Overview of content related to 'university of oregon' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/14912/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en The Tablet Symposium http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tablet-symp-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tablet-symp-rpt#author1">Ryan Burns</a> reports on a one-day symposium on tablet computers, e-readers and other new media objects held at the University of Sussex on 10 April 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Tablet Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] brought together researchers and practitioners to examine questions about uses of tablet computers and e-readers across many walks of life, including academic, artistic, pedagogical, corporate and everyday contexts.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tablet-symp-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report ryan burns apple open university university college london university of hertfordshire university of melbourne university of oregon university of sussex university of sydney android curation data ebook facebook ipad mobile multimedia operating system research social networks standards tablet computer taxonomy usability video wireless Tue, 09 Jul 2013 14:32:10 +0000 lisrw 2477 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 65: Ariadne in Search of Your Views http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 65.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may have already noted in the editorial section of this issue a link to the Reader Survey which I ask you seriously to consider completing, whether you are a frequent <em>Ariadne</em> reader or are reading the Magazine for the first time. Moves are afoot to give <em>Ariadne</em> some effort towards improvements in your experience of the publication and I cannot emphasise enough the value I place on suggestions and comments from you. I am very keen to know what readers value and dislike in <em>Ariadne</em>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 editorial richard waller dcc google griffith university jisc queensland university of technology university of oregon university of oxford wellcome trust devcsi eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih aggregation ajax archives browser curation data data management data set database digital archive droid e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service interoperability ipad javascript metadata mobile multimedia ontologies open source preservation provenance repositories research resource description and access schema search technology software tagging taxonomy uri visualisation web 2.0 web portal xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1647 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk From Passive to Active Preservation of Electronic Records http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/briston-estlund <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/briston-estlund#author1">Heather Briston</a> and <a href="/issue65/briston-estlund#author2">Karen Estlund</a> provide a narrative of the process adopted by the University of Oregon in order to integrate electronic records management into its staff's workflow.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2 of article incorporating edits from XHTML view 20101123 - rew --><!-- v2 of article incorporating edits from XHTML view 20101123 - rew --><p>Permanent records of the University of Oregon (UO) are archived by the Special Collections and University Archives located within the University Libraries. In the digital environment, a new model is being created to ingest, curate and preserve electronic records. This article discusses two case studies working with the Office of the President to preserve electronic records.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/briston-estlund" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article heather briston karen estlund google microsoft oais the national archives university of oregon adobe archives blog cataloguing content management data management digital asset management digital preservation digital record object identification digital repositories droid dspace dvd ead eportfolio file format identifier infrastructure institutional repository microsoft office ocr optical character recognition preservation privacy repositories standards tagging video web 2.0 xml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1584 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Data Services for the Sciences: A Needs Assessment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/westra#author1">Brian Westra</a> describes a data services needs assessment for science research staff at the University of Oregon.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Computational science and raw and derivative scientific data are increasingly important to the research enterprise of higher education institutions. Academic libraries are beginning to examine what the expansion of data-intensive e-science means to scholarly communication and information services, and some are reshaping their own programmes to support the digital curation needs of research staff. These changes in libraries may involve repurposing or leveraging existing services, and the development or acquisition of new skills, roles, and organisational structures [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>Scientific research data management is a fluid and evolving endeavour, reflective of the high rate of change in the information technology landscape, increasing levels of multi-disciplinary research, complex data structures and linkages, advances in data visualisation and analysis, and new tools capable of generating or capturing massive amounts of data.</p> <p>These factors can create a complex and challenging environment for managing data, and one in which libraries can have a significant positive role supporting e-science. A needs assessment can help to characterise scientists' research methods and data management practices, highlighting gaps and barriers [<a href="#2">2</a>], and thereby improve the odds for libraries to plan appropriately and effectively implement services in the local setting [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Methods">Methods</h2> <p>An initiative to conduct a science data services needs assessment was developed and approved in early 2009 at the University of Oregon. The initiative coincided with the hiring of a science data services librarian, and served as an initial project for the position. A researcher-centric approach to the development of services was a primary factor in using an assessment to shape services [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The goals of the project were to:</p> <ul> <li>define the information services needs of science research staff;</li> <li>inform the Libraries and other stakeholders of gaps in the current service structures; and</li> <li>identify research groups or staff who would be willing to participate in, and whose datasets would be good subjects for, pilot data curation projects.</li> </ul> <p>The library took the lead role on the assessment, consulting with other stakeholders in its development and implementation. Campus Information Services provided input on questions regarding campus information technology infrastructure, and to avoid unnecessary overlap with other IT service activities focused on research staff. The Vice President for Research and other organisational units were advised of the project and were asked for referrals to potential project participants. These units provided valuable input in the selection of staff contacts. Librarian subject specialists also suggested staff who might be working with data and interested in participating. Librarians responsible for digital collections, records management, scholarly communications, and the institutional repository were involved in the development of the assessment questions and project plan.</p> <p>The questions used in the assessment were developed through an iterative process. A literature and Web review located several useful resources and examples. These included the University of Minnesota Libraries' study of scientists' research behaviours [<a href="#3">3</a>], and a study by Henty, et al. on the data management practices of Australian researchers [<a href="#5">5</a>]. The Data Audit Framework (DAF - now called the Data Asset Framework) methodology was considered to provide the most comprehensive set of questions with a field-tested methodology and guidelines [<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>][<a href="#8">8</a>][<a href="#9">9</a>][<a href="#10">10</a>][<a href="#11">11</a>]. The stages outlined in the DAF methodology were also instructive, although we elected not to execute a process for identifying and classifying assets (DAF Stage 2), since the organisational structure of our departments and institutes are not conducive to that level of investigation. From the beginning it was recognised that recruitment of scientists was based as much on their willingness to participate as their responsibility for any specific class or type of research-generated data.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article brian westra arl edina imperial college london jisc johns hopkins university microsoft uk data archive university of edinburgh university of essex university of glasgow university of illinois university of oregon university of oxford university of washington archives authentication csv curation data data management data set data visualisation database digital curation digital library drupal e-research e-science file format framework gis higher education infrastructure institutional repository metadata mysql open access provenance repositories research usability visualisation Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1568 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DC 2006: Metadata for Knowledge and Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/dc-2006-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/dc-2006-rpt#author1">Julie Allinson</a>, <a href="/issue49/dc-2006-rpt#author2">Rachel Heery</a>, <a href="/issue49/dc-2006-rpt#author3">Pete Johnston</a> and <a href="/issue49/dc-2006-rpt#author4">Rosemary Russell</a> report on DC 2006, the sixth international conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications, held 3 - 6 October 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/dc-2006-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 event report julie allinson pete johnston rachel heery rosemary russell bnf british library cclrc cetis cilip cornell university eduserv ieee iso jisc ukoln university of bath university of oregon agrovoc jisc information environment aacr2 accessibility application profile archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing collection description controlled vocabularies data database dcmi digital archive digital library dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-learning eprints framework frbr ieee lom institutional repository interoperability javascript json lcsh learning object metadata learning objects lom marc metadata metadata model mods national library ontologies open access owl plain text preservation repositories research resource description and access schema search technology semantic web simple dublin core skos social networks software standards tagging uml vocabularies web app xml xml schema Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1277 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk