Overview of content related to 'oreilly' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/15804/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Eduserv Symposium 2012: Big Data, Big Deal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> attended the annual Eduserv Symposium on 10 May 2012 at the Royal College of Physicians, London to find out what are the implications of big data for Higher Education Institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The annual Eduserv Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] was billed as a ‘must-attend event for IT professionals in Higher Education’; the choice of topical subject matter being one of the biggest crowd-drawers (the other being the amazing venue: the Royal College of Physicians). The past few years have seen coverage of highly topical areas such as virtualisation and the cloud, the mobile university and access management.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report marieke guy amazon cetis dcc eduserv google jisc orcid oreilly oxford internet institute ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of california berkeley university of leicester university of oxford webtrends wellcome trust dealing with data impact project accessibility algorithm big data blog cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation gis google analytics google trends hadoop higher education infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer irods learning analytics mobile nosql oer open data open source remote working research twitter usb Mon, 30 Jul 2012 17:48:45 +0000 lisrw 2370 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Making Software - What Really Works, and Why We Believe It http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>While acknowledging the genuine usefulness of much of its content, <a href="/issue68/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> provides helpful pointers towards a second edition.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Published by O'Reilly, as part of the Theory In Practice series, this book is essentially academic in focus. It takes the form of thirty chapters. The first eight of these aim to provide an introduction to the area of software engineering, or more specifically, the collection and use of supporting evidence to support software engineering practices. These initial chapters are satisfyingly broad in scope, covering topics from human factors and personality to complexity metrics and the process of authoring a systematic review.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review emma tonkin oreilly ukoln university of bath aggregation algorithm api data data mining framework open source repositories research software Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 1650 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Access, Delivery, Performance - The Future of Libraries Without Walls http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a Festschrift celebrating the work of Professor Peter Brophy, founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is normal in some subject disciplines to publish volumes of edited papers in honour of a respected colleague, usually to mark a significant birthday or career change. The contributors to such Festschriften<a href="#editors-note">*</a> are usually made up of former colleagues or pupils of the person being honoured. This volume celebrates the work of Professor Peter Brophy, the founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management (CERLIM), which since 1998 has been based at the Manchester Metropolitan University. This volume contains twelve chapters written by sixteen contributors, many of them colleagues or ex-colleagues of Professor Brophy.</p> <p>Peter Brophy has had an outstanding career both as a librarian and researcher. Alan MacDougall, Visiting Professor at Manchester Metropolitan University provides an outline in the opening chapter. A career that started at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster University in the early 1970s progressed to professional posts at Strathclyde University and Teeside Polytechnic, before Brophy eventually became Librarian at Bristol Polytechnic. From there, he moved to the University of Central Lancashire in 1989, where in 1993 he set up CERLIM. A selected bibliography of works by Professor Brophy fills eleven pages at the end of the volume, revealing the range and diversity of his research interests over the past few decades.</p> <p>The contexts of the early years of Professor Brophy's career are sketched in more detail in the opening chapter by Michael Buckland, Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. Buckland was a colleague of Brophy's at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster in the early 1970s.This chapter gives a good flavour of how library and information research was undertaken in this time when the libraries at what were then 'new universities' had an active interest in innovation and when almost all library research in the UK was funded by the Office for Scientific and Technical Information of the Department of Education and Science.</p> <h2 id="Libraries_and_e-Learning">Libraries and e-Learning</h2> <p>The remainder of the book is organised into four broad themes. The first covers libraries' role in supporting e-learning. The opening chapter in this section is by Gill Needham and Nicky Whitsed of the Open University. It is a series of reflections on a decade of developing library services for distance learners. Starting with the Follett Report of 1993 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the chapter identifies three main phases in the Open University's approach to delivering services to around 200,000 students and 8,000 tutors. The first phase was concerned with fairness; knowing exactly when to introduce online services at a time when a majority of Open University students did not have access to the relevant technologies or skills and when many tutors were reluctant to change their traditional ways of working. Responses to this included the development of library-mediated collections of quality-controlled Internet resources, supplemented by an online skills tutorial focused on generic information skills. Despite all of this, actual use of online resources remained relatively low (p. 30). The second phase, therefore, was mainly about integrating online services more deeply into the core learning activities of courses. The focus switched to the training of tutors and the integration of information resources within the university's emerging virtual learning environment (VLE), based on Moodle. In the interim, a pilot project using the open source MyLibrary software was found to be useful in helping to integrate library services into the learning experiences of individual students. The third phase - which Needham and Whitsed note is still ongoing - concerns the embedding of information literacy and resource-based learning concepts within the university more widely. The chapter ends with some comments on the, perhaps inevitable, tension between the 'invisible library' – 'quietly and strategically … [insinuating] resources and services into all those places where they have the most impact' - and the need to defend library budgets and status within the wider institution (pp. 35-36).</p> <p>The following chapter, by Professor David Baker of the University College Plymouth St Mark and St John, is a general overview of the development of e-learning technologies in UK Higher Education over the past decade. Starting again with Follett, Baker explains how e-learning concepts and technologies have been taken up, focusing in particular on the facilitating role taken by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) in providing a national-level approach to the provision of both infrastructure (e.g., networks, access management tools) and content. In addition, the chapter refers to a number of JISC-funded programmes and initiatives focused on breaking down the barriers that prevent the sharing and re-use of e-learning content. The final sections look at some wider factors influencing the current transformation of learning, teaching and assessment practices. These include the need to integrate institutional services like VLEs with the generic social networking tools and mobile devices familiar to new generations of learners. However, successful integration is not just a matter of technology but of overcoming cultural differences. Baker uses a synthesis of the JISC-funded Learner Experiences of e-Learning projects [<a href="#2">2</a>] to note that there might have been 'an increasing "divide" between the needs, expectations and wishes of the learners and the expectations of the teachers, who were more "traditional" and perhaps not engaged with e-learning in the same way' (p. 49).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review michael day british library cerlim google jisc manchester metropolitan university mla open university oreilly rnib talis ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of california berkeley university of central lancashire victoria university w3c jisc information environment web accessibility initiative accessibility archives bibliographic data cataloguing controlled vocabularies digital library e-learning facebook flickr framework higher education infrastructure knowledge management metadata mobile moodle open source preservation repositories research semantic web software vle vocabularies wcag web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1580 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: iPad - The Missing Manual http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a manual to help support your use of an iPad - 'the book that should have been in the box'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Missing Manual Series, originally written and published by David Pogue has expanded and is now published by O'Reilly, who deal mainly with computer books. Like many other publishers, they have jumped on the 'ibandwagon'. A quick count on Amazon Books gave a dozen similar offerings (excluding developers' guides).</p> <p>This is a review therefore of just one of these paperbacks, and is not a comparative review – with one exception which I shall come to below.</p> <h2 id="Comments">Comments</h2> <p>For writing this review I settled down with the IPad on my knee, Bluetooth keyboard below that and glass of chenin blanc at my right hand – but wondered where to place the volume under review. As yet, nobody has produced a 'skyhook' to hold one or the other. <em>IPad: The Missing Manual (<em>MM</em>)</em> is a little smaller than the iPad itself, about as thick and uses glossy paper with colour illustrations on most pages. In general, each page has a new topic and is organised by basic chapters. <em>Get to know your iPad, Interact with your iPad</em>, etc. They are logical and you can easily flick between them to find the section you need. Not that, with an iPad, you really need to find much. Just plug in applications (apps) and play to find your own way around. This, of course, is typical for Macs of whatever kind. With the iPad however, there is less freedom to find new ways of doing things than with the usual Linux-based Mac OS. The main difficulty is to link up with a computer; fire up iTunes and use this to get started. The basic leaflet that comes with the iPad will tell you all this. Even if you have not used a Mac before, it is fairly intuitive. If you are unsure about the basic operations and included apps, the Apple Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>] gives some short, but informative videos. The Missing Manual elaborates on them. If you have not used an iPhone, or perhaps an IPod before, then the <em>MM</em> helps a bit. If you want to do something, for example, move around the icons of apps on the screen and you don't know what to do, then a brief incursion to the <em>MM</em> is undoubtedly helpful. There is a substantial index to help matters but you may well have picked up the basics from Apple's video tours.</p> <p>At this stage I wanted a 'top up' and went into the kitchen, but I also did an experiment. The weight of iPad on the kitchen scales was 856g; weight of the <em>MM</em> was 427g, ratio, almost exactly 2:1. By a volumetric comparison this is approximately 1: 0.8. The <em>MM</em> is by no means small, so what about information content per volume or mass? Here is another experiment if you have just bought an iPad. First, download the app <em>iCabMobile</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>], this is another browser that can be used instead of, and is rather better than, the bundled Safari. Now download the app <em>GoodReader</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] and then into the browser type: manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iPad_User_Guide.pdf [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Lo and behold you have the 'true' missing manual from Apple. Now, in the browser, insert the letter g before http:// of the target URL of the pdf and press 'return'. This downloads the iPad_User_Guide pdf into <em>GoodReader</em>. It is 19MB but should come down easily. You can then browse Apple's free manual in <em>GoodReader</em> as an e-book.</p> <p>Steve Jobs boasts that there are 8,500 apps for the iPad [<a href="#5">5</a>] but which ones are necessary for your Personal Learning Environment? Well, this review (via <em>MacUser</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], thank you) suggests two very good ones. <em>GoodReader</em> is excellent, you can leaf through the pdf as a book, search it, and so on, so put all your downloaded pdfs there. If you do not use <em>Mobile Me</em> [<a href="#7">7</a>] and if you want to get hold of a pdf (or other) file from your office machine, then use<em> Dropbox</em> [<a href="#8">8</a>] for your office machine and iPad. Upload it in the office and download it to your iPad at leisure. Some apps are mentioned at various places in the <em>MM</em>, but of course more are added all the time so a print-on-paper book is not a good venue for them.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review brian whalley amazon apple oreilly queens university belfast browser ebook ipad iphone itunes linux mac os mobile safari search technology video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1582 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Usability Inspection of Digital Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author1">Lorraine Paterson</a> and <a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author2">Boon Low</a> highlight findings from the usability inspection report conducted for the UX2.0 research project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article boon low lorraine paterson american library association british library iso jisc national e-science centre oreilly university of edinburgh aquabrowser europeana jisc information environment ux2.0 worldcat accessibility ajax cataloguing digital library e-science facebook framework ict interoperability personalisation research resource discovery search technology social networks software standardisation standards tag cloud twitter usability web 2.0 Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1543 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Approximately 97 Things http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/cliff-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/cliff-rvw#author1">Pete Cliff</a> learns something new in this 'Open Source' book every time he makes the tea.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. 2010-05-25-18-28 implementing Pete's edits -REW --><!-- v2. 2010-05-25-18-28 implementing Pete's edits -REW --><p><em>97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know.</em> From the title it should be pretty clear what we're getting, but the creation of this book is a little different. The editor goes so far as to state this is an Open Source book and likens its creation to Open Source Software development. It contains (you guessed it) 97 short (2-page) essays ('axioms'), each one contributed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Each presents a single pearl of wisdom from an expert in the field of Software Architecture.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/cliff-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review pete cliff bbc bodleian libraries oreilly university of oxford wikipedia creative commons licence open source software Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1554 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk e-Framework Implements New Workplan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/dolphin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/dolphin#author1">Ian Dolphin</a> and <a href="/issue59/dolphin#author2">Phil Nicholls</a> describe recent and forthcoming developments from the e-Framework Partnership for Education and Research.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/dolphin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article ian dolphin phil nicholls amazon deewr dest jisc oreilly sakai university of bolton university of hull university of sheffield e-framework wikipedia data digital library e-learning framework ict infrastructure interoperability operating system preservation repositories research service oriented architecture soa software standards twitter uportal Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1465 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Website Optimization http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/cliff-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/cliff-rvw#author1">Pete Cliff</a> used to think 'Website Optimisation' simply meant compressing images and avoiding nested tables, but in this he book finds out how much more there is to it, even in the Age of Broadband.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 4, to accept final edit's supplied by book's author 2008-11-18 REW --><!-- version 4, to accept final edit's supplied by book's author 2008-11-18 REW --><p>Serendipity can be a wonderful thing. It was a Tuesday, over coffee, that the esteemed editor of this publication presented me with a copy of <em>Website Optimization</em> and asked if I would be interested in reviewing it. Two days later, at a regular team meeting for the Repositories Support Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] (RSP), we discussed (rather generally) how we might boost the search ranking and usage of the RSP Web site.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/cliff-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 review pete cliff google jisc oreilly ukoln university of bath w3c repositories support project rsp seo project wikipedia ajax apache cache cool uri css framework html metadata microformats open source rdf repositories research resource description search engine optimisation search technology semantic web software uri video wireless Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1443 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Visualizing Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/cliff-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/cliff-rvw#author1">Pete Cliff</a> considers a new book on data visualisation and hopes one day to implement some of the interesting ideas presented in this work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I'll be honest - I am no expert in data visualisation. I had not heard of Edward Tufte [<a href="#1">1</a>] before looking at this book and while I thought I had an idea about the topic, the book suggested to me I did not. Perhaps this makes me unable to judge the value of its content; but I prefer to think this means I can come at the work as a member of the target audience:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/cliff-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 review pete cliff amazon oreilly ukoln university of bath gnu bibliographic data computer programming data data set data visualisation database flash graphics html java javascript json licence mysql open source photoshop programming language research software svg vector graphics visualisation xml Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1421 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Librarian's Information Literacy Annual Conference (LILAC) 2008 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/lilac-2008-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/lilac-2008-rpt#author1">Keir Hopwood</a> reports on three-day conference about current and future trends in the practice of information literacy teaching in Higher Education and beyond.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/lilac-2008-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 event report keir hopwood google jisc london school of economics oreilly university of brighton university of sheffield university of the west of england wellcome library wikipedia blog data higher education infrastructure knowledge management metadata moodle portal research rss search technology second life software standards video vle web 2.0 Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1395 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web 2.0 in U.S. LIS Schools: Are They Missing the Boat? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/aharony <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/aharony#author1">Noa Aharony</a> asks whether library and information science schools in the United States are underestimating the opportunities offered by Web 2.0 applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Library and information science (LIS) programmes prepare students for performing traditional information tasks such as indexing, retrieval and library management [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>]. The increased importance and centrality of information has moved LIS schools to offer new curricula that combine traditional librarianship and archiving with technological and social aspects of information.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/aharony" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article noa aharony american library association bar-ilan university jisc oclc oreilly university of alberta university of washington isle worldcat archives blog cataloguing content management data database facebook flickr information architecture information society instant messaging metadata open source podcast research rss search technology social networks social software social web software tagging web 2.0 wiki youtube Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1365 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Googlepository and the University Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/manuel-oppenheim <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/manuel-oppenheim#author1">Sue Manuel</a> and <a href="/issue53/manuel-oppenheim#author2">Charles Oppenheim</a> discuss the concept of Google as a repository within the wider context of resource management and provision in Further and Higher Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The development of an increasing array of tools for storing, organising, managing, and searching electronic resources poses some interesting questions for those in the Higher Education sector, not least of which are: what role do repositories have in this new information environment? What effect is Google having on the information-seeking strategies of students, researchers and teachers? Where do libraries fit within the information continuum? And ultimately, what services should they look to provide for their users?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/manuel-oppenheim" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article charles oppenheim sue manuel alt cetis d-lib magazine dcc google ieee jisc loughborough university massachusetts institute of technology oreilly university of cambridge archives hub jisc information environment midess open library access control aggregation algorithm archives bibliographic data blog born digital cataloguing copyright data database digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination e-learning google search higher education identifier ieee lom information architecture information retrieval learning object metadata learning objects librarything lom metadata multimedia open access preservation provenance repositories research resource discovery search technology social software standards tagging usability web services web standards Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1352 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Mastering Regular Expressions, 3rd Edition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/tonkin-tourte-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/tonkin-tourte-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> and <a href="/issue53/tonkin-tourte-rvw#author2">Greg Tourte</a> take a look at the new edition of an O'Reilly classic.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Introduction:_Needles_Haystacks_and_Magnets">Introduction: Needles, Haystacks and Magnets</h2> <p>Since the early days of metadata, powerful textual search methods have been, as Wodehouse's Wooster might have put it, 'of the essence'. Effective use of search engines is all about understanding the use of the rich query syntax supported by that particular software. Examples include the use of Boolean logic (AND, OR and NOT), and wildcards, such as <em><strong>*</strong></em> and <em><strong>?</strong></em>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/tonkin-tourte-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 review emma tonkin greg tourte google oreilly ukoln university of bristol archives ascii csv data database digital library eprints html interoperability java metadata perl php programming language search technology software text mining url Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1363 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Google Hacks http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/bradley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue50/bradley-rvw#author1">Phil Bradley</a> looks at a work offering programming 'know-how' to create resources that will do things with the search engine that might otherwise prove difficult or impossible.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The subtitle for the book is 'Tips and tools for finding and using the world's information' which does neatly sum up its content. This is the third edition, so it is clearly popular, and has been updated to include information and hacks for Google maps, talk and desktop. As with any O'Reilly title, it is very clearly laid out, easy to read, with extremely good illustrations, small icons to indicate tips or notes of caution, plus an in-depth and thorough index. Each hack is clearly indicated by typography, an icon and the top corner of each page indicates the numbered hack.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/bradley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 review phil bradley google oreilly google maps html javascript perl python search technology web 2.0 Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1302 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Ambient Findability http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> reviews a book with interesting content despite a few rough edges.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Ambient Findability</em> is to all external appearances an O'Reilly book. It boasts the familiar line drawing of an animal, on this occasion a Verreaux's sifaka, a large and engagingly thoughtful-looking lemur. Judging the book by its cover would suggest that it be placed on the shelf together with O'Reilly's classic line of reference books, upon which developers all over the world depend for sparsely presented, accurate information and advice. But this book is of a different breed.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 review emma tonkin georgia institute of technology harvard university microsoft oreilly university of bath lemur wikipedia bibliographic data blog framework git identifier interoperability metadata mobile python research rfid search technology semantic web video wireless Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1283 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute: The New Best of the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/williams <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/williams#author1">Caroline Williams</a> describes Intute in the context of the online information environment and outlines aspirations for the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/williams" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article caroline williams ahrc google hefce ilrt intute jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas oreilly sherpa ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of bristol university of huddersfield university of leeds university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome trust ebank uk eprints uk jisc information environment accessibility blog cataloguing data data set database digital library digital repositories eprints file sharing higher education infrastructure personalisation podcast repositories research resource discovery search technology semantic web software vle web 2.0 web resources web services wiki Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1247 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Serving Services in Web 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/vanveen <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/vanveen#author1">Theo van Veen</a> shows with the help of an example, how standardised descriptions of services can help users control the integration of services from different providers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>"I want my browser to recognise information in Web pages and offer me functionality to remix it with relevant information from other services. I want to control which services are offered to me and how they are offered."</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/vanveen" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 feature article theo van veen amazon google oai oreilly ajax algorithm api archives bibliographic data bibliographic record browser cataloguing context objects in spans data database dublin core firefox framework google scholar html identifier javascript knowledge base metadata metadata model microformats oai-pmh open archives initiative openurl owl personalisation portal schema search technology semantic web soa soap sru standardisation standards stylesheet tagging thesaurus uddi url usability web 2.0 web services wsdl xml xsl xslt z39.88 Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1234 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 45: Smaller Might Be Beautiful http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 45.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>While as a fully paid-up cynic I could be forgiven for fingering the metaphorical revolver on sighting a technology evangelist, the evangelist in question has an excellent track record as <em>Ariadne</em> readers will know. <strong>Paul Miller</strong> in his article <a href="/issue45/miller/">Web 2.0: Building the New Library</a> would seem to lift our eyes above the merely technological and in a series of 'Principles' underpinning Web 2.0 provides us with a set of aims with which relatively few might argue violently - on the face of it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 editorial richard waller d-lib magazine jisc oreilly cree daedalus blog cataloguing copyright creative commons digitisation e-learning eprints file sharing framework open access portal repositories research search technology web 2.0 wsrp Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1183 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web 2.0: Building the New Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/miller#author1">Paul Miller</a> explores some of the recent buzz around the concept of 'Web 2.0' and asks what it means for libraries and related organisations.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Web 2.0' is a hot story out on the blogosphere right now, with an army of advocates facing off against those who argue that it is nothing new, and their allies with painful memories of Dot Com hysteria in the 1990s. Even respectable media outlets such as <em>Business Week</em> are getting excited, and an expensive conference in San Francisco at the start of October had to turn people away as it passed over 800 registrations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 feature article paul miller amazon bbc cni coalition for networked information google oreilly talis university of hull wikipedia api blog browser data flickr foi framework google maps html interoperability podcast portal privacy research search technology software technorati uri web 2.0 web browser web services wsrp Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1184 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Accidental Webmaster http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue39/prue-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue39/prue-rvw#author1">Andy Prue</a> examines a guide aimed at inexperienced Webmasters. While the book covers some interesting and salient points, Andy raises questions as to the ideal audience.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The World Wide Web has emerged as one of the key platforms for the development and communication of information.</p> <p>From complex, high-tech organisations like the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (<a href="http://www1.nasa.gov/home/%20">NASA</a>) [<a href="#1">1</a>], through to community sites such as <a href="http://www.abingtontrails.org">Abington Trails</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>], a Pennsylvanian community trails group, the Web has provided effective access to a global audience of billions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue39/prue-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue39 review andy prue oreilly bibliographic data copyright information architecture privacy web development Thu, 29 Apr 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1048 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG): Vector Graphics for the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue28/graphics <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue28/graphics#author1">David Duce</a> discusses the World Wide Web Consortium's Scalable Vector Graphics markup language for 2 dimensional graphics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>To view the Scalable Vector Graphics in this article you will need a viewer. The Adobe® SVG Viewer is a plug-in that will allow your Web browser to render SVG and is available free from the <a href="http://www.adobe.com/svg/viewer/install/">Adobe Web site</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue28/graphics" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue28 feature article david duce alt ibm iso microsoft oreilly oxford brookes university oxford university press university of oxford w3c adobe browser css data dublin core gif graphics html internet explorer jpeg marc metadata namespace png schema standardisation standards svg url vector graphics video vml web browser xlink xml xml namespaces xslt Thu, 21 Jun 2001 23:00:00 +0000 editor 791 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Unix: What Is mod_perl? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/unix <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue21/unix#author1">Ian Peacock</a> explains mod_perl technology for supercharging the Apache Server.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><b>mod_perl</b> <a href="#1">[1]</a> has to be one of the most useful and powerful of the Apache modules. Beneath the inconspicuous name, this module marries two of the most successful and widely acclaimed products of OSS, the Apache Webserver <a href="#2">[2]</a> and Perl <a href="#3">[3]</a>. The result is a kind of Web developers Utopia, with Perl providing easy access to, and control of, the formidable Apache API. Powerful applications can be rapidly created and deployed as solutions to anything from an office Intranet to Enterprise level Web requirements.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue21/unix" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue21 tooled up ian peacock google microsoft oreilly cpan access control apache api archives authentication browser cache content negotiation cookie copyright database dom ecmascript google search html infrastructure interoperability intranet java javascript knowledge base mysql open source open standard perl personalisation php programming language python repositories scripting language search technology standards uri url usability web app web browser windows Wed, 22 Sep 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 643 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Web Editor: From 'One Stop Shop' to Information Hierarchy http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue20/web-editor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue20/web-editor#author1">Rebecca Linford</a> discusses the web editor role: from 'one stop shop' to information hierarchy.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Information_Science_and_Web_Management">Information Science &amp; Web Management</h2> <p>When web services began in Higher Education institutions, the majority of those employed to manage them were technical people. Experience in UNIX, CGI programming and Apache were prerequisites. But as web sites have grown into huge vortexes of information, those with the skills to help identify &amp; satisfy the information needs of client groups have become increasingly valued.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue20/web-editor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue20 regular column rebecca linford loughborough university microsoft oreilly robert gordon university university of dundee university of wales accessibility apache controlled vocabularies copyright database digital library higher education html information architecture library management systems perl search technology software url vocabularies web development web services Mon, 21 Jun 1999 23:00:00 +0000 editor 609 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Web Editor: Institutional Troubleshooter http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue19/web-editor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue19/web-editor#author1">Stephen Emmott</a> describes his experiences of content management at King's College London.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue19/web-editor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue19 regular column stephen emmott kings college london oreilly w3c adobe content management content provider database framework ftp html information architecture rdf research sgml url xml Fri, 19 Mar 1999 00:00:00 +0000 editor 585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk REDD: Regional Electronic Document Delivery Service http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue9/redd <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue9/redd#author1">Chris Taylor</a> provides details on an Australian electronic document delivery service that is based on standard Internet protocols.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue9/redd" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue9 project update chris taylor griffith university oreilly queensland university of technology university of queensland university of southern queensland browser copyright data file format html hypertext software standards tiff url web browser windows Sun, 18 May 1997 23:00:00 +0000 editor 318 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Sociological Research Online: Web-based Journal for the Social Sciences http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue3/sro <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue3/sro#author1">Nigel Gilbert</a> describes Sociological Research Online, a project from the Electronic Journals section of the Electronic Libraries Programme. SocResOnline is a (free) Web-based journal for people involved in Sociology and Sociology-related fields; it contains refereed articles, a substantial number of reviews and debating forums.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Sociological Research Online is a new international journal which promotes rapid communication among sociologists. The first issue was published at the end of March 1996. The journal features high quality applied sociology, focusing on theoretical, empirical and methodological discussions which engage with current political, cultural and intellectual topics and debates.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue3/sro" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue3 project update nigel gilbert jisc oreilly university of manchester university of surrey data research search technology software Sat, 18 May 1996 23:00:00 +0000 editor 80 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk