digital library digital media digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination dublin core fedora commons flash flash video google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability java javascript learning objects licence lom metadata mp3 multimedia mysql open access open data open source php plone podcast portal preservation provenance repositories research rss search technology software standards streaming tagging uk lom core url usability video wav web browser web services wiki xml Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1334 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 51: Democratising Cultural Heritage http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne 51.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having emerged from the political arguments of the 1990s about what culture could be funded and whether it was better to fund soccer or opera, we have moved into an age where, in the UK at least, there are arguments as to what actually constitutes British culture. Fortunately more people are deciding to do culture for themselves than remain passive witnesses to the pundits' debate. The place where they are doing it is online and they are not waiting to see whether their offering attracts the experts' approval - and sometimes, admittedly, one might argue more's the pity.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 editorial richard waller jisc microsoft ukoln university of leeds w3c citeulike preserv accessibility authentication bibliographic data bibliographic database blog copyright database e-learning e-research framework html information architecture infrastructure openid opera passwords portal provenance repositories research rss search technology software uri video virtual research environment web 2.0 youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1304 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Supporting Creativity in Networked Environments: The COINE Project http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/brophy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/brophy-et-al#author1">Geoff Butters</a>, <a href="/issue51/brophy-et-al#author2">Amanda Hulme</a> and <a href="/issue51/brophy-et-al#author3">Peter Brophy</a> describe an approach to enabling a wide range of users to create and share their own stories, thus contributing to the development of cultural heritage at the local level.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/brophy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article amanda hulme geoff butters peter brophy bbc cerlim jisc manchester metropolitan university the national archives accessibility archives copyright data database digitisation graphics information society infrastructure interoperability mac os metadata passwords preservation provenance research schema search technology thesaurus url usability video youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1305 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk