Overview of content related to 'search technology' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1563/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=brian%20whalley&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Need - A Theory Connecting Information Search to Knowledge Formation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a book about a new theory of ‘information need’ that builds upon the ideas of Allen and Taylor from the 1960s to provide a basis for information searching.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The front cover tells you succinctly what this book is about; 'A theory Connecting&nbsp; - Information Search – to – Knowledge Formation.'&nbsp; Equally bluntly, I shall set out my credentials for this review. I am not a library/informational professional but I have an interest in delivering digital and information skills to students. I have read and reviewed this book to further my own knowledge of the subject, as well as to see what (new?) ways there are for students to use search tools and methods as well as enhance both their digital and information literacies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review brian whalley google jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of cambridge university of oxford university of sheffield data further education higher education knowledge base metadata modelling ontologies research search technology semantic web tablet computer Mon, 30 Jul 2012 20:10:55 +0000 lisrw 2371 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk E-books and E-content 2010: Data As Content http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reports on a meeting dealing with academic data management and some JISC projects concerned with institutional responses to the need to manage research data more effectively.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report brian whalley british library datacite google jisc queens university belfast research information network serials solutions university college london university of manchester university of oxford university of southampton peg-board sudamih archives cloud computing data data citation data management data mining data set database doi ebook eprints fedora commons flash foi framework google scholar higher education identifier information retrieval infrastructure metadata mp3 multimedia national library ogg preservation rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web sparql streaming text mining video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1577 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: iPad - The Missing Manual http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a manual to help support your use of an iPad - 'the book that should have been in the box'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Missing Manual Series, originally written and published by David Pogue has expanded and is now published by O'Reilly, who deal mainly with computer books. Like many other publishers, they have jumped on the 'ibandwagon'. A quick count on Amazon Books gave a dozen similar offerings (excluding developers' guides).</p> <p>This is a review therefore of just one of these paperbacks, and is not a comparative review – with one exception which I shall come to below.</p> <h2 id="Comments">Comments</h2> <p>For writing this review I settled down with the IPad on my knee, Bluetooth keyboard below that and glass of chenin blanc at my right hand – but wondered where to place the volume under review. As yet, nobody has produced a 'skyhook' to hold one or the other. <em>IPad: The Missing Manual (<em>MM</em>)</em> is a little smaller than the iPad itself, about as thick and uses glossy paper with colour illustrations on most pages. In general, each page has a new topic and is organised by basic chapters. <em>Get to know your iPad, Interact with your iPad</em>, etc. They are logical and you can easily flick between them to find the section you need. Not that, with an iPad, you really need to find much. Just plug in applications (apps) and play to find your own way around. This, of course, is typical for Macs of whatever kind. With the iPad however, there is less freedom to find new ways of doing things than with the usual Linux-based Mac OS. The main difficulty is to link up with a computer; fire up iTunes and use this to get started. The basic leaflet that comes with the iPad will tell you all this. Even if you have not used a Mac before, it is fairly intuitive. If you are unsure about the basic operations and included apps, the Apple Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>] gives some short, but informative videos. The Missing Manual elaborates on them. If you have not used an iPhone, or perhaps an IPod before, then the <em>MM</em> helps a bit. If you want to do something, for example, move around the icons of apps on the screen and you don't know what to do, then a brief incursion to the <em>MM</em> is undoubtedly helpful. There is a substantial index to help matters but you may well have picked up the basics from Apple's video tours.</p> <p>At this stage I wanted a 'top up' and went into the kitchen, but I also did an experiment. The weight of iPad on the kitchen scales was 856g; weight of the <em>MM</em> was 427g, ratio, almost exactly 2:1. By a volumetric comparison this is approximately 1: 0.8. The <em>MM</em> is by no means small, so what about information content per volume or mass? Here is another experiment if you have just bought an iPad. First, download the app <em>iCabMobile</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>], this is another browser that can be used instead of, and is rather better than, the bundled Safari. Now download the app <em>GoodReader</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] and then into the browser type: manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iPad_User_Guide.pdf [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Lo and behold you have the 'true' missing manual from Apple. Now, in the browser, insert the letter g before http:// of the target URL of the pdf and press 'return'. This downloads the iPad_User_Guide pdf into <em>GoodReader</em>. It is 19MB but should come down easily. You can then browse Apple's free manual in <em>GoodReader</em> as an e-book.</p> <p>Steve Jobs boasts that there are 8,500 apps for the iPad [<a href="#5">5</a>] but which ones are necessary for your Personal Learning Environment? Well, this review (via <em>MacUser</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], thank you) suggests two very good ones. <em>GoodReader</em> is excellent, you can leaf through the pdf as a book, search it, and so on, so put all your downloaded pdfs there. If you do not use <em>Mobile Me</em> [<a href="#7">7</a>] and if you want to get hold of a pdf (or other) file from your office machine, then use<em> Dropbox</em> [<a href="#8">8</a>] for your office machine and iPad. Upload it in the office and download it to your iPad at leisure. Some apps are mentioned at various places in the <em>MM</em>, but of course more are added all the time so a print-on-paper book is not a good venue for them.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review brian whalley amazon apple oreilly queens university belfast browser ebook ipad iphone itunes linux mac os mobile safari search technology video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1582 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk e-Books for the Future: Here but Hiding? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> outlines some developments in e-book technologies and links them to existing ways of presenting textbook information.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 feature article brian whalley bbc cetis google hewlett-packard jisc massachusetts institute of technology queens university of belfast eboni jorum ples project gutenberg wikipedia wikisource aggregation archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing copyright creative commons data database digital asset management digital library digital repositories dspace e-learning ebook ejournal exif file format flash google books higher education hypertext internet explorer interoperability itunes learning objects licence mac os metadata mobile mp3 multimedia open source podcast portal rae repositories research rss scorm search technology software sql standards syndication thesaurus vle widget wiki wireless youtube Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1271 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Electronic Journals, Evolutionary Niches http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue3/ggg <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue3/ggg#author1">Brian Whalley</a> describes what academics want from their journals and shows how these criteria can be met by an on-line journal.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Most academics regard themselves as radicals; in practice, they are probably as conservative as anyone else in the world, publishers included. These are generalisations of course, but regarding new and novel forms of publishing it would appear that physicists logging on to Paul Ginsparg's workstation at Los Alamos are well ahead of the field. Ginsparg is, according to some, changing the face of academic publishing. Publishers and academic authors and readers all have some experience of electronic journals, an indication that they are no longer on the horizon but have arrived.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue3/ggg" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue3 feature article brian whalley ejournal gis passwords rae research search technology Sat, 18 May 1996 23:00:00 +0000 editor 71 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk