Overview of content related to 'copyright' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/168/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Editorial Introduction to Issue 72 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/editorial#author1">The new editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 72.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Change_Is_the_Only_Constant">Change Is the Only Constant</h2> <p>Issue 72 is the product of a long period of almost constant change. In the last issue, Richard Waller waved adieu as the outgoing editor, explaining the circumstances around the change in the Editorial for Issue 71 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 editorial kara jones queensland university of technology sherpa-leap university of bath linkedup project altmetrics cataloguing copyright data data set digitisation dissemination eprints higher education lod metadata open access open data open education repositories research Wed, 26 Feb 2014 21:49:54 +0000 lisrw 2518 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Digitisation and e-Delivery of Theses from ePrints Soton http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author1">Julian Ball</a> and <a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author2">Christine Fowler</a> describe the partnership between the University of Southampton’s Library Digitisation Unit and its institutional repository for digitising and hosting theses.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Hartley Library at the University of Southampton has in excess of 15,000 bound PhD and MPhil theses on 340 linear metres of shelving. Consultation of the hard-copy version is now restricted to readers making a personal visit to the Library, as no further microfiche copies are being produced by the British Library and no master copies of theses are lent from the Library. Retrieval of theses from storage for readers and their subsequent return requires effort from a large number of staff.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article christine fowler julian ball abbyy british library jisc university of southampton uk theses digitisation project aggregation api archives cataloguing copyright data digitisation electronic theses eprints framework institutional repository jpeg jstor library management systems metadata oai-pmh ocr open access open archives initiative open source optical character recognition preservation repositories research search technology software url xml Tue, 30 Jul 2013 13:13:08 +0000 editor 2499 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Open Access and Research Conference 2013: Discovery, Impact and Innovation http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author1">Paula Callan</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author2">Stephanie Bradbury</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author3">Sarah Brown</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author4">Philippa Broadley</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author5">Emma Nelms</a> and <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author6">Christopher Hart</a> report on Open Access and Research 2013 which focused on recent developments and the strategic advantages they bring to the research sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Brisbane, Queensland, Australia was the host location for the second Open Access and Research 2013 conference [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The conference was held at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Gardens Point campus over 31 October – 1 November 2013. QUT has over 45,000 students and has a wide range of specialist research areas.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 event report christopher hart emma nelms paula callan philippa broadley sarah brown stephanie bradbury apple badc elsevier griffith university massachusetts institute of technology niso queensland university of technology university of sydney victoria university aggregation altmetrics archives copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data set dissemination doi e-research eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata open access open data open source portfolio rae repositories research search technology software video Sun, 16 Feb 2014 18:46:48 +0000 2507 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author1">Ikuko Tsuchide</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author2">Yui Nishizono</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author3">Masako Suzuki</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author4">Shigeki Sugita</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author5">Kazuo Yamamoto</a> and <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author6">Hideki Uchijima</a> introduce a number of ideas and projects that have enhanced the progress of the Open Access movement and institutional repositories in Japan over the last ten years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In Japan, Chiba University established the country's first institutional repository, CURATOR [<a href="#1">1</a>] in 2003. Since then, over the last 10 years or so, more than 300 universities and research institutions have set up repositories and the number of full-text items on repositories has exceeded one million [<a href="#2">2</a>]. All the contents are available on Japanese Institutional Repositories Online (JAIRO) [<a href="#3">3</a>] operated by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) [<a href="#4">4</a>] in Japan.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article hideki uchijima ikuko tsuchide kazuo yamamoto masako suzuki shigeki sugita yui nishizono asahikawa medical university cranfield university digital repository federation hokkaido university kagoshima university national institute of informatics osaka university otaru university of commerce sherpa sherpa-leap university of tokyo university of tsukuba repositories support project romeo rsp wikipedia archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data database digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access repositories research search technology standardisation twitter Wed, 10 Jul 2013 17:03:28 +0000 lisrw 2480 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Augmented Reality in Education: The SCARLET+ Experience http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author1">Laura Skilton</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author2">Matt Ramirez</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author3">Guyda Armstrong</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author4">Rose Lock</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author5">Jean Vacher</a> and <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author6">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> describe augmented reality in education case studies from the University of Sussex and the University for the Creative Arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:36.0pt;">&nbsp;Augmented reality, a capability that has been around for decades, is shifting from what was once seen as a gimmick to a bona fide game-changer. [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> </blockquote> <p>Augmented Reality (AR) has been listed in the Horizon Reports, key predictors of the potential impact of new technology on education. The 2011 Report [<a href="#1">1</a>] sparked the idea for an innovative project - SCARLET: Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article guyda armstrong jean vacher laura skilton marie-therese gramstadt matt ramirez rose lock alt courtauld institute of art glasgow school of art jisc mimas museum of london university for the creative arts university of london university of manchester university of sussex university of the arts london vads jorum kaptur scarlet accessibility archives augmented reality blog copyright data data set digitisation e-learning firefox framework ftp graphics infrastructure internet explorer ipad mobile multimedia oer portal research search technology smartphone url video web browser windows wireless youtube Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:38:54 +0000 lisrw 2439 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk ECLAP 2013: Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eclap-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the second international conference held by ECLAP, the e-library for performing arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The beautiful city of Porto was the host location for ECLAP 2013 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the 2nd International Conference on Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment. &nbsp;Porto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon and home of the Instituto Politécnico do Porto (IPP), the largest polytechnic in the country, with over 18,500 students.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marieke guy bbc coventry university dcc microsoft oais ukoln university of leeds university of lisbon w3c europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons data data management digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dublin core dvd ebook epub foaf framework geospatial data haptics higher education ict internet explorer interoperability knowledge base lod metadata multimedia ontologies open data owl preservation rdf remote working repositories research schema social networks software standards streaming usability video vocabularies Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:46:57 +0000 lisrw 2471 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The New Digital Scholar - Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/robinson-rvw#author1">Julia Robinson</a> reviews a substantial and timely collection of essays related to the research and writing practices of NextGen students. Expressing a call for change in the way educators approach Information Literacy teaching, this book invites the reader to redefine, re-evaluate and reflect on what we think we know about students’ research practices today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>McClure and Purdy bring together a mix of perspectives, from librarians and lecturers to professors and programmers, to give voice to the very timely concern in Information Literacy (IL) teaching, that we are not equipping our students for the future as we hoped. So-called NextGen students are engaging with information online in their personal, social and educational lives in ways that are shaping new approaches to and conceptions of research. At the same time, those teaching IL, whether librarians or writing instructors, are basing lesson plans and interventions on traditional pedagogies, arguably unfit for a research landscape so altered by the pace and change of information technologies. Students, IL instructors and academics occupy different spaces in the digital environment and work at cross-purposes. Traditional IL instruction has encouraged students to understand information sources in binary terms, right or wrong, leaving them disoriented and disengaged as they undertake research. Students should instead be encouraged to see research as a recursive conversation. IL instructors need to collaborate with academics to reposition themselves in this conversation and join students in their digital space at the point of need.</p> <h2 id="Structure_and_Content">Structure and Content</h2> <p>The book is divided into four parts and sixteen chapters (see <a href="#appendix">Appendix</a> for full Table of Contents). In the introduction ‘Understanding the NextGen Researcher’, McClure and Purdy set out their premise that NextGen students are prolific writers, readers and researchers, using a multitude of digital technologies to engage in these activities simultaneously, and:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Because digital technologies intertwine research and writing, this book takes as its premise that we – as professionals from a variety of fields – cannot ignore, marginalize </em>(sic)<em>, or leave to others the commitment to understand and help the new digital scholar. In its four parts, this collection explores the facets of that commitment.</em> (p.2)</p> <p>Part One: NextGen Students and the Research Writing ‘Problem’ moves through defining <em>Information Behaviour</em> (Chapter 1), giving a history of the research paper (Chapter 2), identifying key IL frameworks (Chapter 3) and introducing <em>deep learning</em> (Chapter 4). All of these chapters set the scene by providing a broad theoretical basis and shared language with which the reader can access the rest of the book.</p> <p>Most interestingly, McClure defines <em>Information Behaviour</em> as separate and distinct from Information Literacy. He bases his argument on the American Library Association definition of IL, where information-literate people ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, he reframes the ALA’s definition, instead describing it as:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><strong><em>A set of abilities requiring individuals to</em></strong> (my emphasis)<em> recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.</em> (p.20)</p> <p>McClure goes on to argue that if IL is a finite set of skills or abilities then <em>Information Behaviour </em>‘is concerned with the complex processes and influences on the information seeker’ (p.20). Whilst his intention to highlight behaviour is laudable, he adapts the definition of IL to make his point. Indeed, many readers in the UK would see a focus on behaviour and influence as inherent to IL, and already accounted for within the term. For example, the SCONUL Seven Pillars Model of Information Literacy states that:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Information literate people will demonstrate an awareness of how they gather, use, manage, synthesise and create information and data in an ethical manner and will have the information skills to do so effectively.</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>]</p> <p>Information skills are separate here too, but they are part of IL, they do not constitute IL itself. The focus on how accounts for behaviour. Conceptions of IL are detailed and discussed throughout the book along with related but distinct terms such as <em>Digital Literacy</em>,<em> Multiliteracies</em> (both Chapter 7), <em>Digital Agency</em> (Chapter 9), <em>Hyperliteracy</em> (Chapter 13) and <em>Technological Literacy</em> (Chapter 16).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review julia robinson american library association google newcastle university sconul born digital copyright data database framework open access research search technology usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 20:34:48 +0000 lisrw 2472 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Upskilling Liaison Librarians for Research Data Management http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author1">Andrew Cox</a>, <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author2">Eddy Verbaan</a> and <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author3">Barbara Sen</a> explore the design of a curriculum to train academic librarians in the competencies to support Research Data Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many UK HEIs, especially research-intensive institutions, Research Data Management (RDM) is rising rapidly up the agenda. Working closely with other professional services, and with researchers themselves, libraries will probably have a key role to play in supporting RDM. This role might include signposting institutional expertise in RDM; inclusion of the topic in information literacy sessions for PhD students and other researchers; advocacy for open data sharing; or contributing to the management of an institutional data repository.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article andrew cox barbara sen eddy verbaan dcc jisc northumbria university sconul uk data archive university of essex university of sheffield datum for health rdmrose archives bibliographic data bibliometrics cataloguing copyright curation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital library e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository knowledge base knowledge management licence metadata open access open data open education preservation repositories research software web portal Thu, 06 Dec 2012 19:27:43 +0000 lisrw 2402 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Seb Schmoller Replies http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Stepping down from his pivotal role as CEO at ALT, <a href="/issue70/schmoller#author1">Seb Schmoller</a> kindly answers a few questions from <em>Ariadne</em> on his perspective on online learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Ariadne</em>: Seb, please tell us a little about yourself.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article seb schmoller alt harvard university jisc sheffield college university of cambridge university of southampton yale university wikipedia adl archives blog content licence copyright course design e-learning further education higher education ict licence mooc research software twitter video Fri, 07 Dec 2012 12:27:42 +0000 lisrw 2404 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Mining the Archive: The Development of Electronic Journals http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white#author1">Martin White</a> looks through the <em>Ariadne</em> archive to trace the development of e-journals as a particular aspect of electronic service delivery and highlights material he considers as significant.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My career has spanned 42 years in the information business. It has encompassed 10,000-hole optical coincidence cards, online database services, videotext, laser discs, and CD-ROMs, the World Wide Web, mobile services and big data solutions. I find the historical development of information resource management absolutely fascinating, yet feel that in general it is poorly documented from an analytical perspective even though there are some excellent archives.</p> <p>These archives include the back issues of <em>Ariadne</em> from January 1996. <em>Ariadne</em> has always been one of my must-reads as a way of keeping in touch with issues and developments in e-delivery of information. The recently launched new <em>Ariadne</em> platform [<a href="#1">1</a>] has provided easier access to these archives. Looking through its content has reminded me of the skills and vision of the UK information profession as it sought to meet emerging user requirements with very limited resources.&nbsp; The archives have always been available on the <em>Ariadne</em> site but the recent update to the site and the availability of good tags on the archive content has made it much easier to mine through the archive issues.</p> <p>The <em>Ariadne</em> team, in particular Richard Waller, has given me the opportunity to mine those archives [<a href="#2">2</a>] and trace some of the developments in electronic service delivery in the UK.</p> <p>Indeed working through the archives is now probably too easy as in the preparation of this column I have found myself moving sideways from many of the feature articles to revel in the other columns that have been a feature of Ariadne. This article is a personal view of some of these developments and is in no way intended to be a definitive account. Its main purpose is to encourage others to look into the archive and learn from the experiences of the many innovators that have patiently coped with the challenges of emerging technology, resource limitations and often a distinct lack of strategy and policy at both an institutional and government level.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image1-optical-coincidence-card.jpg" style="width: 171px; height: 289px;" title="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970</strong></p> <h2 id="e-Journal_Development">e-Journal Development</h2> <p>Arriving at the University of Southampton in 1967 my main surprise was not the standard of the laboratories but the quality and scale of the Chemistry Department library. School does not prepare you for reading primary journals and how best to make use of Chemical Abstracts, but I quickly found that working in the library was much more fun than in a laboratory. I obtained an excellent result in one vacation project on physical chemistry problems by reverse engineering the problems through Chemical Abstracts! Therefore, as it turned out, I had started my career as an information scientist before I even graduated. By 1977 I was working with The Chemical Society on the micropublishing of journals and taking part in a British Library project on the future of chemical information. &nbsp;Re-reading the outcomes of that project makes me realise how difficult it is to forecast the future. Now my past has re-asserted itself to good effect as I have both the honour and excitement of being Chair of the eContent Committee of the Royal Society of Chemistry.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image2-laserdiscs.jpg" style="width: 336px; height: 312px;" title="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980</strong></p> <p>So from my standpoint, in seeking to identify distinct themes in the development of information resource management in <em>Ariadne</em>, a good place to start is with the e-markup of chemical journals. In Issue 1 Dr Henry Rzepa wrote about the potential benefits of the semantic markup of primary journals to provide chemists with access to the content of the journal article and not just to a contents page and title [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The immediate problem you face reading this admirable summary of the potential benefits of markup is that many of the hyperlinks have disappeared. History has been technologically terminated. Almost 15 years passed by before the Royal Society of Chemistry set up Project Prospect and turned semantic markup into a production process [4]. Dr Rzepa is now Professor of Computational Chemistry at Imperial College, London.</p> <p>By the mid-1990s good progress had been made in e-journal production technologies and the first e-only journals were beginning to appear. Among them was <em>Glacial Geology and Geomorphology</em> (GGG) which existed in a printed version only in as far as readers could print out a selection from it. One aim of GGG is therefore to provide the benefits of electronic transfer as well as other value added products in an accepted academic, peer-reviewed system. The author of the article describing the project [<a href="#5">5</a>] was Dr. Brian Whalley, who went on to become a Professor in the Geomaterials Research Group, Queens University of Belfast. As you will discover from <a href="../author/brian-whalley-author-profile">his author profile</a> (another <em>Ariadne</em> innovation), Brian is still active though retired from formal education. What struck me about this article was the author’s vision in January 1996 of how e-journals could be of benefit in university teaching.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article martin white andrew w mellon foundation british library hefce imperial college london institute of physics intranet focus ltd jisc mimas portico stm ukoln university of glasgow university of manchester university of sheffield university of southampton jisc information environment accessibility archives big data blog content management copyright database ebook ejournal higher education intellectual property jstor licence mobile open access research resource management search technology standards Thu, 06 Dec 2012 15:50:18 +0000 lisrw 2401 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk IFLA World Library and Information Congress 2012 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the 78th IFLA General Conference and Assembly held in Helsinki, Finland over 11-17 August 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Sunday newcomers session chaired by <strong>Buhle Mbambo-Thata</strong> provided us with some insight into the sheer magnitude of IFLA (as most people seem to call it) or the World Library and Information Congress (to give the formal name) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This year’s congress had over 4,200 delegates from 120 different countries, though over a thousand of these were Finnish librarians making the most of the locality of this year’s event.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ifla-2012-08-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy arl association of research libraries cni coalition for networked information dcc google ifla simon fraser university ukoln university of bath university of glasgow university of northampton accessibility aggregation archives chrome cloud computing communications protocol copyright curation data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation dublin core facebook framework identifier internet explorer linked data mac os metadata mobile named entity recognition preservation privacy remote working repositories research twitter video Tue, 11 Dec 2012 13:16:31 +0000 lisrw 2407 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The E-copyright Handbook http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at the latest of Paul Pedley’s copyright guidance books, and, in some respects, finds it wanting.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Pedley is a name that needs no introduction to <em>aficionados</em> of copyright textbooks, being the author of several such books published by Facet Publishing in the past (and reviewed by <em>Ariadne </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>][<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>]).&nbsp; His latest effort, <em>The E-copyright Handbook</em>, attempts to cover the fast-moving and complex world of electronic copyright, using an interesting approach.&nbsp; Rather than the traditional way of such books, describing the media and describing the rights granted to copyright owners, the way the law applies to each media type, exceptions to copyright and so on, his approach is a mixture but with some emphasis on activities, as a glance at the chapter titles shows: Introduction, Content Types, Activities, Copyright Exceptions, Licences, the Digital Economy Act, Enforcement and The Hargreaves Review.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is a complex approach, which requires careful cross-referencing and also checking that material is neither duplicated, nor that is anything is overlooked.&nbsp; It is not clear to me whether the book is meant for reading through, or whether it should be just dipped into when a particular issue causes someone to check the law; but I found the approach confusing.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book also suffers from being in a fast-moving area, where the law, and technology, change fast and although it is clear that Facet got the book published in record time, as there are numerous references to 2012 developments in the text, the work is already out of date in several places, and will no doubt get more out of date as the months go on.&nbsp; Another problem is that the book cannot make up its mind whether it is written for UK readers, or readers in the EU, or in the USA.&nbsp; All too often, different countries’ court cases are mentioned together; one is (say) a UK case and another is a US case.&nbsp; Without the understanding that US law and UK law in this field are very different, people will come to incorrect conclusions about the significance of the cases to them in their day to day work. Moreover, all too often the cases are described without any court decisions relating to them being provided; so one is left with the worry ‘why did the author mention this case at all?’</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review charles oppenheim bbc de montfort university google jisc loughborough university university of strathclyde bibliographic data bibliometrics cloud computing copyright data database dissemination google books open access research standards streaming url web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:30:54 +0000 lisrw 2415 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Most of a Conference http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/taylor#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> writes about how she made the most of a conference to promote and inform the work of a project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working with repositories in various ways for over five years, so I have, of course, attended the major international conference Open Repositories before. I have never actually presented anything or represented a specific project at the event, though. This year was different. This year I had a mission -&nbsp; to present a poster on the DataFlow Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] and to talk to people about the work we had been doing for the past 12 months and (I hoped) to interest them in using the Open Source (OS) systems we had developed during that period.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article stephanie taylor ukoln university of glasgow university of oxford university of southampton devcsi hydra rsp api archives blog cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital library digital repositories dissemination doi flickr framework hashtag higher education infrastructure javascript licence linked data linux metadata open access open source provenance rdf repositories research research information management software standards sword protocol tagging text mining twitter visualisation widget wiki zip Tue, 31 Jul 2012 15:05:33 +0000 lisrw 2374 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Collaborations Workshop 2012: Software, Sharing and Collaboration in Oxford http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/cw12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/cw12-rpt#author1">Simon Choppin</a> reports on a two-day software workshop held at The Queen’s College, Oxford over 21 - 22 March 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On the 21 and 22 March 2012 I attended a workshop which was unlike the stolid conferences I was used to. In the space of two sunny days I found I had spoken to more people and learnt more about them than I usually managed in an entire week. Presentations were short and focused, discussions were varied and fascinating, and the relaxed, open format was very effective in bringing people from differing disciplines together to consider a common theme. In this case the theme was software, and whether you used or developed it, there was plenty of food for thought.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/cw12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report simon choppin national grid service sheffield hallam university software sustainability institute university of oxford university of sheffield blog copyright curation data dissemination framework genetic algorithm licence machine learning open access open source repositories research software twitter video web 2.0 Thu, 26 Apr 2012 13:57:05 +0000 lisrw 2326 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Delivering Open Educational Resources for Engineering Design http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/darlington <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/darlington#author1">Mansur Darlington</a> describes two methods for presenting online OERs for engineering design that were developed and explored as part of the Higher Education Academy/JISC-funded DelOREs (Delivering Open Educational Resources for Engineering Design) Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A great deal of information is accessible on the World Wide Web which might be useful to both students and teachers. This material, however, is of variable quality and usefulness and is aimed at a wide spectrum of users. Moreover, such material rarely appears accompanied by guidance on how it may be most effectively used by potential users. To make information more usable it must be made more readily discoverable and there should be clear – and preferably machine-readable – indications of its provenance and quality and the legitimate uses to which it may be put.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/darlington" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article mansur darlington hea heriot-watt university jisc massachusetts institute of technology university of bath jorum mrc aggregation algorithm blog copyright creative commons data e-learning framework google search higher education html identifier intellectual property json licence metadata microdata oer provenance rdf repositories research resource description resource discovery rss schema search technology software standardisation standards taxonomy ukoer url vocabularies wordpress xhtml xml Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2234 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Kultivating Kultur: Increasing Arts Research Deposit http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> discusses how the JISC-funded Kultivate Project is encouraging arts research deposit in UK institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Funded by the Deposit strand [<a href="#1">1</a>] JISC Information Environment programme and led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), a Research Centre of the University for the Creative Arts, Kultivate will increase arts research deposit in UK institutional repositories.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article marie-therese gramstadt falmouth university goldsmiths college google jisc leiden university microsoft royal college of art university for the creative arts university of bristol university of chicago university of exeter university of glasgow university of huddersfield university of london university of nottingham university of southampton university of the arts london vads depositmo jisc information environment opendoar reposit repositories support project romeo rsp web2rights archives blog cataloguing copyright curation data database dspace eprints exif framework google search graphics institutional repository metadata multimedia open access open source portfolio repositories research research information management schema screencast search technology software sword protocol vocabularies Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2140 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 68 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> issue 68.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I am pleased to introduce you to the content of Issue 68, and to have the opportunity to remind you that you have a far larger number of channels into the publication’s content.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 editorial richard waller british library jisc massachusetts institute of technology national academy of sciences royal holloway sakai clif depositmo hydra opendoar repositories support project rsp aggregation archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data data citation data set digital repositories digitisation dissemination doi eprints facebook fedora commons foi framework higher education ict identifier information retrieval instant messaging institutional repository library management systems lucene metadata ms word multimedia ocr oer opac open source openurl preservation repositories research resource description resource discovery rss search technology second life sfx sharepoint software solr standardisation sword protocol taxonomy twitter vufind web 2.0 wordpress xml Mon, 12 Mar 2012 15:17:06 +0000 lisrw 2322 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk IMPACT Final Conference 2011 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/impact-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the two-day conference looking at the results of the IMPACT Project in making digitisation and OCR better, faster and cheaper.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The IMPACT Project (<strong>Imp</strong>roving <strong>Ac</strong>cess to <strong>T</strong>ext) [<a href="#1">1</a>] was funded by the European Commission back in 2007 to look at significantly advancing access to historical text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) methods. As the project reaches its conclusion, one of its key objectives is sharing project outputs.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report marieke guy abbyy austrian national library bnf brightsolid british library california digital library content conversion specialists d-lib magazine dcc google ibm institute for dutch lexicology national and university library of slovenia national library of finland national library of the netherlands stanford university tufts university ukoln university of bath university of munich university of oxford university of salford university of utrecht ahlib europeana impact project archives blog copyright data data management data mining data set database digital library digitisation dissemination finereader framework google books ict information retrieval information society interoperability metadata mets national library ocr oer open source optical character recognition preservation research search technology software solr tagging tesseract twitter unicode wiki wordpress Sun, 26 Feb 2012 13:36:33 +0000 lisrw 2233 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: University Libraries and Digital Learning Environments http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lafortune-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/lafortune-rvw#author1">Sylvie Lafortune</a> reviews a collection of essays that examine the transformation of academic libraries as they become part of digital learning environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This book examines how academic libraries are realigning themselves with the university of the 21<sup>st</sup> century, which is increasingly becoming a digital learning environment. The expectations of the Google generation, the interdependence of teaching and research, and the changing roles of library staff&nbsp; and technology all play a fundamental part in this environment–and to lead the discussions in this book, the editors have called on 18 experts and practitioners.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lafortune-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review sylvie lafortune google laurentian university archives copyright curation data database digital repositories e-learning framework further education gis graphics higher education interoperability library management systems licence mobile preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology software standards tag cloud virtual research environment web 2.0 wireless Sun, 19 Feb 2012 16:38:31 +0000 lisrw 2229 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk eSciDoc Days 2011: The Challenges for Collaborative eResearch Environments http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/escidoc-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/escidoc-rpt#author1">Ute Rusnak</a> reports on the fourth in a series of two-day conferences called eSciDoc Days, organised by FIZ Karlsruhe and the Max Planck Digital Library in Berlin over 26-27 October 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>eSciDoc is a well-known open source platform for creating eResearch environments using generic services and tools based on a shared infrastructure. This concept allows for managing research and publication data together with related metadata, internal and/or external links and access rights. Development of eSciDoc was initiated by a collaborative venture between FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz Institute for Information Infrastructure and the Max Planck Digital Library (MPDL) and was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/escidoc-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report ute rusnak fiz karlsruhe jisc archives authentication big data browser copyright curation data data management data set database digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination e-research ebook ejournal fedora commons framework higher education infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge management licence metadata open source preservation provenance repositories research rich internet application soa software virtual research environment visualisation web services Mon, 27 Feb 2012 20:20:52 +0000 lisrw 2239 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk From Link Rot to Web Sanctuary: Creating the Digital Educational Resource Archive (DERA) http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/scaife#author1">Bernard M Scaife</a> describes how an innovative use of the EPrints repository software is helping to preserve official documents from the Web.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>When I started as Technical Services Librarian at the Institute of Education (IOE) in September 2009, one of the first tasks I was given was to do something about all the broken links in the catalogue. Link rot [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the bane of the Systems Librarian's life and I was well aware that you had to run fast to stand still.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article bernard m scaife bbc becta google jisc national library of australia oai the national archives uk data archive university of london university of southampton archives bibliographic data cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data data mining digital preservation digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons higher education html identifier infrastructure interoperability lcsh library management systems licence metadata ms word multimedia national library oai-pmh open access preservation provenance repositories research schema search technology software thesaurus ulcc url xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1625 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk A Double-edged Sword: What Are the Implications of Freedom of Information for the HE Sector? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rin-foi-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/rin-foi-rpt#author1">Amy Gibbons</a> reports on the second in a series of workshops organised by the Research Information Network to explore the impact of the Freedom of Information Act on the Higher Education sector, held at University College London on 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rin-foi-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report amy gibbons hefce jisc kings college london queens university belfast research information network the national archives university college london university of central lancashire university of east anglia archives blog copyright data data set dissemination foi foia framework higher education infrastructure intellectual property open access privacy research social networks sword protocol Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1628 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk UK Reading Experience Database http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt#author1">Bethan Ruddock</a> reports from the launch event for the UK Reading Experience Database, held at the Betty Boothroyd Library, the Open University, Milton Keynes, on 24 February 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><p>I was invited down to the Open University (OU) Betty Boothroyd Library in Milton Keynes for the launch of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. I had been asked to attend to talk about the LOCAH Project and Linked Data, but I was also looking forward to learning about the RED Project.</p> <p>This was the first of two launch days, and was designed for librarians, archivists, and information managers. A second launch day for teachers in Higher Education was to be held in London the next day.</p> <h2 id="What_Is_UK_RED">What Is UK RED?</h2> <p>The tagline for UK RED is 'the experience of reading in Britain from 1450 to 1945', and the database brings together reading experiences, making them both searchable and browsable. What is a reading experience? It is evidence of anyone alive between the mid-15th and 20thcenturies having read and interacted with a book or other piece of writing, such as magazines, newspapers, letters - even playbills and advertisements. Ownership alone is not enough; there must be something to show that the person in question actually read the work or at least part of it.</p> <p>This information can be found in a number of places - a printed book review would be an obvious example. The RED team also find many entries in diaries. Such entries can range from simple lists of books that someone has read over the course of a year, to detailed descriptions of when and where they read a particular book, and how they felt about it. Often diary entries are not actually about the book; it is mentioned in passing and in the context of a number of other activities.</p> <p>While the owner's name on the flyleaf is not itself enough to justify a 'reading experience', annotations to the text are, as they show that the person has actually interacted with the text. Of course, you then have to consider whether the person whose name is on the flyleaf is the same as the person doing the annotating!</p> <p>RED is much more than a list of 'people who have read books'. The database aims to bring out as much information as possible about the reading experience. The interface to submit a new entry allows you to specify where the reading was taking place, all the way down to a particular room in a particular house. It also aims to identify if the reading was silent or aloud, alone or with other people; whether the book was owned by the reader, a library book, borrowed, or even stolen. All these data are then used to build up a rich database of information on who was reading what (and how!) in Britain.</p> <p>UK RED is not just concerned with reading experiences within Britain: team members also look at the reading experiences of citizens abroad. <strong>Edmund King</strong>, Research Associate, Reading Experience Database, OU, told us that, as a consequence, there are fascinating examples of what captured British soldiers were reading in prisoner-of-war (POW) camps as well as examples of what they were not allowed to read. Books in Welsh and Pakistani were banned, as well as atlases and anything about the Russian revolution. I do not know if there are corresponding records for what prisoners in UK POW camps were forbidden to read, but it would be very interesting to find out.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report bethan ruddock ahrc eduserv jisc mimas newcastle university open university talis ukoln university of manchester university of oxford archives hub dbpedia locah lucero wikipedia apache archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copac copyright data data set database dissemination flickr higher education intellectual property linked data linux open source php provenance research software sparql sql twitter video Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1629 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author1">Marion Tattersall</a>, <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author2">Carmen O'Dell</a> and <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author3">John Lewis</a> report on Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade, organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) in partnership with the White Rose University Consortium and held 1-3 March 2011 at the University of Sheffield.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report carmen odell john lewis marion tattersall dcc jisc national grid service national science foundation queensland university of technology uk data archive ukoln university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of leeds university of manchester university of melbourne university of oxford university of sheffield university of york beginners guide to digital preservation data train project dmtpsych jisc information environment wikipedia yodl archives blog cloud computing copyright creative commons curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation e-research fedora commons foi framework infrastructure licence metadata multimedia open data portal preservation privacy repositories research resource discovery software taxonomy usb video visualisation vle Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1631 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Envisioning Future Academic Library Services http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a timely collection of essays that highlights the values of institutional leadership and resourcefulness in academic librarianship's engagements with Web 2.0.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Since networked information technology has initiated a breathtaking transformation of knowledge practices, librarians have had a generous supply of thought leaders whose lifetime experience has permitted them to issue credible translations of the 'writing on the wall'. Recently, however, there seems to be many more analysts (and soothsayers) and much more anxious observation and published interpretation of such writing. And the message comes in a red ink, in bold, and with distinct portent, when not downright ominous.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review john azzolini british library clifford chance google university of melbourne yale university bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set digital library digitisation disruptive innovation dissemination ebook framework higher education ict knowledge management mobile muves open access personalisation preservation research search technology second life web 2.0 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1632 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 66: Sanity Check http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 66.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With institutions searching to increase the impact of the work they do, and conscious of the immediate impact of any event they organise, many will be interested to read of <a href="/issue66/guy/">10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event</a> in which <strong>Marieke Guy</strong> provides a raft of suggestions to enhance the participants' experience of and involvement in, the event they are attending.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 editorial richard waller british library google jisc ukoln university of pretoria e-curator keepit zetoc aggregation archives blog browser copyright curation data database digital audio digital preservation digital repositories file format flickr framework geospatial data gis identifier institutional repository learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone netvibes open access open source personalisation podcast preservation privacy refworks repositories research resource description and access rss search technology software streaming tagging twitter usability video web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1602 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk RefShare: A Community of Practice to Enhance Research Collaboration http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for postgraduate students in phytomedicine using RefShare, to enhance collaborative research.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article tertia coetsee ifla university of melbourne university of pretoria jisc information environment bibliographic data copyright data database digital preservation dissemination e-research electronic theses ict infrastructure open data preservation privacy refworks research search technology web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1605 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Developments in Virtual 3D Imaging of Cultural Artefacts http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/collmann <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/collmann#author1">Richard Collmann</a> describes how experience using a portable Virtual 3D Object Rig in cultural institutions has led to significant improvements in apparatus design and workflow.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The collapsable, portable electromechanical Virtual 3D (V3D) Object Rig Model 1 (ORm1) (Figures 1, 2, 3) was developed to meet an obvious need found after an important Australian cultural artefact - a nineteenth-century post-mortem plaster head-cast of the notorious bushranger Ned Kelly [<a href="#1">1</a>] - was Apple QTVR-imaged (QuickTime Virtual Reality) using a large static object rig at the University of Melbourne over 2003/4. The author requested that this moving and hyperlinked image be constructed as a multimedia component of a conjectured cross-disciplinary undergraduate teaching unit. The difficulties encountered in obtaining permission from the cultural collection involved to transport this object some 400 metres to the imaging rig located on the same geographical campus suggested to the author that a portable object imaging rig could be devised and taken to any cultural collection anywhere to image objects <em>in situ</em>.</p> <p>In the early to mid-19th century these physical records were taken for phrenological research purposes, however by the late-C19 this quasi-science had been largely discredited. The underlying reasons for these practices had been forgotten; the recording and keeping was absorbed by reason of habit into accepted routine procedure; as just a part of the workflow within the State criminal justice execution process. This procedure would be rejected out of hand nowadays, but this 19th century habit of retaining physical artefacts is fortunate for the present-day cross-disciplinary historian.</p> <p>As mentioned, the author wished to use the head cast as the pivotal focus for cross-disciplinary undergraduate teaching purposes with contributions from the perspective of History of Science, Australian Colonial History, Sociology and Criminology. It was considered by the subject contributors that such a cross-disciplinary teaching module could well benefit from a Web-based multimedia approach.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/collmann" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article richard collmann apple university of melbourne e-curator versi archives copyright data data mining data set database digital media dublin core e-research e-science exif fedora commons flash gnome internet explorer metadata multimedia photoshop preservation provenance quicktime repositories research software visualisation windows wireless Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1606 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> describes new tools and services that can help you get your event heard.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><p>In 2007 Lorcan Dempsey coined the phrase 'the amplified conference' [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He used the term to refer to how event outputs (such as talks and presentations) were being amplified 'through a variety of network tools and collateral communications'.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article marieke guy eduserv google jisc mpeg qik ukoln university of bath beginners guide to digital preservation internet archive jisc powr project powr amplified event archives avi blog copyright creative commons digital preservation dissemination elluminate facebook flickr hashtag intellectual property licence metadata mobile mobile phone mp4 netvibes odp open source opml pageflakes podcast preservation remote working research rss search technology software storify streaming tagging twitter usb ustream video web development webinar wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1607 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Saving the Sounds of the UK in the UK SoundMap http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author1">Maureen Pennock</a> and <a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author2">Chris Clark</a> introduce an innovative initiative from the British Library to map a 12-month soundscape of the UK.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><p>The impact of the digital age upon libraries has been profound, changing not only the back office, services, and the range of materials available to users, but also the public face of libraries and the relationship between the library and its users. Within this changed relationship, collaboration, participation, and online social networks play an increasingly important role in the user experience, especially in large university and national libraries. At the same time, a shift is taking place in the type of collection items held in libraries, and the percentage of born-digital materials acquired is increasing on a daily basis.</p> <p>The British Library is no exception, making use of a wide range of online services and tools to engage with users and enhance access to the collections, both digitised and born-digital. Numerous initiatives are currently taking place across the Library to engage with users and address these changes, and one in particular has sought to capitalise on both the increase in participatory networks and the opportunities afforded by born-digital material. This initiative is the <em>UK SoundMap</em>, an online crowd-sourcing activity driven by the British Library in partnership with the Noise Futures Network to engage and build the community in development of a new born-digital audio-visual research resource [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Unlocking_and_Integrating_Audio-Visual_Content_at_the_British_Library">Unlocking and Integrating Audio-Visual Content at the British Library</h2> <p>The UK SoundMap is being carried out as part of a wider project by the British Library's Sound &amp; Vision Department: Unlocking &amp; Integrating Audio Visual Content (UIAVC). The UIAVC project seeks to address changing user needs in a multi-media research environment by establishing the building blocks for a redefined and integrated sound and moving image service within the Library. Other, complementary initiatives in the project include:</p> <ul> <li>Modernising and enhancing interactive features in the existing Archival Sound Recordings (ASR) portal, which currently provides access to over 45,000 selected recordings of music, spoken word, and human and natural environments [<a href="#3">3</a>].</li> <li>Establishing a New Music Network to select and capture content from musicians whose work is produced outside the usual commercial channels</li> <li>Exploring and piloting new R&amp;D Tools to improve resource discovery through new search and analysis tools for speech and music [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Increasing the amount of digital audio and video content accessible to users at the Library (i.e. onsite), and remotely</li> </ul> <p>Overall, the project is key to meeting the Library's audio-visual strategy, which aims to unlock and integrate audio-visual content across the library according to user needs. The initiatives interrelate to a significant degree as they each follow the content path from acquisition to curation to integrated delivery. They each focus on digital content (both born-digital and digitised analogue content), they embrace both onsite and remote (Web) access, and collectively they express the commitment the Library now has towards integrating audio-visual media within the research experience.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article chris clark maureen pennock british library google android archives browser copyright curation data data set digital audio flac geospatial data gis google maps iphone metadata mobile mobile phone mp3 portal preservation privacy research resource discovery rss search technology sms social networks twitter video Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1609 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Beyond the PDF http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt#author1">Jodi Schneider</a> reports on a three-day workshop about the future of scientific communication, held in San Diego CA, USA, in January 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Beyond the PDF' brought together around 80 people to the University of California San Diego to discuss scholarly communication, primarily in the sciences. The main topic: How can we apply emergent technologies to improve measurably the way that scholarship is conveyed and comprehended? The group included domain scientists, researchers and software developers, librarians, funders, publishers, journal editors - a mix which organiser <strong>Phil Bourne</strong> described as 'visionaries, developers, consumers, and conveyors' of scholarship.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report jodi schneider deri elsevier google microsoft national university of ireland science and technology facilities council w3c archives blog cloud computing copyright data data citation data set dexy epub framework git google scholar html html5 identifier intellectual property linked data metadata open access opm persistent identifier provenance repositories research semantic web social networks software standards streaming text mining twitter video visualisation wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1613 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Introductory Concepts in Information Science http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at an introduction to Information Science but fails to be impressed.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With a title like that, one would expect a primer, introducing all the key concepts of information science to someone studying the topic for the first time at undergraduate or Masters' level, and possibly for the interested layman. Such a book would be a worthy successor to Chris Hanson's <em>Introduction to Science Information Work</em>, and Roger Meetham's <em>Information Retrieval</em>, both of which were first published about 40 years ago. Sadly, however, this book does not fulfil the promise of its title.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review charles oppenheim british library british museum google loughborough university accessibility bibliometrics copyright digital library digital repositories information retrieval open access repositories research resource management software url Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1598 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk FRBR in Practice http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/taylor-teague <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/taylor-teague#author1">Wendy Taylor</a> and <a href="/issue64/taylor-teague#author2">Kathy Teague</a> describe what they learnt about how FRBR is used at the Celia Library for the Visually Impaired in Helsinki, during their Ulverscroft/IFLA-funded visit.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/taylor-teague" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article kathy teague wendy taylor ifla rnib ukoln bibliographic data bibliographic record cataloguing copyright data file sharing frbr library management systems licence marc21 national library opac search technology standards xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1567 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Blue Ribbon Task Force Symposium on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on a symposium which provided an opportunity for stakeholders to respond to the recent Blue Ribbon Task Force report on Sustainable Digital Preservation and Access.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Thursday 6 May 2010 an historic event took place. The event allowed people to express their opinions on potential future action in a highly significant area. No, not the British general election, and I'm sure the concurrence of dates was unintentional! This event was the Blue Ribbon Task Force Symposium on sustainable digital preservation and access, held at the Wellcome Collection Conference Centre in London [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/blue-ribbon-uk-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report marieke guy bbc british library cni coalition for networked information datacite dcc iso jisc oclc open planets foundation uk data archive ukoln university college london university of bath university of essex beginners guide to digital preservation europeana archives blog copyright creative commons curation data data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dublin core fedora commons framework infrastructure national library open access open source preservation research software video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1570 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk