Table of contents: issue70 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/16073/issues/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Editorial Introduction to Issue 70 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 70.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Issue 70 of <em>Ariadne </em>which is full to the brim with feature articles and a wide range of event reports and book reviews.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 editorial richard waller alt amazon google hefce jisc portico rdwg ukoln university of oxford w3c ark project jisc information environment jusp liparm rdmrose web accessibility initiative wikipedia accessibility aggregation archives bs8878 controlled vocabularies data data management database digital curation digitisation ejournal framework higher education identifier internet explorer jstor licence metadata microsoft reporting services mobile open access perl portal preservation privacy raptor repositories research resource management schema search technology software standardisation standards sushi wcag web resources web services wiki xml xml schema Fri, 14 Dec 2012 14:20:23 +0000 lisrw 2417 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Gold Open Access: Counting the Costs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/andrew#author1">Theo Andrew</a> presents new data on the cost of Gold OA publishing at the University of Edinburgh.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Research Councils UK (RCUK) have recently announced a significant amendment to their open access (OA) &nbsp;policy which requires all research papers that result from research partly or wholly funded by RCUK to be made open access [<a href="#1">1</a>]. To comply with this policy, researchers must either; a) publish in an open access journal, termed Gold OA, which often incurs an article processing charge (APC); or, b) ensure that a copy of the post-print is deposited in an appropriate repository, also known as Green OA.</p> <p>A subsequent clarification from RCUK stated that Gold OA is the preferred mechanism of choice to realise open access for outputs that they have funded and have announced the award of block grants to eligible institutions to achieve this aim [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Where a Gold OA option is unavailable, Green OA is also acceptable; however, RCUK have indicated that the decision will be ultimately left up to institutions as to which route to take [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>Since RCUK are the major funder of research in the United Kingdom, this new policy will not only have a major impact on how researchers publish their work, but also huge implications for their budgets. Many research institutions funded by RCUK are currently investigating how they will implement this policy and are looking at the costs for open access publication, and how they can support the adoption of open access within their organisation. The ball is very much in the court of institutions to decide how to play the open access game.</p> <p>One of the key factors that will affect institutions is the cost that publishers will set for their APCs. So far RCUK have steered clear of suggesting an appropriate fee, leaving individual publishers to determine the market level of the APCs as per the current situation. Meanwhile there seems to be a huge variability in costs. There is a general expectation that over time APCs will settle to a reasonable rate and similarly journal subscriptions will lower to reflect the gradual change in business model from subscription fees to APCs. Most publishers have not yet been upfront about what impact they will have on journal subscriptions, if any, and it is hard to access and assess real-life data. RSC Publishing is one notable exception since it has introduced a system of waiving a proportion of APC fees based on institutional subscription costs.</p> <p>Much of this transition period to full open access will have to be navigated through uncharted territory, where no one has a clear handle on the costs involved. The rationale of this article is to present data on article processing charges gathered over the past five years, report on trends seen within this data, to suggest some approaches and to generally contribute to and inform the policy discussion.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>To put some rough-and-ready figures on the table, the University of Edinburgh publishes in the region of 4,000-4,500 peer-reviewed journal articles per year; this figure does not include other publication types like working papers not affected by the RCUK policy. Assuming an average Article Processing Charge (APC) of £1500 [<a href="#4">4</a>], the total publication costs to make all of these outputs Gold would be in the region of £6m. It is clear that even with guaranteed funding from HEFCE, and other funders of research, large research-intensive universities will not be able to pay for all of their research to be published under Gold OA. How to allocate funding to researchers will be a difficult choice that many institutions are currently asking themselves - will it be on a first-come-first-served basis, funder-specific, or will REF-submitted material take priority?</p> <p>Equally problematic are the difficulties we face in fully assessing an institution’s total spend on open access. Whilst it is possible to find out through aggregate sources like Web of Science how many articles are published in fully open access journals. It is virtually impossible to find out the number of open access articles published in hybrid journals as there is currently no flag in the metadata which indicates the open status of the paper. A hybrid journal is a traditional subscription journal that offers open access to individual articles upon payment of an APC. Of course it is possible to find hybrid open access content through EuropePMC.org; however this will only give a snapshot for the biomedical and life sciences. With current systems and processes it is virtually impossible to gauge this spend accurately.</p> <h2 id="Cost_Data">Cost Data</h2> <p>Unfortunately, financial data about open access publishing is scarce. The University of Edinburgh (UoE) has recently implemented account codes to allow the finance systems to track this spend going forwards; however, finding out costs retrospectively remains problematic. Furthermore, institutions are not typically in the habit of publishing this data with others. The institutions that have shared data show a degree of variability. In 2010, the foremost initial supporter and enabler of Gold Open Access publishing in the UK, the Wellcome Trust, found that the&nbsp;average cost of publication under the author-pays model was $2,367 (approximately £1,500) [<a href="#4">4</a>]. RCUK in their recent press release on block grants for open access estimate the average APC as £1,727 plus VAT [<a href="#2">2</a>], whilst, based on figures in the Finch Report, the University of Nottingham paid on average £1,216 [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p>All these figures are useful as they give a ballpark figure upon which further estimates can be based. The precise cost of individual APCs levied by publishers is generally unavailable in a form which easily enables further analysis. Typically this information is available from publisher’s Web sites; however, aggregating the data is cumbersome as there is no consistent way to interrogate the Web sites and APCs commonly vary from title to title in the publishers’ portfolio. There have been some commendable attempts to gather this information, for example the SHERPA RoMEO listing of Publishers with Paid Options for Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Here about 100 publishers have been surveyed and their APCs are listed. A large cost variance exists for some publishers’ records as individual journals often have different APCs, and also institutional subscriptions/memberships can reduce costs in a non-uniform way. It takes a lot of effort to gather these data and keep them it up to date. Other approaches have tried to crowd-source this activity, for example Ross Mounce’s survey of open access publishers, publications, licences and fees. Here approximately 130 publishers’ web sites were surveyed to find out what licences are being used on the open access content; the cost being a secondary focus of the survey. Analysis of these data shows less than 5% of publishers claiming 'open access' are fully compliant with the Budapest Declaration on Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>].</p> <p>The data we present here is an attempt to enrich the data available to interested parties and make them available in a reusable format for further analysis. It comprises articles funded by the Wellcome Trust at the University of Edinburgh between 2007 and 2012. In total there are 260 articles published in a mixture of open access journals and traditional subscription journals with an open access option (sometimes known as hybrid). All of the journals charged an article processing fee. Overall, the total cost incurred was £452,713.40. The mean article processing charge was £1,741.21, with the median value £1,644.22. The full data can be accessed online at the Edinburgh DataShare repository [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article theo andrew hefce university of edinburgh university of nottingham wellcome trust datashare sherpa romeo accessibility altmetrics blog creative commons data data management data set digital library licence metadata open access portfolio repositories research Mon, 03 Dec 2012 20:23:29 +0000 lisrw 2393 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Upskilling Liaison Librarians for Research Data Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author1">Andrew Cox</a>, <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author2">Eddy Verbaan</a> and <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author3">Barbara Sen</a> explore the design of a curriculum to train academic librarians in the competencies to support Research Data Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many UK HEIs, especially research-intensive institutions, Research Data Management (RDM) is rising rapidly up the agenda. Working closely with other professional services, and with researchers themselves, libraries will probably have a key role to play in supporting RDM. This role might include signposting institutional expertise in RDM; inclusion of the topic in information literacy sessions for PhD students and other researchers; advocacy for open data sharing; or contributing to the management of an institutional data repository.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article andrew cox barbara sen eddy verbaan dcc jisc northumbria university sconul uk data archive university of essex university of sheffield datum for health rdmrose archives bibliographic data bibliometrics cataloguing collection development copyright curation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital library e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository knowledge base knowledge management licence metadata open access open data open education preservation repositories research software web portal Thu, 06 Dec 2012 19:27:43 +0000 lisrw 2402 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The LIPARM Project: A New Approach to Parliamentary Metadata http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/gartner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/gartner#author1">Richard Gartner</a> outlines a collaborative project which aims to link together the digitised UK Parliamentary record by providing a metadata scheme, controlled vocabularies and a Web-based interface.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Parliamentary historians in the United Kingdom are particularly fortunate as their key primary source, the record of Parliamentary proceedings, is almost entirely available in digitised form. Similarly, those needing to consult and study contemporary proceedings as scholars, journalists or citizens have access to the daily output of the UK's Parliaments and Assemblies in electronic form shortly after their proceedings take place.</p> <p>Unfortunately, the full potential of this resource for all of these users is limited by the fact that it is scattered throughout a heterogeneous information landscape and so cannot be approached as a unitary resource.&nbsp; It is not a simple process, for instance, to distinguish the same person if he or she appears in more than one of these collections or, for that matter, to identify the same legislation if it is referenced inconsistently in different resources. As a result, using it for searching or for more sophisticated analyses becomes problematic when one attempts to move beyond one of its constituent collections.</p> <p>Finding some mechanism to allow these collections to be linked and so used as a coherent, integrated resource has been on the wish-list of Parliamentary historians and other stakeholders in this area for some time. In the mid-2000s, for instance, the History of Parliament Trust brought together the custodians of several digitised collections to examine ways in which this could be done. In 2011, some of these ideas came to fruition when JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) funded a one-year project named LIPARM (Linking the Parliamentary Record through Metadata) which aimed to design a mechanism for encoding these linkages within XML architectures and to produce a working prototype for an interface which would enable the potential offered by this new methodology to be realised in practice.</p> <p>This article explains the rationale of the LIPARM Project and how it uses XML to link together core components of the Parliamentary record within a unified metadata scheme. It introduces the XML schema, Parliamentary Metadata Language (PML), which was created by the project and the set of controlled vocabularies for Parliamentary proceedings which the project also created to support it.&nbsp; It also discusses the experience of the project in converting two XML-encoded collections of Parliamentary proceedings to PML and work on the prototype Web-based union catalogue which will form the initial gateway to PML-encoded metadata.</p> <h2 id="Background:_The_Need_for_Integrated_Parliamentary_Metadata">Background: The Need for Integrated Parliamentary Metadata</h2> <p>The UK's Parliamentary record has been the focus of a number of major digitisation initiatives which have made its historical corpus available in almost its entirety: in addition, the current publishing operations of the four Parliaments and Assemblies in the UK ensure that the contemporary record is available in machine-readable form on a daily basis. Unfortunately, these collections have limited interoperability owing to their disparate approaches to data and metadata which renders the federated searching and browsing of their contents currently impossible. In addition, the disparity of platforms on which they are offered, and the wide diversity of user interfaces they use to present the data (as shown by the small sample in Figure 1), render extensive research a time-consuming and cumbersome process if it is necessary to extend its remit beyond the confines of a single collection.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Four major collections of Parliamentary proceedings, each using a different interface" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-gartner/liparm-figure1.png" style="width: 640px; height: 231px;" title="Figure 1: Four major collections of Parliamentary proceedings, each using a different interface" /></p> <p style="text-align: left; "><strong>Figure 1: Four major collections of Parliamentary proceedings, each using a different interface</strong></p> <p>A more integrated approach to Parliamentary metadata offers major potential for new research: it would, for instance, allow the comprehensive tracking of an individual's career, including all of their contributions to debates and proceedings. It would allow the process of legislation to be traced automatically, voting patterns to be analysed, and the emergence of themes and topics in Parliamentary history to be analysed on a large scale.</p> <p>One example of the linkages that could usefully be made in an integrated metadata architecture can be seen in the career of Sir James Craig, the Prime Minister of Northern Ireland from 1921 to 1940.&nbsp; Figure 2 illustrates some of the connections that could be made to represent his career:-</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Sample of potential linkages for a Parliamentarian" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-gartner/figure2-james-craig-v3.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 331px;" title="Figure 2: Sample of potential linkages for a Parliamentarian" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Sample of potential linkages for a Parliamentarian</strong></p> <p>The connections shown here are to the differing ways in which he is named in the written proceedings, to his tenures in both Houses, the constituencies he represented, the offices he held and the contributions he made to debates. Much more complex relationships are, of course, possible and desirable.</p> <p>The advantages of an integrated approach to metadata which would allow these connections to be made have long been recognised by practitioners in this field, and several attempts have been made to create potential strategies for realising them. But it was only in 2011 that these took more concrete form when a one-day meeting sponsored by JISC brought together representatives from the academic, publishing, library and archival sectors to devise a strategy for integrating Parliamentary metadata. Their report proposed the creation of an XML schema for linking core components of this record and the creation of a series of controlled vocabularies for these components which could form the basis of the semantic linkages to be encoded in the schema [<a href="#1">1</a>]. These proposals then formed the basis of a successful bid to JISC for a project to put them into practice: the result was the LIPARM (Linking the Parliamentary Record through Metadata) Project.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/gartner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article richard gartner jisc kings college london library of congress national library of wales liparm archives cataloguing controlled vocabularies data digital library digitisation e-research identifier interoperability metadata multimedia national library rdf research research information management schema uri vocabularies xml xml schema Fri, 30 Nov 2012 19:41:15 +0000 lisrw 2391 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 'Does He Take Sugar?': The Risks of Standardising Easy-to-read Language http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author2">Dominik Lukeš</a> and <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author3">Alistair McNaught</a> highlight the risks of attempting to standardise easy-to-read language for online resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The idea that if we could only improve how we communicate, there would be less misunderstanding among people is as old as the hills. Historically, this notion has been expressed through things like school reform, spelling reform, publication of communication manuals, etc. The most radical expression of the desire for better understanding is the invention of a whole new artificial language with the intention of providing a universal language for humanity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article alistair mcnaught brian kelly dominik lukes alt alt-c bbc google jisc jisc techdis rdwg ukoln university of bath w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility algorithm blog bs8878 dissemination doi e-learning framework higher education internet explorer multimedia operating system research search technology software standards vocabularies wcag web 2.0 web resources Sat, 15 Dec 2012 15:18:25 +0000 lisrw 2431 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The ARK Project: Analysing Raptor at Kent http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lyons <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lyons#author1">Leo Lyons</a> describes how University of Kent librarians are benefitting from Raptor's ability to produce e-resource usage statistics and charts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is indisputable that the use of e-resources in university libraries has increased exponentially over the last decade and there would be little disagreement with a prediction that usage is set to continue to increase for the foreseeable future. The majority of students both at undergraduate and post-graduate level now come from a background where online access is the <em>de facto</em> standard.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lyons" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article leo lyons cardiff university jisc microsoft newcastle university university of huddersfield university of kent ark project authentication blog cataloguing csv data data set database further education identifier infrastructure internet explorer ldap licence microsoft reporting services mobile native app raptor repositories research sharepoint shibboleth software sql standards wiki xml Tue, 04 Dec 2012 17:21:49 +0000 lisrw 2394 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk SUSHI: Delivering Major Benefits to JUSP http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author1">Paul Meehan</a>, <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author2">Paul Needham</a> and <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author3">Ross MacIntyre</a> explain the enormous time and cost benefits in using SUSHI to support rapid gathering of journal usage reports into the JUSP service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A full-scale implementation of the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) would not be possible without the automated data harvesting afforded by the Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol. Estimated time savings in excess of 97% compared with manual file handling have allowed JUSP to expand its service to more than 35 publishers and 140 institutions by September 2012. An in-house SUSHI server also allows libraries to download quality-checked data from many publishers via JUSP, removing the need to visit numerous Web sites. The protocol thus affords enormous cost and time benefits for the centralised JUSP service and for all participating institutions. JUSP has also worked closely with many publishers to develop and implement SUSHI services, pioneering work to benefit both the publishers and the UK HE community.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/jusp-logo.png" style="width: 145px; height: 133px;" title="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" /></p> <h2 id="JUSP:_Background_to_the_Service">JUSP: Background to the Service</h2> <p>The management of journal usage statistics can be an onerous task at the best of times. The introduction of the COUNTER [<a href="#1">1</a>] Code of Practice in 2002 was a major step forward, allowing libraries to collect consistent, audited statistics from publishers. By July 2012, 125 publishers offered the JR1 report, providing the number of successful full-text downloads. In the decade since COUNTER reports became available, analysis of the reports has become increasingly important, with library managers, staff and administrators increasingly forced to examine journal usage to inform and rationalise purchasing and renewal decisions.</p> <p>In 2004, JISC Collections commissioned a report [<a href="#2">2</a>] which concluded that there was a definite demand for a usage statistics portal for the UK HE community; with some sites subscribing to more than 100 publishers, just keeping track of access details and downloading reports was becoming a significant task in itself, much less analysing the figures therein. There followed a report into the feasibility of establishing a ‘Usage Statistics Service’ carried out by Key Perspectives Limited and in 2008 JISC issued an ITT (Invitation To Tender). By early 2009 a prototype service, known as the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) had been developed by a consortium including Evidence Base at Birmingham City University, Cranfield University, JISC Collections and Mimas at The University of Manchester; the prototype featured a handful of publishers and three institutions. However, despite a centralised service appearing feasible [<a href="#3">3</a>], the requirement to download and process data in spreadsheet format, and the attendant time taken, still precluded a full-scale implementation across UK HE.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="COUNTER" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/counter-header.png" style="width: 640px; height: 45px;" title="COUNTER" /></p> <p>Release 3 of the COUNTER Code of Practice in 2009 however mandated the use of the newly-introduced Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol [<a href="#4">4</a>], a mechanism for the machine-to-machine transfer of COUNTER-compliant reports; this produced dramatic efficiencies of time and cost in the gathering of data from publishers. The JUSP team began work to implement SUSHI for a range of publishers and expanded the number of institutions. By September 2012, the service had grown significantly, whilst remaining free at point of use, and encompassed 148 participating institutions, and 35 publishers. To date more than 100 million individual points of data have been collected by JUSP, all via SUSHI, a scale that would have been impossible without such a mechanism in place or without massive additional staff costs.</p> <p>JUSP offers much more than basic access to publisher statistics, however; the JUSP Web site [<a href="#5">5</a>] details the numerous reports and analytical tools on offer, together with detailed user guides and support materials. The cornerstone of the service though is undeniably its SUSHI implementation, both in terms of gathering the COUNTER JR1 and JR1a data and - as developed more recently - its own SUSHI server, enabling institutions to re-harvest data into their own library management tools for local analysis.</p> <h2 id="JUSP_Approach_to_SUSHI_Development_and_Implementation">JUSP Approach to SUSHI Development and Implementation</h2> <p>Once the decision was made to scale JUSP into a full service, the development of SUSHI capability became of paramount importance. The team had been able to handle spreadsheets of data on a small scale, but the expected upscale to 100+ institutions and multiple publishers within a short time frame meant that this would very quickly become unmanageable and costly in staff time and effort - constraints that were proving to be a source of worry at many institutions too: while some sites could employ staff whose role revolved around usage stats gathering and analysis, this was not possible at every institution, nor especially straightforward for institutions juggling dozens, if not hundreds, of publisher agreements and deals.</p> <p>Two main issues were immediately apparent in the development of the SUSHI software. Firstly, there was a lack of any standard SUSHI client software that we could use or adapt, and, more worryingly, the lack of SUSHI support at a number of major publishers. While many publishers use an external company or platform such as Atypon, MetaPress or HighWire to collect and provide usage statistics, others had made little or no progress in implementing SUSHI support by late 2009 - where SUSHI servers were in place these were often untested or unused by consumers.</p> <p>An ultimate aim for JUSP was to develop a single piece of software that would seamlessly interact with any available SUSHI repository and download data for checking and loading into JUSP. However, the only client software available by 2009 was written and designed to work in the Windows environment, or used Java, which can be very complex to work with and of which the JUSP team had limited expertise. The challenge therefore became to develop a much simpler set of code using Perl and/or PHP, common and simple programming languages which were much more familiar to the JUSP team.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article paul meehan paul needham ross macintyre birmingham city university cranfield university elsevier intute jisc jisc collections mimas niso university of manchester university of oxford jusp nesli pirus2 zetoc archives authentication csv data data set database digital library dublin core html identifier interoperability java multimedia openurl passwords perl php portal raptor repositories research shibboleth software standards sushi windows xml Wed, 05 Dec 2012 17:54:19 +0000 lisrw 2396 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Seb Schmoller Replies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Stepping down from his pivotal role as CEO at ALT, <a href="/issue70/schmoller#author1">Seb Schmoller</a> kindly answers a few questions from <em>Ariadne</em> on his perspective on online learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Ariadne</em>: Seb, please tell us a little about yourself.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article seb schmoller alt harvard university jisc sheffield college university of cambridge university of southampton yale university wikipedia adl archives blog content licence copyright course design e-learning further education higher education ict licence mooc research software twitter video Fri, 07 Dec 2012 12:27:42 +0000 lisrw 2404 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 21st-century Scholarship and Wikipedia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/thomas#author1">Amber Thomas</a> explores the ways in which emerging research practices and Wikipedia illustrate the changing boundaries of academic work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia, the world’s fifth most-used Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>], is a good illustration of the growing credibility of online resources. In his article in <em>Ariadne </em>earlier this year, “Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Academic Acceptance” [<a href="#2">2</a>], Brian Whalley described the debates around accuracy and review, in the context of geology.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article amber thomas bbc becta british library jisc open university orcid ukoln university of warwick jorum myexperiment wikipedia archives blog data dewey decimal e-learning framework further education google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure linked data oer open access open education open source rdf repositories research search technology semantic web smartphone software uri web 2.0 wiki Fri, 30 Nov 2012 13:18:23 +0000 lisrw 2390 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Case Studies in Web Sustainability http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/turner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/turner#author1">Scott Turner</a> describes issues around making Web resources sustainable.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At the moment organisations often make significant investments in producing Web-based material, often funded through public money, for example from JISC. But what happens when some of those organisations are closed or there&nbsp; is no longer any money or resources to host the site? We are seeing cuts in funding or changes in governmental policy, which is resulting in the closure of some of these organisations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/turner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article scott turner amazon google jisc university of northampton amazon web services archives blog cloud computing css geospatial data google analytics google docs html infrastructure internet explorer mac os passwords research search engine optimisation search technology standards twitter url web resources web services youtube Mon, 10 Dec 2012 15:09:03 +0000 lisrw 2405 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mining the Archive: The Development of Electronic Journals http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white#author1">Martin White</a> looks through the <em>Ariadne</em> archive to trace the development of e-journals as a particular aspect of electronic service delivery and highlights material he considers as significant.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My career has spanned 42 years in the information business. It has encompassed 10,000-hole optical coincidence cards, online database services, videotext, laser discs, and CD-ROMs, the World Wide Web, mobile services and big data solutions. I find the historical development of information resource management absolutely fascinating, yet feel that in general it is poorly documented from an analytical perspective even though there are some excellent archives.</p> <p>These archives include the back issues of <em>Ariadne</em> from January 1996. <em>Ariadne</em> has always been one of my must-reads as a way of keeping in touch with issues and developments in e-delivery of information. The recently launched new <em>Ariadne</em> platform [<a href="#1">1</a>] has provided easier access to these archives. Looking through its content has reminded me of the skills and vision of the UK information profession as it sought to meet emerging user requirements with very limited resources.&nbsp; The archives have always been available on the <em>Ariadne</em> site but the recent update to the site and the availability of good tags on the archive content has made it much easier to mine through the archive issues.</p> <p>The <em>Ariadne</em> team, in particular Richard Waller, has given me the opportunity to mine those archives [<a href="#2">2</a>] and trace some of the developments in electronic service delivery in the UK.</p> <p>Indeed working through the archives is now probably too easy as in the preparation of this column I have found myself moving sideways from many of the feature articles to revel in the other columns that have been a feature of Ariadne. This article is a personal view of some of these developments and is in no way intended to be a definitive account. Its main purpose is to encourage others to look into the archive and learn from the experiences of the many innovators that have patiently coped with the challenges of emerging technology, resource limitations and often a distinct lack of strategy and policy at both an institutional and government level.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image1-optical-coincidence-card.jpg" style="width: 171px; height: 289px;" title="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970</strong></p> <h2 id="e-Journal_Development">e-Journal Development</h2> <p>Arriving at the University of Southampton in 1967 my main surprise was not the standard of the laboratories but the quality and scale of the Chemistry Department library. School does not prepare you for reading primary journals and how best to make use of Chemical Abstracts, but I quickly found that working in the library was much more fun than in a laboratory. I obtained an excellent result in one vacation project on physical chemistry problems by reverse engineering the problems through Chemical Abstracts! Therefore, as it turned out, I had started my career as an information scientist before I even graduated. By 1977 I was working with The Chemical Society on the micropublishing of journals and taking part in a British Library project on the future of chemical information. &nbsp;Re-reading the outcomes of that project makes me realise how difficult it is to forecast the future. Now my past has re-asserted itself to good effect as I have both the honour and excitement of being Chair of the eContent Committee of the Royal Society of Chemistry.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image2-laserdiscs.jpg" style="width: 336px; height: 312px;" title="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980</strong></p> <p>So from my standpoint, in seeking to identify distinct themes in the development of information resource management in <em>Ariadne</em>, a good place to start is with the e-markup of chemical journals. In Issue 1 Dr Henry Rzepa wrote about the potential benefits of the semantic markup of primary journals to provide chemists with access to the content of the journal article and not just to a contents page and title [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The immediate problem you face reading this admirable summary of the potential benefits of markup is that many of the hyperlinks have disappeared. History has been technologically terminated. Almost 15 years passed by before the Royal Society of Chemistry set up Project Prospect and turned semantic markup into a production process [4]. Dr Rzepa is now Professor of Computational Chemistry at Imperial College, London.</p> <p>By the mid-1990s good progress had been made in e-journal production technologies and the first e-only journals were beginning to appear. Among them was <em>Glacial Geology and Geomorphology</em> (GGG) which existed in a printed version only in as far as readers could print out a selection from it. One aim of GGG is therefore to provide the benefits of electronic transfer as well as other value added products in an accepted academic, peer-reviewed system. The author of the article describing the project [<a href="#5">5</a>] was Dr. Brian Whalley, who went on to become a Professor in the Geomaterials Research Group, Queens University of Belfast. As you will discover from <a href="../author/brian-whalley-author-profile">his author profile</a> (another <em>Ariadne</em> innovation), Brian is still active though retired from formal education. What struck me about this article was the author’s vision in January 1996 of how e-journals could be of benefit in university teaching.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article martin white andrew w mellon foundation british library hefce imperial college london institute of physics intranet focus ltd jisc mimas portico stm ukoln university of glasgow university of manchester university of sheffield university of southampton jisc information environment accessibility archives big data blog content management copyright database ebook ejournal higher education intellectual property jstor licence mobile open access research resource management search technology standards Thu, 06 Dec 2012 15:50:18 +0000 lisrw 2401 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CURATEcamp iPres 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author1">Mark Jordan</a>, <a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author2">Courtney Mumma</a>, <a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author3">Nick Ruest</a> and the participants of CURATEcamp iPres 2012 report on this unconference for digital curation practitioners and researchers, held on 2 October 2012 in Toronto.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CURATEcamp is ‘A series of unconference-style events focused on connecting practitioners and technologists interested in digital curation.’ [<a href="#1">1</a>] The first CURATEcamp was held in the summer of 2010, and there have been just over 10 Camps since then.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report courtney mumma mark jordan nick ruest british library library of congress ndsa premis simon fraser university york university apache archives blog cloud computing curation data digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination ebook file format google docs hashtag identifier infrastructure linux metadata open source operating system preservation programming language python repositories software standards taxonomy twitter vocabularies Thu, 13 Dec 2012 12:21:18 +0000 lisrw 2409 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk euroCRIS Membership Meeting, Madrid http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> and <a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author2">Brigitte Jörg</a> report on the bi-annual euroCRIS membership and Task Groups meetings which took place in Madrid on 5-6 November 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>euroCRIS membership meetings [<a href="#1">1</a>] are held twice a year, providing members and invited participants with updates on strategic and Task Group progress and plans, as well as the opportunity to share experience of Current Research Information System (CRIS)-related developments and seek feedback. A CERIF (<em>Common European Research Information Format</em>) tutorial is usually included on the first morning for those new to the standard, and the host country reports on local CRIS initiatives in the ‘national’ session.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report brigitte jorg rosemary russell codata elsevier eurocris imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath reposit adobe aggregation bibliometrics blog cerif data data model data set database digital repositories dublin core framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability lod ontologies open access open source portal preservation rdf repositories research research information management software standards visualisation vocabularies xml Thu, 13 Dec 2012 09:07:57 +0000 lisrw 2408 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hydra UK: Flexible Repository Solutions to Meet Varied Needs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the Hydra UK event held on 22 November 2012 at the Library of the London School of Economics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hydra, as described in the opening presentation of this event, is a project initiated in 2008 by the University of Hull, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and DuraSpace to work towards a reusable framework for multi-purpose, multi-functional, multi-institutional repository-enabled solutions for the management of digital content collections [<a href="#1">1</a>]. An initial timeframe for the project of three years had seen all founding institutional partners successfully implement a repository demonstrating these characteristics.&nbsp; Key to the aims of the project has always been to generate wider interest outside the partners to foster not only sustainability in the technology, but also sustainability of the community around this open source development.&nbsp; Hydra has been disseminated through a range of events, particularly through the international Open Repositories conferences [<a href="#2">2</a>], but the sphere of interest in Hydra has now stimulated the holding of specific events in different countries: Hydra UK is one of them.</p> <p>The Hydra UK event was held on 22 November 2012, kindly hosted by the Library at the London School of Economics.&nbsp; Representatives from institutions across the UK, but also Ireland, Austria and Switzerland, came together to learn about the Hydra Project, and to discuss how Hydra might serve their digital content collection management needs.&nbsp; 29 delegates from 21 institutions were present, representing mostly universities but also the archive, museum and commercial sectors.&nbsp; Five presentations were given on Hydra, focusing on the practical experience of using this framework and how it fits into overall system architectures, and time was also deliberately given over to discussion of more specific topics of interest and to allow delegates the opportunity to voice their requirements.&nbsp; The presentations were:</p> <ul> <li>Introduction to Hydra</li> <li>Hydra @ Hull</li> <li>Hydra @ Glasgow Caledonian University</li> <li>Hydra @ LSE</li> <li>Hydra @ Oxford</li> </ul> <h2 id="Introduction_to_Hydra">Introduction to Hydra</h2> <p>Chris Awre from the University of Hull gave the opening presentation.&nbsp; The starting basis for Hydra was mutual recognition by all the founding partners that a repository should be an enabler for managing digital content collections, not a constraint or simply a silo of content.&nbsp; Digital repositories have been put forward and applied as a potential solution for a variety of use cases over the years, and been used at different stages of a content lifecycle.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure1-hydra-rpt-lse-library.jpg" style="width: 178px; height: 178px;" title="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: LSE Library</strong><br /><small>(Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)</small></p> <p>To avoid producing a landscape of multiple repositories all having to be managed to cover these use cases, the Hydra Project sought to identify a way in which one repository solution could be applied flexibly to meet the requirements of different use cases. The idea of a single repository with multiple points of interaction came into being – Hydra – and the concept of individual Hydra ‘head’ solutions.</p> <p>The Hydra Project is informed by two main principles:</p> <ul> <li>No single system can provide the full range of repository-based solutions for a given institution’s needs,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet sustainable solutions require a common repository infrastructure.</li> <li>No single institution can resource the development of a full range of solutions on its own,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet each needs the flexibility to tailor solutions to local demands and workflows.</li> </ul> <p>The Hydra Project has sought to provide the common infrastructure upon which flexible solutions can be built, and shared.</p> <p>The recognition that no single institution can achieve everything it might want for its repository has influenced the project from the start. &nbsp;To quote an African proverb, ‘If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far, go together’. Working together has been vital.&nbsp; To organise this interaction, Hydra has structured itself through three interleaving sub-communities, the Steering Group, the Partners and Developers, as shown by Figure 2.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/hydra-community-structure-v4.jpg" style="width: 661px; height: 506px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><p>The concept of a Hydra Partner has emerged from this model of actively working together, and the project has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) process for any institution wishing to have its use of, and contribution and commitment to Hydra recognised.&nbsp; Starting with the original four partners in 2008, Hydra now has 11 partners, with two more in the process of joining.&nbsp; All have made valuable contributions and helped to make Hydra better.&nbsp; Hydra partnership is not the only route to involvement, though, and there are many in the Hydra developer community who are adopters of the software, but who have not reached a stage where partnership is appropriate.</p> <p>The technical implementation of Hydra was supported through early involvement in the project by MediaShelf, a commercial technical consultancy focused on repository solutions.&nbsp; All Hydra software is, though, open source, available under the Apache 2.0 licence, and all software code contributions are managed in this way.&nbsp; The technical implementation is based on a set of core principles that describe how content objects should be structured within the repository, and with an understanding that different content types can be managed using different workflows.&nbsp; Following these principles, Hydra could be implemented in a variety of ways: the technical direction taken by the project is simply the one that suited the partners at the time.</p> <p>Hydra as currently implemented is built on existing open source components, and the project partners are committed to supporting these over time:</p> <ul> <li>Fedora: one of the digital repository systems maintained through DuraSpace [<a href="#3">3</a>]</li> <li>Apache Solr: powerful indexing software now being used in a variety of discovery solutions [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Blacklight: a next-generation discovery interface, which has its own community around it [<a href="#5">5</a>]</li> <li>Hydra plugin: a collection of components that facilitate workflow in managing digital content [<a href="#6">6</a>]</li> <li>Solrizer: a component that indexes Fedora-held content into a Solr index</li> </ul> <p>These components are arranged in the architecture shown in Figure 3.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure3-hydra-architecture-v4.jpg" style="width: 543px; height: 258px;" title="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 3: Hydra architecture</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><p>A common feature of the last three components in the list above is the use of Ruby on Rails as the coding language and its ability to package up functionality in discrete ‘gems’.&nbsp; This was consciously chosen for Hydra because of its agile programming capabilities, its use of the MVC (Model–View–Controller) structure, and its testing infrastructure.&nbsp; The choice has been validated on a number of occasions as Hydra has developed.&nbsp; However, it was noted that other coding languages and systems could be used to implement Hydra where appropriate.&nbsp; This applies to all the main components, even Fedora.&nbsp; Whilst a powerful and flexible repository solution in its own right, Fedora has proved to be complex to use: Hydra has sought in part to tap this capability through simpler interfaces and interactions.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report chris awre bbc bodleian libraries california digital library duraspace glasgow caledonian university jisc london school of economics sakai stanford university university of hull university of oxford university of virginia hydra jisc information environment remap project apache api archives authentication cataloguing collection development content management data data management data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination eprints fedora commons framework google maps infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata multimedia open source preservation repositories research ruby search technology sharepoint software solr streaming video vle Thu, 13 Dec 2012 19:24:07 +0000 lisrw 2411 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk IFLA World Library and Information Congress 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the 78th IFLA General Conference and Assembly held in Helsinki, Finland over 11-17 August 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Sunday newcomers session chaired by <strong>Buhle Mbambo-Thata</strong> provided us with some insight into the sheer magnitude of IFLA (as most people seem to call it) or the World Library and Information Congress (to give the formal name) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This year’s congress had over 4,200 delegates from 120 different countries, though over a thousand of these were Finnish librarians making the most of the locality of this year’s event.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy arl association of research libraries cni coalition for networked information dcc google ifla simon fraser university ukoln university of bath university of glasgow university of northampton accessibility aggregation archives chrome cloud computing communications protocol copyright curation data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation dublin core facebook framework identifier internet explorer linked data mac os metadata mobile named entity recognition preservation privacy remote working repositories research twitter video Tue, 11 Dec 2012 13:16:31 +0000 lisrw 2407 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL) 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt#author1">Anna Mastora</a> and <a href="/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt#author2">Sarantos Kapidakis</a> report on TPDL 2012 held at Paphos, Cyprus, over 23-27 September 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 16<sup>th</sup> International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL) 2012 [<a href="#1">1</a>] was another successful event in the series of ECDL/TPDL conferences which has been the leading European scientific forum on digital libraries for 15 years. Across these years, the conference has brought together researchers, developers, content providers and users in the field of digital libraries by addressing issues in the area where theoretical and applied research meet, such as digital library models, architectures, functionality, users, and quality.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report anna mastora sarantos kapidakis city university london cni coalition for networked information google ionian university iso massachusetts institute of technology microsoft national technical university of athens open university princeton university the national archives university of cyprus university of malta university of strathclyde europeana archives blog data data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination facebook frbr graphics information retrieval interoperability linked data metadata multimedia natural language processing ontologies preservation research resource discovery search technology semantic web skos software standards thesaurus twitter visualisation Sun, 16 Dec 2012 13:44:54 +0000 lisrw 2432 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: User Studies for Digital Library Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/aytac-rvw#author1">Selenay Aytac</a> reviews a collection of essays on user studies and digital library development that provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>User Studies for Digital Library Development</em> provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries. While there are many books on user studies and digital library development, this work operates at the junction of these two domains and stands out for its insights, balance, and quality of its case-based investigations. The book brings together points of view from different professional communities, including practitioners as well as researchers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review selenay aytac bbc glasgow caledonian university library of congress long island university manchester metropolitan university national library of australia university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of malta university of oxford university of sheffield university of strathclyde europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data course design creative commons data digital library digital preservation e-learning framework information society metadata mobile multimedia national library open access research resource discovery usability web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:10:17 +0000 lisrw 2412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Embedded Librarian http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a comprehensive overview of embedded librarianship, a new model of library service that promises to enhance the strategic value of contemporary knowledge work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarianship as a profession is confronting a growing demand to prove its worth. Library patrons expect utility. The organisations that fund them pre-suppose a contribution to their bottom lines.</p> <p>The calls for this proof come from librarians themselves as much as from their employers. And the tone of the questioning is persistent if not redundant. It can be distilled to a fundamental query: Can the library sustain its basic mission of effectively and efficiently fulfilling its users' information needs given the technological, social, and economic developments that are transforming how people interact with data, documents, and each other?</p> <h2 id="Librarianship:_In_Search_of_the_Value_Proposition">Librarianship: In Search of the Value Proposition</h2> <p>These transformations have been occurring for some time, in different areas of living and working. Though not flowing from a single source, for librarians the impacts from these changes have seemingly converged on their profession as if they were collusive forces.</p> <p>A global financial crisis and its lingering downturns have resulted in deeper budget cuts for many departments in every type of institution, public and private. A rising trend toward direct information consumption has caused many everyday users as well as executives to believe that removing librarians from the knowledge cycle is the next logical step. Caught within the sights of cost-conscious decision makers, libraries and information centres have become vulnerable to downsizing.</p> <p>Students enter universities - even secondary schools - wedded unconsciously to their handhelds, always connected, assuming unmitigated and near-immediate digital satisfaction for their knowledge wants. Most of them were born into this socio-technical life-world as if it were a natural order. They know and expect nothing else. In such an environment, librarians orchestrate access but need not be confronted. They maintain crucial databases and finding aids, but can do so unseen and disembodied. They can be relegated to infrastructural innards.</p> <p>For-profit organisations, the home of law firm and business librarians, are looking upon the outsourcing of support staff with increasing favour. And while library positions have not yet been handed over wholesale to third-party providers, there is industry trepidation that it could move in that direction. The threat is vague but distinctly present.</p> <p>Many have taken to the outlets of library opinion and prediction, warning of impending disintermediation and possible obsolescence if the field fails to embrace drastic changes in how it carries out its service mission. Blogs, journals, and conferences are animated with calls to re-conceptualise philosophies and re-direct core methods. Some commentators merely emit distress signals on behalf of the library community. They are invocations of crisis without even a stab at real solutions. Others, however, are serious attempts to map out alternative pathways to a more stable occupational future. These need to be reckoned with.</p> <p>A common path taken by the more constructive endeavours is demonstrating how librarianship can re-establish its value in a rapidly changing environment. This value is understood to be the knowledge-creating and disseminating efficacies that libraries bring to their users more ably and with less cost than other institutions. Since libraries are housed and financially supported by parent organisations of some kind, the value is usually construed as a combination of business and mission-relevant attributes. The emphasis on mission may be more pronounced in academic and public libraries, while corporate and firm libraries stress the financial aspects, but it is ultimately about how management assesses the library's contributions to the organisation's long-term integrity. Granted, the value has a large practical component for a library's patrons; the direct benefits are the answers, leads, and guidance they obtain when visiting the reference desk or searching the collections. However, the final criterion for most libraries will be the value proposition attributed to them by upper-level decision makers. User satisfaction is a valuable standard, but in the end it is often translated into a determination of whether the library produces distinct results in light of the resources devoted to maintaining it.</p> <p>A concrete attempt to re-assert the business and service value of librarians has been the adoption of the practice model known as embedded librarianship. Although it has been applied in libraries in one form or another for a few decades - without necessarily using the word ‘embedded’ - only in the past several years has it risen to widespread notability. Judging by the upsurge in professional discussions and published cases devoted to this approach, librarians of many types are expressing keen interest in the value-enhancing potential of embedding themselves. Its contemporary significance is fully examined by David Shumaker in <em>The Embedded Librarian: Innovative Strategies for Taking Knowledge Where It's Needed</em>. The author, an associate professor at The Catholic University of America's School of Library and Information Science in Washington, D.C., is a well-known chronicler of embedded practices. This book is the field's first attempt at a comprehensive review of embedded librarianship's shared features, variable manifestations, and elements for success among major types of libraries.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review john azzolini clifford chance blog cataloguing data database digital library framework higher education research search technology standards Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:32:15 +0000 lisrw 2413 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/dobreva-rvw#author1">Milena Dobreva</a> reviews the newly published book of Martin de Saulles which looks at the new models of information production, distribution and consumption.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Writing about information and the changes in the models of its production, distribution and consumption is no simple task. Besides the long-standing debate on what information and knowledge really mean, the world of current technologies is changing at a pace which inevitably influences all spheres of human activity. But the first of those spheres to tackle is perhaps that of information – how we create, disseminate, and use it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review milena dobreva amazon jisc university of brighton university of malta archives big data blog cloud computing data data mining digital library digital preservation digitisation google search information society institutional repository mobile podcast research search technology video wiki Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:49:00 +0000 lisrw 2414 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Using Mobile Technology to Deliver Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/maclellan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/maclellan-rvw#author1">Fiona MacLellan</a> reviews a practical guide to mobile technology and its use in delivering library services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My initial thought upon seeing <em>Using Mobile Technology to Deliver Library Services</em> was available for review was that it was a topic of which I have limited knowledge – but part of its appeal was that I could learn about a new subject.&nbsp; After I registered to review the book I then had second thoughts. I began to worry that the book would be too advanced for me.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/maclellan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review fiona maclellan university of northampton augmented reality bibliographic data ebook licence mobile mobile phone qr code research rfid sms Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:05:05 +0000 lisrw 2429 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The E-copyright Handbook http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at the latest of Paul Pedley’s copyright guidance books, and, in some respects, finds it wanting.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Pedley is a name that needs no introduction to <em>aficionados</em> of copyright textbooks, being the author of several such books published by Facet Publishing in the past (and reviewed by <em>Ariadne </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>][<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>]).&nbsp; His latest effort, <em>The E-copyright Handbook</em>, attempts to cover the fast-moving and complex world of electronic copyright, using an interesting approach.&nbsp; Rather than the traditional way of such books, describing the media and describing the rights granted to copyright owners, the way the law applies to each media type, exceptions to copyright and so on, his approach is a mixture but with some emphasis on activities, as a glance at the chapter titles shows: Introduction, Content Types, Activities, Copyright Exceptions, Licences, the Digital Economy Act, Enforcement and The Hargreaves Review.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is a complex approach, which requires careful cross-referencing and also checking that material is neither duplicated, nor that is anything is overlooked.&nbsp; It is not clear to me whether the book is meant for reading through, or whether it should be just dipped into when a particular issue causes someone to check the law; but I found the approach confusing.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book also suffers from being in a fast-moving area, where the law, and technology, change fast and although it is clear that Facet got the book published in record time, as there are numerous references to 2012 developments in the text, the work is already out of date in several places, and will no doubt get more out of date as the months go on.&nbsp; Another problem is that the book cannot make up its mind whether it is written for UK readers, or readers in the EU, or in the USA.&nbsp; All too often, different countries’ court cases are mentioned together; one is (say) a UK case and another is a US case.&nbsp; Without the understanding that US law and UK law in this field are very different, people will come to incorrect conclusions about the significance of the cases to them in their day to day work. Moreover, all too often the cases are described without any court decisions relating to them being provided; so one is left with the worry ‘why did the author mention this case at all?’</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review charles oppenheim bbc de montfort university google jisc loughborough university university of strathclyde bibliographic data bibliometrics cloud computing copyright data database dissemination google books open access research standards streaming url web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:30:54 +0000 lisrw 2415 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Understanding Information and Computation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a very individual perspective on the extent to which the growth and structure of the World Wide Web is governed by the fundamental laws of physics and mathematics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have been a member of the information profession for almost 60 years, but then I started at a very young age.&nbsp;&nbsp; Indeed I was a library assistant at the age of four.&nbsp; My grandfather was the volunteer librarian for the small library in Clanfield, Hampshire, which opened up for a couple of afternoons each week.&nbsp; My job was to stack the books up, and help him put them back on the shelves.&nbsp; I felt very important.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review martin white ibm intranet focus ltd oxford university press university of oxford university of sheffield bibliographic data content management data information retrieval intranet research search technology Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:51:07 +0000 lisrw 2416 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk