Overview of content related to 'algorithm' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/15219/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en The Potential of Learning Analytics and Big Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/charlton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author1">Patricia Charlton</a>, <a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author2">Manolis Mavrikis</a> and <a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author3">Demetra Katsifli</a> discuss how the emerging trend of learning analytics and big data can support and empower learning and teaching.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:18.0pt;">&nbsp;‘<em>Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted</em>.’ Attributed to Albert Einstein</p> </blockquote><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/charlton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article demetra katsifli manolis mavrikis patricia charlton bbc google ieee jenzabar london knowledge lab algorithm big data browser cybernetics data data mining database doi e-learning educational data mining framework hadoop higher education identifier learning analytics learning design modelling mooc personalisation research search technology semantic web social networks software streaming video visualisation Mon, 08 Jul 2013 20:07:14 +0000 lisrw 2476 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataFinder: A Research Data Catalogue for Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> and <a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author2">Neil Jefferies</a> explain the context and the decisions guiding the development of DataFinder, a data catalogue for the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2012 the University of Oxford Research Committee endorsed a university ‘Policy on the management of research data and records’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Much of the infrastructure to support this policy is being developed under the Jisc-funded Damaro Project [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The nascent services that underpin the University’s RDM (research data management) infrastructure have been divided into four themes:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article neil jefferies sally rumsey bodleian libraries datacite jisc orcid uk data archive university of oxford dmponline impact project aggregation algorithm api archives cataloguing controlled vocabularies curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital archive digital library eprints fedora commons identifier infrastructure jacs linked data metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative passwords preservation purl rdf repositories research research information management schema search technology semantic web software solr standards uri url vocabularies wireframe xml Thu, 13 Jun 2013 20:23:22 +0000 lisrw 2446 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 'Does He Take Sugar?': The Risks of Standardising Easy-to-read Language http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author2">Dominik Lukeš</a> and <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author3">Alistair McNaught</a> highlight the risks of attempting to standardise easy-to-read language for online resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The idea that if we could only improve how we communicate, there would be less misunderstanding among people is as old as the hills. Historically, this notion has been expressed through things like school reform, spelling reform, publication of communication manuals, etc. The most radical expression of the desire for better understanding is the invention of a whole new artificial language with the intention of providing a universal language for humanity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article alistair mcnaught brian kelly dominik lukes alt alt-c bbc google jisc jisc techdis rdwg ukoln university of bath w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility algorithm blog bs8878 dissemination doi e-learning framework higher education internet explorer multimedia operating system research search technology software standards vocabularies wcag web 2.0 web resources Sat, 15 Dec 2012 15:18:25 +0000 lisrw 2431 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc1"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2012: Big Data, Big Deal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> attended the annual Eduserv Symposium on 10 May 2012 at the Royal College of Physicians, London to find out what are the implications of big data for Higher Education Institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The annual Eduserv Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] was billed as a ‘must-attend event for IT professionals in Higher Education’; the choice of topical subject matter being one of the biggest crowd-drawers (the other being the amazing venue: the Royal College of Physicians). The past few years have seen coverage of highly topical areas such as virtualisation and the cloud, the mobile university and access management.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report marieke guy amazon cetis dcc eduserv google jisc orcid oreilly oxford internet institute ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of california berkeley university of leicester university of oxford webtrends wellcome trust dealing with data impact project accessibility algorithm big data blog cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation gis google analytics google trends hadoop higher education infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer irods learning analytics mobile nosql oer open data open source remote working research twitter usb Mon, 30 Jul 2012 17:48:45 +0000 lisrw 2370 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Delivering Open Educational Resources for Engineering Design http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/darlington <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/darlington#author1">Mansur Darlington</a> describes two methods for presenting online OERs for engineering design that were developed and explored as part of the Higher Education Academy/JISC-funded DelOREs (Delivering Open Educational Resources for Engineering Design) Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A great deal of information is accessible on the World Wide Web which might be useful to both students and teachers. This material, however, is of variable quality and usefulness and is aimed at a wide spectrum of users. Moreover, such material rarely appears accompanied by guidance on how it may be most effectively used by potential users. To make information more usable it must be made more readily discoverable and there should be clear – and preferably machine-readable – indications of its provenance and quality and the legitimate uses to which it may be put.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/darlington" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article mansur darlington hea heriot-watt university jisc massachusetts institute of technology university of bath jorum mrc aggregation algorithm blog copyright creative commons data e-learning framework google search higher education html identifier intellectual property json licence metadata microdata oer provenance rdf repositories research resource description resource discovery rss schema search technology software standardisation standards taxonomy ukoer url vocabularies wordpress xhtml xml Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2234 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Peculiarities of Digitising Materials from the Collections of the National Academy of Sciences, Armenia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan#author1">Alan Hopkinson</a> and <a href="/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan#author2">Tigran Zargaryan</a> give an overview of their experience of digitising paper-based materials in the Fundamental Scientific Library of the National Academy of Sciences, Armenia including some of the obstacles encountered during image processing and optical character recognition.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>Early writing which first appeared as cuneiform protocols and then emerged in manuscript form and as printed materials is currently entering a new stage in its development – in the form of electronic publications.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article alan hopkinson tigran zargaryan abbyy british library eifl ifla jisc digital media microsoft middlesex university national academy of sciences national library of armenia stm tasi endangered archives programme adobe algorithm archives content management data database dcmi digital media digital repositories digitisation document format drupal dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative dvd eprints file format graphics infrastructure jpeg metadata national library ocr open access open source open standard optical character recognition preservation repositories research resource description schema software standards tiff Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2235 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of the Past of the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/fpw11-rpt#author1">Matthew Brack</a> reports on the one-day international workshop 'The Future of the Past of the Web' held at the British Library Conference Centre, London on 7 October, 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have all heard at least some of the extraordinary statistics that attempt to capture the sheer size and ephemeral nature of the Web. According to the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), more than 70 new domains are registered and more than 500,000 documents are added to the Web every minute [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This scale, coupled with its ever-evolving use, present significant challenges to those concerned with preserving both the content and context of the Web.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report matthew brack bbc british library bsi dcc digital preservation coalition google hanzo archives institute of historical research iso jisc kings college london library of congress nhs oxford internet institute the national archives university of oxford university of sheffield wellcome library arcomem internet archive memento uk government web archive aggregation algorithm api archives big data blog browser cache curation data data mining data model digital asset management digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi flickr identifier interoperability library data lod metadata preservation repositories research search technology social web software tag cloud twitter ulcc uri url visualisation warc wayback machine web resources wordpress youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:52 +0000 lisrw 2236 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Making Software - What Really Works, and Why We Believe It http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>While acknowledging the genuine usefulness of much of its content, <a href="/issue68/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> provides helpful pointers towards a second edition.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Published by O'Reilly, as part of the Theory In Practice series, this book is essentially academic in focus. It takes the form of thirty chapters. The first eight of these aim to provide an introduction to the area of software engineering, or more specifically, the collection and use of supporting evidence to support software engineering practices. These initial chapters are satisfyingly broad in scope, covering topics from human factors and personality to complexity metrics and the process of authoring a systematic review.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review emma tonkin oreilly ukoln university of bath aggregation algorithm api data data mining framework open source repositories research software Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 1650 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Data Science Professionals: A Global Community of Sharing http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/iassist-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p align="left"><a href="/issue68/iassist-2011-rpt#author1">Sylvie Lafortune</a> reports on the 37th annual conference of the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST), held over 30 May – 3 June 2011 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The IASSIST [<a href="#1">1</a>] Conference is a long-standing annual event which brings together researchers, statistical analysts as well as computer and information professionals interested in all aspects of research data, from discovery to reuse. This 37<sup>th</sup> meeting spanned five days where participants could attend workshops, IASSIST business meetings and a myriad of presentations. This year, the event focused on the sharing of tools and techniques which ‘improves capabilities across disciplines and along the entire data life cycle’.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/iassist-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report sylvie lafortune association of research libraries cessda datacite dcc iassist laurentian university massachusetts institute of technology national science foundation simon fraser university university of alberta yale university data without boundaries ddi algorithm archives controlled vocabularies data data citation data management data set digital repositories e-science framework gis identifier infrastructure lod metadata microdata ms word nesstar ontologies open data open source portal rdf repositories research schema software standards visualisation xml Mon, 27 Feb 2012 19:36:45 +0000 lisrw 2238 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Preparing Collections for Digitization http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a recently published book on the selection and preparation of archive and library collections for digitisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the past 20 years a great deal of information and guidance has been published to support cultural heritage organisations interested in undertaking digitisation projects. It is well over a decade now since the seminal Joint National Preservation Office and Research Libraries Group Preservation Conference on <em>Guidelines for digital imaging</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>] and standard introductory texts on digitisation like Anne Kenney and Oya Rieger's <em>Moving theory into practice</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>] and Stuart Lee's <em>Digital imaging: a practical handbook</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] are of a similar age - although still extremely useful. More up-to-date guidance is also available from services like JISC Digital Media [<a href="#4">4</a>] and the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --></p><p>Into this mix comes this new book on the preparation of collections for digitisation by Anna Bülow and Jess Ahmon, respectively Head of Preservation and Preservation Officer at The National Archives in Kew, London. The book claims to fill a gap in the existing literature, covering the practical aspects of safeguarding collections during image capture. It is perhaps worth noting upfront that the main focus of the book is on textual resources and documentary records, meaning that it would seem to be most useful for those working in the libraries and archives sectors.</p> <p>The first chapter provides some essential context, linking digitisation initiatives to the ongoing collection management practices of archives and libraries. It makes the general point that collection management has three main aspects: the <em>development</em>, <em>use</em> and <em>preservation</em> of collections.</p> <blockquote><p>Collection management involves making well informed decisions in order to prioritise actions and optimise the allocation of resources to maintain as much accessible value as possible. (p. 5)</p></blockquote> <p>Bülow and Ahmon argue that digital technologies have created new challenges for collection management, e.g. being partly responsible for a shift in attention from the development and <em>preservation</em> role to the development and <em>use</em> role. In practice, however, the link between the roles can be more nuanced. For example, in some cases digitisation may benefit conservation aims by helping to reduce the physical handling of fragile materials. In general, however, the authors feel that while the long-term sustainability challenges of digital content remain unresolved, "digitization of any book or document cannot be seen as a preservation measure for the original itself." (p. 8). The chapter concludes with a brief outline of the four phases of digitisation, each of which is made up of multiple steps. Of these, this book focuses primarily on the first two stages, covering all of the tasks that need to be done prior to imaging (e.g. selection, rights clearance, document preparation) as well as those associated with the digitisation process itself (imaging, quality assurance, transcription, metadata creation). The remaining two stages, chiefly facilitating use and sustainability, are not dealt with in any detail by this book.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review michael day harvard university jisc jisc digital media library association the national archives ukoln university of bath algorithm archives digital media digital preservation digitisation file format interoperability metadata preservation provenance research resource description standards tiff Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1633 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk What Is a URI and Why Does It Matter? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/thompson-hs#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> describes how recent developments in Web technology have affected the relationship between URI and resource representation and the related consequences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>URI stands for Uniform Resource Identifier, the official name for those things you see all the time on the Web that begin <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'http:'</font> or <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'mailto:'</font>, for example <span class="style1">http://<em>www.w3.org</em>/</span>, which is the URI for the home page of the World Wide Web Consortium [<a href="#1">1</a>]. (These things were called URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) in the early days of the Web, and the change from URL to URI is either hugely significant or completely irrelevant, depending on who is talking—I have nothing to say about this issue in this article. If you have never heard of URIs (or IRIs, the even more recent fully internationalised version), but are familiar with URLs, just think 'URL' whenever you see 'URI' below.)</p> <p>Historically, URIs were mostly seen as simply the way you accessed Web pages. These pages were hand-authored, relatively stable and simply shipped out on demand. More and more often that is no longer the case; in at least three different ways:</p> <ul> <li>Web pages for reading have been complemented by pictures for viewing, videos for watching and music for listening;</li> <li>The Web is now more than a conduit for information, it is a means to a variety of ends; we use it to <em>do</em> things: purchase goods and services, contribute to forums, play games;</li> <li>The things we access on the Web are often not hand-authored or stable, but are automatically synthesised from 'deeper' data sources on demand. Furthermore, that synthesis is increasingly influenced by aspects of the way we initiate the access.</li> </ul> <p>It is against this background that I think it is worth exploring with some care what URIs were meant to be, and how they are being used in practice. In particular, I want to look at what is to be gained from a better understanding of how other kinds of identifiers work.</p> <h2 id="The_Official_Version">The Official Version</h2> <p>Insofar as there are definitive documents about all this, they all agree that URIs are, as the third initial says, <strong>identifiers</strong>, that is, names. They identify <strong>resources</strong>, and often (although not always) allow you to access <strong>representations</strong> of those resources. (Words in <strong>bold</strong> are used as technical terms—their ordinary language meaning is in many cases likely to be more confusing than helpful.)</p> <p>'Resource' names a role in a story, not an intrinsically distinguishable subset of things, just as 'referent' does in ordinary language. Things are resources because someone created a URI to identify them, not because they have some particular properties in and of themselves.</p> <p>'Representation' names a pair: a character sequence and a media type. The <strong>media type</strong> specifies how the character string should be interpreted. For example JPG or HTML or MP3 would be likely media types for representations of an image of an apple, a news report about an orchard or a recording of a Beatles song, respectively.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article henry s. thompson apple google ietf university of edinburgh w3c wikipedia aggregation ajax algorithm browser cataloguing cookie data framework gif google maps html hypertext identifier javascript jpg metadata mp3 png rfc search technology semantic web uri url web 2.0 web app xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1589 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Infrastructure for Research Data Management at the University of Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author1">James A. J. Wilson</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author2">Michael A. Fraser</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author3">Luis Martinez-Uribe</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author4">Paul Jeffreys</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author5">Meriel Patrick</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author6">Asif Akram</a> and <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author7">Tahir Mansoori</a> describe the approaches taken, findings, and issues encountered while developing research data management services and infrastructure at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><p>The University of Oxford began to consider research data management infrastructure in earnest in 2008, with the 'Scoping Digital Repository Services for Research Data' Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Two further JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee)-funded pilot projects followed this initial study, and the approaches taken by these projects, and their findings, form the bulk of this article.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article asif akram james a. j. wilson luis martinez-uribe meriel patrick michael a. fraser paul jeffreys tahir mansoori ahds dcc google hefce ibm jisc microsoft oxford university computing services research information network uk data archive university of east anglia university of essex university of melbourne university of oxford university of southampton datashare eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih algorithm archives bibliographic data browser cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital asset management digital curation digital repositories e-research flash framework geospatial data gis google maps ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service intellectual property interoperability j2ee jpeg metadata multimedia open access portal preservation provenance qt repositories research research information management schema search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml xml schema Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1590 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Libraries for the Data Challenge http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/salo#author1">Dorothea Salo</a> examines how library systems and procedures need to change to accommodate research data.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Eager to prove their relevance among scholars leaving print behind, libraries have participated vocally in the last half-decade's conversation about digital research data. On the surface, libraries would seem to have much human and technological infrastructure ready-constructed to repurpose for data: digital library platforms and institutional repositories may appear fit for purpose. However, unless libraries understand the salient characteristics of research data, and how they do and do not fit with library processes and infrastructure, they run the risk of embarrassing missteps as they come to grips with the data challenge.</p> <p>Whether managing research data is 'the new special collections,'[<a href="#1">1</a>] a new form of regular academic-library collection development, or a brand-new library specialty, the possibilities have excited a great deal of talk, planning, and educational opportunity in a profession seeking to expand its boundaries.</p> <p>Faced with shrinking budgets and staffs, library administrators may well be tempted to repurpose existing technology infrastructure and staff to address the data curation challenge. Existing digital libraries and institutional repositories seem on the surface to be a natural fit for housing digital research data. Unfortunately, significant mismatches exist between research data and library digital warehouses, as well as the processes and procedures librarians typically use to fill those warehouses. Repurposing warehouses and staff for research data is therefore neither straightforward nor simple; in some cases, it may even prove impossible.</p> <h2 id="Characteristics_of_Research_Data">Characteristics of Research Data</h2> <p>What do we know about research data? What are its salient characteristics with respect to stewardship?</p> <h3 id="Size_and_Scope">Size and Scope</h3> <p>Perhaps the commonest mental image of research data is terabytes of information pouring out of the merest twitch of the Large Hadron Collider Project. So-called 'Big Data' both captures the imagination of and creates sheer terror in the practical librarian or technologist. 'Small data,' however, may prove to be the bigger problem: data emerging from individual researchers and labs, especially those with little or no access to grants, or a hyperlocal research focus. Though each small-data producer produces only a trickle of data compared to the like of the Large Hadron Collider Project, the tens of thousands of small-data producers in aggregate may well produce as much data (or more, measured in bytes) as their Big Data counterparts [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Securely and reliably storing and auditing this amount of data is a serious challenge. The burgeoning 'small data' store means that institutions without local Big Data projects are by no means exempt from large-scale storage considerations.</p> <p>Small data also represents a serious challenge in terms of human resources. Best practices instituted in a Big Data project reach all affected scientists quickly and completely; conversely, a small amount of expert intervention in such a project pays immense dividends. Because of the great numbers of individual scientists and labs producing small data, however, immensely more consultations and consultants are necessary to bring practices and the resulting data to an acceptable standard.</p> <h3 id="Variability">Variability</h3> <p>Digital research data comes in every imaginable shape and form. Even narrowing the universe of research data to 'image' yields everything from scans of historical glass negative photographs to digital microscope images of unicellular organisms taken hundreds at a time at varying depths of field so that the organism can be examined in three dimensions. The tools that researchers use naturally shape the resulting data. When the tool is proprietary, unfortunately, so may be the file format that it produced. When that tool does not include long-term data viability as a development goal, the data it produces are often neither interoperable nor preservable.</p> <p>A major consequence of the diversity of forms and formats of digital research data is a concomitant diversity in desired interactions. The biologist with a 3-D stack of microscope images interacts very differently with those images than does a manuscript scholar trying to extract the underlying half-erased text from a palimpsest. These varying affordances <em>must</em> be respected by dissemination platforms if research data are to enjoy continued use.</p> <p>One important set of interactions involves actual changes to data. Many sorts of research data are considerably less usable in their raw state than after they have had filters or algorithms or other processing performed on them. Others welcome correction, or are refined by comparison with other datasets. Two corollaries emerge: first, that planning and acting for data stewardship must take place throughout the research process, rather than being an add-on at the end; and second, that digital preservation systems designed to steward only final, unchanging materials can only fail faced with real-world datasets and data-use practices.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article dorothea salo california digital library dcc google oai university of wisconsin hydra algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog collection development cookie curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination drupal dspace dublin core eprints fedora commons file format flickr google docs infrastructure institutional repository interoperability library management systems linked data marc metadata mods oai-pmh open source preservation rdf repositories research search technology software standardisation standards sword protocol wiki xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1566 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Fourth DCC-RIN Research Data Management Forum http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rdmf4-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/rdmf4-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> and <a href="/issue63/rdmf4-rpt#author2">Graham Pryor</a> report on the fourth Research Data Management Forum event, on the theme "Dealing with Sensitive Data: Managing Ethics, Security and Trust," organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and Research Information Network (RIN) in Manchester, England, over 10 - 11 March, 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The fourth meeting of the Research Data Management Forum was held in Manchester on 10 and 11 March 2010, co-sponsored by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and the Research Information Network (RIN) [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The event took <em>Dealing with Sensitive Data: Managing Ethics, Security and Trust</em> as its theme [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Day_1:_10_March_2010">Day 1: 10 March 2010</h2> <p>DCC Associate Director <strong>Liz Lyon</strong> and RIN Head of Programmes <strong>Stéphane Goldstein </strong>welcomed the 45 delegates to the event, and began by introducing the keynote speaker, <strong>Iain Buchan</strong>, Professor of Public Health Informatics and Director of the Northwest Institute for Bio-Health Informatics (NIBHI), University of Manchester.</p> <p>Iain's talk was entitled <em>Opening Bio-Health Data and Models Securely and Effectively for Public Benefit</em>, and addressed three main questions:</p> <ol> <li>Where does the public's health need digital innovation?</li> <li>How can research curators promote this innovation (and what are the implications for Ethics, Security and Trust)?</li> <li>Is a framework required (covering the Social Contract and a digital and operational infrastructure)?</li> </ol> <p>A major theme in contemporary healthcare is that of <em>prevention</em>, and the need for proactive 'citizen buy-in' in order to avert NHS bankruptcy, a need supported by the use of 'persuasive technologies.' There is, however, a disconnect between the proactive public health model, and the reactive clinical model, and between expectations and available resource. 'Digital bridges', composed of new information technologies, are used to close the gaps between primary and secondary care, and to link disease-specific pathways.</p> <p>Iain touched on the impact that the data deluge is having on healthcare, reflecting that knowledge can no longer be managed solely by reading scholarly papers: the datasets and structures now extend far beyond any single study's observations. It is now necessary to build data-centred models, and to interrogate them for clusters via dedicated algorithms.</p> <p>However, there are holes in the datasets – for example, clinical trials exclude women of childbearing age and subjects undergoing certain treatments – hence electronic health records must be mined in order to fill these gaps, but this can be problematised by a lack of useful metadata, leading to 'healthcare data tombs,' repositories of health records lacking the contextual information to make them useful. Such data resources may be worse than useless: they may be misinformation.</p> <p>Comprehensible social networks with user-friendly interfaces can be used to improve the quality of metadata, based on the principle that more frequent use leads to better quality information. These networks can also bridge the Balkanisation that can occur when different groups tackle the same issue from varying standpoints (e.g. examining obesity from dietary- and exercise-based perspectives, but not sharing data across these boundaries.) The vision is for a joint, open, unifying and interdisciplinary framework and understanding wherein resources and expertise are shared. Of course, crossing these divides is accompanied by a raft of trust and security issues, and Iain described the various measures that are implemented to cope with them.</p> <p>Iain discussed the ethical issues surrounding wider use of health record information across the NHS, including consent (opt-in versus opt-out), the right (or lack thereof) of an investigator to go to a patient directly, and – perhaps most controversially – whether it was actually <em>unethical </em>to allow a health dataset to go under-exploited. If this is indeed the case, it follows that there is a real need to audit the demonstrable good that is derived from datasets.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rdmf4-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report graham pryor martin donnelly bbc dcc jisc nhs research information network the national archives uk data archive university of bristol university of edinburgh university of london university of manchester algorithm archives curation data data management data set digital archive digital curation foi framework higher education infrastructure licence metadata preservation repositories research social networks standards ulcc Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1551 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UK Institutional Repository Search: Innovation and Discovery http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/lyte-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/lyte-et-al#author1">Vic Lyte</a>, <a href="/issue61/lyte-et-al#author2">Sophia Jones</a>, <a href="/issue61/lyte-et-al#author3">Sophia Ananiadou</a> and <a href="/issue61/lyte-et-al#author4">Linda Kerr</a> describe an innovative tool to showcase UK research output through advanced discovery and retrieval facilities.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Institutional repositories are a major element of the Open Access movement. More specifically in research and education, the main purpose is to make available as much of the research output of an institution as possible.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/lyte-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article linda kerr sophia ananiadou sophia jones vic lyte google ibm intute jisc microsoft mimas oclc sherpa ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of cambridge university of manchester university of nottingham automatic metadata generation opendoar repomman wikipedia aggregation algorithm apache archives bibliographic data cloud computing data digital library e-research framework google scholar google search higher education information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository lucene metadata open access personalisation preservation repositories research search technology semantic web taxonomy text mining uima visualisation web 2.0 Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1511 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Learning to YODL: Building York's Digital Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/stracchino-feng <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/stracchino-feng#author1">Peri Stracchino</a> and <a href="/issue61/stracchino-feng#author2">Yankui Feng</a> describe a year's progress in building the digital library infrastructure outlined by Julie Allinson and Elizabeth Harbord in their article last issue.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/stracchino-feng" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article peri stracchino yankui feng iso jisc oracle sherpa university of york york university yodl yodl-ing access control accessibility agile development algorithm api archives authentication avi bmp copyright data database digital library digital repositories dvd fedora commons file format gif infrastructure java jpeg jpg ldap metadata mods mp3 multimedia open source png repositories research search technology software solaris tiff tomcat url usability vra vra core wav web services xacml xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1513 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Content Architecture: Exploiting and Managing Diverse Resources http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/isko-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/isko-2009-rpt#author1">Jane Stevenson</a> gives a personal view of the recent UK conference organised by the International Society of Knowledge Organization.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/isko-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report jane stevenson bbc coalition for networked information google microsoft mimas oracle university college london university of cambridge university of manchester archives hub dbpedia wikipedia algorithm api archives browser cloud computing controlled vocabularies data data set database digitisation e-research framework identifier infrastructure infrastructure as a service knowledge base linked data lod metadata microsoft office multimedia ontologies open data rdf research resource description search technology semantic web software uri vocabularies wordpress xml Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1499 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk To VRE Or Not to VRE?: Do South African Malaria Researchers Need a Virtual Research Environment? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer#author1">Heila Pienaar</a> and <a href="/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer#author2">Martie van Deventer</a> identify the requirements of a Virtual Research Environment (VRE) for malaria researchers in South Africa.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 4: 200906051150 to accommodate final table correction and fuller conclusion; awaitng ref 12 content-REW --><!-- version 4: 200906051150 to accommodate final table correction and fuller conclusion; awaitng ref 12 content-REW --><p>Worldwide, the research paradigm is in the process of expanding into eResearch and open scholarship. This implies new ways of collaboration, dissemination and reuse of research results, specifically via the Web. Developing countries are also able to exploit the opportunity to make their knowledge output more widely known and accessible and to co-operate in research partnerships.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article heila pienaar martie van deventer british library google jisc microsoft university of oxford university of pretoria bvreh ibvre mrc myexperiment algorithm blog browser curation data data management data set database dissemination document management e-learning e-research e-science framework google scholar graphics identifier infrastructure intellectual property java knowledge management ms word open source passwords portal portfolio repositories research search technology social networks software video virtual research environment web 2.0 wiki Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1469 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Publish and Cherish With Non-proprietary Peer Review Systems http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/waaijers <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/waaijers#author1">Leo Waaijers</a> urges Open Access-mandating research funders to extend OA publishing conditions by stimulating the market.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Now that publications are increasingly being enriched with databases and audio-visual elements, the need for non-proprietary review systems – that is, peer review systems that do not require the assignment of copyright to the organiser of the peer review i.e. the publisher - is becoming ever-more pressing. Although there is a steadily growing number of peer-reviewed Open Access journals [<a href="#1">1</a>] and an active Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association [<a href="#2">2</a>], the supply fails to keep pace with the demand.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/waaijers" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article leo waaijers michel wesseling sherpa stm university of utrecht wellcome trust romeo accessibility aggregation algorithm copyright data database dissemination framework ftp ict infrastructure open access preservation repositories research standards Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1473 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Copyright Angst, Lust for Prestige and Cost Control: What Institutions Can Do to Ease Open Access http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/waaijers-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/waaijers-et-al#author1">Leo Waaijers</a> writes about copyright, prestige and cost control in the world of open access while in two appendices Bas Savenije and Michel Wesseling compare the costs of open access publishing and subscriptions/licences for their respective institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 3 to accept 3 post-edits from author 2008-11-06 rew --><!-- version 3 to accept 3 post-edits from author 2008-11-06 rew --><p>The view that the results of publicly financed research should also be publicly accessible enjoys broad support in the academic community. Where their own articles are concerned, however, many authors hesitate to circulate them openly, for example by publishing them in Open Access journals or placing them in their institution's repository. They ask themselves whether that will not be at odds with the copyright rules and whether they will gain – or perhaps even lose – prestige.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/waaijers-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article leo waaijers michel wesseling dest elsevier google jisc lund university sherpa stm university of nottingham university of utrecht repec romeo wikipedia accessibility aggregation algorithm archives copyright database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education licence metadata open access passwords repositories research sfx software standards Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1429 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk What Happens If I Click on This?': Experiences of the Archives Hub http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/stevenson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/stevenson#author1">Jane Stevenson</a> describes the results of usability testing for the Archives Hub Web site.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2 2008-11-12 following Jane's final edits after her conference REW --><!-- version 2 2008-11-12 following Jane's final edits after her conference REW --><p>For online services, the importance of developing user-friendly and accessible Web sites is of paramount importance. This article is about user testing recently carried out by the Archives Hub [<a href="#1">1</a>], an online service run by Mimas [<a href="#2">2</a>], which is a national data centre that provides access to a whole range of online services for research, learning and teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/stevenson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article jane stevenson british library jisc mimas the national archives university of manchester archives hub wikipedia algorithm archives bibliographic data cataloguing collection description data database further education higher education hypertext preservation repositories research search technology standards usability Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1434 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Patent Failure - How Judges, Bureaucrats, and Lawyers Put Innovators at Risk http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/hannabuss-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/hannabuss-rvw#author1">Stuart Hannabuss</a> reviews a work which debunks some key assumptions about IPR and contends that current patent arrangements are ineffective.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Arguments about intellectual property rights (IPR) never go away, particularly now that technological and market changes drive the legal agendas along very fast. Nowhere faster probably than in software and business-methods patents, one of the more colourful aspects of a highly litigious field today. Much of the debate centres on the USA where R&amp;D spending is highest (particularly by big players, who incidentally have the most lucrative and best-defended patents).</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/hannabuss-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 review stuart hannabuss ibm microsoft algorithm bibliographic data data intellectual property open source software Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1445 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Networked Library Service Layer: Sharing Data for More Effective Management and Cooperation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/gatenby <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/gatenby#author1">Janifer Gatenby</a> identifies criteria for determining which data in various library systems could be more beneficially shared and managed at a network level.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/gatenby" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article janifer gatenby amazon google ietf ifla iso library of congress niso oai oclc worldcat aggregation algorithm archives atom authentication authority data bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright data data set database digital library digital repositories digitisation framework ftp identifier information retrieval interoperability knowledge base library data library management systems licence marc21 mashup metadata oai-pmh opac open archives initiative openurl portal preservation rdf repositories research resource management rfc rss schema search technology social networks software sru standardisation standards syndication uri url web portal web services z39.50 z39.88 Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1408 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Implementing Ex Libris's PRIMO at the University of East Anglia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/lewis <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/lewis#author1">Nick Lewis</a> outlines the University of East Anglia's experience of implementing Ex Libris's Primo, a new search and retrieval interface for presenting the library catalogue and institutional databases and e-resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/lewis" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 feature article nick lewis amazon british library google ifla oai oclc ukoln university of east anglia university of glasgow university of strathclyde aquabrowser worldcat ajax algorithm amazon web services authentication bibliographic data browser cataloguing data data management database digital repositories dublin core ejournal facebook frbr google scholar institutional repository interoperability javascript ldap library management systems linux marc metadata mobile open access portal refworks repositories resource discovery rss search technology sfx shibboleth software solaris standards tagging url web 2.0 web services xml Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1390 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Human-powered Search Engines: An Overview and Roundup http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> looks at the major contenders and discusses the value of this type of search engine.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article phil bradley apple bbc google intute wikipedia algorithm cloud computing data database facebook flickr java rss search technology software tag cloud technorati url video web 2.0 Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1367 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Programming Collective Intelligence http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/cliff-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/cliff-rvw#author1">Pete Cliff</a> tries to remember A-level mathematics as he dives into the fascinating world of machine learning and statistics and how to apply these techniques to Web-accessible datasets.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>When I was handed this book for review a colleague of mine said "rather you than me" and there is no doubt that <em>Programming Collective Intelligence</em> is probably not a book for everyone. However, if phrases like 'Bayesian filtering', 'Support-vector machines', 'Collaborative filtering' and 'Methods of clustering' do not deter you or better, engage your interest, then this work is well worth a look.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/cliff-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 review pete cliff ukoln university of bath ajax algorithm api blog data data set python research ruby web 2.0 Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1378 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Googlepository and the University Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/manuel-oppenheim <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/manuel-oppenheim#author1">Sue Manuel</a> and <a href="/issue53/manuel-oppenheim#author2">Charles Oppenheim</a> discuss the concept of Google as a repository within the wider context of resource management and provision in Further and Higher Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The development of an increasing array of tools for storing, organising, managing, and searching electronic resources poses some interesting questions for those in the Higher Education sector, not least of which are: what role do repositories have in this new information environment? What effect is Google having on the information-seeking strategies of students, researchers and teachers? Where do libraries fit within the information continuum? And ultimately, what services should they look to provide for their users?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/manuel-oppenheim" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article charles oppenheim sue manuel alt cetis d-lib magazine dcc google ieee jisc loughborough university massachusetts institute of technology oreilly university of cambridge archives hub jisc information environment midess open library access control aggregation algorithm archives bibliographic data blog born digital cataloguing copyright data database digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination e-learning google search higher education identifier ieee lom information architecture information retrieval learning object metadata learning objects librarything lom metadata multimedia open access preservation provenance repositories research resource discovery search technology social software standards tagging usability web services web standards Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1352 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The KIDMM Community's 'MetaKnowledge Mash-up' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kidmm-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/kidmm-rpt#author1">Conrad Taylor</a> reports on the KIDMM knowledge community and its September 2007 one-day conference about data, information and knowledge management issues.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="About_KIDMM">About KIDMM</h2> <p>The British Computer Society [<a href="#1">1</a>], which in 2007 celebrates 50 years of existence, has a self-image around engineering, software, and systems design and implementation. However, within the BCS there are over fifty Specialist Groups (SGs); among these, some have a major focus on 'informatics', or the <em>content</em> of information systems.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kidmm-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 event report conrad taylor anglia ruskin university bsi google library of congress nhs ordnance survey the national archives ukoln university of bolton university of london university of manchester wikipedia adobe algorithm archives ascii born digital browser cataloguing controlled vocabularies csv cybernetics data data management data mining data set database digital archive digital asset management dublin core e-government e-learning ead eportfolio foia framework geospatial data gis google maps identifier information retrieval information society interoperability location-based services metadata mis named entity recognition ontologies portfolio preservation provenance repositories research search technology sgml software standards tagging text mining thesaurus vocabularies wiki xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1358 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a><a name="events1"></a></p> <h3 id="Introduction_to_Federated_Searching_Technology_and_Developments">Introduction to Federated Searching Technology &amp; Developments</h3> <p>Date: 11 May 2007<br />Venue: Conference Room, Southport College, Mornington Road, Southport, PR9 0TT<br />Delegate Fee: £50.00</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 news and events richard waller ahrc amazon british library british museum cerlim cilip edge hill university google imperial college london jisc kings college london microsoft mla newcastle university nhs oclc sakai tilburg university ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of london university of york w3c iwmw jisc information environment accessibility algorithm amazon web services api archives blog born digital cataloguing cd-rom collection development copyright data data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination e-learning e-science framework further education higher education ict information architecture infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer interoperability knowledge management metadata microformats mobile national library open access open source podcast portal preservation rdf rdfa repositories research resource sharing rss search technology social software software standardisation tagging usability video videoconferencing virtual research environment web 2.0 web app web development web portal web services wiki xcri xhtml xml xslt youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1318 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk New Search Engines in 2006 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue50/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> takes a look at some of the search engines that he noticed in 2006 and provides quick assessments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 feature article phil bradley american library association bbc cilip google nhs wikipedia algorithm blog cloud computing creative commons data ebook privacy research search technology tag cloud url video windows zip Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1289 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 2nd International DCC Conference 2006: Digital Data Curation in Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/2-dcc-conf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Alexander Ball and <a href="/issue50/2-dcc-conf-rpt#author2">Manjula Patel</a> provide an overview of the second annual conference of the Digital Curation Centre.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The International Digital Curation Conference is held annually by the Digital Curation Centre [<a href="#1">1</a>] to bring together researchers in the field and promote discussion of policy and strategy. The second conference in this series [<a href="#2">2</a>], with the theme 'digital data curation in practice', was held between 21-22 November 2006 in Glasgow.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/2-dcc-conf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 event report alex ball manjula patel ahds badc coalition for networked information codata dcc jisc johns hopkins university massachusetts institute of technology niso sherpa the national archives ukoln university of bath university of cambridge university of chicago university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of illinois university of liverpool university of southampton university of stirling ebank uk preserv r4l algorithm application profile archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons curation data data management data mining data set database digital archive digital curation digital library digital preservation droid dspace e-science file format flickr framework frbr html infrastructure irods java metadata national library open access open data open source preservation repositories research software web services wiki Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1296 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Video Streaming of Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/tourte-tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/tourte-tonkin#author2">Greg Tourte</a> and <a href="/issue49/tourte-tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> describe the set-up and use of video streaming technology at the IWMW 2006 event.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The recent Institutional Web Management Workshop (<a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/webmaster-2006/">IWMW 2006</a>) [<a href="#1">1</a>] was a rare opportunity to try out a few new pieces of technology. With events that occur at a different location each year, it is often difficult to do so, since the infrastructure at the venue may not be suitable, and it is difficult to liase effectively with technical staff at the venue before the event in order to put all the necessary technology into place.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/tourte-tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 feature article emma tonkin greg tourte apache software foundation apple bbc ieee microsoft mpeg ukoln university of bath iwmw wikipedia algorithm asf avi cache codec data dvd file format flash flash video gpl graphics h.263 h.264 infrastructure interoperability licence linux mac os mp3 mpeg-1 mpeg-2 mpeg-4 multimedia ogg ogg theora preservation quicktime research software standards streaming theora usability video video codec video encoding web development windows windows media wireless wmv Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1274 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Immaculate Catalogues, Indexes and Monsters Too... http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/cig-2006-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/cig-2006-rpt#author1">David E. Bennett</a> reports on the three day residential CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group Annual Conference, University of East Anglia, during September 2006.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Restful accommodation and pleasant food prepared the delegates for the carefully balanced mix of social networking sessions and challenging seminars. Everyone was extremely friendly and most proved to be erudite socialites, networking in some cases with great assertiveness and sense of purpose.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/cig-2006-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 event report david e. bennett british library cilip goldsmiths college imperial college london loughborough university the national archives university of london university of manchester university of oxford aimss suncat aacr2 accessibility aggregation algorithm application profile archives ascii bibliographic data bibliographic record cataloguing controlled vocabularies database digital archive digital library e-government e-learning framework identifier interoperability isbd marc metadata multimedia ocr onix ontologies opac portal rae rdf repositories research resource description resource description and access resource discovery restful search technology semantic web software standards tagging taxonomy thesaurus unicode usability video vocabularies web resources xml z39.50 Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1279 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Foundation for Automatic Digital Preservation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/ferreira-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author1">Miguel Ferreira</a>, <a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author2">Ana Alice Baptista</a> and <a href="/issue48/ferreira-et-al#author3">Jose Carlos Ramalho</a> propose a Service-Oriented Architecture to help cultural heritage institutions to accomplish automatic digital preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Efforts to archive a large amount of digital material are being developed by many cultural heritage institutions. We have evidence of this in the numerous initiatives aiming to harvest the Web [<a href="#1">1-5</a>] together with the impressive burgeoning of institutional repositories [<a href="#6">6</a>]. However, getting the material inside the archive is just the beginning for any initiative concerned with the long-term preservation of digital materials.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/ferreira-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article ana alice baptista jose carlos ramalho miguel ferreira carnegie mellon university d-lib magazine dcc digital preservation coalition google harvard university ieee ifla library of congress oais oasis oclc premis the national archives university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of minho crib reposit algorithm archives ascii bibliographic data controlled vocabularies data data set database digital archive digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digital record object identification digital repositories dissemination document format drm droid dspace dublin core eprints fedora commons file format framework google trends graphics identifier interoperability java jstor knowledge base licence metadata open source operating system preservation preservation metadata repositories research semantic web service oriented architecture service registry soa soap software standards taxonomy uddi video vocabularies wayback machine web services wsdl xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1254 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a id="headlines" name="headlines"></a><a name="events1"></a></p> <h3 id="UKeiG_Training:_Developing_and_managing_e-book_collections">UKeiG Training: Developing and managing e-book collections</h3> <p>The UK eInformation Group (UKeiG), in co-operation with Academic and National Library Training Co-operative (ANLTC), are pleased to present a course entitled 'Developing and managing e-book collections', to be held in Training Room 1, The Library, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 on Tuesday, 12 September 2006 from 9.30a.m. to 4.30p.m.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 news and events richard waller ahds andrew w mellon foundation australian national university bbc british library bufvc cni coalition for networked information cornell university digital preservation coalition dublin city university edina eduserv google heriot-watt university imperial college london jisc kings college london loughborough university microsoft mimas mla museum of london national library of australia oai oxford university press premis tasi the national archives university college dublin university of oxford perx aggregation ajax algorithm archives blog browser content management copyright curation data digital audio digital curation digital preservation digital repositories digitisation droid e-science ebook ejournal file format firefox identifier intellectual property internet explorer interoperability latex licence metadata multimedia national library oai-pmh open source photoshop preservation preservation metadata repositories research resource discovery schema search technology software uri video xml Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1262 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk