Overview of content related to 'mobile' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/16/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue=issue64 RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Editorial Introduction to Issue 64: Supporting the Power of Research Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 64.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In these cash-strapped times among all the admonitions to save money here, and resources there, I rather hope to hear much about the necessity of protecting and building the knowledge economy if the UK is to make its way in the globalised world, since we cannot pretend to compete easily in other areas of endeavour. Hence research has to be regarded as one of the aces remaining to us, and thus I hope the importance of gathering, managing and preserving for long-term access research outcomes will be widely appreciated and supported.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 editorial richard waller bbc cerlim google ifla intute national library of australia rnib automatic metadata generation itunes u archives bibliographic data bibliographic record big data blog cataloguing curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories digitisation drupal dspace e-science electronic theses fedora commons framework frbr google scholar higher education infrastructure interoperability ipad iphone itunes metadata mobile national library preservation repositories research search technology social networks software standards twitter vim web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1559 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Software Comparison: Building Digital Library Infrastructure at LSE http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/fay#author1">Ed Fay</a> presents a comparison of repository software that was carried out at LSE in support of digital library infrastructure development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article ed fay british library d-lib magazine london school of economics oai oais university of york wellcome library safir access control aggregation api archives authentication authentication service blog cataloguing content management data data management data model database digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure institutional repository ldap library management systems linked data metadata mobile multimedia national library open access open source persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata repositories research schema search technology shibboleth software standards twitter uri video vle web app xacml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1560 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Rewriting the Book: On the Move With the Library of Birmingham http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/gambles <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/gambles#author1">Brian Gambles</a> presents the Library of Birmingham vision and strategy for addressing the challenge of mobile digital services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Library of Birmingham (LoB) will open in 2013 as a world-class centre for culture, learning and knowledge, rewriting the book for public libraries in the 21st century. 'Rewriting the Book', which is integral to the new LoB brand, recognises and embraces the present and future challenge to libraries – it accepts that established means of accessing knowledge are changing rapidly and dynamically, with a significant digital dimension, and that increasingly radical responses to this challenge are demanded from leaders in the library sector.</p> <p>The LoB will seek to transform perceptions of Birmingham, redefining 'the library', with an outward focus, deeply embedded in partnership working, digitally connected to the world, and servicing both local and international audiences as a platform and cultural hub for knowledge and communal exchange. Fundamental to this change will be the delivery of digital services both inside and outside the new library with greater support for mobile communications with customers. Mobile is commonplace today, and opens up many opportunities to enhance customer experience both inside and external to the new library.</p> <p>This article describes the continuing journey of the LoB project in assessing the challenge of mobile, its relevance and how innovation could improve the visitor experience in the future.</p> <h2 id="Mobility:_An_Integral_Part_of_Living">Mobility: An Integral Part of Living</h2> <p>Mobile services are an integral part of our daily lives and embedded in our culture. This is never more apparent when we do not have them close to hand – a recent survey found that 40% of mobile phone users would rather lose their wallet than their mobile device. The choice may not be available for much longer: the mobile is very likely to become your wallet in the future!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/gambles" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article brian gambles amazon american museum of natural history apple google microsoft museum of london itunes u archives augmented reality cloud computing digital media digitisation ebook facebook framework ict information retrieval infrastructure ipad iphone itunes metadata mobile mobile phone qr code research sms software wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1561 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Public Library 2.0: Culture Change? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/hammond#author1">Sarah Hammond</a> explores UK public libraries' growing participation in social media to reach their audiences online, with a focus on blogging.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Beginning in the mid 2000s I began keeping an eye on how libraries have been getting involved with social software - I started this haphazardly just out of interest but then I started to be more systematic when I needed to explore online resources for my organisation, the National Railway Museum. When I left to pursue my MA in Librarianship at the University of Sheffield I took the opportunity to do some serious research into the subject with a focus on UK public libraries as it seemed to me that they were hugely under-represented online.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article sarah hammond bbc british library information today nhs oxford university press robert gordon university university of oxford university of sheffield university of the west of england archives blog doi facebook flickr framework higher education librarything microblogging mobile netvibes opac podcast research search technology social software software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1562 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute Reflections at the End of an Era http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author1">Angela Joyce</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author2">Linda Kerr</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author3">Tim Machin</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author4">Paul Meehan</a> and <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author5">Caroline Williams</a> look back at the history and achievements of Intute, and reflect on lessons learned as the service enters its final year.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article angela joyce caroline williams linda kerr paul meehan tim machin ahrc bbc british library google hea heriot-watt university intute jisc linden lab mimas ukoln university of bristol university of glamorgan university of huddersfield university of manchester university of oxford wellcome trust automatic metadata generation eevl elib jisc information environment mobile internet detective sosig wikipedia blog cataloguing collection development curation data database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education metadata mobile personalisation research resource discovery search technology second life software tagging twitter vim vocabularies web 2.0 web browser web resources widget Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1564 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23 Things in Public Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/leech#author1">Helen Leech</a> describes a collaborative project to increase front-line staff's understanding and use of Web 2.0 in public libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you know that:</p> <ul> <li>Of the Generation Y – the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s – 96% are members of a social network</li> <li>There are some 200 million blogs on the World Wide Web</li> <li>One in eight couples who married in the USA in 2009 met over the Internet</li> <li>If Facebook were a country, it would be the fourth largest by population in the world after China, the USA and India</li> </ul> <p>All the statistics emanate from Socialnomics [<a href="#1">1</a>]. They are designed to be attention-grabbers, and they will no doubt provoke ferocious debate. However, what is unarguable is that some seismic shifts have taken place on the Internet in the past ten years, and social media and user-generated content now play a huge role in the way many people create and share information and how they communicate with each other.</p> <p>These changes have crept up on public libraries. Ten years ago, we became Internet experts when the People's Network initiative put 30,000 computers into our buildings. We became used to the new role of teaching people how to use a mouse, what a search engine is, how to create an email account. But when it came to content, we tended to leave that to our customers. Friends Reunited came along, followed by Myspace, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, and we were dimly aware of them as social phenomena, but we did not have much to do with them in our day-to-day work.</p> <h2 id="Changes_in_Public_Libraries">Changes in Public Libraries</h2> <p>So what has changed and why do we need to know about them now? The list below is by no means exhaustive but represents some of the main drivers behind changes emerging within public libraries in the UK.</p> <ol> <li>The need to help people get online. As I write, every public library in the UK is being asked to sign up to Race Online [<a href="#2">2</a>], the initiative to get 100% of the population clued up by the time the Olympics happens. The reappointed UK Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox launched the Race Online 2012 campaign in March 2010. The initiative reports that more than 600 partners have pledged to help more than 1.7 million new people to get online by the end of 2012. Its rationale is "to build a UK of near-universal web literacy by the time of the Olympics, with access as easy and affordable as water, electricity or gas and skills considered as fundamental as literacy and numeracy: [its] ambition is to get everyone of working-age online by the end of this Parliament." People need to know the key skills for getting around online, and a large part of these skills involves social networking.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>Changes in the way people communicate. There is a subtle shift taking place in electronic communication, moving onwards from email towards more collaborative methods: file sharing and cloud computing, social media that include information 'walls,' instant messaging and mobile apps. There is growing evidence that Generation Y and the Millenials – the generations born after the late 1980s – are moving towards very different methods of communication. It is important that library staff understand these technologies, since they are going to become as mainstream as email very shortly.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><em>Communities in Control</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>]: you might recognise this as the title of a recent government paper, looking at the need to pass control over political processes to local communities, and how this could be achieved. The principle is being reinforced through the new administration's Big Society initiative [<a href="#4">4</a>]. New technologies are allowing people to mobilise in a way that simply has not been possible before, to create and share content, and to become involved in the running of public libraries in radical new ways. It is also worth looking at the International Association for Public Participation's <em>Spectrum of Public Participation </em>[<a href="#5">5</a>] which gives some idea of the range of ways in which we need to work with our communities, from providing them with information all the way up to acting as facilitators so that they can manage and run services themselves. It is also worth watching the film <em>Us Now</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], which gives a glimpse of the way that new technologies might affect people's relationships with central government and public services. It highlights the way that social networking applications allow huge numbers of people to collaborate to do previously unthinkable things, like run a bank. If communities can make the day-to-day decisions necessary to run a bank or a second division football club, then it starts to become possible that they could do the same for political processes or delivery of public services. Library staff need to understand this culture of engagement, and to understand the tools that facilitate it.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>The economic environment. The next four years, 2010-14, are going to be the hardest public services have seen, and we are going to have to make cost savings everywhere we can. There are clear benefits in collaboration, and the tools that are available for this are improving rapidly. Which is where <em>23 Things</em> comes in.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article helen leech bbc google imperial college london university of huddersfield wikipedia archives blog cataloguing cloud computing database facebook file sharing flickr google wave instant messaging librarything mobile podcast rss search technology social networks software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1565 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt#author1">Keith Doyle</a> provides a personal perspective on a conference organised by UKOLN for those involved in the provision of institutional Web services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This was the 13th Institutional Web Management Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] to be organised by UKOLN [<a href="#2">2</a>] held at the University of Sheffield from 12 to 14 July 2010.&nbsp;The theme was 'The Web in Turbulent Times' [<a href="#3">3</a>]. As such, there was a healthy balance of glass-half-empty-doom-and-gloom, and glass-half-full-yes-we-can.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report keith doyle canterbury christ church university eduserv google ilrt oxford university computing services terminalfour ukoln university college london university of bristol university of cambridge university of oxford university of salford university of sheffield university of the west of england w3c iwmw memento mobile campus assistant wikipedia accessibility apache blog browser cocoa content management css curation data data visualisation datamining facebook firefox framework geospatial data gis hashtag higher education html html5 hypertext information architecture linked data mashup metadata mobile mobile phone opera plone portal qr code rdfa research rss search technology sharepoint smartphone social web software taxonomy twitter usability video videoconferencing visualisation web app web development web services webkit widget wookie wordpress xcri xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1569 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2010: The Mobile University http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt#author1">Shailey Minocha</a> reflects on the one-day symposium organised by Eduserv in May 2010. The aim of the event was to discuss whether and how mobile technology will play a significant role in the delivery of UK Higher Education in the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report shailey minocha blackboard canterbury christ church university edge hill university eduserv google massachusetts institute of technology open university oucs ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of wolverhampton itunes u accessibility ajax android augmented reality blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data e-learning facebook framework higher education html html5 infrastructure ipad iphone itunes junaio location-based services mobile mobile learning mobile phone open source operating system podcast qr code research search technology smartphone sms social software software twitter url usability video web 2.0 web services webkit wiki wikitude wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1573 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries (emtacl10) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/emtacl10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/emtacl10-rpt#author1">Andrew Walsh</a> reports on a new international conference on emerging technologies within academic libraries organised by the library of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and held in Trondheim, Norway in April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/emtacl10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report andrew walsh amazon google heriot-watt university oclc talis university of huddersfield university of nottingham journaltocs api blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data database facebook google books google docs google scholar infrastructure internet explorer library management systems linked data mashup mobile mp4 open data portal repositories research rss search technology semantic web sms social networks software video web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1576 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International UPA 2010 Conference User Experience Design for the World http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/upa-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/upa-2010-rpt#author1">Liza Zamboglou</a> and <a href="/issue64/upa-2010-rpt#author2">Lorraine Paterson</a> report on the Usability Professionals' Association's International Conference held in Munich, Germany in May 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We were fortunate enough to attend the UPA 2010 International Conference [<a href="#2">2</a>] which was recently held in the Bayerischer Hof Hotel in Munich, a beautiful hotel which has accommodated numerous famous guests in the past ranging from Paris Hilton to the Dalai Lama. The conferences main focus this year was on how UX professionals can create great user experiences across different cultures.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/upa-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report liza zamboglou lorraine paterson jisc national e-science centre oracle university of edinburgh aquabrowser ux2.0 avatar data digital library e-science mobile research resource discovery search technology smartphone usability video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1578 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Access, Delivery, Performance - The Future of Libraries Without Walls http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a Festschrift celebrating the work of Professor Peter Brophy, founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is normal in some subject disciplines to publish volumes of edited papers in honour of a respected colleague, usually to mark a significant birthday or career change. The contributors to such Festschriften<a href="#editors-note">*</a> are usually made up of former colleagues or pupils of the person being honoured. This volume celebrates the work of Professor Peter Brophy, the founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management (CERLIM), which since 1998 has been based at the Manchester Metropolitan University. This volume contains twelve chapters written by sixteen contributors, many of them colleagues or ex-colleagues of Professor Brophy.</p> <p>Peter Brophy has had an outstanding career both as a librarian and researcher. Alan MacDougall, Visiting Professor at Manchester Metropolitan University provides an outline in the opening chapter. A career that started at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster University in the early 1970s progressed to professional posts at Strathclyde University and Teeside Polytechnic, before Brophy eventually became Librarian at Bristol Polytechnic. From there, he moved to the University of Central Lancashire in 1989, where in 1993 he set up CERLIM. A selected bibliography of works by Professor Brophy fills eleven pages at the end of the volume, revealing the range and diversity of his research interests over the past few decades.</p> <p>The contexts of the early years of Professor Brophy's career are sketched in more detail in the opening chapter by Michael Buckland, Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. Buckland was a colleague of Brophy's at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster in the early 1970s.This chapter gives a good flavour of how library and information research was undertaken in this time when the libraries at what were then 'new universities' had an active interest in innovation and when almost all library research in the UK was funded by the Office for Scientific and Technical Information of the Department of Education and Science.</p> <h2 id="Libraries_and_e-Learning">Libraries and e-Learning</h2> <p>The remainder of the book is organised into four broad themes. The first covers libraries' role in supporting e-learning. The opening chapter in this section is by Gill Needham and Nicky Whitsed of the Open University. It is a series of reflections on a decade of developing library services for distance learners. Starting with the Follett Report of 1993 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the chapter identifies three main phases in the Open University's approach to delivering services to around 200,000 students and 8,000 tutors. The first phase was concerned with fairness; knowing exactly when to introduce online services at a time when a majority of Open University students did not have access to the relevant technologies or skills and when many tutors were reluctant to change their traditional ways of working. Responses to this included the development of library-mediated collections of quality-controlled Internet resources, supplemented by an online skills tutorial focused on generic information skills. Despite all of this, actual use of online resources remained relatively low (p. 30). The second phase, therefore, was mainly about integrating online services more deeply into the core learning activities of courses. The focus switched to the training of tutors and the integration of information resources within the university's emerging virtual learning environment (VLE), based on Moodle. In the interim, a pilot project using the open source MyLibrary software was found to be useful in helping to integrate library services into the learning experiences of individual students. The third phase - which Needham and Whitsed note is still ongoing - concerns the embedding of information literacy and resource-based learning concepts within the university more widely. The chapter ends with some comments on the, perhaps inevitable, tension between the 'invisible library' – 'quietly and strategically … [insinuating] resources and services into all those places where they have the most impact' - and the need to defend library budgets and status within the wider institution (pp. 35-36).</p> <p>The following chapter, by Professor David Baker of the University College Plymouth St Mark and St John, is a general overview of the development of e-learning technologies in UK Higher Education over the past decade. Starting again with Follett, Baker explains how e-learning concepts and technologies have been taken up, focusing in particular on the facilitating role taken by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) in providing a national-level approach to the provision of both infrastructure (e.g., networks, access management tools) and content. In addition, the chapter refers to a number of JISC-funded programmes and initiatives focused on breaking down the barriers that prevent the sharing and re-use of e-learning content. The final sections look at some wider factors influencing the current transformation of learning, teaching and assessment practices. These include the need to integrate institutional services like VLEs with the generic social networking tools and mobile devices familiar to new generations of learners. However, successful integration is not just a matter of technology but of overcoming cultural differences. Baker uses a synthesis of the JISC-funded Learner Experiences of e-Learning projects [<a href="#2">2</a>] to note that there might have been 'an increasing "divide" between the needs, expectations and wishes of the learners and the expectations of the teachers, who were more "traditional" and perhaps not engaged with e-learning in the same way' (p. 49).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review michael day british library cerlim google jisc manchester metropolitan university mla open university oreilly rnib talis ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of california berkeley university of central lancashire victoria university w3c jisc information environment web accessibility initiative accessibility archives bibliographic data cataloguing controlled vocabularies digital library e-learning facebook flickr framework higher education infrastructure knowledge management metadata mobile moodle open source preservation repositories research semantic web software vle vocabularies wcag web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1580 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: iPad - The Missing Manual http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a manual to help support your use of an iPad - 'the book that should have been in the box'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Missing Manual Series, originally written and published by David Pogue has expanded and is now published by O'Reilly, who deal mainly with computer books. Like many other publishers, they have jumped on the 'ibandwagon'. A quick count on Amazon Books gave a dozen similar offerings (excluding developers' guides).</p> <p>This is a review therefore of just one of these paperbacks, and is not a comparative review – with one exception which I shall come to below.</p> <h2 id="Comments">Comments</h2> <p>For writing this review I settled down with the IPad on my knee, Bluetooth keyboard below that and glass of chenin blanc at my right hand – but wondered where to place the volume under review. As yet, nobody has produced a 'skyhook' to hold one or the other. <em>IPad: The Missing Manual (<em>MM</em>)</em> is a little smaller than the iPad itself, about as thick and uses glossy paper with colour illustrations on most pages. In general, each page has a new topic and is organised by basic chapters. <em>Get to know your iPad, Interact with your iPad</em>, etc. They are logical and you can easily flick between them to find the section you need. Not that, with an iPad, you really need to find much. Just plug in applications (apps) and play to find your own way around. This, of course, is typical for Macs of whatever kind. With the iPad however, there is less freedom to find new ways of doing things than with the usual Linux-based Mac OS. The main difficulty is to link up with a computer; fire up iTunes and use this to get started. The basic leaflet that comes with the iPad will tell you all this. Even if you have not used a Mac before, it is fairly intuitive. If you are unsure about the basic operations and included apps, the Apple Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>] gives some short, but informative videos. The Missing Manual elaborates on them. If you have not used an iPhone, or perhaps an IPod before, then the <em>MM</em> helps a bit. If you want to do something, for example, move around the icons of apps on the screen and you don't know what to do, then a brief incursion to the <em>MM</em> is undoubtedly helpful. There is a substantial index to help matters but you may well have picked up the basics from Apple's video tours.</p> <p>At this stage I wanted a 'top up' and went into the kitchen, but I also did an experiment. The weight of iPad on the kitchen scales was 856g; weight of the <em>MM</em> was 427g, ratio, almost exactly 2:1. By a volumetric comparison this is approximately 1: 0.8. The <em>MM</em> is by no means small, so what about information content per volume or mass? Here is another experiment if you have just bought an iPad. First, download the app <em>iCabMobile</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>], this is another browser that can be used instead of, and is rather better than, the bundled Safari. Now download the app <em>GoodReader</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] and then into the browser type: manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iPad_User_Guide.pdf [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Lo and behold you have the 'true' missing manual from Apple. Now, in the browser, insert the letter g before http:// of the target URL of the pdf and press 'return'. This downloads the iPad_User_Guide pdf into <em>GoodReader</em>. It is 19MB but should come down easily. You can then browse Apple's free manual in <em>GoodReader</em> as an e-book.</p> <p>Steve Jobs boasts that there are 8,500 apps for the iPad [<a href="#5">5</a>] but which ones are necessary for your Personal Learning Environment? Well, this review (via <em>MacUser</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], thank you) suggests two very good ones. <em>GoodReader</em> is excellent, you can leaf through the pdf as a book, search it, and so on, so put all your downloaded pdfs there. If you do not use <em>Mobile Me</em> [<a href="#7">7</a>] and if you want to get hold of a pdf (or other) file from your office machine, then use<em> Dropbox</em> [<a href="#8">8</a>] for your office machine and iPad. Upload it in the office and download it to your iPad at leisure. Some apps are mentioned at various places in the <em>MM</em>, but of course more are added all the time so a print-on-paper book is not a good venue for them.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review brian whalley amazon apple oreilly queens university belfast browser ebook ipad iphone itunes linux mac os mobile safari search technology video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1582 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk