Overview of content related to 'iso' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/1215/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=leonard%20will&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Book Review: Powering Search - The Role of Thesauri in New Information Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/will-rvw#author1">Leonard Will</a> reviews a comprehensive survey of the literature on the use of thesauri in information search processes and interfaces.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Powering Search</em> is a comprehensive review and synthesis of work that has been done over the past 50 years on the use of thesauri to make searching for information more effective. The book does not discuss the principles and practice of construction of information retrieval thesauri in any detail, but concentrates on the search process and on the user interface through which a searcher interacts with a body of information resources. It is written clearly: each chapter begins and ends with a summary of its content, and the first and last chapters summarise the whole book. There are copious references throughout and a full index.</p> <p>As the author says in his conclusion:</p> <blockquote><p>'This book has taken a new approach to thesauri by critiquing the relevant literatures of a variety of communities who share an interest in thesauri and their functions but who are not, it should be noted, closely collaborating at this time – research communities such as library and information science, information retrieval, knowledge organization, human-computer interaction, information architecture, information search behavior, usability studies, search user interface, metadata-enabled information access, interactive information retrieval, and searcher education.'</p> </blockquote> <p>One consequence of these disparate approaches is that terminology varies across communities: there are many interpretations of the meaning of <em>facet, category, keyword </em>or<em> taxonomy</em>, for example, which the author acknowledges, but he then uses these terms without saying precisely what definition he gives them.</p> <h2 id="Information_Search_Processes">Information Search Processes</h2> <p>Chapters 2 and 3 review studies on how people go about searching for information, leading to the perhaps self-evident conclusion that there are two types of approach. If a specific and well-defined piece of information is sought, people will amend and refine their queries in the light of initial results to get closer to what they seek. On the other hand, if the search requirement is less well defined, a browsing or 'berrypicking' approach is adopted to explore a subject area, picking up and assembling pieces of information and changing the destination as the exploration progresses. Both these approaches use an iterative procedure, within which a thesaurus can serve to make a search more precise, in the first case, or to show the broader context, in the second.</p> <p>Chapter 4 deals with thesauri in Web-based search systems, and gives several examples of thesauri in digital libraries, subject gateways and portals, digital archives and linked data repositories. This is one way of grouping these examples, but it is not clear that there is any distinction in principle between the way thesauri can be used in each of them, or indeed in search interfaces to other types of document collections. The main distinction, which is not fully addressed, is whether the information resources being searched have been indexed with terms from the thesaurus being used, or whether the thesaurus is just a source of possible terms for searching the text, and possibly the metadata, of documents. More weight needs to be given to the statement in the introduction to ISO 25964 -1:</p> <blockquote><p>'If both the indexer and the searcher are guided to choose the same term for the same concept, then relevant documents will be retrieved. This is the main principle underlying thesaurus design ...'</p> </blockquote> <p>In fact the book generally talks about <em>terms</em> rather than the approach taken by the current standards of considering unambiguously defined <em>concepts</em>, with terms just serving as convenient labels for these. Each concept may have many labels by which it can be retrieved, including one chosen as <em>preferred</em> for each language covered by the thesaurus.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review leonard will ansi cilip iso niso willpower information accessibility controlled vocabularies dewey decimal digital archive digital library graphics information architecture information retrieval interoperability lcsh linked data metadata repositories research search technology standards taxonomy thesaurus url usability visualisation vocabularies Wed, 26 Jun 2013 18:00:00 +0000 lisrw 2451 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk