Overview of content related to 'blog' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/156/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Visualising Building Access Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/brewerton-cooper <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/brewerton-cooper#author1">Gary Brewerton</a> and <a href="/issue73/brewerton-cooper#author2">Jason Cooper</a> describe how the imposition of visitor access control for safety purposes was developed into a useful management tool to measure library building usage.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>1980 the Pilkington Library (the Library) was opened to support the current and future information needs of students, researchers and staff at Loughborough University. The building had four floors, the lower three forming the Library Service and the top floor hosting the Department of Library and Information Studies. Entry to the building was via the third floor (having been built against a hill) and there was a turnstile gate to count the number of visitors. The entrance of the building was revamped in 2000 and the turnstile replaced with a people counter that used an infra-red beam.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/brewerton-cooper" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper loughborough university sconul w3c access control ajax api blog browser data database higher education html html5 internet explorer javascript jquery json library management systems mobile perl vocabularies web app xhtml Thu, 10 Jul 2014 14:57:04 +0000 lisrw 2531 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk LinkedUp: Linking Open Data for Education http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author1">Marieke Guy</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author2">Mathieu d’Aquin</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author3">Stefan Dietze</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author4">Hendrik Drachsler</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author5">Eelco Herder</a> and <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author6">Elisabetta Parodi</a> describe the activities carried out by the LinkedUp Project looking at the promotion of open data in education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the past, discussions around Open Education have tended to focus on content and primarily Open Educational Resources (OER), freely accessible, openly licensed resources that are used for teaching, learning, assessment and research purposes. However Open Education is a complex beast made up of many aspects, of which the opening up of data is one important element.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article eelco herder elisabetta parodi hendrik drachsler marieke guy mathieu d’aquin stefan dietze bbc dcc elsevier knowledge media institute mimas open knowledge foundation open university ordnance survey ukoln university of bath university of manchester university of southampton w3c dbpedia europeana linkedup project wikipedia blog cataloguing cloud computing data data management data mining data set data visualisation dissemination facebook framework higher education hypertext ict identifier information retrieval infrastructure interoperability learning analytics learning management system linked data lod mashup metadata mobile mobile learning mooc oer open data open education personalisation portal privacy rdf remote working repositories research search technology semantic web sparql topic map twitter uri usability video visualisation web resources web standards xml Tue, 04 Feb 2014 13:12:30 +0000 editor 2503 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Realising the Potential of Altmetrics within Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author1">Jean Liu</a> and <a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author2">Euan Adie</a> of Altmetric take a look at the growing presence of altmetrics in universities, and consider some of the potential applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The concept of alternative metrics as indicators of non-traditional forms of research impact – better known as ‘altmetrics’ – has been gaining significant attention and support from both the scholarly publishing and academic communities. After being adopted by many publishing platforms and institutional repositories within the past year, altmetrics have entered into the scholarly mainstream, emerging as a relevant topic for academic consideration amidst mounting opposition to misuse of the Journal Impact Factor.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article euan adie jean liu altmetric llp carnegie mellon university indiana university london school of economics university of bath university of glasgow adobe aggregation altmetrics article-level metrics blog data data set digitisation doi identifier metadata open access passwords repositories research twitter url web services Wed, 29 Jan 2014 20:21:26 +0000 lisrw 2500 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Digital Dieting - From Information Obesity to Intellectual Fitness http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/sanders-rvw#author1">Kevin Sanders</a> examines Tara Brabazon’s latest analytical work which investigates the proliferation of low-quality information in the digital realm and the issues of excessive reliance on social tools for learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Following a body of work that includes <em>The University of Google: Education in the (post) Information Age</em> (2007) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and <em>Digital Hemlock: Internet Education and the Poisoning of Teaching</em> (2002), Brabazon has developed a central position within the debate surrounding technology and pedagogy, although there is very little that is centrist about Brabazon's writing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 review kevin sanders apple google ibm university of bath university of cambridge heron blog facebook framework higher education ict internet explorer managerialism multimedia neoliberalism open access research search technology software youtube Mon, 03 Mar 2014 18:41:44 +0000 lisrw 2519 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 71 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 71.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As I depart this chair after the preparation of what I thought would be the last issue of <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], I make no apology for the fact that I did my best to include as much material&nbsp; to her ‘swan song’ as possible. With the instruction to produce only one more issue this year, I felt it was important to publish as much of the content in the pipeline as I could.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 editorial richard waller amazon birmingham city university digital repository federation jisc loughborough university oclc oregon state university ukoln university for the creative arts university of huddersfield university of oxford university of sussex wellcome library jusp kaptur scarlet accessibility agile development api archives augmented reality authentication big data blog bs8878 cataloguing content management controlled vocabularies curation data data management data set database digital library digitisation diigo ebook educational data mining framework google docs higher education html html5 infrastructure jquery learning analytics metadata mets mobile native apps open access open source portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology software solr standardisation standards sushi tagging twitter url video wcag web 2.0 web app widget xml schema Wed, 17 Jul 2013 19:01:02 +0000 lisrw 2493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author1">Ikuko Tsuchide</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author2">Yui Nishizono</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author3">Masako Suzuki</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author4">Shigeki Sugita</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author5">Kazuo Yamamoto</a> and <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author6">Hideki Uchijima</a> introduce a number of ideas and projects that have enhanced the progress of the Open Access movement and institutional repositories in Japan over the last ten years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In Japan, Chiba University established the country's first institutional repository, CURATOR [<a href="#1">1</a>] in 2003. Since then, over the last 10 years or so, more than 300 universities and research institutions have set up repositories and the number of full-text items on repositories has exceeded one million [<a href="#2">2</a>]. All the contents are available on Japanese Institutional Repositories Online (JAIRO) [<a href="#3">3</a>] operated by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) [<a href="#4">4</a>] in Japan.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article hideki uchijima ikuko tsuchide kazuo yamamoto masako suzuki shigeki sugita yui nishizono asahikawa medical university cranfield university digital repository federation hokkaido university kagoshima university national institute of informatics osaka university otaru university of commerce sherpa sherpa-leap university of tokyo university of tsukuba repositories support project romeo rsp wikipedia archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data database digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access repositories research search technology standardisation twitter Wed, 10 Jul 2013 17:03:28 +0000 lisrw 2480 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/brewerton#author1">Gary Brewerton</a> takes us step by step through the various stages of implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System for your institution.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article takes you step by step through the various stages of implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System; from writing the business case to involving stakeholders, selecting a system, implementation planning, advocacy, training and data entry. It recognises the hard work required to embed such a system into your institution both during the implementation process and beyond.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton loughborough university sconul authentication blog cataloguing collection development data e-learning freemium higher education intellectual property internet explorer ldap library management systems mooc open source podcast shibboleth software standards vle Mon, 17 Jun 2013 18:35:26 +0000 lisrw 2448 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing a Prototype Library WebApp for Mobile Devices http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author1">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author2">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the development of a prototype WebApp to improve access to Library systems at Loughborough University for mobile devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Reviewing Loughborough University Library’s Web site statistics over a 12-month period (October 2011 – September 2012) showed a monthly average of 1,200 visits via mobile devices (eg smart phones and tablet computers). These visits account for 4% of the total monthly average visits; but plotting the percentage of visits per month from such mobile devices demonstrated over the period a steady increase, rising from 2% to 8%.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper apple google loughborough university w3c adobe ajax android apache api authentication blog browser cache cataloguing content management cookie css data framework google books html html5 ipad iphone itunes java javascript jquery json library management systems local storage metadata mobile native app native apps open source passwords perl restful rss standards tablet computer url vocabularies web app web browser web development widget xhtml xml Mon, 10 Jun 2013 13:33:09 +0000 admin 2438 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk KAPTUR the Highlights: Exploring Research Data Management in the Visual Arts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author1">Leigh Garrett</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author2">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author3">Carlos Silva</a> and <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author4">Anne Spalding</a> describe the exploration of the importance and nature of research data in the visual arts and requirements for their appropriate curation and preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>KAPTUR (2011-13) [<a href="#1">1</a>], funded by Jisc and led by the Visual Arts Data Service, was a collaborative project involving four institutional partners: the Glasgow School of Arts; Goldsmiths, University of London; University for the Creative Arts; and the University of the Arts London.&nbsp;Research data have in recent years become regarded as a valuable institutional resource and their appropriate collection, curation, publication and preservation as essential. This has been driven by a number of internal and external forces, and all UK Research Councils now require it as a condition of funding [<a href="#2">2</a>]. As a result, a network of data repositories has emerged [<a href="#3">3</a>], some funded by research councils and others by institutions themselves. However, at the outset of the project, research data management practice within the visual arts appeared to operate rather <em>ad hoc</em> with none of the specialist arts institutions within the UK having either implemented research data management policies [<a href="#4">4</a>] or established research data management systems.&nbsp; KAPTUR sought to:</p> <ul> <li>investigate the nature of visual arts research data;</li> <li>make recommendations for its effective management;</li> <li>develop a model of best practice applicable to both specialist institutions and arts departments within multidisciplinary institutions; and</li> <li>apply, test and refine the model of best practice across the four institutional partner institutions.</li> </ul> <p>This paper outlines the background and context of the project; explores the nature of visual arts research data; details the outcomes of the user and technical review; and describes the work which underwent within the partner institutions around policy formation and staff engagement.</p> <p>Led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), in collaboration with the Glasgow School of Art, Goldsmiths College, University of the Arts London and University for the Creative Arts, and funded by Jisc, KAPTUR [<a href="#1">1</a>] sought to ‘...discover, create and pilot a sectoral model of best practice in the management of research data in the [visual] arts.’ [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-garrett-et-al/logo-2.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 210px;" title="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" /></p> <p>Recent years have witnessed an increasing recognition across the Higher Education sector that research data are a valuable resource and therefore its appropriate curation and preservation are essential.&nbsp; In addition, wider societal and political forces meant that research councils, teams and researchers were coming under increasing pressure to make publicly funded data freely available.&nbsp; As such the publication of research data was increasingly becoming a requirement of funding, for example the Arts and Humanities Research Council [<a href="#6">6</a>] and Medical Research Council [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Equally important was the need for increased data transparency, and to enable researchers to access existing datasets to test the validity and reliability of the data and associated research methods; to reinterpret the data; and to preserve the data for future scrutiny. In response, many universities, for example the University of Edinburgh, had established institutional research data management systems to support the deposit and preservation of research data, whilst others were in the process of piloting services, for example the University of Leicester, and establishing policies and procedures which actively support researchers to manage their data effectively, such as Canterbury Christ Church University and Northumbria University. In addition, many of the research councils themselves had established repositories, for example the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex, which curates research data in the social sciences and humanities, and the Natural Environment Research Council, which supports a network of data centres across its disciplinary areas.</p> <p>However, given the emerging landscape, at the outset of the project it was clear that very little was known about the collection, curation and usage of research data in the visual arts:&nbsp;none of the specialist arts institutions had research data management policies or infrastructure in place and evidence collected at the time indicated that practice was at best, <em>ad hoc</em>, left to individual researchers and teams with limited support or guidance. Little work had been undertaken to understand the distinctive and varied nature of research data in the visual arts, and even less to understand how these data could be collected, curated, preserved and exploited, or their potential impact assessed.</p> <p>By its very nature, research in the visual arts is highly complex and varied, often comprising a wide variety of outputs and formats which present researchers, repository managers and institutions with many discipline-specific difficulties. The methods and processes which generate this research are just as varied and complex.&nbsp; Research endeavour in the visual arts relies heavily on the physical artefact: sketchbooks, logbooks, journals, and workbooks.&nbsp; Alongside these data, a wide range of related project documentation and protocols are also created.&nbsp; While technology may offer considerable potential to support the safe storage and preservation of research and related data, and to enhance access, the highly distinctive nature of the visual arts and its research methods also present enormous technical problems with regard to formats, standards, roles and responsibilities, and policies.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article anne spalding carlos silva leigh garrett marie-therese gramstadt ahrc canterbury christ church university courtauld institute of art datacite dcc falmouth university glasgow school of art goldsmiths college hefce jisc northumbria university uk data archive university for the creative arts university of bath university of birmingham university of edinburgh university of essex university of leicester university of london university of the arts london vads kaptur keepit mrc scarlet archives augmented reality blog cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set digitisation eprints framework higher education infrastructure metadata oer open access preservation repositories research semantic web software video Mon, 01 Jul 2013 17:50:23 +0000 lisrw 2461 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Bring Your Own Policy: Why Accessibility Standards Need to Be Contextually Sensitive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author2">Jonathan Hassell</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author3">David Sloan</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author4">Dominik Lukeš</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author5">E A Draffan</a> and <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author6">Sarah Lewthwaite</a> argue that rather than having a universal standard for Web accessibility, standardisation of Web accessibility practices and policies needs to be sufficiently flexible to cater for the local context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Initiatives to enhance Web accessibility have previously focused on the development of guidelines which apply on a global basis. Legislation at national and international levels increasingly mandate conformance with such guidelines. However large scale surveys have demonstrated the failure of such approaches to produce any significant impact.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article brian kelly david sloan dominik lukes ea draffan jonathan hassell sarah lewthwaite iso kings college london london metropolitan university oracle ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of southampton w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility agile development blog browser bs8878 cookie data doi e-learning ead framework ict mobile research responsive design social networks software standardisation standards usability video wcag web resources web services web standards youtube Mon, 08 Jul 2013 18:13:42 +0000 lisrw 2475 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Augmented Reality in Education: The SCARLET+ Experience http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author1">Laura Skilton</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author2">Matt Ramirez</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author3">Guyda Armstrong</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author4">Rose Lock</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author5">Jean Vacher</a> and <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author6">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> describe augmented reality in education case studies from the University of Sussex and the University for the Creative Arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:36.0pt;">&nbsp;Augmented reality, a capability that has been around for decades, is shifting from what was once seen as a gimmick to a bona fide game-changer. [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> </blockquote> <p>Augmented Reality (AR) has been listed in the Horizon Reports, key predictors of the potential impact of new technology on education. The 2011 Report [<a href="#1">1</a>] sparked the idea for an innovative project - SCARLET: Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article guyda armstrong jean vacher laura skilton marie-therese gramstadt matt ramirez rose lock alt courtauld institute of art glasgow school of art jisc mimas museum of london university for the creative arts university of london university of manchester university of sussex university of the arts london vads jorum kaptur scarlet accessibility archives augmented reality blog copyright data data set digitisation e-learning firefox framework ftp graphics infrastructure internet explorer ipad mobile multimedia oer portal research search technology smartphone url video web browser windows wireless youtube Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:38:54 +0000 lisrw 2439 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making Citation Work: A British Library DataCite Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a workshop on practical data citation issues for institutions, held at the British Library, London, on 8 March 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Friday, 8 March 2013, I attended the fifth in the series of DataCite workshops run by the British Library [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The British Library Conference Centre was the venue for this workshop on the theme 'Making Citation Work: Practical Issues for Institutions'. I counted myself lucky to get a place: the organisers had had so much interest they had started a reserve list for the event.&nbsp; I could believe it as it was standing room only at one point, though an awkwardly placed pillar may have contributed to that.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report alex ball ahds badc british library california digital library datacite dcc science and technology facilities council ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of exeter university of nottingham university of york open exeter api archives blog cataloguing content negotiation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital object identifier doi framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property metadata open access persistent identifier preservation repositories research schema standards url video vocabularies Tue, 09 Jul 2013 15:38:46 +0000 lisrw 2478 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECLAP 2013: Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eclap-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the second international conference held by ECLAP, the e-library for performing arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The beautiful city of Porto was the host location for ECLAP 2013 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the 2nd International Conference on Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment. &nbsp;Porto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon and home of the Instituto Politécnico do Porto (IPP), the largest polytechnic in the country, with over 18,500 students.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marieke guy bbc coventry university dcc microsoft oais ukoln university of leeds university of lisbon w3c europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons data data management digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dublin core dvd ebook epub foaf framework geospatial data haptics higher education ict internet explorer interoperability knowledge base lod metadata multimedia ontologies open data owl preservation rdf remote working repositories research schema social networks software standards streaming usability video vocabularies Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:46:57 +0000 lisrw 2471 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JABES 2013 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/jabes-rpt#author1">Marlène Delhaye</a> reports on the two-day annual conference organised by the French Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES) held in Montpellier, France over 14-15 May 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In what has now become something of a tradition, the ‘Corum’ Congress Centre in Montpellier, France, hosted the twelfth in the series of the Journées de l’Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES - Higher Education Bibliographic Agency) [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marlene delhaye bnf editeur google jisc jisc collections national library of australia oclc orcid universite d’aix-marseille open library worldcat api archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing collection development controlled vocabularies data digital object identifier digitisation dissemination doi ebook epub freemium hashtag higher education html identifier infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge base library management systems licence metadata mooc national library open access open data portal privacy repositories research resource description and access standards sushi tagging text mining twitter video web app Mon, 01 Jul 2013 12:11:53 +0000 lisrw 2459 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Information Society - A Study of Continuity and Change http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rafiq-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/rafiq-rvw#author1">Muhammad Rafiq</a> offers us a detailed review of a work, now in its sixth edition, which examines the information society, its origin, development, its associated issues and the current landscape.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>The Information Society</em> offers a detailed discussion on the concept and dynamics of the information society from a historical perspective to the present era of information societies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rafiq-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review muhammad rafiq american library association google ifla oclc university of sargodha blog data digitisation ebook foi information society infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer mobile phone privacy research web 2.0 Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:03:56 +0000 lisrw 2470 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Gold Open Access: Counting the Costs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/andrew#author1">Theo Andrew</a> presents new data on the cost of Gold OA publishing at the University of Edinburgh.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Research Councils UK (RCUK) have recently announced a significant amendment to their open access (OA) &nbsp;policy which requires all research papers that result from research partly or wholly funded by RCUK to be made open access [<a href="#1">1</a>]. To comply with this policy, researchers must either; a) publish in an open access journal, termed Gold OA, which often incurs an article processing charge (APC); or, b) ensure that a copy of the post-print is deposited in an appropriate repository, also known as Green OA.</p> <p>A subsequent clarification from RCUK stated that Gold OA is the preferred mechanism of choice to realise open access for outputs that they have funded and have announced the award of block grants to eligible institutions to achieve this aim [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Where a Gold OA option is unavailable, Green OA is also acceptable; however, RCUK have indicated that the decision will be ultimately left up to institutions as to which route to take [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>Since RCUK are the major funder of research in the United Kingdom, this new policy will not only have a major impact on how researchers publish their work, but also huge implications for their budgets. Many research institutions funded by RCUK are currently investigating how they will implement this policy and are looking at the costs for open access publication, and how they can support the adoption of open access within their organisation. The ball is very much in the court of institutions to decide how to play the open access game.</p> <p>One of the key factors that will affect institutions is the cost that publishers will set for their APCs. So far RCUK have steered clear of suggesting an appropriate fee, leaving individual publishers to determine the market level of the APCs as per the current situation. Meanwhile there seems to be a huge variability in costs. There is a general expectation that over time APCs will settle to a reasonable rate and similarly journal subscriptions will lower to reflect the gradual change in business model from subscription fees to APCs. Most publishers have not yet been upfront about what impact they will have on journal subscriptions, if any, and it is hard to access and assess real-life data. RSC Publishing is one notable exception since it has introduced a system of waiving a proportion of APC fees based on institutional subscription costs.</p> <p>Much of this transition period to full open access will have to be navigated through uncharted territory, where no one has a clear handle on the costs involved. The rationale of this article is to present data on article processing charges gathered over the past five years, report on trends seen within this data, to suggest some approaches and to generally contribute to and inform the policy discussion.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>To put some rough-and-ready figures on the table, the University of Edinburgh publishes in the region of 4,000-4,500 peer-reviewed journal articles per year; this figure does not include other publication types like working papers not affected by the RCUK policy. Assuming an average Article Processing Charge (APC) of £1500 [<a href="#4">4</a>], the total publication costs to make all of these outputs Gold would be in the region of £6m. It is clear that even with guaranteed funding from HEFCE, and other funders of research, large research-intensive universities will not be able to pay for all of their research to be published under Gold OA. How to allocate funding to researchers will be a difficult choice that many institutions are currently asking themselves - will it be on a first-come-first-served basis, funder-specific, or will REF-submitted material take priority?</p> <p>Equally problematic are the difficulties we face in fully assessing an institution’s total spend on open access. Whilst it is possible to find out through aggregate sources like Web of Science how many articles are published in fully open access journals. It is virtually impossible to find out the number of open access articles published in hybrid journals as there is currently no flag in the metadata which indicates the open status of the paper. A hybrid journal is a traditional subscription journal that offers open access to individual articles upon payment of an APC. Of course it is possible to find hybrid open access content through EuropePMC.org; however this will only give a snapshot for the biomedical and life sciences. With current systems and processes it is virtually impossible to gauge this spend accurately.</p> <h2 id="Cost_Data">Cost Data</h2> <p>Unfortunately, financial data about open access publishing is scarce. The University of Edinburgh (UoE) has recently implemented account codes to allow the finance systems to track this spend going forwards; however, finding out costs retrospectively remains problematic. Furthermore, institutions are not typically in the habit of publishing this data with others. The institutions that have shared data show a degree of variability. In 2010, the foremost initial supporter and enabler of Gold Open Access publishing in the UK, the Wellcome Trust, found that the&nbsp;average cost of publication under the author-pays model was $2,367 (approximately £1,500) [<a href="#4">4</a>]. RCUK in their recent press release on block grants for open access estimate the average APC as £1,727 plus VAT [<a href="#2">2</a>], whilst, based on figures in the Finch Report, the University of Nottingham paid on average £1,216 [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p>All these figures are useful as they give a ballpark figure upon which further estimates can be based. The precise cost of individual APCs levied by publishers is generally unavailable in a form which easily enables further analysis. Typically this information is available from publisher’s Web sites; however, aggregating the data is cumbersome as there is no consistent way to interrogate the Web sites and APCs commonly vary from title to title in the publishers’ portfolio. There have been some commendable attempts to gather this information, for example the SHERPA RoMEO listing of Publishers with Paid Options for Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Here about 100 publishers have been surveyed and their APCs are listed. A large cost variance exists for some publishers’ records as individual journals often have different APCs, and also institutional subscriptions/memberships can reduce costs in a non-uniform way. It takes a lot of effort to gather these data and keep them it up to date. Other approaches have tried to crowd-source this activity, for example Ross Mounce’s survey of open access publishers, publications, licences and fees. Here approximately 130 publishers’ web sites were surveyed to find out what licences are being used on the open access content; the cost being a secondary focus of the survey. Analysis of these data shows less than 5% of publishers claiming 'open access' are fully compliant with the Budapest Declaration on Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>].</p> <p>The data we present here is an attempt to enrich the data available to interested parties and make them available in a reusable format for further analysis. It comprises articles funded by the Wellcome Trust at the University of Edinburgh between 2007 and 2012. In total there are 260 articles published in a mixture of open access journals and traditional subscription journals with an open access option (sometimes known as hybrid). All of the journals charged an article processing fee. Overall, the total cost incurred was £452,713.40. The mean article processing charge was £1,741.21, with the median value £1,644.22. The full data can be accessed online at the Edinburgh DataShare repository [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article theo andrew hefce university of edinburgh university of nottingham wellcome trust datashare sherpa romeo accessibility altmetrics blog creative commons data data management data set digital library licence metadata open access portfolio repositories research Mon, 03 Dec 2012 20:23:29 +0000 lisrw 2393 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 'Does He Take Sugar?': The Risks of Standardising Easy-to-read Language http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author2">Dominik Lukeš</a> and <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author3">Alistair McNaught</a> highlight the risks of attempting to standardise easy-to-read language for online resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The idea that if we could only improve how we communicate, there would be less misunderstanding among people is as old as the hills. Historically, this notion has been expressed through things like school reform, spelling reform, publication of communication manuals, etc. The most radical expression of the desire for better understanding is the invention of a whole new artificial language with the intention of providing a universal language for humanity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article alistair mcnaught brian kelly dominik lukes alt alt-c bbc google jisc jisc techdis rdwg ukoln university of bath w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility algorithm blog bs8878 dissemination doi e-learning framework higher education internet explorer multimedia operating system research search technology software standards vocabularies wcag web 2.0 web resources Sat, 15 Dec 2012 15:18:25 +0000 lisrw 2431 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The ARK Project: Analysing Raptor at Kent http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lyons <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lyons#author1">Leo Lyons</a> describes how University of Kent librarians are benefitting from Raptor's ability to produce e-resource usage statistics and charts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is indisputable that the use of e-resources in university libraries has increased exponentially over the last decade and there would be little disagreement with a prediction that usage is set to continue to increase for the foreseeable future. The majority of students both at undergraduate and post-graduate level now come from a background where online access is the <em>de facto</em> standard.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lyons" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article leo lyons cardiff university jisc microsoft newcastle university university of huddersfield university of kent ark project authentication blog cataloguing csv data data set database further education identifier infrastructure internet explorer ldap licence microsoft reporting services mobile native app raptor repositories research sharepoint shibboleth software sql standards wiki xml Tue, 04 Dec 2012 17:21:49 +0000 lisrw 2394 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Seb Schmoller Replies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Stepping down from his pivotal role as CEO at ALT, <a href="/issue70/schmoller#author1">Seb Schmoller</a> kindly answers a few questions from <em>Ariadne</em> on his perspective on online learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Ariadne</em>: Seb, please tell us a little about yourself.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article seb schmoller alt harvard university jisc sheffield college university of cambridge university of southampton yale university wikipedia adl archives blog content licence copyright course design e-learning further education higher education ict licence mooc research software twitter video Fri, 07 Dec 2012 12:27:42 +0000 lisrw 2404 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 21st-century Scholarship and Wikipedia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/thomas#author1">Amber Thomas</a> explores the ways in which emerging research practices and Wikipedia illustrate the changing boundaries of academic work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia, the world’s fifth most-used Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>], is a good illustration of the growing credibility of online resources. In his article in <em>Ariadne </em>earlier this year, “Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Academic Acceptance” [<a href="#2">2</a>], Brian Whalley described the debates around accuracy and review, in the context of geology.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article amber thomas bbc becta british library jisc open university orcid ukoln university of warwick jorum myexperiment wikipedia archives blog data dewey decimal e-learning framework further education google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure linked data oer open access open education open source rdf repositories research search technology semantic web smartphone software uri web 2.0 wiki Fri, 30 Nov 2012 13:18:23 +0000 lisrw 2390 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Case Studies in Web Sustainability http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/turner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/turner#author1">Scott Turner</a> describes issues around making Web resources sustainable.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At the moment organisations often make significant investments in producing Web-based material, often funded through public money, for example from JISC. But what happens when some of those organisations are closed or there&nbsp; is no longer any money or resources to host the site? We are seeing cuts in funding or changes in governmental policy, which is resulting in the closure of some of these organisations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/turner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article scott turner amazon google jisc university of northampton amazon web services archives blog cloud computing css geospatial data google analytics google docs html infrastructure internet explorer mac os passwords research search engine optimisation search technology standards twitter url web resources web services youtube Mon, 10 Dec 2012 15:09:03 +0000 lisrw 2405 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mining the Archive: The Development of Electronic Journals http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white#author1">Martin White</a> looks through the <em>Ariadne</em> archive to trace the development of e-journals as a particular aspect of electronic service delivery and highlights material he considers as significant.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My career has spanned 42 years in the information business. It has encompassed 10,000-hole optical coincidence cards, online database services, videotext, laser discs, and CD-ROMs, the World Wide Web, mobile services and big data solutions. I find the historical development of information resource management absolutely fascinating, yet feel that in general it is poorly documented from an analytical perspective even though there are some excellent archives.</p> <p>These archives include the back issues of <em>Ariadne</em> from January 1996. <em>Ariadne</em> has always been one of my must-reads as a way of keeping in touch with issues and developments in e-delivery of information. The recently launched new <em>Ariadne</em> platform [<a href="#1">1</a>] has provided easier access to these archives. Looking through its content has reminded me of the skills and vision of the UK information profession as it sought to meet emerging user requirements with very limited resources.&nbsp; The archives have always been available on the <em>Ariadne</em> site but the recent update to the site and the availability of good tags on the archive content has made it much easier to mine through the archive issues.</p> <p>The <em>Ariadne</em> team, in particular Richard Waller, has given me the opportunity to mine those archives [<a href="#2">2</a>] and trace some of the developments in electronic service delivery in the UK.</p> <p>Indeed working through the archives is now probably too easy as in the preparation of this column I have found myself moving sideways from many of the feature articles to revel in the other columns that have been a feature of Ariadne. This article is a personal view of some of these developments and is in no way intended to be a definitive account. Its main purpose is to encourage others to look into the archive and learn from the experiences of the many innovators that have patiently coped with the challenges of emerging technology, resource limitations and often a distinct lack of strategy and policy at both an institutional and government level.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image1-optical-coincidence-card.jpg" style="width: 171px; height: 289px;" title="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970</strong></p> <h2 id="e-Journal_Development">e-Journal Development</h2> <p>Arriving at the University of Southampton in 1967 my main surprise was not the standard of the laboratories but the quality and scale of the Chemistry Department library. School does not prepare you for reading primary journals and how best to make use of Chemical Abstracts, but I quickly found that working in the library was much more fun than in a laboratory. I obtained an excellent result in one vacation project on physical chemistry problems by reverse engineering the problems through Chemical Abstracts! Therefore, as it turned out, I had started my career as an information scientist before I even graduated. By 1977 I was working with The Chemical Society on the micropublishing of journals and taking part in a British Library project on the future of chemical information. &nbsp;Re-reading the outcomes of that project makes me realise how difficult it is to forecast the future. Now my past has re-asserted itself to good effect as I have both the honour and excitement of being Chair of the eContent Committee of the Royal Society of Chemistry.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image2-laserdiscs.jpg" style="width: 336px; height: 312px;" title="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980</strong></p> <p>So from my standpoint, in seeking to identify distinct themes in the development of information resource management in <em>Ariadne</em>, a good place to start is with the e-markup of chemical journals. In Issue 1 Dr Henry Rzepa wrote about the potential benefits of the semantic markup of primary journals to provide chemists with access to the content of the journal article and not just to a contents page and title [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The immediate problem you face reading this admirable summary of the potential benefits of markup is that many of the hyperlinks have disappeared. History has been technologically terminated. Almost 15 years passed by before the Royal Society of Chemistry set up Project Prospect and turned semantic markup into a production process [4]. Dr Rzepa is now Professor of Computational Chemistry at Imperial College, London.</p> <p>By the mid-1990s good progress had been made in e-journal production technologies and the first e-only journals were beginning to appear. Among them was <em>Glacial Geology and Geomorphology</em> (GGG) which existed in a printed version only in as far as readers could print out a selection from it. One aim of GGG is therefore to provide the benefits of electronic transfer as well as other value added products in an accepted academic, peer-reviewed system. The author of the article describing the project [<a href="#5">5</a>] was Dr. Brian Whalley, who went on to become a Professor in the Geomaterials Research Group, Queens University of Belfast. As you will discover from <a href="../author/brian-whalley-author-profile">his author profile</a> (another <em>Ariadne</em> innovation), Brian is still active though retired from formal education. What struck me about this article was the author’s vision in January 1996 of how e-journals could be of benefit in university teaching.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article martin white andrew w mellon foundation british library hefce imperial college london institute of physics intranet focus ltd jisc mimas portico stm ukoln university of glasgow university of manchester university of sheffield university of southampton jisc information environment accessibility archives big data blog content management copyright database ebook ejournal higher education intellectual property jstor licence mobile open access research resource management search technology standards Thu, 06 Dec 2012 15:50:18 +0000 lisrw 2401 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CURATEcamp iPres 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author1">Mark Jordan</a>, <a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author2">Courtney Mumma</a>, <a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author3">Nick Ruest</a> and the participants of CURATEcamp iPres 2012 report on this unconference for digital curation practitioners and researchers, held on 2 October 2012 in Toronto.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CURATEcamp is ‘A series of unconference-style events focused on connecting practitioners and technologists interested in digital curation.’ [<a href="#1">1</a>] The first CURATEcamp was held in the summer of 2010, and there have been just over 10 Camps since then.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report courtney mumma mark jordan nick ruest british library library of congress ndsa premis simon fraser university york university apache archives blog cloud computing curation data digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination ebook file format google docs hashtag identifier infrastructure linux metadata open source operating system preservation programming language python repositories software standards taxonomy twitter vocabularies Thu, 13 Dec 2012 12:21:18 +0000 lisrw 2409 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk euroCRIS Membership Meeting, Madrid http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> and <a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author2">Brigitte Jörg</a> report on the bi-annual euroCRIS membership and Task Groups meetings which took place in Madrid on 5-6 November 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>euroCRIS membership meetings [<a href="#1">1</a>] are held twice a year, providing members and invited participants with updates on strategic and Task Group progress and plans, as well as the opportunity to share experience of Current Research Information System (CRIS)-related developments and seek feedback. A CERIF (<em>Common European Research Information Format</em>) tutorial is usually included on the first morning for those new to the standard, and the host country reports on local CRIS initiatives in the ‘national’ session.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report brigitte jorg rosemary russell codata elsevier eurocris imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath reposit adobe aggregation bibliometrics blog cerif data data model data set database digital repositories dublin core framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability lod ontologies open access open source portal preservation rdf repositories research research information management software standards visualisation vocabularies xml Thu, 13 Dec 2012 09:07:57 +0000 lisrw 2408 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL) 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt#author1">Anna Mastora</a> and <a href="/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt#author2">Sarantos Kapidakis</a> report on TPDL 2012 held at Paphos, Cyprus, over 23-27 September 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 16<sup>th</sup> International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL) 2012 [<a href="#1">1</a>] was another successful event in the series of ECDL/TPDL conferences which has been the leading European scientific forum on digital libraries for 15 years. Across these years, the conference has brought together researchers, developers, content providers and users in the field of digital libraries by addressing issues in the area where theoretical and applied research meet, such as digital library models, architectures, functionality, users, and quality.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report anna mastora sarantos kapidakis city university london cni coalition for networked information google ionian university iso massachusetts institute of technology microsoft national technical university of athens open university princeton university the national archives university of cyprus university of malta university of strathclyde europeana archives blog data data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination facebook frbr graphics information retrieval interoperability linked data metadata multimedia natural language processing ontologies preservation research resource discovery search technology semantic web skos software standards thesaurus twitter visualisation Sun, 16 Dec 2012 13:44:54 +0000 lisrw 2432 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Embedded Librarian http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a comprehensive overview of embedded librarianship, a new model of library service that promises to enhance the strategic value of contemporary knowledge work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarianship as a profession is confronting a growing demand to prove its worth. Library patrons expect utility. The organisations that fund them pre-suppose a contribution to their bottom lines.</p> <p>The calls for this proof come from librarians themselves as much as from their employers. And the tone of the questioning is persistent if not redundant. It can be distilled to a fundamental query: Can the library sustain its basic mission of effectively and efficiently fulfilling its users' information needs given the technological, social, and economic developments that are transforming how people interact with data, documents, and each other?</p> <h2 id="Librarianship:_In_Search_of_the_Value_Proposition">Librarianship: In Search of the Value Proposition</h2> <p>These transformations have been occurring for some time, in different areas of living and working. Though not flowing from a single source, for librarians the impacts from these changes have seemingly converged on their profession as if they were collusive forces.</p> <p>A global financial crisis and its lingering downturns have resulted in deeper budget cuts for many departments in every type of institution, public and private. A rising trend toward direct information consumption has caused many everyday users as well as executives to believe that removing librarians from the knowledge cycle is the next logical step. Caught within the sights of cost-conscious decision makers, libraries and information centres have become vulnerable to downsizing.</p> <p>Students enter universities - even secondary schools - wedded unconsciously to their handhelds, always connected, assuming unmitigated and near-immediate digital satisfaction for their knowledge wants. Most of them were born into this socio-technical life-world as if it were a natural order. They know and expect nothing else. In such an environment, librarians orchestrate access but need not be confronted. They maintain crucial databases and finding aids, but can do so unseen and disembodied. They can be relegated to infrastructural innards.</p> <p>For-profit organisations, the home of law firm and business librarians, are looking upon the outsourcing of support staff with increasing favour. And while library positions have not yet been handed over wholesale to third-party providers, there is industry trepidation that it could move in that direction. The threat is vague but distinctly present.</p> <p>Many have taken to the outlets of library opinion and prediction, warning of impending disintermediation and possible obsolescence if the field fails to embrace drastic changes in how it carries out its service mission. Blogs, journals, and conferences are animated with calls to re-conceptualise philosophies and re-direct core methods. Some commentators merely emit distress signals on behalf of the library community. They are invocations of crisis without even a stab at real solutions. Others, however, are serious attempts to map out alternative pathways to a more stable occupational future. These need to be reckoned with.</p> <p>A common path taken by the more constructive endeavours is demonstrating how librarianship can re-establish its value in a rapidly changing environment. This value is understood to be the knowledge-creating and disseminating efficacies that libraries bring to their users more ably and with less cost than other institutions. Since libraries are housed and financially supported by parent organisations of some kind, the value is usually construed as a combination of business and mission-relevant attributes. The emphasis on mission may be more pronounced in academic and public libraries, while corporate and firm libraries stress the financial aspects, but it is ultimately about how management assesses the library's contributions to the organisation's long-term integrity. Granted, the value has a large practical component for a library's patrons; the direct benefits are the answers, leads, and guidance they obtain when visiting the reference desk or searching the collections. However, the final criterion for most libraries will be the value proposition attributed to them by upper-level decision makers. User satisfaction is a valuable standard, but in the end it is often translated into a determination of whether the library produces distinct results in light of the resources devoted to maintaining it.</p> <p>A concrete attempt to re-assert the business and service value of librarians has been the adoption of the practice model known as embedded librarianship. Although it has been applied in libraries in one form or another for a few decades - without necessarily using the word ‘embedded’ - only in the past several years has it risen to widespread notability. Judging by the upsurge in professional discussions and published cases devoted to this approach, librarians of many types are expressing keen interest in the value-enhancing potential of embedding themselves. Its contemporary significance is fully examined by David Shumaker in <em>The Embedded Librarian: Innovative Strategies for Taking Knowledge Where It's Needed</em>. The author, an associate professor at The Catholic University of America's School of Library and Information Science in Washington, D.C., is a well-known chronicler of embedded practices. This book is the field's first attempt at a comprehensive review of embedded librarianship's shared features, variable manifestations, and elements for success among major types of libraries.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review john azzolini clifford chance blog cataloguing data database digital library framework higher education research search technology standards Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:32:15 +0000 lisrw 2413 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/dobreva-rvw#author1">Milena Dobreva</a> reviews the newly published book of Martin de Saulles which looks at the new models of information production, distribution and consumption.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Writing about information and the changes in the models of its production, distribution and consumption is no simple task. Besides the long-standing debate on what information and knowledge really mean, the world of current technologies is changing at a pace which inevitably influences all spheres of human activity. But the first of those spheres to tackle is perhaps that of information – how we create, disseminate, and use it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review milena dobreva amazon jisc university of brighton university of malta archives big data blog cloud computing data data mining digital library digital preservation digitisation google search information society institutional repository mobile podcast research search technology video wiki Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:49:00 +0000 lisrw 2414 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache collection development content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog collection development copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Evaluation of Assessment Diaries and GradeMark at the University of Glamorgan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau#author1">Karen Fitzgibbon</a> and <a href="/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau#author2">Alice Lau</a> describe a JISC-funded project in evaluating the pedagogical and workload impact that two assessment- and feedback-related innovations have on students and staff and report on lessons for the sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Assessment and feedback practice in Higher Education has long been the major source of student dissatisfaction (National Student Surveys) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. While technologies are increasingly being used as a tool to improve the learning experience for students and staff, the use of technologies in improving the assessment experience is still patchy.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article alice lau karen fitzgibbon blackboard jisc university of glamorgan blog data database dissemination higher education internet explorer research software vle Sat, 28 Jul 2012 12:26:56 +0000 lisrw 2351 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Most of a Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/taylor#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> writes about how she made the most of a conference to promote and inform the work of a project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working with repositories in various ways for over five years, so I have, of course, attended the major international conference Open Repositories before. I have never actually presented anything or represented a specific project at the event, though. This year was different. This year I had a mission -&nbsp; to present a poster on the DataFlow Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] and to talk to people about the work we had been doing for the past 12 months and (I hoped) to interest them in using the Open Source (OS) systems we had developed during that period.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article stephanie taylor ukoln university of glasgow university of oxford university of southampton devcsi hydra rsp api archives blog cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital library digital repositories dissemination doi flickr framework hashtag higher education infrastructure javascript licence linked data linux metadata open access open source provenance rdf repositories research research information management software standards sword protocol tagging text mining twitter visualisation widget wiki zip Tue, 31 Jul 2012 15:05:33 +0000 lisrw 2374 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Redeveloping the Loughborough Online Reading List System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author1">Jon Knight</a>, <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author2">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author3">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the redevelopment of Loughborough University’s open source reading list system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Loughborough Online Reading Lists System (LORLS) [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been developed at Loughborough University since the late 1990s.&nbsp; LORLS was originally implemented at the request of the University’s Learning and Teaching Committee simply to make reading lists available online to students.&nbsp; The Library staff immediately saw the benefit of such a system in not only allowing students ready access to academics’ reading lists but also in having such access themselves. This was because a significant number of academics were bypassing the library when generating and distributing lists to their students who were then in turn surprised when the library did not have the recommended books either in stock or in sufficient numbers to meet demand.</p> <p>The first version of the system produced by the Library Systems Team was part of a project that also had a ‘reading lists amnesty’ in which academics were encouraged to provide their reading lists to the library which then employed some temporary staff over the summer to enter them into the new system.&nbsp; This meant that the first version of LORLS went live in July 2000 with a reasonable percentage of lists already in place.&nbsp; Subsequently the creation and editing of reading lists was made the responsibility of the academics or departmental admin staff, with some assistance from library staff.</p> <p>LORLS was written in Perl, with a MySQL database back-end.&nbsp; Most user interfaces were delivered via the web, with a limited number of back-end scripts that helped the systems staff maintain the system and alert library staff to changes that had been made to reading lists.</p> <p>Soon after the first version of LORLS went live at Loughborough, a number of other universities expressed an interest in using or modifying the system. Permission was granted by the University to release it as open source under the General Public Licence (GPL)[<a href="#2">2</a>].&nbsp; New versions were released as the system was developed and bugs were fixed. The last version of the original LORLS code base/data design was version 5, which was downloaded by sites worldwide.</p> <h2 id="Redesign">Redesign</h2> <p>By early 2007 it was decided to take a step back and see if there were things that could be done better in LORLS.&nbsp; Some design decisions made in 1999 no longer made sense eight years later.&nbsp; Indeed some of the database design was predicated on how teaching modules were supposed to work at Loughborough and it had already become clear that the reality of how they were deployed was often quite different.&nbsp; For example, during the original design, the principle was that each module would have a single reading list associated with it.&nbsp; Within a few years several modules had been found that were being taught by two (or more!) academics, all wanting their own independent reading list.</p> <p>Some of the structuring of the data in the MySQL database began to limit how the system could be developed.&nbsp; The University began to plan an organisational restructuring shortly after the redesign of LORLS was commenced, and it was clear that the simple departmental structure was likely to be replaced by a more fluid school and department mix.</p> <p>Library staff were also beginning to request new features that were thus increasingly awkward to implement.&nbsp; Rather than leap through hoops to satisfy them within the framework of the existing system, it made sense to add them into the design process for a full redesign.</p> <p>It was also felt that the pure CGI-driven user interface could do with a revamp.&nbsp; The earlier LORLS user interfaces used only basic HTML forms, with little in the way of client-side scripting.&nbsp; Whilst that meant that they tended to work on any web browser and were pretty accessible, they were also a bit clunky compared to some of the newer dynamic web sites.</p> <p>A distinct separation of the user interface from the back-end database was decided upon to improve localization and portability of the system as earlier versions of LORLS had already shown that many sites took the base code and then customised the user interface parts of the CGI scripts to their own look and feel.&nbsp; The older CGI scripts were a mix of user interaction elements and database access and processing, which made this task a bit more difficult than it really needed to be.</p> <p>Separating the database code from the user interface code would let people easily tinker with one without unduly affecting the other.&nbsp; It would also allow local experimentation with multiple user-interface designs for different user communities or devices.</p> <p>This implied that a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) would need to be defined. As asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)[<a href="#3">3</a>] interactions had been successful applied in a number of recent projects the team had worked on, XML was chosen as the format to be used.&nbsp; At first simple object access protocol (SOAP) style XML requests was experimented with, as well as XML responses, but it was soon realised that SOAP was far too heavy-weight for most of the API calls, so a lighter ‘RESTful’ API was selected.&nbsp; The API was formed of CGI scripts that took normal parameters as input and returned XML documents for the client to parse and display.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper jon knight google harvard university loughborough university microsoft gnu access control ajax api archives authentication bibliographic data blog cache chrome cookie data database digital library e-learning framework google books gpl html javascript jquery json library management systems licence metadata moodle mysql open source perl refworks restful schema shibboleth soap software sql standards web browser xml z39.50 zip Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:32:55 +0000 lisrw 2354 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2012: Big Data, Big Deal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> attended the annual Eduserv Symposium on 10 May 2012 at the Royal College of Physicians, London to find out what are the implications of big data for Higher Education Institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The annual Eduserv Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] was billed as a ‘must-attend event for IT professionals in Higher Education’; the choice of topical subject matter being one of the biggest crowd-drawers (the other being the amazing venue: the Royal College of Physicians). The past few years have seen coverage of highly topical areas such as virtualisation and the cloud, the mobile university and access management.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report marieke guy amazon cetis dcc eduserv google jisc orcid oreilly oxford internet institute ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of california berkeley university of leicester university of oxford webtrends wellcome trust dealing with data impact project accessibility algorithm big data blog cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation gis google analytics google trends hadoop higher education infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer irods learning analytics mobile nosql oer open data open source remote working research twitter usb Mon, 30 Jul 2012 17:48:45 +0000 lisrw 2370 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JISC Research Information Management: CERIF Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> reports on a two-day workshop on research information management and CERIF held in Bristol over 27-28 June 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>A workshop on Research Information Management (RIM) and CERIF was held in Bristol on 27-28 June 2012, organised by the Innovation Support Centre [<a href="#1">1</a>] at UKOLN, together with the JISC RIM and RCSI (Repositories and Curation Shared Infrastructure) Programmes. It was a follow-up to the CERIF Tutorial and UK Data Surgery [<a href="#2">2</a>] held in Bath in February.</p> <h2 id="Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</h2> <p>The aim was to bring together people working on the various elements of the UK RIM jigsaw to share experience of using CERIF and explore ways of working together more closely. While the first day focused specifically on RIM, the second day widened to explore synergies with the repositories community. Participants therefore included JISC RIM and MRD projects and programme managers, support and evaluation projects, Research Councils, funders and repository infrastructure projects. There were around 30 participants [<a href="#3">3</a>] in total, with some variation across the two days, given the different content. The event was chaired by Josh Brown, RIM Programme Manager and Neil Jacobs, Programme Director, Digital Infrastructure, both at JISC. All presentations as well as breakout session outputs are available via the UKOLN ISC Events site [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <h2 id="The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</h2> <p>The UK community was pleased to welcome Brigitte Jörg [<a href="#5">5</a>] to the meeting, in the first week of her new role at UKOLN’s Innovation Support Centre as National Coordinator for the CERIF Support Project. Brigitte is already well known to British practitioners working with CERIF – both in her role as as CERIF Task Group Leader [<a href="#6">6</a>] at euroCRIS and as advisor to several existing JISC projects. We look forward to working with her on further initiatives – her CERIF expertise will be a huge asset for Research Information Management support and coordination in British Higher Education.</p> <h2 id="UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</h2> <p>There is certainly extensive RIM-related activity in the UK currently, which looks set to continue. The landscape was outlined in the scene setting sessions by myself, based on the CERIF adoption study [<a href="#7">7</a>] carried out earlier this year. The rate of CRIS (Current Research Information System) procurement has increased very rapidly in the last few years, particularly during 2011. For example the first Pure system in the UK was procured jointly by the Universities of Aberdeen and St Andrews in May 2009; now there are 19 UK universities using Pure. Since all CRIS on the market are CERIF-compatible (to a greater or lesser extent) this means that a large number of UK institutions are CERIF users (again, to varying degrees) – around 31% [<a href="#7">7</a>]. The two other CERIF CRIS being used in the UK are CONVERIS (Avedas, Germany) and Symplectic Elements (UK-based); only one UK CERIF CRIS is being developed in-house, at the University of Huddersfield. There is therefore a significant potential user base for the many CERIF-based services discussed over the course of the workshop. Particularly as more institutions reach the end of their CRIS implementation phase, they are going to be looking for opportunities to exploit the interchange benefits offered by CERIF.</p> <h2 id="UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</h2> <p>As a reflection of the intensity of UK CRIS activity, the UK has the largest number of institutional members of euroCRIS – 25. The next country in terms of membership is Germany, with just 13 members (and then the Netherlands, with seven). It is also notable that there were six UK papers (up from three in 2010) at the recent euroCRIS conference in Prague (all openly accessible from the euroCRIS website [<a href="#8">8</a>]), reflecting the growing UK presence at international level. This indicates the significant impact of JISC programmes - both RIM and MRD (Managing Research Data). At euroCRIS meetings other European countries have expressed some envy of the resources currently available in the UK to support RIM development!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report rosemary russell cornell university edina elsevier eurocris hefce imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath university of huddersfield university of oxford university of st andrews devcsi wikipedia blog cerif curation data data model data set dublin core file format framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata ontologies open access open source repositories research research information management schema software standards vocabularies xml Sun, 29 Jul 2012 19:46:13 +0000 lisrw 2367 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Mob Rule Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/maclellan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/maclellan-rvw#author1">Fiona MacLellan</a> reviews a book which discusses the current unconference phenomenon and highlights the learning opportunities that these environments offer.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The unconference phenomenon is something that I have heard lots about and have previously tried to read information about; however what this basic research has never been able to do is convince me of the necessity for the unconference or camp environment.&nbsp; Michelle Boule in this concise and easy-to-read book has managed to go at least part way to achieving this.&nbsp; Through use of case study, interview and example, the book provides an overview of the history of the unconference alongside the benefits it may represent to individuals and organisations.&nbsp; Boule illustrates the bene</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/maclellan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review fiona maclellan university of northampton archives blog hashtag research search technology twitter web resources Sun, 29 Jul 2012 12:15:59 +0000 lisrw 2359 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk