Overview of content related to 'metadata' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/95/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=christopher%20blackwell&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Image 'Quotation' Using the C.I.T.E. Architecture http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author1">Christopher Blackwell</a> and <a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author2">Amy Hackney Blackwell</a> describe with examples a digital library infrastructure that affords canonical citation for 'quoting' images, useful for creating commentaries, arguments, and teaching tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Quotation is the heart of scholarly argument and teaching, the activity of bringing insight to something complex by focused discussion of its parts. Philosophers who have reflected on the question of quotation have identified two necessary components: a name, pointer, or citation on the one hand and a reproduction or repetition on the other. Robert Sokolowski calls quotation a 'curious conjunction of being able to name and to contain' [<a href="#1">1</a>]; V.A. Howard is more succinct: quotation is 'replication-plus-reference' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. We are less interested in the metaphysical aspects of quotation than in the practical ones.</p> <p>The tools and techniques described here were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0916148 &amp; No. 0916421. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).</p> <h2 id="Quotation">Quotation</h2> <p>Quotation, when accompanied by citation, allows us to bring the reader's attention to bear on a particular part of a larger whole efficiently and without losing the surrounding context. A work of Biblical exegesis, for example, can quote or merely cite 'Genesis 1:29' without having to reproduce the entire Hebrew Bible, or even the Book of Genesis; a reader can resolve that citation to a particular passage about the creation of plants, and can see that passage as a discrete node at the bottom of a narrowing hierarchy: Hebrew Bible, Genesis, Chapter 1, Verse 29. We take this for granted.</p> <p>Quoting a text is easy. But how can we quote an image? This remains difficult even in the 21st century where it is easy to reproduce digital images, pass them around through networks, and manipulate them on our desks.</p> <p>A scholar wishing to refer to a particular part of an image will generally do something like this: She will open one version of an image in some editing software, select and 'cut' a section from it, and 'paste' that section into a document containing the text of her commentary or argument. She might add to the text of her argument a reference to the source of the image. The language that describes this process is that of mechanical work&nbsp;– cutting and pasting&nbsp;– rather than the language of quotation and citation. The process yields a fragment of an image with only a tenuous connection to the ontological hierarchy of the object of study. The same scholar who would never give a citation to '<em>The Bible</em>, page 12' rather than to 'Genesis 1:29' will, of necessity, cite an image-fragment in a way similarly unlikely to help readers find the source and locate the fragment in its natural context.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article amy hackney blackwell christopher blackwell clemson university furman university google harvard university national academy of sciences national science foundation university of virginia gnu homer multitext archives browser creative commons css data digital library doi dublin core firefox free software html identifier infrastructure java licence metadata namespace openoffice research safari schema software standards stylesheet tei thesaurus url urn vocabularies web browser xhtml xml xsl xslt zip Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1620 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk