Table of contents: issue69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/16045/issues/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache collection development content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog collection development copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Evaluation of Assessment Diaries and GradeMark at the University of Glamorgan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau#author1">Karen Fitzgibbon</a> and <a href="/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau#author2">Alice Lau</a> describe a JISC-funded project in evaluating the pedagogical and workload impact that two assessment- and feedback-related innovations have on students and staff and report on lessons for the sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Assessment and feedback practice in Higher Education has long been the major source of student dissatisfaction (National Student Surveys) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. While technologies are increasingly being used as a tool to improve the learning experience for students and staff, the use of technologies in improving the assessment experience is still patchy.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article alice lau karen fitzgibbon blackboard jisc university of glamorgan blog data database dissemination higher education internet explorer research software vle Sat, 28 Jul 2012 12:26:56 +0000 lisrw 2351 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Launching a New Community-owned Content Service http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/milloy#author1">Caren Milloy</a> describes some of the challenges overcome and lessons learned by JISC Collections during the development of JISC eCollections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>JISC eCollections is a set of e-resource platforms launched in November 2011 by JISC Collections, in partnership with the JISC data centres EDINA and Mimas. The platforms (Figure 1) are JISC MediaHub, JISC Historic Books and JISC Journal Archives; together, they are intended to provide a sustainable, value-for-money alternative to accessing licensed content on publisher platforms, by consolidating and hosting the broad range of historical book, journal archive and multimedia content purchased by JISC Collections on behalf of the UK education community. The vision is to provide a world-class collection that ensures users’ broadest information needs are well met, and to work in partnership with the community to improve and develop the platforms around evolving student and researcher expectations.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The primary role of JISC Collections is the licensing of content on behalf of its UK Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) member organisations. Over the last 10 years, JISC Collections has invested over £40 million in centralised licensing of digital content, in perpetuity, on behalf of all its members. The first agreement was signed in 2002 for ProQuest’s Early English Books Online (EEBO). Since then, national licences have been negotiated for historic books, journal archives and multimedia content (Figure 1), such as documentaries and educational films. In 2010, JISC Collections invested a further £2.5 million in film and image content, representing UK and world history since 1987, specially selected for teaching and learning. The majority of JISC Collections’ member organisations would be unable to afford per-institution subscriptions to these book, journal and multimedia collections, so centralised licensing is critical to broadening access.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-milloy/fig1-jec-platforms.png" style="width: 680px; height: 213px;" title="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service</strong></p> <h2 id="Why_Develop_JISC_eCollections">Why Develop JISC eCollections?</h2> <p>The platforms contain more than 4.5 million resources from over 20 providers. JISC Collections members were previously required to access this content via a range of separate services, each with different user interfaces and administrative requirements, and with a complex funding set-up including both JISC subsidies and publisher access fees payable by each institution. JISC Collections felt that its existing – and future – investments in content would best be protected and preserved by developing an independent service, as an affordable alternative to relying on content providers for access to perpetually licensed content. Such a service would allow the education community to take ownership of its acquisitions and assure it of future control. In 2011 each group of resources was consolidated into one platform to increase discoverability, simplify the user experience (making it more inclusive to users at all academic levels), reduce the administrative burden, and thereby enable maximum value to be derived from the initial content investments.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article caren milloy british library edina google jisc jisc collections middlesex university mimas research information network ubird aggregation archives cataloguing data data mining database ebook further education graphics higher education licence marc metadata multimedia ocr open access optical character recognition passwords portfolio preservation provenance research resource discovery schema search technology Sat, 28 Jul 2012 16:36:05 +0000 lisrw 2356 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Most of a Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/taylor#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> writes about how she made the most of a conference to promote and inform the work of a project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working with repositories in various ways for over five years, so I have, of course, attended the major international conference Open Repositories before. I have never actually presented anything or represented a specific project at the event, though. This year was different. This year I had a mission -&nbsp; to present a poster on the DataFlow Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] and to talk to people about the work we had been doing for the past 12 months and (I hoped) to interest them in using the Open Source (OS) systems we had developed during that period.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article stephanie taylor ukoln university of glasgow university of oxford university of southampton devcsi hydra rsp api archives blog cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital library digital repositories dissemination doi flickr framework hashtag higher education infrastructure javascript licence linked data linux metadata open access open source provenance rdf repositories research research information management software standards sword protocol tagging text mining twitter visualisation widget wiki zip Tue, 31 Jul 2012 15:05:33 +0000 lisrw 2374 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Ariadne: Migrating and Enriching Content with Drupal http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/bunting <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/bunting#author1">Thom Bunting</a> explains some of the technology behind the migration of <em>Ariadne</em> (including more than 1600 articles from its back issues archive) onto a Drupal content management platform.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Tools and strategies for content management are a perennial topic in <em>Ariadne. </em> With&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=" title="Link to overview of articles including references to 'content management'">more than one hundred articles</a>&nbsp;touching on content management system (CMS) technologies or techniques since this online magazine commenced publication in 1996,&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;attests to continuing interest in this topic. Authors have discussed this topic within various contexts, from&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=intranet&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to articles discussing 'content management', within 'intranet' context">intranets</a> to&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/repositories?article-type=&amp;term=content+management&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to overview of articles referring to 'content management', within 'repositories' context">repositories</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=web+2.0&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to overview of articles discussing 'content management', within context of Web 2.0">Web 2.0</a>, &nbsp;with some notable&nbsp;<a href="/sites/all/datacharts/hc/72-chart-wp.html#timeline" title="Link to timeline: articles referring to 'content management'">surges in references to 'content management' between 2000 and 2005</a>&nbsp;(see Figure 1 below). &nbsp;Although levels of discussion are by no means trending, over recent years it is clear that&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em> authors have taken note of and written about content management tools and techniques on a regular basis.&nbsp;</p> <p>In the light of this long-established interest, it is noteworthy that&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em> itself migrated into a content management system only recently. Although the formatting of its articles did change a few times since 1996, <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;remained 'hand-coded' for more than fifteen years. &nbsp;None of its articles had been migrated into a database-driven content management system until March 2012, when&nbsp;<a href="/issue68" title="Link to table of contents for Ariadne issue 68">issue 68</a>&nbsp;was published.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As mentioned in the&nbsp;<a href="/issue68/editorial1" title="Editorial introduction: Welcome to New Ariadne">editorial introduction</a>&nbsp;to that first issue, launching the new content management arrangements, and as discussed in some more detail below (see 'Technical challenges in content migration'), the considerable size of&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em>'s archive of back issues was daunting. &nbsp;With <a href="/articles" title="Overview of more than 1600 articles in Ariadne">more than 1600 articles</a>&nbsp;in hand-coded 'flat'-html formats,&nbsp;the process of migration itself required careful planning to result in a seamless, graceful transition into an entirely new content management arrangement. &nbsp;Over time, the sheer size of the <em>Ariadne</em> corpus had made it both increasingly rich in content and increasingly more challenging to convert retrospectively into a database-driven CMS as the total number of articles published within this online magazine steadily expanded.&nbsp;</p> <p>In looking back over the recent process of migrating <em>Ariadne</em> onto a CMS platform, this article discusses some tools and techniques used to prepare content for transfer, testing, and then re-launch. &nbsp;After explaining some of the background to and objectives of this work, this article focuses on key features of content management supported by Drupal.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Timeline of references in Ariadne to content management" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-bunting/content%20management-timeline.png" style="height: 453px; width: 500px; " title="Figure 1: Timeline of references in Ariadne to content management" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Ariadne timeline of references to content management</strong></p> <h2 id="Requirements_Analysis:_Planning_the_Way_Forward">Requirements Analysis: Planning the Way Forward</h2> <p>Based on surveys of readers and authors conducted in late 2010, the <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;management team analysed the range of feedback, drew up sets of re-development requirements, and then considered the options available.</p> <p>The following table provides an overview of key findings regarding the range of enhanced functionality and features considered:</p> <table align="center" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" id="500wtable" style="width: 500px; "> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center; "><strong>Overview of findings derived from survey responses</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center; "><em>enhanced functionality or feature</em></td> <td style="text-align: center; "><em>interest recorded in surveys</em></td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by keywords</td> <td>73.4% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>updated look and feel</td> <td>62.3% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by title</td> <td>50.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>enhanced use of search engine</td> <td>48.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved display for portable devices</td> <td>34.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>more summative information on articles</td> <td>32.1% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved navigability from article level</td> <td>32.1% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved social media options</td> <td>29.5% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by author</td> <td>28.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved RSS feeds</td> <td>27.0% of respondents</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In addition to these findings derived from surveys, the management team also recognised the need for some other functionalities to support monitoring of <em>Ariadne</em>'s on-going engagement with various domains and institutions across the UK and beyond.</p> <table align="center" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" id="500wtable" style="width: 500px; "> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center; "><strong>Additional features to support monitoring of engagement</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: left; ">identification of author domains (higher education, further education, research, commercial, etc)</td> <td style="text-align: left; ">to support analysis of <em>Ariadne</em> connections and reach across various sectors</td> </tr> <tr> <td>identification of authors by organisation</td> <td>to support analysis of <em>Ariadne</em> connections and reach in UK and worldwide</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Taking into account the key findings derived from survey questions as well as the additional functionality identified as useful in monitoring UK and worldwide engagement, the <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;management team drew up sets of re-development requirements and considered how to proceed.&nbsp;Migration into a content management system represented the obvious way forward, as it became clear that <em>Ariadne</em>'s&nbsp;previous tradition of 'hand-coded' production (dating from the early days of the Web) had little chance of coping gracefully with the new sets of requirements.</p> <p>In a review of CMS options available, it also became clear that&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drupal" title="Wikipedia article: Drupal">Drupal</a>&nbsp;[<a href="#1">1</a>] was well positioned as a content management system (or, emphasising its highly modular and extensible design, <em>content management framework </em>&nbsp;[<a href="#2">2</a>] ) to supply required functionality and features.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/bunting" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up thom bunting ibm microsoft ukoln university of bath datagovuk gnu wikipedia apache api archives bibliographic data content licence content management css data data set database drupal framework further education graphics higher education html identifier jquery json licence linux metadata mysql open source perl php preservation python rdf repositories research rss search technology software sql server sqlite standards taxonomy usability video visualisation web 2.0 xml Fri, 27 Jul 2012 16:47:36 +0000 lisrw 2348 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Redeveloping the Loughborough Online Reading List System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author1">Jon Knight</a>, <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author2">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author3">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the redevelopment of Loughborough University’s open source reading list system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Loughborough Online Reading Lists System (LORLS) [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been developed at Loughborough University since the late 1990s.&nbsp; LORLS was originally implemented at the request of the University’s Learning and Teaching Committee simply to make reading lists available online to students.&nbsp; The Library staff immediately saw the benefit of such a system in not only allowing students ready access to academics’ reading lists but also in having such access themselves. This was because a significant number of academics were bypassing the library when generating and distributing lists to their students who were then in turn surprised when the library did not have the recommended books either in stock or in sufficient numbers to meet demand.</p> <p>The first version of the system produced by the Library Systems Team was part of a project that also had a ‘reading lists amnesty’ in which academics were encouraged to provide their reading lists to the library which then employed some temporary staff over the summer to enter them into the new system.&nbsp; This meant that the first version of LORLS went live in July 2000 with a reasonable percentage of lists already in place.&nbsp; Subsequently the creation and editing of reading lists was made the responsibility of the academics or departmental admin staff, with some assistance from library staff.</p> <p>LORLS was written in Perl, with a MySQL database back-end.&nbsp; Most user interfaces were delivered via the web, with a limited number of back-end scripts that helped the systems staff maintain the system and alert library staff to changes that had been made to reading lists.</p> <p>Soon after the first version of LORLS went live at Loughborough, a number of other universities expressed an interest in using or modifying the system. Permission was granted by the University to release it as open source under the General Public Licence (GPL)[<a href="#2">2</a>].&nbsp; New versions were released as the system was developed and bugs were fixed. The last version of the original LORLS code base/data design was version 5, which was downloaded by sites worldwide.</p> <h2 id="Redesign">Redesign</h2> <p>By early 2007 it was decided to take a step back and see if there were things that could be done better in LORLS.&nbsp; Some design decisions made in 1999 no longer made sense eight years later.&nbsp; Indeed some of the database design was predicated on how teaching modules were supposed to work at Loughborough and it had already become clear that the reality of how they were deployed was often quite different.&nbsp; For example, during the original design, the principle was that each module would have a single reading list associated with it.&nbsp; Within a few years several modules had been found that were being taught by two (or more!) academics, all wanting their own independent reading list.</p> <p>Some of the structuring of the data in the MySQL database began to limit how the system could be developed.&nbsp; The University began to plan an organisational restructuring shortly after the redesign of LORLS was commenced, and it was clear that the simple departmental structure was likely to be replaced by a more fluid school and department mix.</p> <p>Library staff were also beginning to request new features that were thus increasingly awkward to implement.&nbsp; Rather than leap through hoops to satisfy them within the framework of the existing system, it made sense to add them into the design process for a full redesign.</p> <p>It was also felt that the pure CGI-driven user interface could do with a revamp.&nbsp; The earlier LORLS user interfaces used only basic HTML forms, with little in the way of client-side scripting.&nbsp; Whilst that meant that they tended to work on any web browser and were pretty accessible, they were also a bit clunky compared to some of the newer dynamic web sites.</p> <p>A distinct separation of the user interface from the back-end database was decided upon to improve localization and portability of the system as earlier versions of LORLS had already shown that many sites took the base code and then customised the user interface parts of the CGI scripts to their own look and feel.&nbsp; The older CGI scripts were a mix of user interaction elements and database access and processing, which made this task a bit more difficult than it really needed to be.</p> <p>Separating the database code from the user interface code would let people easily tinker with one without unduly affecting the other.&nbsp; It would also allow local experimentation with multiple user-interface designs for different user communities or devices.</p> <p>This implied that a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) would need to be defined. As asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)[<a href="#3">3</a>] interactions had been successful applied in a number of recent projects the team had worked on, XML was chosen as the format to be used.&nbsp; At first simple object access protocol (SOAP) style XML requests was experimented with, as well as XML responses, but it was soon realised that SOAP was far too heavy-weight for most of the API calls, so a lighter ‘RESTful’ API was selected.&nbsp; The API was formed of CGI scripts that took normal parameters as input and returned XML documents for the client to parse and display.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper jon knight google harvard university loughborough university microsoft gnu access control ajax api archives authentication bibliographic data blog cache chrome cookie data database digital library e-learning framework google books gpl html javascript jquery json library management systems licence metadata moodle mysql open source perl refworks restful schema shibboleth soap software sql standards web browser xml z39.50 zip Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:32:55 +0000 lisrw 2354 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing collection development data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Second British Library DataCite Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a one-day workshop on metadata supporting the citation of research data, held at the British Library, London, on 6 July 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Friday, 6 July 2012 I made my way to the British Library Conference Centre for the second in a series of DataCite workshops [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The theme was <em>Describe, Disseminate, Discover: Metadata for Effective Data Citation</em>. In welcoming us to the event, <strong>Lee-Ann Coleman</strong>, Head of Scientific, Technical and Medical Information at the British Library, said there had been some doubt as to whether anyone would turn up to an event about metadata, but as it happened there were 36 of us, drawn from across the UK and beyond.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report alex ball british library datacite dcc iso oais science and technology facilities council ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of oxford apache application profile archives cataloguing content management data data citation data management data set database digital curation doi dublin core foaf identifier infrastructure intellectual property marc metadata ontologies portal preservation prism rdf repositories research schema software standards url Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:54:47 +0000 lisrw 2366 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2012: Big Data, Big Deal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> attended the annual Eduserv Symposium on 10 May 2012 at the Royal College of Physicians, London to find out what are the implications of big data for Higher Education Institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The annual Eduserv Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] was billed as a ‘must-attend event for IT professionals in Higher Education’; the choice of topical subject matter being one of the biggest crowd-drawers (the other being the amazing venue: the Royal College of Physicians). The past few years have seen coverage of highly topical areas such as virtualisation and the cloud, the mobile university and access management.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report marieke guy amazon cetis dcc eduserv google jisc orcid oreilly oxford internet institute ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of california berkeley university of leicester university of oxford webtrends wellcome trust dealing with data impact project accessibility algorithm big data blog cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation gis google analytics google trends hadoop higher education infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer irods learning analytics mobile nosql oer open data open source remote working research twitter usb Mon, 30 Jul 2012 17:48:45 +0000 lisrw 2370 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW) 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on the 16th Institutional Web Management Workshop held at the University of Edinburgh's Appleton Tower between 18 - 20 July 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 16th Institutional Web Management Workshop (IWMW 12) took place at the University of Edinburgh's Appleton Tower – a building with a stunning panoramic view over the volcanic city.&nbsp; The event brought together 172 delegates and attracted an additional 165 viewers to the live video stream of the plenary sessions over the three days.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/iwmw-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report kirsty pitkin blackboard cetis dcc edina edinburgh college of art jisc london school of economics nesta open university paper.li robert gordon university university of bradford university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glamorgan university of southampton university of york devcsi dmponline iwmw jorum accessibility api archives authentication browser bs8878 content management cookie data data management data set data visualisation database foi google refine graphics infrastructure kis licence mobile native apps oer open data open source plone preservation repositories research responsive design search engine optimisation standards storify tagging twitter ukoer url video visualisation wcag web development web services widget xcri-cap Tue, 31 Jul 2012 12:54:44 +0000 lisrw 2373 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JISC Research Information Management: CERIF Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> reports on a two-day workshop on research information management and CERIF held in Bristol over 27-28 June 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>A workshop on Research Information Management (RIM) and CERIF was held in Bristol on 27-28 June 2012, organised by the Innovation Support Centre [<a href="#1">1</a>] at UKOLN, together with the JISC RIM and RCSI (Repositories and Curation Shared Infrastructure) Programmes. It was a follow-up to the CERIF Tutorial and UK Data Surgery [<a href="#2">2</a>] held in Bath in February.</p> <h2 id="Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</h2> <p>The aim was to bring together people working on the various elements of the UK RIM jigsaw to share experience of using CERIF and explore ways of working together more closely. While the first day focused specifically on RIM, the second day widened to explore synergies with the repositories community. Participants therefore included JISC RIM and MRD projects and programme managers, support and evaluation projects, Research Councils, funders and repository infrastructure projects. There were around 30 participants [<a href="#3">3</a>] in total, with some variation across the two days, given the different content. The event was chaired by Josh Brown, RIM Programme Manager and Neil Jacobs, Programme Director, Digital Infrastructure, both at JISC. All presentations as well as breakout session outputs are available via the UKOLN ISC Events site [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <h2 id="The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</h2> <p>The UK community was pleased to welcome Brigitte Jörg [<a href="#5">5</a>] to the meeting, in the first week of her new role at UKOLN’s Innovation Support Centre as National Coordinator for the CERIF Support Project. Brigitte is already well known to British practitioners working with CERIF – both in her role as as CERIF Task Group Leader [<a href="#6">6</a>] at euroCRIS and as advisor to several existing JISC projects. We look forward to working with her on further initiatives – her CERIF expertise will be a huge asset for Research Information Management support and coordination in British Higher Education.</p> <h2 id="UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</h2> <p>There is certainly extensive RIM-related activity in the UK currently, which looks set to continue. The landscape was outlined in the scene setting sessions by myself, based on the CERIF adoption study [<a href="#7">7</a>] carried out earlier this year. The rate of CRIS (Current Research Information System) procurement has increased very rapidly in the last few years, particularly during 2011. For example the first Pure system in the UK was procured jointly by the Universities of Aberdeen and St Andrews in May 2009; now there are 19 UK universities using Pure. Since all CRIS on the market are CERIF-compatible (to a greater or lesser extent) this means that a large number of UK institutions are CERIF users (again, to varying degrees) – around 31% [<a href="#7">7</a>]. The two other CERIF CRIS being used in the UK are CONVERIS (Avedas, Germany) and Symplectic Elements (UK-based); only one UK CERIF CRIS is being developed in-house, at the University of Huddersfield. There is therefore a significant potential user base for the many CERIF-based services discussed over the course of the workshop. Particularly as more institutions reach the end of their CRIS implementation phase, they are going to be looking for opportunities to exploit the interchange benefits offered by CERIF.</p> <h2 id="UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</h2> <p>As a reflection of the intensity of UK CRIS activity, the UK has the largest number of institutional members of euroCRIS – 25. The next country in terms of membership is Germany, with just 13 members (and then the Netherlands, with seven). It is also notable that there were six UK papers (up from three in 2010) at the recent euroCRIS conference in Prague (all openly accessible from the euroCRIS website [<a href="#8">8</a>]), reflecting the growing UK presence at international level. This indicates the significant impact of JISC programmes - both RIM and MRD (Managing Research Data). At euroCRIS meetings other European countries have expressed some envy of the resources currently available in the UK to support RIM development!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report rosemary russell cornell university edina elsevier eurocris hefce imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath university of huddersfield university of oxford university of st andrews devcsi wikipedia blog cerif curation data data model data set dublin core file format framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata ontologies open access open source repositories research research information management schema software standards vocabularies xml Sun, 29 Jul 2012 19:46:13 +0000 lisrw 2367 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Using Games to Enhance Learning and Teaching http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/aayeshah-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/aayeshah-rvw#author1">Wajeehah Aayeshah</a> reviews a comprehensive book on educational games that highlights the attributes of effective games usage but which also identifies the potential problems when using them in a pedagogical context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Using Games to Enhance Learning and Teaching: A Beginner’s Guide</em> is exactly what the title maintains: a beginner’s guide. The editors and primary authors, Nicola Whitton and Alex Moseley, have provided an extensive overview of using games as a pedagogical resource. While this title highlights the benefits of effective games usage, it nonetheless also identifies the potential problems when employing games in a pedagogical context.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/aayeshah-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review wajeehah aayeshah swinburne university of technology framework research Sun, 29 Jul 2012 17:07:52 +0000 lisrw 2363 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Mob Rule Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/maclellan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/maclellan-rvw#author1">Fiona MacLellan</a> reviews a book which discusses the current unconference phenomenon and highlights the learning opportunities that these environments offer.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The unconference phenomenon is something that I have heard lots about and have previously tried to read information about; however what this basic research has never been able to do is convince me of the necessity for the unconference or camp environment.&nbsp; Michelle Boule in this concise and easy-to-read book has managed to go at least part way to achieving this.&nbsp; Through use of case study, interview and example, the book provides an overview of the history of the unconference alongside the benefits it may represent to individuals and organisations.&nbsp; Boule illustrates the bene</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/maclellan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review fiona maclellan university of northampton archives blog hashtag research search technology twitter web resources Sun, 29 Jul 2012 12:15:59 +0000 lisrw 2359 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Implementing Technology in Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/mchugh-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/mchugh-rvw#author1">Elizabeth McHugh</a> reviews a first published work that she feels is a straightforward, jargon-free guide on how to implement technology solutions in libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At some point in our careers there may, indeed in these fast moving technological times, will be a period or periods when we will be required to be part of, lead or manage a project implementing technology solutions in libraries.&nbsp; At 173 pages long, with 13 chapters and 5 appendices, the author seeks to provide the reader with a clear, practitioner-written, jargon-free guide to doing so.&nbsp;<br /></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/mchugh-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review elizabeth mchugh amazon university of the highlands and islands ebook further education higher education licence research resource discovery Sun, 29 Jul 2012 14:49:35 +0000 lisrw 2362 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Managing Research Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rumsey-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rumsey-rvw#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> reviews a book which describes and explains the topics of interest central to practitioners involved with research data management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Higher Education institutions (HEIs) in the UK are planning and implementing infrastructure and services to manage research data more urgently than they did for research publications. One policy framework sent to UK vice-chancellors from a major UK funding body (EPSRC), which set out clear expectations of responsibilities for data management at institutions within a given timetable, appears to have been the spark that prompted research data management (RDM) to be taken up by the upper echelons of management, and concrete activities set in place to start addressing the problem.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rumsey-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review sally rumsey bbc bodleian libraries datacite dcc jisc oais university of oxford archives blog curation data data citation data management data set doi foi framework higher education identifier infrastructure repositories research social networks wiki Sun, 29 Jul 2012 13:51:34 +0000 lisrw 2361 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: I, Digital – A History Devoid of the Personal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rusbridge-rvw#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> reviews an edited volume that aims to fill a gap in ‘literature designed specifically to guide archivists’ thinking about personal digital materials’.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We are all too familiar with the dire predictions of coming Digital Dark Ages, when All Shall be Lost because of the fragility of our digital files and the transience of the formats. We forget, of course, that loss was always the norm. The wonderful documents in papyrus, parchment and paper that we so admire and wonder at, are the few lucky survivors of their times. Sometimes they have been carefully nurtured, sometimes they have been accidentally preserved. But almost all were lost!</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review chris rusbridge british library dcc jisc national library of australia university of glasgow university of oxford university of virginia elib wikipedia archives bibliographic data curation data digital library digital preservation digital repositories ebook facebook internet explorer mis preservation privacy repositories research social web twitter web services wordpress youtube Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:17:27 +0000 lisrw 2365 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Need - A Theory Connecting Information Search to Knowledge Formation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a book about a new theory of ‘information need’ that builds upon the ideas of Allen and Taylor from the 1960s to provide a basis for information searching.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The front cover tells you succinctly what this book is about; 'A theory Connecting&nbsp; - Information Search – to – Knowledge Formation.'&nbsp; Equally bluntly, I shall set out my credentials for this review. I am not a library/informational professional but I have an interest in delivering digital and information skills to students. I have read and reviewed this book to further my own knowledge of the subject, as well as to see what (new?) ways there are for students to use search tools and methods as well as enhance both their digital and information literacies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review brian whalley google jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of cambridge university of oxford university of sheffield data further education higher education knowledge base metadata modelling ontologies research search technology semantic web tablet computer Mon, 30 Jul 2012 20:10:55 +0000 lisrw 2371 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Getting Started with Cloud Computing http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a collection of essays on cloud computing that attempts to clarify the technology and its applications for librarians and information professionals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I will admit to having read very little in the way of fiction writing over the last half-century though perhaps as a chemist by training I do enjoy science fiction from authors such as Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov and Fred Hoyle. All were distinguished scientists, none more so than Fred Hoyle, who was Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy at the University of Cambridge.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review martin white american library association apple eduserv google intranet focus ltd jisc oclc university of cambridge university of sheffield cloud computing content management data information retrieval infrastructure as a service intranet ipad microsoft office mobile privacy search technology sharepoint software Sat, 28 Jul 2012 22:42:54 +0000 lisrw 2358 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk