Overview of content related to 'citeulike' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/14613/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Connecting Researchers at the University of Bath http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author1">Jez Cope</a> and <a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author2">Geraldine Jones</a> describe a recent series of events introducing social media to research students at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Connected Researcher initiative is a response to both local and sector-wide events. At the University of Bath groups of postgraduate research students from Chemistry and Social Sciences separately expressed an interest in finding out how to profile their own research and establish links with other researchers in their fields.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article geraldine jones jez cope google research information network university of bath university of derby citeulike wikipedia bibliographic data blog curation database digital media dissemination doi e-learning hashtag higher education ict identifier microblogging mobile preservation research rss search technology social software social web syndication twitter video virtual research environment web 2.0 web services wiki wordpress Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1621 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Science in Transition http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews an edited volume published to commemorate the founding of the Institute of Information Scientists in 1958.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><p>Until it joined with the Library Association in 2002 to form the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), the Institute of Information Scientists was a professional organisation for those primarily working in scientific and technical information work. The chapters in this volume were first published in 2008 as a special issue of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> to commemorate the founding of the institute in 1958. In accordance with this, many of the chapters provide a retrospective - sometimes even anecdotal - overview of developments in information science in the UK since the 1950s. While the approach of the volume is thematic, a major focus is on key initiatives and individuals, the latter including such luminaries as Jason Farradane, Cyril Cleverden and Karen Spärk Jones.</p> <p>Following a guest editorial by Brian Vickery, there are sixteen chapters in the book. While each chapter stands alone, conceptually the volume moves - with some exceptions - from largely retrospective reviews of past progress in information science by scholars of the older generation to overviews of current trends and technologies by their younger colleagues. Vickery's editorial tries to place information science in its historical context, explaining how the advent of digital computers and the Internet has transformed the discipline dramatically while simultaneously making its future more uncertain. This is also a view articulated by several of the volume contributors.</p> <p>The opening chapter is an attempt by Jack Meadows to discern the main research themes in UK information science over the past 50 years. A survey of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> and other journals showed that the predominant theme was information retrieval, but that there was also important research being undertaken into information seeking, communication and bibliometrics. The chapter also tries to delineate some of the factors affecting information science research in the UK, for example noting the negative consequences of the demise of the old British Library Research and Development Department in the 1990s [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He concludes, however, on a positive note, pointing out that 'activities that were relatively marginal decades ago - such as automated information retrieval - are now at the heart of major growth industries' (p. 17). He also notes that the widening interest in information science concepts has brought in researchers from other disciplines - which is probably one of the key lessons of the whole book. In the second chapter, David Bawden (City University) again uses the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> as a means of exploring the development of the information science discipline itself, focusing on the underlying philosophical bases of the subject proposed by scholars like Bertie Brookes and Jason Farradane.</p> <p>The third chapter is by Stella Dextre Clarke. This is a retrospective of fifty years of knowledge organisation work in the information science domain that takes a partly anecdotal approach, attempting to illustrate 'how it felt to work in those times' (p. 45). Perhaps the best aspect of this is that it enables Dextre Clarke to give the reader a feel for what information retrieval could be like in the card-based pre-computer age. The chapter opens with a brief overview of the state of subject classification in the late 1950s, noting the continued practical predominance of enumerative schemes like the Dewey Decimal Classification while the theoreticians S. R. Ranganathan and Henry E. Bliss were still working away developing their (then) revolutionary ideas of 'faceted classification.' The focus then changes to the development of thesauri, noting the importance of Jean Aitchison's pioneering work on thesaurus construction. Dextre Clarke then provides a very brief overview of the role of controlled vocabularies in the early information retrieval tests conducted as part of the Aslib-Cranfield Research Project, a topic covered in more detail in the following chapter. Finally, moving to the present day, Dextre Clarke notes the continued importance of controlled vocabularies in the form of taxonomies and provides some pointers for a future Semantic Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review michael day british library cilip edinburgh napier university indiana university library association london school of economics loughborough university microsoft stm ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of wolverhampton citeulike bibliographic data bibliometrics blog controlled vocabularies copyright data data mining data set database dewey decimal digital library ejournal facebook flickr ict information retrieval institutional repository metadata national library open access privacy repositories research rss second life semantic web social software standards thesaurus twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1555 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Collecting Evidence in a Web 2.0 Context http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/chapman-russell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/chapman-russell#author1">Ann Chapman</a> and <a href="/issue60/chapman-russell#author2">Rosemary Russell</a> describe the challenge of collecting evidence for a study of how Web 2.0 is being used in the UK HE sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/chapman-russell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article ann chapman rosemary russell google jisc ukoln university of bath citeulike good apis jorum sharegeo wikipedia archives blog cataloguing data database facebook flickr geospatial data gis google scholar google search higher education librarything mashup netvibes pageflakes passwords podcast repositories research rss search technology second life social networks software standards twitter video vle web 2.0 web app web development wiki wordpress youtube Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1488 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Collaborative and Social Tagging Networks http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/tonkin-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/tonkin-et-al#author1">Emma Tonkin</a>, <a href="/issue54/tonkin-et-al#author2">Edward M. Corrado</a>, <a href="/issue54/tonkin-et-al#author3">Heather Lea Moulaison</a>, <a href="/issue54/tonkin-et-al#author4">Margaret E. I. Kipp</a>, <a href="/issue54/tonkin-et-al#author5">Andrea Resmini</a>, <a href="/issue54/tonkin-et-al#author6">Heather D. Pfeiffer</a> and <a href="/issue54/tonkin-et-al#author7">Qiping Zhang</a> gather a series of international perspectives on the practice of social tagging of documents within a community context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Social tagging, which is also known as collaborative tagging, social classification, and social indexing, allows ordinary users to assign keywords, or tags, to items. Typically these items are Web-based resources and the tags become immediately available for others to see and use. Unlike traditional classification, social tagging keywords are typically freely chosen instead of using a controlled vocabulary.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/tonkin-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article andrea resmini edward m. corrado emma tonkin heather d. pfeiffer heather lea moulaison margaret e. i. kipp qiping zhang amazon college of new jersey d-lib magazine google iso long island university new mexico state university rutgers university ukoln university of cambridge university of illinois citeulike aggregation blog cloud computing controlled vocabularies data data set digital library framework hypertext information architecture information retrieval interoperability knowledge management metadata mobile phone multimedia ontologies research search technology social networks software standards subject heading tag cloud tagging technorati thesaurus usability video vocabularies web 2.0 wiki Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1372 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 51: Democratising Cultural Heritage http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne 51.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having emerged from the political arguments of the 1990s about what culture could be funded and whether it was better to fund soccer or opera, we have moved into an age where, in the UK at least, there are arguments as to what actually constitutes British culture. Fortunately more people are deciding to do culture for themselves than remain passive witnesses to the pundits' debate. The place where they are doing it is online and they are not waiting to see whether their offering attracts the experts' approval - and sometimes, admittedly, one might argue more's the pity.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 editorial richard waller jisc microsoft ukoln university of leeds w3c citeulike preserv accessibility authentication bibliographic data bibliographic database blog copyright database e-learning e-research framework html information architecture infrastructure openid opera passwords portal provenance repositories research rss search technology software uri video virtual research environment web 2.0 youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1304 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Citeulike: A Researcher's Social Bookmarking Service http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/emamy-cameron <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/emamy-cameron#author1">Kevin Emamy</a> and <a href="/issue51/emamy-cameron#author2">Richard Cameron</a> describe a tool that helps researchers gather, collect and share papers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3 where the ref 4 is suppressed since information on the projects mentioned not provided by publication date: references were re-ordered don to 6 REW --><!-- v3 where the ref 4 is suppressed since information on the projects mentioned not provided by publication date: references were re-ordered don to 6 REW --><p>This article describes Citeulike, a fusion of Web-based social bookmarking services and traditional bibliographic management tools. It discusses how Citeulike turns the linear 'gather, collect, share' process inherent in academic research into a circular 'gather, collect, share and network' process, enabling the sharing and discovery of academic literature and research papers.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/emamy-cameron" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article kevin emamy richard cameron amazon google ieee citeulike wikipedia archives bibliographic data bibliographic database bibliographic record blog browser data data mining data set database google analytics jstor linux metadata opac open source portal research rss search technology social software software standards tagging url web 2.0 web browser web services Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1311 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Opening Up OpenURLs with Autodiscovery http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/chudnov <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/chudnov#author1">Daniel Chudnov</a>, <a href="/issue43/chudnov#author2">Richard Cameron</a>, <a href="/issue43/chudnov#author3">Jeremy Frumkin</a>, <a href="/issue43/chudnov#author4">Ross Singer</a> and <a href="/issue43/chudnov#author5">Raymond Yee</a> demonstrate a 'gather locally, share globally' approach to OpenURLs and metadata autodiscovery in scholarly and non-scholarly environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Library users have never before had so many options for finding, collecting and sharing information. Many users abandon old information management tools whenever new tools are easier, faster, more comprehensive, more intuitive, or simply 'cooler.' Many successful new tools adhere to a principle of simplicity - HTML made it simple for anyone to publish on the Web; XML made it simple for anyone to exchange more strictly defined data; and RSS made it simple to extract and repurpose information from any kind of published resource [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/chudnov" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 feature article daniel chudnov jeremy frumkin raymond yee richard cameron ross singer d-lib magazine georgia institute of technology google ims ims global learning consortium jisc library of congress niso oai oclc oregon state university sakai university of california berkeley yale university citeulike iesr jisc information environment archives bibliographic data bison blog browser cataloguing cookie data database digital library firefox framework google scholar html identifier infrastructure interoperability javascript lucene metadata mets mods oai-pmh open archives initiative openurl personalisation repositories research rss schema search technology service registry sfx software sru srw standards technorati uddi url usability web browser web resources web services wordpress wsdl xml Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1136 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk