Overview of content related to 'queens university belfast' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/15802/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=brian%20whalley&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Book Review: Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> looks at a student survival aid in the information age that should also be valuable for tutors.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies' is an example of an ever-increasing range of 'self-help' books for students on a variety of topics relating skills, tips and education. Such books range from 'Critical thinking skills' [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the quite specific, for example, 'Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and more' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This offering from Gower/Ashgate comes somewhere in between. It introduces students to the main current technologies and some of the pedagogic devices they might find in modern education.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review brian whalley apple google microsoft queens university belfast wikipedia blog data e-learning ebook higher education ict linux mobile open source openoffice png podcast repositories software usb wiki youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1601 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk E-books and E-content 2010: Data As Content http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reports on a meeting dealing with academic data management and some JISC projects concerned with institutional responses to the need to manage research data more effectively.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/ebooks-ucl-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report brian whalley british library datacite google jisc queens university belfast research information network serials solutions university college london university of manchester university of oxford university of southampton peg-board sudamih archives cloud computing data data citation data management data mining data set database doi ebook eprints fedora commons flash foi framework google scholar higher education identifier information retrieval infrastructure metadata mp3 multimedia national library ogg preservation rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web sparql streaming text mining video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1577 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: iPad - The Missing Manual http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a manual to help support your use of an iPad - 'the book that should have been in the box'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Missing Manual Series, originally written and published by David Pogue has expanded and is now published by O'Reilly, who deal mainly with computer books. Like many other publishers, they have jumped on the 'ibandwagon'. A quick count on Amazon Books gave a dozen similar offerings (excluding developers' guides).</p> <p>This is a review therefore of just one of these paperbacks, and is not a comparative review – with one exception which I shall come to below.</p> <h2 id="Comments">Comments</h2> <p>For writing this review I settled down with the IPad on my knee, Bluetooth keyboard below that and glass of chenin blanc at my right hand – but wondered where to place the volume under review. As yet, nobody has produced a 'skyhook' to hold one or the other. <em>IPad: The Missing Manual (<em>MM</em>)</em> is a little smaller than the iPad itself, about as thick and uses glossy paper with colour illustrations on most pages. In general, each page has a new topic and is organised by basic chapters. <em>Get to know your iPad, Interact with your iPad</em>, etc. They are logical and you can easily flick between them to find the section you need. Not that, with an iPad, you really need to find much. Just plug in applications (apps) and play to find your own way around. This, of course, is typical for Macs of whatever kind. With the iPad however, there is less freedom to find new ways of doing things than with the usual Linux-based Mac OS. The main difficulty is to link up with a computer; fire up iTunes and use this to get started. The basic leaflet that comes with the iPad will tell you all this. Even if you have not used a Mac before, it is fairly intuitive. If you are unsure about the basic operations and included apps, the Apple Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>] gives some short, but informative videos. The Missing Manual elaborates on them. If you have not used an iPhone, or perhaps an IPod before, then the <em>MM</em> helps a bit. If you want to do something, for example, move around the icons of apps on the screen and you don't know what to do, then a brief incursion to the <em>MM</em> is undoubtedly helpful. There is a substantial index to help matters but you may well have picked up the basics from Apple's video tours.</p> <p>At this stage I wanted a 'top up' and went into the kitchen, but I also did an experiment. The weight of iPad on the kitchen scales was 856g; weight of the <em>MM</em> was 427g, ratio, almost exactly 2:1. By a volumetric comparison this is approximately 1: 0.8. The <em>MM</em> is by no means small, so what about information content per volume or mass? Here is another experiment if you have just bought an iPad. First, download the app <em>iCabMobile</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>], this is another browser that can be used instead of, and is rather better than, the bundled Safari. Now download the app <em>GoodReader</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] and then into the browser type: manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iPad_User_Guide.pdf [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Lo and behold you have the 'true' missing manual from Apple. Now, in the browser, insert the letter g before http:// of the target URL of the pdf and press 'return'. This downloads the iPad_User_Guide pdf into <em>GoodReader</em>. It is 19MB but should come down easily. You can then browse Apple's free manual in <em>GoodReader</em> as an e-book.</p> <p>Steve Jobs boasts that there are 8,500 apps for the iPad [<a href="#5">5</a>] but which ones are necessary for your Personal Learning Environment? Well, this review (via <em>MacUser</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], thank you) suggests two very good ones. <em>GoodReader</em> is excellent, you can leaf through the pdf as a book, search it, and so on, so put all your downloaded pdfs there. If you do not use <em>Mobile Me</em> [<a href="#7">7</a>] and if you want to get hold of a pdf (or other) file from your office machine, then use<em> Dropbox</em> [<a href="#8">8</a>] for your office machine and iPad. Upload it in the office and download it to your iPad at leisure. Some apps are mentioned at various places in the <em>MM</em>, but of course more are added all the time so a print-on-paper book is not a good venue for them.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review brian whalley amazon apple oreilly queens university belfast browser ebook ipad iphone itunes linux mac os mobile safari search technology video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1582 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Supporting Research Students http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a work which helps Library and Information Science Staff at Higher Education Institutions to support their research students.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The purpose of this book is to support Library and Information Science (LIS) professionals at Higher Education institutions (HEIs) who may be involved with doctoral students. <em>Supporting Research Students</em> emanates from Dr Allan's own experience in gaining a PhD and as a Senior Lecturer in Student Learning and Management Learning at the University of Hull. She thus has considerable expertise in seeing postgraduate research from the student point of view and from support provision by LIS staff. I came to this review with interest and I should lay out my own credentials.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review brian whalley google microsoft queens university belfast university of hull wikipedia bibliographic data data gis google scholar higher education hypertext multimedia ontologies open source refworks research virtual research environment web 2.0 Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1557 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Product Review: The IPad and the Educator, First Impressions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw-2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/whalley-rvw-2#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reports on his initial impressions of the new Apple iPad in the first three weeks since its release in the USA and what it has to offer the mobile educator.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Triumph_of_Design_over_Function">Triumph of Design over Function?</h2> <p>So, you have seen and read the hype about the iPad [<a href="#1">1</a>]; the world release has been delayed until the US appetite has been satiated and it will be the end of May for the rest of the world. Should you buy one or is this an example of the triumph of elegant design over function? What follows is an initial view of an iPad bought in the US in April and the results of some playing around with it in the USA and then the UK. It is not a comparative test with 'netbooks' or other e-book readers (such as Kindle and Sony), although I shall make some discrete comparisons because this review stems from an earlier discussion about e-books in <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Main_Impressions">Main Impressions</h2> <p>One complaint about existing e-book readers was, and is, that they do not have colour screens. I want to view Web pages with images and text at a decent size and read e-books with coloured (and preferably hypertext) material. I'd like my students to have this capability too. The e-ink technology in a Kindle cannot currently offer anything other than greyscale so the iPad is immediately a 'wow' when you turn it on. The touch screen is excellent and a size that can be used to read books as well as Web pages without lots of scrolling. This was my main reason for trying the iPad as, apart of my desire to have students use a Personal Learning Environment (PLE, device plus appropriately chosen applications), the screen was a major consideration. Netbooks fill the bill to a limited extent but with the 9.7" diagonal (19.5 x 15 cm screen, portrait or landscape conversion in 1 second) the iPad is more than good. All my colleagues who have paid me £5 just to touch it have remarked on this. Have a look at the (<em>Guardian</em>) Eyewitness app [<a href="#3">3</a>] to see what it can do. The screen also provides a keyboard (scaling for the orientation) that can be used for typing rather than prodding with a finger or stylus but, as with the iPhone, you can only get numerals by shifting a key. A separate Apple Bluetooth keyboard is available which is very neat, light and allows proper typing. This review was initially typed on the iPad Notes application ('app' now of course), I have not yet tried the Apple iWorks suite and at this stage I am not using the iPad as a laptop replacement; but rather, as a lightweight device that can be used for basic notebook functionality with the ability to read text and view Web pages without strain or undue scrolling.</p> <p>The 3G version of the iPad is not yet out but, for the moment, this does not concern me; I can 'synch' my iPhone and Macbook Pro when needed and my iPhone gives me some iPhone applications of usefully increased screen size (there are lots more to come specifically for the iPad of course). Music and video (4:3 ratio) come over smoothly - and video is at a reasonable size to view rather than squinting myopically at an iPhone. The iPad was useful on a Transatlantic flight (steerage with restricted lapspace) for typing, music and film. When necessary, you can slip it beside you and need not worry about slopping your gin and tonic over a keyboard. Convenience is a great selling point about the iPad, battery life is excellent, a claimed 10 hours. It took about 6 hours to recharge from 4% capacity to full. The same power connector-USB cable (used also for data connectivity) works for the iPod and iPhone as well so you can easily charge from laptop, external AC sources, car adapter as well, as a <em>PowerMonkey </em>or similar external power source. Power efficiency is mainly due to the type of computer architecture the machine uses. It is the same Apple custom CPU (known as A4) that is used by the iPhone and so, from this point of view, the iPad is indeed a large iPhone. The architecture differs from that used on most netbooks, which are really stripped down and relatively slow and power-hungry versions of (x86 architecture) laptops. We should really think of the iPad as a new generation of small computer and it remains to be seen what Apple will develop in the future.</p> <p>Unfortunately, Digital Rights Management (DRM) meant that I could not access iTunes myself in the USA so I had to rely on my son's access to try a few things out. I now have a list of applications to experiment with but I shall not report on those here, they will have to wait until the App Store opens for iPad use in the UK. At present, you can only have one app open at a time (plus audio on the iPod application). Apple have already indicated that the next version of the OS will have multiple-tasking, that is, keeping two applications open at the same time; currently you have to switch using the discrete 'home' button. This button is on the screen, the on/off and volume controls are around the rim together with docking connector, earpiece jack socket, aperture for microphone (so you can use the iDictaphone app) and a switch to lock/unlock the screen orientation.</p> <p>I mentioned DRM earlier so the only iBooks downloaded so far are <em>Winnie the Pooh</em> and <em>Twelfth Night</em>. The former is really very good with the original E.H. Shepard coloured illustrations. They are text-searchable (did you know that the word 'hunny' only occurs three times in <em>Winnie the Pooh</em>?), there is a dictionary and the ability to change to one of five different typefaces and two sizes. The text is very clear and readable in either mode and the graphics can give you a page turn as slow or as fast as you like, neat. I also tried <em>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</em> downloaded from <em>Stanza</em> where there is more flexibility with fonts but the text is less crisp. I downloaded apps for <em>Kindle </em>[<a href="#4">4</a>] and <em>Reader Lite </em>but did not use their offerings. I suspect that there will be improvements from most e-book vendors with iPad optimisation in the jockeying for position that appears to be going on in the e-book world. We have yet to see how the commercial textbook vendors deal with e-books for the iPad.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw-2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review brian whalley alt alt-c apple bbc google queens university belfast adobe data drm ebook flash google scholar graphics html html5 hypertext ipad iphone itunes jpg podcast usb video wiki Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1558 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: My Word! Plagiarism and College Culture http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a look at this problem from an American anthropologist and finds there is more in it than just a consideration of plagiarism.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>My Word!</em> is an attention-grabbing title for a book on plagiarism by an academic anthropologist and teacher. Although written entirely from a North American perspective, many bells will ring here for all concerned with teaching and education. Do not, however, expect a set of ideas or rules to prevent (!) or reduce plagiarism.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 review brian whalley cornell university queens university belfast bibliographic data copyright higher education intellectual property software video Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1538 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Blended Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews Barbara Allan's book on blended learning for Information and Library Science staff and educational developers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As the author says, 'The overall aim of this book is to provide a practical guide to library and information workers who are involved in education and training, and who are interested in designing and delivering blended learning experiences to their colleagues and customers'. I come from an academic geology background but with an interest in teaching and ICT in teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 review brian whalley queens university belfast ajax blog e-learning higher education ict library management systems perl standards video Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1382 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk