Overview of content related to 'ahrc' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/14936/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en KAPTUR the Highlights: Exploring Research Data Management in the Visual Arts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author1">Leigh Garrett</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author2">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author3">Carlos Silva</a> and <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author4">Anne Spalding</a> describe the exploration of the importance and nature of research data in the visual arts and requirements for their appropriate curation and preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>KAPTUR (2011-13) [<a href="#1">1</a>], funded by Jisc and led by the Visual Arts Data Service, was a collaborative project involving four institutional partners: the Glasgow School of Arts; Goldsmiths, University of London; University for the Creative Arts; and the University of the Arts London.&nbsp;Research data have in recent years become regarded as a valuable institutional resource and their appropriate collection, curation, publication and preservation as essential. This has been driven by a number of internal and external forces, and all UK Research Councils now require it as a condition of funding [<a href="#2">2</a>]. As a result, a network of data repositories has emerged [<a href="#3">3</a>], some funded by research councils and others by institutions themselves. However, at the outset of the project, research data management practice within the visual arts appeared to operate rather <em>ad hoc</em> with none of the specialist arts institutions within the UK having either implemented research data management policies [<a href="#4">4</a>] or established research data management systems.&nbsp; KAPTUR sought to:</p> <ul> <li>investigate the nature of visual arts research data;</li> <li>make recommendations for its effective management;</li> <li>develop a model of best practice applicable to both specialist institutions and arts departments within multidisciplinary institutions; and</li> <li>apply, test and refine the model of best practice across the four institutional partner institutions.</li> </ul> <p>This paper outlines the background and context of the project; explores the nature of visual arts research data; details the outcomes of the user and technical review; and describes the work which underwent within the partner institutions around policy formation and staff engagement.</p> <p>Led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), in collaboration with the Glasgow School of Art, Goldsmiths College, University of the Arts London and University for the Creative Arts, and funded by Jisc, KAPTUR [<a href="#1">1</a>] sought to ‘...discover, create and pilot a sectoral model of best practice in the management of research data in the [visual] arts.’ [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-garrett-et-al/logo-2.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 210px;" title="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" /></p> <p>Recent years have witnessed an increasing recognition across the Higher Education sector that research data are a valuable resource and therefore its appropriate curation and preservation are essential.&nbsp; In addition, wider societal and political forces meant that research councils, teams and researchers were coming under increasing pressure to make publicly funded data freely available.&nbsp; As such the publication of research data was increasingly becoming a requirement of funding, for example the Arts and Humanities Research Council [<a href="#6">6</a>] and Medical Research Council [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Equally important was the need for increased data transparency, and to enable researchers to access existing datasets to test the validity and reliability of the data and associated research methods; to reinterpret the data; and to preserve the data for future scrutiny. In response, many universities, for example the University of Edinburgh, had established institutional research data management systems to support the deposit and preservation of research data, whilst others were in the process of piloting services, for example the University of Leicester, and establishing policies and procedures which actively support researchers to manage their data effectively, such as Canterbury Christ Church University and Northumbria University. In addition, many of the research councils themselves had established repositories, for example the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex, which curates research data in the social sciences and humanities, and the Natural Environment Research Council, which supports a network of data centres across its disciplinary areas.</p> <p>However, given the emerging landscape, at the outset of the project it was clear that very little was known about the collection, curation and usage of research data in the visual arts:&nbsp;none of the specialist arts institutions had research data management policies or infrastructure in place and evidence collected at the time indicated that practice was at best, <em>ad hoc</em>, left to individual researchers and teams with limited support or guidance. Little work had been undertaken to understand the distinctive and varied nature of research data in the visual arts, and even less to understand how these data could be collected, curated, preserved and exploited, or their potential impact assessed.</p> <p>By its very nature, research in the visual arts is highly complex and varied, often comprising a wide variety of outputs and formats which present researchers, repository managers and institutions with many discipline-specific difficulties. The methods and processes which generate this research are just as varied and complex.&nbsp; Research endeavour in the visual arts relies heavily on the physical artefact: sketchbooks, logbooks, journals, and workbooks.&nbsp; Alongside these data, a wide range of related project documentation and protocols are also created.&nbsp; While technology may offer considerable potential to support the safe storage and preservation of research and related data, and to enhance access, the highly distinctive nature of the visual arts and its research methods also present enormous technical problems with regard to formats, standards, roles and responsibilities, and policies.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article anne spalding carlos silva leigh garrett marie-therese gramstadt ahrc canterbury christ church university courtauld institute of art datacite dcc falmouth university glasgow school of art goldsmiths college hefce jisc northumbria university uk data archive university for the creative arts university of bath university of birmingham university of edinburgh university of essex university of leicester university of london university of the arts london vads kaptur keepit mrc scarlet archives augmented reality blog cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set digitisation eprints framework higher education infrastructure metadata oer open access preservation repositories research semantic web software video Mon, 01 Jul 2013 17:50:23 +0000 lisrw 2461 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UK Reading Experience Database http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt#author1">Bethan Ruddock</a> reports from the launch event for the UK Reading Experience Database, held at the Betty Boothroyd Library, the Open University, Milton Keynes, on 24 February 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><p>I was invited down to the Open University (OU) Betty Boothroyd Library in Milton Keynes for the launch of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. I had been asked to attend to talk about the LOCAH Project and Linked Data, but I was also looking forward to learning about the RED Project.</p> <p>This was the first of two launch days, and was designed for librarians, archivists, and information managers. A second launch day for teachers in Higher Education was to be held in London the next day.</p> <h2 id="What_Is_UK_RED">What Is UK RED?</h2> <p>The tagline for UK RED is 'the experience of reading in Britain from 1450 to 1945', and the database brings together reading experiences, making them both searchable and browsable. What is a reading experience? It is evidence of anyone alive between the mid-15th and 20thcenturies having read and interacted with a book or other piece of writing, such as magazines, newspapers, letters - even playbills and advertisements. Ownership alone is not enough; there must be something to show that the person in question actually read the work or at least part of it.</p> <p>This information can be found in a number of places - a printed book review would be an obvious example. The RED team also find many entries in diaries. Such entries can range from simple lists of books that someone has read over the course of a year, to detailed descriptions of when and where they read a particular book, and how they felt about it. Often diary entries are not actually about the book; it is mentioned in passing and in the context of a number of other activities.</p> <p>While the owner's name on the flyleaf is not itself enough to justify a 'reading experience', annotations to the text are, as they show that the person has actually interacted with the text. Of course, you then have to consider whether the person whose name is on the flyleaf is the same as the person doing the annotating!</p> <p>RED is much more than a list of 'people who have read books'. The database aims to bring out as much information as possible about the reading experience. The interface to submit a new entry allows you to specify where the reading was taking place, all the way down to a particular room in a particular house. It also aims to identify if the reading was silent or aloud, alone or with other people; whether the book was owned by the reader, a library book, borrowed, or even stolen. All these data are then used to build up a rich database of information on who was reading what (and how!) in Britain.</p> <p>UK RED is not just concerned with reading experiences within Britain: team members also look at the reading experiences of citizens abroad. <strong>Edmund King</strong>, Research Associate, Reading Experience Database, OU, told us that, as a consequence, there are fascinating examples of what captured British soldiers were reading in prisoner-of-war (POW) camps as well as examples of what they were not allowed to read. Books in Welsh and Pakistani were banned, as well as atlases and anything about the Russian revolution. I do not know if there are corresponding records for what prisoners in UK POW camps were forbidden to read, but it would be very interesting to find out.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report bethan ruddock ahrc eduserv jisc mimas newcastle university open university talis ukoln university of manchester university of oxford archives hub dbpedia locah lucero wikipedia apache archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copac copyright data data set database dissemination flickr higher education intellectual property linked data linux open source php provenance research software sparql sql twitter video Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1629 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute Reflections at the End of an Era http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author1">Angela Joyce</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author2">Linda Kerr</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author3">Tim Machin</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author4">Paul Meehan</a> and <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author5">Caroline Williams</a> look back at the history and achievements of Intute, and reflect on lessons learned as the service enters its final year.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article angela joyce caroline williams linda kerr paul meehan tim machin ahrc bbc british library google hea heriot-watt university intute jisc linden lab mimas ukoln university of bristol university of glamorgan university of huddersfield university of manchester university of oxford wellcome trust automatic metadata generation eevl elib jisc information environment mobile internet detective sosig wikipedia blog cataloguing curation data database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education metadata mobile personalisation research resource discovery search technology second life software tagging twitter vim vocabularies web 2.0 web browser web resources widget Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1564 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk An Attack on Professionalism and Scholarship? Democratising Archives and the Production of Knowledge http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/flinn <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/flinn#author1">Andrew Flinn</a> describes some recent developments in democratising the archive and asks whether these developments really deserve to be viewed as a threat to professional and academic standards.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2, based on author responses to edited version; 2010-02-12-17-27-rew --><!-- version 2, based on author responses to edited version; 2010-02-12-17-27-rew --><p>This article was originally delivered as a paper for the 'Archives 2.0: Shifting Dialogues Between Users and Archivists' conference organised by the University of Manchester's ESRC Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC) in March 2009. The paper came at an opportune time. I was absorbed in a research project examining independent and community archival initiatives in the UK and exploring the possibilities of user- (or community-)generated and contributed content for archives and historical research [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Furthermore I had just received referees' comments on a proposed research project examining the potential impact of the latter developments on professional archival practice. Whilst two of the reports were very positive, one was more than a little hostile. The reviewer was scathing about the focus of the proposed research on the democratisation of knowledge production, dismissing the notion as part of a short-term political agenda that was detrimental to the idea of scholarship and one with which the archive profession should not concern itself. In particular, scorn was reserved for the idea that, in future archive catalogues, many 'voices' might be enabled 'to supplement or even supplant the single, authoritative, professional voice', an idea which was described as being, <em>in extremis</em>, 'a frontal attack on professionalism, standards and scholarship'.</p> <p>At the time of receiving this review and considering my response, I was also beginning to write my paper for the conference and had already decided that my theme would be democratising the archive. However I realised that these comments neatly encapsulated a powerful and genuine strand of thinking within the archive profession and academia more generally, which one might loosely term 'traditional'. Although there are now many user-generated content archive and heritage projects in existence, and terms such as participatory archives, Archives 2.0 and even History 2.0 are an increasingly common part of professional discourse [<a href="#2">2</a>], some, perhaps many, archivists and scholars remain deeply sceptical about the need for a democratisation of the archive and of scholarship.</p> <p>In the end the research project was supported by the AHRC despite the critical review and has now commenced [<a href="#3">3</a>]. However, in this brief article I will try to respond to this strand of thinking by, first identifying what is meant by the democratisation of the archive and why advocates of such a thing believe it to be important. I will then briefly introduce two different but linked developments (independent or community archives and user- or community-generated content), which in harness with new technologies might play a role in such a democratisation, and in so doing challenge aspects of traditional archival thinking and practice. Finally I will offer a few thoughts on the shifts in our understanding of the archive and the resistance to those shifts. Ultimately, I will suggest that rather than viewing this debate as one between the expert (or the academic or the professional) and the crowd, it is in the concept of communities that the key might be found. A successful democratised and participatory archive is one which recognises that all those who come into contact with the archive (directly or indirectly), the 'community of the record', can and do affect our understanding and knowledge of that archive.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/flinn" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article andrew flinn ahrc alt mla smithsonian institution the national archives university college london university of manchester university of oxford archives hub wikipedia archives blog cataloguing curation data digitisation dissemination framework identifier preservation repositories research web 2.0 wiki Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1524 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk E-Curator: A 3D Web-based Archive for Conservators and Curators http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/hess-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author1">Mona Hess</a>, <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author2">Graeme Were</a>, <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author3">Ian Brown</a>, <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author4">Sally MacDonald</a>, <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author5">Stuart Robson</a> and <a href="/issue60/hess-et-al#author6">Francesca Simon Millar</a> describe a project which combines 3D colour laser scanning and e-Science technologies for capturing and sharing very large 3D scans and datasets about museum artefacts in a secure computing environment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction:_The_Evolving_Field_of_Artefact_Documentation">Introduction: The Evolving Field of Artefact Documentation</h2> <p>Digital heritage technologies promise a greater understanding of cultural objects cared for by museums. Recent technological advances in digital photography and image processing not only offer a high level of documentation, they also provide powerful analytical tools for conservation monitoring of cultural objects.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/hess-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article francesca simon millar graeme were ian brown mona hess sally macdonald stuart robson ahrc british museum jisc ukoln university college london university of cambridge ahessc e-curator archives big data cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation dissemination e-science file format gpl graphics identifier infrastructure internet explorer licence metadata multimedia namespace open source preservation provenance rdbms research software standards visualisation Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1491 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk E-Publication and Open Access in the Arts and Humanities in the UK http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/heath-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/heath-et-al#author1">Malcolm Heath</a>, <a href="/issue54/heath-et-al#author2">Michael Jubb</a> and <a href="/issue54/heath-et-al#author3">David Robey</a> review recent UK discussions and evidence about e-publishing and open access, their impact and implications for researchers in the arts and humanities.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/heath-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article david robey malcolm heath michael jubb ahds ahrc de montfort university google institute of historical research jisc microsoft oxford university press research information network university of birmingham university of cambridge university of leeds university of oxford university of wales university of york rioja accessibility archives curation data data set database digitisation dissemination ebook ejournal higher education ict interoperability jstor metadata open access preservation rae repositories research thesaurus usability Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1370 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Newsline http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="TASI_Workshops_in_November_and_December">TASI Workshops in November &amp; December</h3> <p>There are currently places available on the following Nov/Dec workshops:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 news and events shirley keane ahrc british library cilip cni coalition for networked information dcc deutsches filminstitut emory university google humboldt university berlin imperial college london jisc kings college london mla national library of the netherlands oai oais oclc tasi the national archives ukoln university college london university of bristol university of cambridge university of glasgow university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of southampton datashare jisc information environment repositories research team repositories support project rosa rsp accessibility application profile archives authentication bibliographic data bibliometrics blog cloud computing copyright curation data data mining data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination dspace e-learning e-research e-science ebook eprints fedora commons foi framework graphics html identifier information society infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability intranet learning objects linked data linux mashup metadata microformats national library open access open data open source operating system personalisation photoshop portal preservation privacy repositories research rss search technology second life semantic web soa social networks software tagging taxonomy usability visualisation web 2.0 wiki windows xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1646 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 24 Hour Museum: From Past to Future http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/pratty <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>As 24 Hour Museum rebuilds and looks outwards to new partnerships, <a href="/issue52/pratty#author1">Jon Pratty</a> looks at challenges faced over the last seven years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>24 Hour Museum [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a successful and sustainable cultural Web site. Type the word 'museum' into Google UK and up it pops as a top five search result. Unlike the other top sites, all national museums or galleries, 24HM's remit covers the whole country, in eclectic subject areas, reaching a wide variety of audiences with simple and accessible content.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/pratty" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article jon pratty ahrc bbc google mla oai university of cambridge university of leicester wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives content management data database digital media further education html infrastructure interoperability knowledge management metadata portal research rss search technology semantic web soap software syndication tagging url vocabularies web 2.0 web services widget windows xml Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1331 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events1"></a>Building Trust in Digital Repositories Using the DRAMBORA Toolkit</p> <p>Pre-SOA Conference Workshop:<br />Building Trust in Digital Repositories Using the DRAMBORA Toolkit<br />27 August 2007, 11.00-16.00<br />The Queen's University of Belfast, Northern Ireland<br /><a href="http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/drambora-belfast-2007/">http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/drambora-belfast-2007/</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 news and events richard waller ahrc andrew w mellon foundation carnegie mellon university cilip cornell university dcc de montfort university eblida google hea ieee intute jisc jisc collections kings college london mla national library of the netherlands national science foundation oclc oxford university press queens university belfast rnib tasi the national archives university of glasgow university of nottingham university of oxford university of virginia worldcat aggregation archives blog cataloguing copyright curation data database digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories e-science ebook fedora commons flickr foi framework information architecture information retrieval infrastructure intellectual property marc metadata multimedia national library ontologies open access open source photoshop portal preservation prism privacy repositories research resource management resource sharing soa social networks social software social web software tagging tei web 2.0 web app web development web resources web standards youtube Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1342 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The JISC Annual Conference 2007 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/jisc-conf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/jisc-conf-rpt#author1">Philip Pothen</a> and colleagues provide an overview of the proceedings of this Spring's JISC Annual Conference.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Opening_Keynote_Address">Opening Keynote Address</h2> <p>The 2007 JISC conference began with a welcome from JISC Executive Secretary <strong>Dr Malcolm Read</strong> who thanked the more than 600 delegates for attending the conference, held for the fifth year running at the ICC in Birmingham.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/jisc-conf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 event report philip pothen ahrc amazon bbc becta british library cetis dcc digital preservation coalition edina eduserv google hefce jisc jisc collections jisc infonet liverpool john moores university microsoft mimas mla nhs oxford brookes university rnib robert gordon university staffordshire university uk data archive ukerna ukoln university of greenwich university of oxford university of southampton university of wales university of wolverhampton wellcome trust e-framework gmsa jisc information environment memetic perseus accessibility aggregation archives browser cataloguing copyright crm curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination e-business e-learning e-science ejournal eportfolio flickr foi foia framework further education higher education ict infrastructure intellectual property interoperability knowledge base mobile mobile phone open access open source openid personalisation portfolio preservation rae repositories research search technology second life sms soa social software software tagging video virtual research environment vle web 2.0 web browser web development web resources wireless application profile youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1315 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a><a name="events1"></a></p> <h3 id="Introduction_to_Federated_Searching_Technology_and_Developments">Introduction to Federated Searching Technology &amp; Developments</h3> <p>Date: 11 May 2007<br />Venue: Conference Room, Southport College, Mornington Road, Southport, PR9 0TT<br />Delegate Fee: £50.00</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 news and events richard waller ahrc amazon british library british museum cerlim cilip edge hill university google imperial college london jisc kings college london microsoft mla newcastle university nhs oclc sakai tilburg university ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of london university of york w3c iwmw jisc information environment accessibility algorithm amazon web services api archives blog born digital cataloguing cd-rom copyright data data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination e-learning e-science framework further education higher education ict information architecture infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer interoperability knowledge management metadata microformats mobile national library open access open source podcast portal preservation rdf rdfa repositories research resource sharing rss search technology social software software standardisation tagging usability video videoconferencing virtual research environment web 2.0 web app web development web portal web services wiki xcri xhtml xml xslt youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1318 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute: The New Best of the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/williams <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/williams#author1">Caroline Williams</a> describes Intute in the context of the online information environment and outlines aspirations for the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/williams" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article caroline williams ahrc google hefce ilrt intute jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas oreilly sherpa ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of bristol university of huddersfield university of leeds university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome trust ebank uk eprints uk jisc information environment accessibility blog cataloguing data data set database digital library digital repositories eprints file sharing higher education infrastructure personalisation podcast repositories research resource discovery search technology semantic web software vle web 2.0 web resources web services wiki Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1247 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Tasks of the AHDS: Ten Years on http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/dunning <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/dunning#author1">Alastair Dunning</a> reviews 10 years in the history of the Arts and Humanities Data Service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/dunning" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article alastair dunning ahds ahrc de montfort university google imperial college london jisc kings college london loughborough university oais sherpa tasi ukoln university of sheffield aria ict guides sherpa digital preservation archives cataloguing copyright data data set database digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation e-science framework gis ict infrastructure interoperability jpeg metadata multimedia ontologies preservation repositories research resource management search technology sql standards tiff web services xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1252 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retrospective on the RDN http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/hiom <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/hiom#author1">Debra Hiom</a>, in the first of a two-part series on the Resource Discovery Network, looks back at the development of the RDN and its activities to date.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction"><a name="introduction"></a>Introduction</h2> <p>This article will describe the history of the Resource Discovery Network (RDN) [<a href="#1">1</a>], charting the development of subject gateways in the UK since 1993 to the present day. To help set the history of the gateways in the wider context of the resource discovery landscape in the last decade or so, readers are encouraged to refer to Lorcan Dempsey's recent article on the development of digital libraries [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/hiom" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 feature article debra hiom ahrc british library hea heriot-watt university ilrt intute jisc kings college london ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of bristol university of hull university of london university of manchester university of oxford university of reading university of surrey bril cain dner eevl elib ihr-info jisc information environment sosig subject portals project aggregation application profile archives cache cataloguing database digital library digitisation dublin core framework ftp further education higher education interoperability lom metadata portal research resource discovery search technology software standards subject gateway vocabularies web resources z39.50 Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1229 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Projects Into Services: The UK Experience http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/brophy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/brophy#author1">Peter Brophy</a> reviews the experience of the UK academic sector in turning digital library projects into sustainable services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction:_The_First_Wave">Introduction: The First Wave</h2> <p>It is worth remembering that there is a long history of successful commercialisation of digital library R&amp;D projects in the UK. While there are probably even earlier examples, the obvious instances are the Birmingham Libraries Co-operative Mechanisation Project (BLCMP) and the South-West Academic Libraries Co-operative Automation Project (SWALCAP) from the 1960s.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/brophy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article peter brophy ahrc british library edina eduserv jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas mla oclc talis university of bath dner elib heron iesr jisc information environment jorum archives authentication bibliographic data cataloguing copac data data set database digital library framework further education higher education internet explorer interoperability opac open archives initiative openurl research resource discovery service registry sfx web resources Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1205 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Virtual Research Environments: Overview and Activity http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/fraser <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue44/fraser#author1">Michael Fraser</a> provides an overview of the virtual research environment (VRE) and introduces three JISC-funded projects in which Oxford University is participating.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Virtual research environments (VREs), as one hopes the name suggests, comprise digital infrastructure and services which enable research to take place. The idea of a VRE, which in this context includes cyberinfrastructure and e-infrastructure, arises from and remains intrinsically linked with, the development of e-science.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/fraser" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue44 feature article michael a. fraser ahds ahrc andrew w mellon foundation blackboard cclrc cni dcc google ibm ieee jisc national grid service national science foundation oss watch royal netherlands academy of arts and sciences sakai sherpa university of east anglia university of hull university of leeds university of oxford university of portsmouth bvreh csage e-framework esp-grid isme jisc information environment memetic sakai vre portal demonstrator silchester roman town spie aggregation browser curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation dissemination document management e-learning e-science eprints framework ict information retrieval infrastructure interoperability java managed learning environment metadata open access open source portal preservation privacy rae repositories research schema search technology semantic web shibboleth software srw taxonomy uportal video virtual research environment visualisation vle web portal web services wiki wireless wsrp z39.50 Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1165 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Supporting Local Data Users in the UK Academic Community http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/martinez <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue44/martinez#author1">Luis Martinez</a> and <a href="/issue44/martinez#author2">Stuart Macdonald</a> discuss the differing areas of expertise within the UK data libraries with particular reference to their relationship with National Data Centres, the role of the Data Information Specialists Committee - UK (DISC-UK) and other information specialists.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article will report on existing local data support infrastructures within the UK tertiary education community. It will discuss briefly early methods and traditions of data collection within UK territories. In addition it will focus on the current UK data landscape with particular reference to specialised national data centres which provide access to large-scale government surveys, macro socio-economic data, population censuses and spatial data.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/martinez" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue44 feature article luis martinez stuart macdonald ahds ahrc edina google iassist jisc london school of economics mimas uk data archive university of edinburgh university of essex university of manchester university of oxford digimap jisc information environment sosig x4l sdit archives bibliographic data blog curation data data mining data set database digital media digital repositories digitisation dissemination e-learning geospatial data gis metadata microdata mobile mobile phone multimedia open access podcast preservation repositories research search technology semantic web software video web services wiki wireless wireless application profile Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1167 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk