Overview of content related to 'open access' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/169/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Book Review: Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/maclellan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/maclellan-rvw#author1">Fiona MacLellan</a> reviews the third edition of Peggy Johnson’s text focusing on a key area for libraries: collection development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Collection development is a key skill taught in library schools around the world, it represents one of the <em>business as usual</em> elements in most librarians' roles, certainly in any I have undertaken. Getting your collection development right is a skill that takes lots of practice: like knowing which items to add to enhance your library stock; and which ones to remove to ensure that breadth of collection is not damaged; whilst making the collection inviting and easy to navigate. These aspects form but a small part of the challenge of collection development.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/maclellan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 review fiona maclellan american library association sconul university of northampton collection development digitisation open access preservation repositories research Sun, 27 Jul 2014 16:01:05 +0000 lisrw 2535 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 72 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/editorial#author1">The new editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 72.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Change_Is_the_Only_Constant">Change Is the Only Constant</h2> <p>Issue 72 is the product of a long period of almost constant change. In the last issue, Richard Waller waved adieu as the outgoing editor, explaining the circumstances around the change in the Editorial for Issue 71 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 editorial kara jones queensland university of technology sherpa-leap university of bath linkedup project altmetrics cataloguing copyright data data set digitisation dissemination eprints higher education lod metadata open access open data open education repositories research Wed, 26 Feb 2014 21:49:54 +0000 lisrw 2518 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digitisation and e-Delivery of Theses from ePrints Soton http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author1">Julian Ball</a> and <a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author2">Christine Fowler</a> describe the partnership between the University of Southampton’s Library Digitisation Unit and its institutional repository for digitising and hosting theses.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Hartley Library at the University of Southampton has in excess of 15,000 bound PhD and MPhil theses on 340 linear metres of shelving. Consultation of the hard-copy version is now restricted to readers making a personal visit to the Library, as no further microfiche copies are being produced by the British Library and no master copies of theses are lent from the Library. Retrieval of theses from storage for readers and their subsequent return requires effort from a large number of staff.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article christine fowler julian ball abbyy british library jisc university of southampton uk theses digitisation project aggregation api archives cataloguing copyright data digitisation electronic theses eprints framework institutional repository jpeg jstor library management systems metadata oai-pmh ocr open access open archives initiative open source optical character recognition preservation repositories research search technology software url xml Tue, 30 Jul 2013 13:13:08 +0000 editor 2499 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Realising the Potential of Altmetrics within Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author1">Jean Liu</a> and <a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author2">Euan Adie</a> of Altmetric take a look at the growing presence of altmetrics in universities, and consider some of the potential applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The concept of alternative metrics as indicators of non-traditional forms of research impact – better known as ‘altmetrics’ – has been gaining significant attention and support from both the scholarly publishing and academic communities. After being adopted by many publishing platforms and institutional repositories within the past year, altmetrics have entered into the scholarly mainstream, emerging as a relevant topic for academic consideration amidst mounting opposition to misuse of the Journal Impact Factor.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article euan adie jean liu altmetric llp carnegie mellon university indiana university london school of economics university of bath university of glasgow adobe aggregation altmetrics article-level metrics blog data data set digitisation doi identifier metadata open access passwords repositories research twitter url web services Wed, 29 Jan 2014 20:21:26 +0000 lisrw 2500 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Shared Repositories, Shared Benefits: Regional and Consortial Repositories in Japan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author1">Takeo Ozono</a>, <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author2">Daisuke Ueda</a> and <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author3">Fumiyo Ozaki</a> describe the work of the ShaRe Project and its influence upon the development of consortial repositories and the benefits they have brought to Japanese institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The ShaRe Project (Shared Repository Project 2008-2009), which aimed to promote the concept of consortial repositories and facilitate their implementation, has made a significant contribution to the rapid growth of institutional repositories (IRs) in Japan. Following precedents including White Rose Research Online (UK) and SHERPA-LEAP (UK), 14 regional consortial repositories have been set up on a prefectoral basis across Japan<a href="#editor1">*</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article daisuke ueda fumiyo ozaki takeo ozono digital repository federation hiroshima university kagawa university national institute of informatics sherpa sherpa-leap repositories support project rsp wikipedia archives cloud computing content management data database digitisation dspace eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer open access operating system portal repositories research search technology software Sun, 28 Jul 2013 15:11:28 +0000 lisrw 2495 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Access and Research Conference 2013: Discovery, Impact and Innovation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author1">Paula Callan</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author2">Stephanie Bradbury</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author3">Sarah Brown</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author4">Philippa Broadley</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author5">Emma Nelms</a> and <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author6">Christopher Hart</a> report on Open Access and Research 2013 which focused on recent developments and the strategic advantages they bring to the research sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Brisbane, Queensland, Australia was the host location for the second Open Access and Research 2013 conference [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The conference was held at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Gardens Point campus over 31 October – 1 November 2013. QUT has over 45,000 students and has a wide range of specialist research areas.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 event report christopher hart emma nelms paula callan philippa broadley sarah brown stephanie bradbury apple badc elsevier griffith university massachusetts institute of technology niso queensland university of technology university of sydney victoria university aggregation altmetrics archives collection development copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data set dissemination doi e-research eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata open access open data open source portfolio rae repositories research search technology software video Sun, 16 Feb 2014 18:46:48 +0000 2507 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Digital Dieting - From Information Obesity to Intellectual Fitness http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/sanders-rvw#author1">Kevin Sanders</a> examines Tara Brabazon’s latest analytical work which investigates the proliferation of low-quality information in the digital realm and the issues of excessive reliance on social tools for learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Following a body of work that includes <em>The University of Google: Education in the (post) Information Age</em> (2007) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and <em>Digital Hemlock: Internet Education and the Poisoning of Teaching</em> (2002), Brabazon has developed a central position within the debate surrounding technology and pedagogy, although there is very little that is centrist about Brabazon's writing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 review kevin sanders apple google ibm university of bath university of cambridge heron blog facebook framework higher education ict internet explorer managerialism multimedia neoliberalism open access research search technology software youtube Mon, 03 Mar 2014 18:41:44 +0000 lisrw 2519 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 71 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 71.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As I depart this chair after the preparation of what I thought would be the last issue of <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], I make no apology for the fact that I did my best to include as much material&nbsp; to her ‘swan song’ as possible. With the instruction to produce only one more issue this year, I felt it was important to publish as much of the content in the pipeline as I could.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 editorial richard waller amazon birmingham city university digital repository federation jisc loughborough university oclc oregon state university ukoln university for the creative arts university of huddersfield university of oxford university of sussex wellcome library jusp kaptur scarlet accessibility agile development api archives augmented reality authentication big data blog bs8878 cataloguing content management controlled vocabularies curation data data management data set database digital library digitisation diigo ebook educational data mining framework google docs higher education html html5 infrastructure jquery learning analytics metadata mets mobile native apps open access open source portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology software solr standardisation standards sushi tagging twitter url video wcag web 2.0 web app widget xml schema Wed, 17 Jul 2013 19:01:02 +0000 lisrw 2493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author1">Ikuko Tsuchide</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author2">Yui Nishizono</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author3">Masako Suzuki</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author4">Shigeki Sugita</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author5">Kazuo Yamamoto</a> and <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author6">Hideki Uchijima</a> introduce a number of ideas and projects that have enhanced the progress of the Open Access movement and institutional repositories in Japan over the last ten years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In Japan, Chiba University established the country's first institutional repository, CURATOR [<a href="#1">1</a>] in 2003. Since then, over the last 10 years or so, more than 300 universities and research institutions have set up repositories and the number of full-text items on repositories has exceeded one million [<a href="#2">2</a>]. All the contents are available on Japanese Institutional Repositories Online (JAIRO) [<a href="#3">3</a>] operated by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) [<a href="#4">4</a>] in Japan.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article hideki uchijima ikuko tsuchide kazuo yamamoto masako suzuki shigeki sugita yui nishizono asahikawa medical university cranfield university digital repository federation hokkaido university kagoshima university national institute of informatics osaka university otaru university of commerce sherpa sherpa-leap university of tokyo university of tsukuba repositories support project romeo rsp wikipedia archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data database digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access repositories research search technology standardisation twitter Wed, 10 Jul 2013 17:03:28 +0000 lisrw 2480 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Performance-based Funding Model: Creating New Research Databases in Sweden and Norway http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eriksson#author1">Leif Eriksson</a> describes how the introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) has created new forms of research databases in Sweden and Norway.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) models has helped to set the focus on scientific publishing since this is one of the major indicators for measuring research output. As a secondary result, it has also forced the countries that have introduced a model that is not solely based on citations to create a new form of research database; the national portal for scientific literature.</p> <p>Even in countries that have not adapted a PRFS model, these forms of portals are common. In Sweden, the national database has been the result of local universities’ and Higher Education institutions’ efforts towards a mutual search interface to the different local repositories that have emerged.&nbsp; The repositories are sometimes created to support a local funding model, but the most common reason is simply to disseminate scientific publishing.</p> <p>The contribution of publications that cannot be found in the international citation indexes are substantial even for peer-reviewed publications especially for literature in the Humanities and the Social Sciences but also in Natural Sciences by adding a lot of conference papers that would otherwise not be recognised.&nbsp; This can be seen as a side-effect of the discussions on the introduction of PRFS models. Even if not all publications meet the criteria to be recognised as scientific, a significant number of them are still added to the base of publications that can be analysed from a PRFS perspective.</p> <p>The incentive to disseminate search results is the other driving force for the national catalogues and, in this case, the portals are playing an important role since many of the publications mainly written in domestic languages are otherwise seldom visible to other researchers and the public.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The change in the Higher Education landscape has been significant over the last decades. One of the major changes has been the introduction of performance-based research funding systems (PRFS) starting with the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) in the United Kingdom in 1986 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The incentive offered by a PRFS model is that it overturns the allocation of funding often based on historical grounds which are no longer valid. It can also be considered as a part of an orientation towards more effective management of the public sector, based on principles derived from the private sector. The central idea in this transformation is the drive to increase productivity without adding resources to the system, while replacing traditional command-and-control systems with market-style incentives [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Publications are playing a more and more important role in the process of evaluating research and also as an indicator in the performance-based research funding systems (PRFS). Of 14 countries which were identified as having PRFSs, at least 10 have publication output as an indicator of research quality [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>The reason why publications are used as a PRFS indicator is that the latter measures the output of research both quantitatively and qualitatively. Moreover, those publication data are easily found in bibliographic databases.&nbsp; However, the introduction of an indicator for publications has not been without controversy in the countries that have adopted PRFS. The resulting discussions have generally focused on two main issues:</p> <ol> <li>Should publications be used as a first-order or a second-order indicator?</li> <li>Which data source would best reflect the research output in a particular country?</li> </ol> <p>OECD launched a report on various PRFS models in 2010 including a systematic exposition of the different indicators being used [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Publications are often found among the first-order indicators which are aimed directly at measuring research performance. This can be done by simply counting publications in relation to the number of research staff of a certain institution but the common practice is to add a qualitative element, either by ranking of publication channels as occurs in Denmark and Norway, or by citation analysis as operates in Belgium, that is, in the Flemish community, and Sweden.</p> <p>Second-order indicators are based on indexes instead of direct measurements. These indexes are often created as a reaction to the methodological difficulties when dealing with citation analysis. The best known indexes are Journal Impact Factor (JIF) which measures a journal’s impact through the number of citations its articles receive, and H-index which is often used on an individual level when comparing the citation history of different authors. However, both indicators are simplifications of more complex structures and have been criticised when being used for research assessment purposes [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <p>The second question has created even more controversy in those countries which have adopted a PRFS model. When deciding on which database would best support the publication indicator, the issue as to which type of publications should be counted immediately comes to the fore.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article leif eriksson oracle uppsala university worldcat aggregation bibliographic data bibliographic database cataloguing data database dissemination doi higher education national library open access portal rae repositories research search technology ssh visualisation Wed, 03 Jul 2013 17:38:13 +0000 lisrw 2465 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk KAPTUR the Highlights: Exploring Research Data Management in the Visual Arts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author1">Leigh Garrett</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author2">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author3">Carlos Silva</a> and <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author4">Anne Spalding</a> describe the exploration of the importance and nature of research data in the visual arts and requirements for their appropriate curation and preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>KAPTUR (2011-13) [<a href="#1">1</a>], funded by Jisc and led by the Visual Arts Data Service, was a collaborative project involving four institutional partners: the Glasgow School of Arts; Goldsmiths, University of London; University for the Creative Arts; and the University of the Arts London.&nbsp;Research data have in recent years become regarded as a valuable institutional resource and their appropriate collection, curation, publication and preservation as essential. This has been driven by a number of internal and external forces, and all UK Research Councils now require it as a condition of funding [<a href="#2">2</a>]. As a result, a network of data repositories has emerged [<a href="#3">3</a>], some funded by research councils and others by institutions themselves. However, at the outset of the project, research data management practice within the visual arts appeared to operate rather <em>ad hoc</em> with none of the specialist arts institutions within the UK having either implemented research data management policies [<a href="#4">4</a>] or established research data management systems.&nbsp; KAPTUR sought to:</p> <ul> <li>investigate the nature of visual arts research data;</li> <li>make recommendations for its effective management;</li> <li>develop a model of best practice applicable to both specialist institutions and arts departments within multidisciplinary institutions; and</li> <li>apply, test and refine the model of best practice across the four institutional partner institutions.</li> </ul> <p>This paper outlines the background and context of the project; explores the nature of visual arts research data; details the outcomes of the user and technical review; and describes the work which underwent within the partner institutions around policy formation and staff engagement.</p> <p>Led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), in collaboration with the Glasgow School of Art, Goldsmiths College, University of the Arts London and University for the Creative Arts, and funded by Jisc, KAPTUR [<a href="#1">1</a>] sought to ‘...discover, create and pilot a sectoral model of best practice in the management of research data in the [visual] arts.’ [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-garrett-et-al/logo-2.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 210px;" title="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" /></p> <p>Recent years have witnessed an increasing recognition across the Higher Education sector that research data are a valuable resource and therefore its appropriate curation and preservation are essential.&nbsp; In addition, wider societal and political forces meant that research councils, teams and researchers were coming under increasing pressure to make publicly funded data freely available.&nbsp; As such the publication of research data was increasingly becoming a requirement of funding, for example the Arts and Humanities Research Council [<a href="#6">6</a>] and Medical Research Council [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Equally important was the need for increased data transparency, and to enable researchers to access existing datasets to test the validity and reliability of the data and associated research methods; to reinterpret the data; and to preserve the data for future scrutiny. In response, many universities, for example the University of Edinburgh, had established institutional research data management systems to support the deposit and preservation of research data, whilst others were in the process of piloting services, for example the University of Leicester, and establishing policies and procedures which actively support researchers to manage their data effectively, such as Canterbury Christ Church University and Northumbria University. In addition, many of the research councils themselves had established repositories, for example the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex, which curates research data in the social sciences and humanities, and the Natural Environment Research Council, which supports a network of data centres across its disciplinary areas.</p> <p>However, given the emerging landscape, at the outset of the project it was clear that very little was known about the collection, curation and usage of research data in the visual arts:&nbsp;none of the specialist arts institutions had research data management policies or infrastructure in place and evidence collected at the time indicated that practice was at best, <em>ad hoc</em>, left to individual researchers and teams with limited support or guidance. Little work had been undertaken to understand the distinctive and varied nature of research data in the visual arts, and even less to understand how these data could be collected, curated, preserved and exploited, or their potential impact assessed.</p> <p>By its very nature, research in the visual arts is highly complex and varied, often comprising a wide variety of outputs and formats which present researchers, repository managers and institutions with many discipline-specific difficulties. The methods and processes which generate this research are just as varied and complex.&nbsp; Research endeavour in the visual arts relies heavily on the physical artefact: sketchbooks, logbooks, journals, and workbooks.&nbsp; Alongside these data, a wide range of related project documentation and protocols are also created.&nbsp; While technology may offer considerable potential to support the safe storage and preservation of research and related data, and to enhance access, the highly distinctive nature of the visual arts and its research methods also present enormous technical problems with regard to formats, standards, roles and responsibilities, and policies.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article anne spalding carlos silva leigh garrett marie-therese gramstadt ahrc canterbury christ church university courtauld institute of art datacite dcc falmouth university glasgow school of art goldsmiths college hefce jisc northumbria university uk data archive university for the creative arts university of bath university of birmingham university of edinburgh university of essex university of leicester university of london university of the arts london vads kaptur keepit mrc scarlet archives augmented reality blog cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set digitisation eprints framework higher education infrastructure metadata oer open access preservation repositories research semantic web software video Mon, 01 Jul 2013 17:50:23 +0000 lisrw 2461 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataFinder: A Research Data Catalogue for Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> and <a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author2">Neil Jefferies</a> explain the context and the decisions guiding the development of DataFinder, a data catalogue for the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2012 the University of Oxford Research Committee endorsed a university ‘Policy on the management of research data and records’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Much of the infrastructure to support this policy is being developed under the Jisc-funded Damaro Project [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The nascent services that underpin the University’s RDM (research data management) infrastructure have been divided into four themes:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article neil jefferies sally rumsey bodleian libraries datacite jisc orcid uk data archive university of oxford dmponline impact project aggregation algorithm api archives cataloguing controlled vocabularies curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital archive digital library eprints fedora commons identifier infrastructure jacs linked data metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative passwords preservation purl rdf repositories research research information management schema search technology semantic web software solr standards uri url vocabularies wireframe xml Thu, 13 Jun 2013 20:23:22 +0000 lisrw 2446 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making Citation Work: A British Library DataCite Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a workshop on practical data citation issues for institutions, held at the British Library, London, on 8 March 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Friday, 8 March 2013, I attended the fifth in the series of DataCite workshops run by the British Library [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The British Library Conference Centre was the venue for this workshop on the theme 'Making Citation Work: Practical Issues for Institutions'. I counted myself lucky to get a place: the organisers had had so much interest they had started a reserve list for the event.&nbsp; I could believe it as it was standing room only at one point, though an awkwardly placed pillar may have contributed to that.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report alex ball ahds badc british library california digital library datacite dcc science and technology facilities council ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of exeter university of nottingham university of york open exeter api archives blog cataloguing content negotiation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital object identifier doi framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property metadata open access persistent identifier preservation repositories research schema standards url video vocabularies Tue, 09 Jul 2013 15:38:46 +0000 lisrw 2478 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JABES 2013 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/jabes-rpt#author1">Marlène Delhaye</a> reports on the two-day annual conference organised by the French Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES) held in Montpellier, France over 14-15 May 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In what has now become something of a tradition, the ‘Corum’ Congress Centre in Montpellier, France, hosted the twelfth in the series of the Journées de l’Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES - Higher Education Bibliographic Agency) [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marlene delhaye bnf editeur google jisc jisc collections national library of australia oclc orcid universite d’aix-marseille open library worldcat api archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing collection development controlled vocabularies data digital object identifier digitisation dissemination doi ebook epub freemium hashtag higher education html identifier infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge base library management systems licence metadata mooc national library open access open data portal privacy repositories research resource description and access standards sushi tagging text mining twitter video web app Mon, 01 Jul 2013 12:11:53 +0000 lisrw 2459 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The New Digital Scholar - Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/robinson-rvw#author1">Julia Robinson</a> reviews a substantial and timely collection of essays related to the research and writing practices of NextGen students. Expressing a call for change in the way educators approach Information Literacy teaching, this book invites the reader to redefine, re-evaluate and reflect on what we think we know about students’ research practices today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>McClure and Purdy bring together a mix of perspectives, from librarians and lecturers to professors and programmers, to give voice to the very timely concern in Information Literacy (IL) teaching, that we are not equipping our students for the future as we hoped. So-called NextGen students are engaging with information online in their personal, social and educational lives in ways that are shaping new approaches to and conceptions of research. At the same time, those teaching IL, whether librarians or writing instructors, are basing lesson plans and interventions on traditional pedagogies, arguably unfit for a research landscape so altered by the pace and change of information technologies. Students, IL instructors and academics occupy different spaces in the digital environment and work at cross-purposes. Traditional IL instruction has encouraged students to understand information sources in binary terms, right or wrong, leaving them disoriented and disengaged as they undertake research. Students should instead be encouraged to see research as a recursive conversation. IL instructors need to collaborate with academics to reposition themselves in this conversation and join students in their digital space at the point of need.</p> <h2 id="Structure_and_Content">Structure and Content</h2> <p>The book is divided into four parts and sixteen chapters (see <a href="#appendix">Appendix</a> for full Table of Contents). In the introduction ‘Understanding the NextGen Researcher’, McClure and Purdy set out their premise that NextGen students are prolific writers, readers and researchers, using a multitude of digital technologies to engage in these activities simultaneously, and:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Because digital technologies intertwine research and writing, this book takes as its premise that we – as professionals from a variety of fields – cannot ignore, marginalize </em>(sic)<em>, or leave to others the commitment to understand and help the new digital scholar. In its four parts, this collection explores the facets of that commitment.</em> (p.2)</p> <p>Part One: NextGen Students and the Research Writing ‘Problem’ moves through defining <em>Information Behaviour</em> (Chapter 1), giving a history of the research paper (Chapter 2), identifying key IL frameworks (Chapter 3) and introducing <em>deep learning</em> (Chapter 4). All of these chapters set the scene by providing a broad theoretical basis and shared language with which the reader can access the rest of the book.</p> <p>Most interestingly, McClure defines <em>Information Behaviour</em> as separate and distinct from Information Literacy. He bases his argument on the American Library Association definition of IL, where information-literate people ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, he reframes the ALA’s definition, instead describing it as:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><strong><em>A set of abilities requiring individuals to</em></strong> (my emphasis)<em> recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.</em> (p.20)</p> <p>McClure goes on to argue that if IL is a finite set of skills or abilities then <em>Information Behaviour </em>‘is concerned with the complex processes and influences on the information seeker’ (p.20). Whilst his intention to highlight behaviour is laudable, he adapts the definition of IL to make his point. Indeed, many readers in the UK would see a focus on behaviour and influence as inherent to IL, and already accounted for within the term. For example, the SCONUL Seven Pillars Model of Information Literacy states that:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Information literate people will demonstrate an awareness of how they gather, use, manage, synthesise and create information and data in an ethical manner and will have the information skills to do so effectively.</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>]</p> <p>Information skills are separate here too, but they are part of IL, they do not constitute IL itself. The focus on how accounts for behaviour. Conceptions of IL are detailed and discussed throughout the book along with related but distinct terms such as <em>Digital Literacy</em>,<em> Multiliteracies</em> (both Chapter 7), <em>Digital Agency</em> (Chapter 9), <em>Hyperliteracy</em> (Chapter 13) and <em>Technological Literacy</em> (Chapter 16).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review julia robinson american library association google newcastle university sconul born digital copyright data database framework open access research search technology usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 20:34:48 +0000 lisrw 2472 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 70 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 70.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Issue 70 of <em>Ariadne </em>which is full to the brim with feature articles and a wide range of event reports and book reviews.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 editorial richard waller alt amazon google hefce jisc portico rdwg ukoln university of oxford w3c ark project jisc information environment jusp liparm rdmrose web accessibility initiative wikipedia accessibility aggregation archives bs8878 controlled vocabularies data data management database digital curation digitisation ejournal framework higher education identifier internet explorer jstor licence metadata microsoft reporting services mobile open access perl portal preservation privacy raptor repositories research resource management schema search technology software standardisation standards sushi wcag web resources web services wiki xml xml schema Fri, 14 Dec 2012 14:20:23 +0000 lisrw 2417 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Gold Open Access: Counting the Costs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/andrew#author1">Theo Andrew</a> presents new data on the cost of Gold OA publishing at the University of Edinburgh.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Research Councils UK (RCUK) have recently announced a significant amendment to their open access (OA) &nbsp;policy which requires all research papers that result from research partly or wholly funded by RCUK to be made open access [<a href="#1">1</a>]. To comply with this policy, researchers must either; a) publish in an open access journal, termed Gold OA, which often incurs an article processing charge (APC); or, b) ensure that a copy of the post-print is deposited in an appropriate repository, also known as Green OA.</p> <p>A subsequent clarification from RCUK stated that Gold OA is the preferred mechanism of choice to realise open access for outputs that they have funded and have announced the award of block grants to eligible institutions to achieve this aim [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Where a Gold OA option is unavailable, Green OA is also acceptable; however, RCUK have indicated that the decision will be ultimately left up to institutions as to which route to take [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>Since RCUK are the major funder of research in the United Kingdom, this new policy will not only have a major impact on how researchers publish their work, but also huge implications for their budgets. Many research institutions funded by RCUK are currently investigating how they will implement this policy and are looking at the costs for open access publication, and how they can support the adoption of open access within their organisation. The ball is very much in the court of institutions to decide how to play the open access game.</p> <p>One of the key factors that will affect institutions is the cost that publishers will set for their APCs. So far RCUK have steered clear of suggesting an appropriate fee, leaving individual publishers to determine the market level of the APCs as per the current situation. Meanwhile there seems to be a huge variability in costs. There is a general expectation that over time APCs will settle to a reasonable rate and similarly journal subscriptions will lower to reflect the gradual change in business model from subscription fees to APCs. Most publishers have not yet been upfront about what impact they will have on journal subscriptions, if any, and it is hard to access and assess real-life data. RSC Publishing is one notable exception since it has introduced a system of waiving a proportion of APC fees based on institutional subscription costs.</p> <p>Much of this transition period to full open access will have to be navigated through uncharted territory, where no one has a clear handle on the costs involved. The rationale of this article is to present data on article processing charges gathered over the past five years, report on trends seen within this data, to suggest some approaches and to generally contribute to and inform the policy discussion.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>To put some rough-and-ready figures on the table, the University of Edinburgh publishes in the region of 4,000-4,500 peer-reviewed journal articles per year; this figure does not include other publication types like working papers not affected by the RCUK policy. Assuming an average Article Processing Charge (APC) of £1500 [<a href="#4">4</a>], the total publication costs to make all of these outputs Gold would be in the region of £6m. It is clear that even with guaranteed funding from HEFCE, and other funders of research, large research-intensive universities will not be able to pay for all of their research to be published under Gold OA. How to allocate funding to researchers will be a difficult choice that many institutions are currently asking themselves - will it be on a first-come-first-served basis, funder-specific, or will REF-submitted material take priority?</p> <p>Equally problematic are the difficulties we face in fully assessing an institution’s total spend on open access. Whilst it is possible to find out through aggregate sources like Web of Science how many articles are published in fully open access journals. It is virtually impossible to find out the number of open access articles published in hybrid journals as there is currently no flag in the metadata which indicates the open status of the paper. A hybrid journal is a traditional subscription journal that offers open access to individual articles upon payment of an APC. Of course it is possible to find hybrid open access content through EuropePMC.org; however this will only give a snapshot for the biomedical and life sciences. With current systems and processes it is virtually impossible to gauge this spend accurately.</p> <h2 id="Cost_Data">Cost Data</h2> <p>Unfortunately, financial data about open access publishing is scarce. The University of Edinburgh (UoE) has recently implemented account codes to allow the finance systems to track this spend going forwards; however, finding out costs retrospectively remains problematic. Furthermore, institutions are not typically in the habit of publishing this data with others. The institutions that have shared data show a degree of variability. In 2010, the foremost initial supporter and enabler of Gold Open Access publishing in the UK, the Wellcome Trust, found that the&nbsp;average cost of publication under the author-pays model was $2,367 (approximately £1,500) [<a href="#4">4</a>]. RCUK in their recent press release on block grants for open access estimate the average APC as £1,727 plus VAT [<a href="#2">2</a>], whilst, based on figures in the Finch Report, the University of Nottingham paid on average £1,216 [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p>All these figures are useful as they give a ballpark figure upon which further estimates can be based. The precise cost of individual APCs levied by publishers is generally unavailable in a form which easily enables further analysis. Typically this information is available from publisher’s Web sites; however, aggregating the data is cumbersome as there is no consistent way to interrogate the Web sites and APCs commonly vary from title to title in the publishers’ portfolio. There have been some commendable attempts to gather this information, for example the SHERPA RoMEO listing of Publishers with Paid Options for Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Here about 100 publishers have been surveyed and their APCs are listed. A large cost variance exists for some publishers’ records as individual journals often have different APCs, and also institutional subscriptions/memberships can reduce costs in a non-uniform way. It takes a lot of effort to gather these data and keep them it up to date. Other approaches have tried to crowd-source this activity, for example Ross Mounce’s survey of open access publishers, publications, licences and fees. Here approximately 130 publishers’ web sites were surveyed to find out what licences are being used on the open access content; the cost being a secondary focus of the survey. Analysis of these data shows less than 5% of publishers claiming 'open access' are fully compliant with the Budapest Declaration on Open Access [<a href="#7">7</a>].</p> <p>The data we present here is an attempt to enrich the data available to interested parties and make them available in a reusable format for further analysis. It comprises articles funded by the Wellcome Trust at the University of Edinburgh between 2007 and 2012. In total there are 260 articles published in a mixture of open access journals and traditional subscription journals with an open access option (sometimes known as hybrid). All of the journals charged an article processing fee. Overall, the total cost incurred was £452,713.40. The mean article processing charge was £1,741.21, with the median value £1,644.22. The full data can be accessed online at the Edinburgh DataShare repository [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/andrew" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article theo andrew hefce university of edinburgh university of nottingham wellcome trust datashare sherpa romeo accessibility altmetrics blog creative commons data data management data set digital library licence metadata open access portfolio repositories research Mon, 03 Dec 2012 20:23:29 +0000 lisrw 2393 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Upskilling Liaison Librarians for Research Data Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author1">Andrew Cox</a>, <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author2">Eddy Verbaan</a> and <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author3">Barbara Sen</a> explore the design of a curriculum to train academic librarians in the competencies to support Research Data Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many UK HEIs, especially research-intensive institutions, Research Data Management (RDM) is rising rapidly up the agenda. Working closely with other professional services, and with researchers themselves, libraries will probably have a key role to play in supporting RDM. This role might include signposting institutional expertise in RDM; inclusion of the topic in information literacy sessions for PhD students and other researchers; advocacy for open data sharing; or contributing to the management of an institutional data repository.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article andrew cox barbara sen eddy verbaan dcc jisc northumbria university sconul uk data archive university of essex university of sheffield datum for health rdmrose archives bibliographic data bibliometrics cataloguing collection development copyright curation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital library e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository knowledge base knowledge management licence metadata open access open data open education preservation repositories research software web portal Thu, 06 Dec 2012 19:27:43 +0000 lisrw 2402 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 21st-century Scholarship and Wikipedia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/thomas#author1">Amber Thomas</a> explores the ways in which emerging research practices and Wikipedia illustrate the changing boundaries of academic work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia, the world’s fifth most-used Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>], is a good illustration of the growing credibility of online resources. In his article in <em>Ariadne </em>earlier this year, “Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Academic Acceptance” [<a href="#2">2</a>], Brian Whalley described the debates around accuracy and review, in the context of geology.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article amber thomas bbc becta british library jisc open university orcid ukoln university of warwick jorum myexperiment wikipedia archives blog data dewey decimal e-learning framework further education google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure linked data oer open access open education open source rdf repositories research search technology semantic web smartphone software uri web 2.0 wiki Fri, 30 Nov 2012 13:18:23 +0000 lisrw 2390 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mining the Archive: The Development of Electronic Journals http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white#author1">Martin White</a> looks through the <em>Ariadne</em> archive to trace the development of e-journals as a particular aspect of electronic service delivery and highlights material he considers as significant.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My career has spanned 42 years in the information business. It has encompassed 10,000-hole optical coincidence cards, online database services, videotext, laser discs, and CD-ROMs, the World Wide Web, mobile services and big data solutions. I find the historical development of information resource management absolutely fascinating, yet feel that in general it is poorly documented from an analytical perspective even though there are some excellent archives.</p> <p>These archives include the back issues of <em>Ariadne</em> from January 1996. <em>Ariadne</em> has always been one of my must-reads as a way of keeping in touch with issues and developments in e-delivery of information. The recently launched new <em>Ariadne</em> platform [<a href="#1">1</a>] has provided easier access to these archives. Looking through its content has reminded me of the skills and vision of the UK information profession as it sought to meet emerging user requirements with very limited resources.&nbsp; The archives have always been available on the <em>Ariadne</em> site but the recent update to the site and the availability of good tags on the archive content has made it much easier to mine through the archive issues.</p> <p>The <em>Ariadne</em> team, in particular Richard Waller, has given me the opportunity to mine those archives [<a href="#2">2</a>] and trace some of the developments in electronic service delivery in the UK.</p> <p>Indeed working through the archives is now probably too easy as in the preparation of this column I have found myself moving sideways from many of the feature articles to revel in the other columns that have been a feature of Ariadne. This article is a personal view of some of these developments and is in no way intended to be a definitive account. Its main purpose is to encourage others to look into the archive and learn from the experiences of the many innovators that have patiently coped with the challenges of emerging technology, resource limitations and often a distinct lack of strategy and policy at both an institutional and government level.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image1-optical-coincidence-card.jpg" style="width: 171px; height: 289px;" title="Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Optical coincidence card, circa 1970</strong></p> <h2 id="e-Journal_Development">e-Journal Development</h2> <p>Arriving at the University of Southampton in 1967 my main surprise was not the standard of the laboratories but the quality and scale of the Chemistry Department library. School does not prepare you for reading primary journals and how best to make use of Chemical Abstracts, but I quickly found that working in the library was much more fun than in a laboratory. I obtained an excellent result in one vacation project on physical chemistry problems by reverse engineering the problems through Chemical Abstracts! Therefore, as it turned out, I had started my career as an information scientist before I even graduated. By 1977 I was working with The Chemical Society on the micropublishing of journals and taking part in a British Library project on the future of chemical information. &nbsp;Re-reading the outcomes of that project makes me realise how difficult it is to forecast the future. Now my past has re-asserted itself to good effect as I have both the honour and excitement of being Chair of the eContent Committee of the Royal Society of Chemistry.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-white/image2-laserdiscs.jpg" style="width: 336px; height: 312px;" title="Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Laser disc, circa 1980</strong></p> <p>So from my standpoint, in seeking to identify distinct themes in the development of information resource management in <em>Ariadne</em>, a good place to start is with the e-markup of chemical journals. In Issue 1 Dr Henry Rzepa wrote about the potential benefits of the semantic markup of primary journals to provide chemists with access to the content of the journal article and not just to a contents page and title [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The immediate problem you face reading this admirable summary of the potential benefits of markup is that many of the hyperlinks have disappeared. History has been technologically terminated. Almost 15 years passed by before the Royal Society of Chemistry set up Project Prospect and turned semantic markup into a production process [4]. Dr Rzepa is now Professor of Computational Chemistry at Imperial College, London.</p> <p>By the mid-1990s good progress had been made in e-journal production technologies and the first e-only journals were beginning to appear. Among them was <em>Glacial Geology and Geomorphology</em> (GGG) which existed in a printed version only in as far as readers could print out a selection from it. One aim of GGG is therefore to provide the benefits of electronic transfer as well as other value added products in an accepted academic, peer-reviewed system. The author of the article describing the project [<a href="#5">5</a>] was Dr. Brian Whalley, who went on to become a Professor in the Geomaterials Research Group, Queens University of Belfast. As you will discover from <a href="../author/brian-whalley-author-profile">his author profile</a> (another <em>Ariadne</em> innovation), Brian is still active though retired from formal education. What struck me about this article was the author’s vision in January 1996 of how e-journals could be of benefit in university teaching.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article martin white andrew w mellon foundation british library hefce imperial college london institute of physics intranet focus ltd jisc mimas portico stm ukoln university of glasgow university of manchester university of sheffield university of southampton jisc information environment accessibility archives big data blog content management copyright database ebook ejournal higher education intellectual property jstor licence mobile open access research resource management search technology standards Thu, 06 Dec 2012 15:50:18 +0000 lisrw 2401 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk euroCRIS Membership Meeting, Madrid http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> and <a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author2">Brigitte Jörg</a> report on the bi-annual euroCRIS membership and Task Groups meetings which took place in Madrid on 5-6 November 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>euroCRIS membership meetings [<a href="#1">1</a>] are held twice a year, providing members and invited participants with updates on strategic and Task Group progress and plans, as well as the opportunity to share experience of Current Research Information System (CRIS)-related developments and seek feedback. A CERIF (<em>Common European Research Information Format</em>) tutorial is usually included on the first morning for those new to the standard, and the host country reports on local CRIS initiatives in the ‘national’ session.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report brigitte jorg rosemary russell codata elsevier eurocris imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath reposit adobe aggregation bibliometrics blog cerif data data model data set database digital repositories dublin core framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability lod ontologies open access open source portal preservation rdf repositories research research information management software standards visualisation vocabularies xml Thu, 13 Dec 2012 09:07:57 +0000 lisrw 2408 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: User Studies for Digital Library Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/aytac-rvw#author1">Selenay Aytac</a> reviews a collection of essays on user studies and digital library development that provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>User Studies for Digital Library Development</em> provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries. While there are many books on user studies and digital library development, this work operates at the junction of these two domains and stands out for its insights, balance, and quality of its case-based investigations. The book brings together points of view from different professional communities, including practitioners as well as researchers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review selenay aytac bbc glasgow caledonian university library of congress long island university manchester metropolitan university national library of australia university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of malta university of oxford university of sheffield university of strathclyde europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data course design creative commons data digital library digital preservation e-learning framework information society metadata mobile multimedia national library open access research resource discovery usability web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:10:17 +0000 lisrw 2412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The E-copyright Handbook http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at the latest of Paul Pedley’s copyright guidance books, and, in some respects, finds it wanting.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Pedley is a name that needs no introduction to <em>aficionados</em> of copyright textbooks, being the author of several such books published by Facet Publishing in the past (and reviewed by <em>Ariadne </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>][<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>]).&nbsp; His latest effort, <em>The E-copyright Handbook</em>, attempts to cover the fast-moving and complex world of electronic copyright, using an interesting approach.&nbsp; Rather than the traditional way of such books, describing the media and describing the rights granted to copyright owners, the way the law applies to each media type, exceptions to copyright and so on, his approach is a mixture but with some emphasis on activities, as a glance at the chapter titles shows: Introduction, Content Types, Activities, Copyright Exceptions, Licences, the Digital Economy Act, Enforcement and The Hargreaves Review.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is a complex approach, which requires careful cross-referencing and also checking that material is neither duplicated, nor that is anything is overlooked.&nbsp; It is not clear to me whether the book is meant for reading through, or whether it should be just dipped into when a particular issue causes someone to check the law; but I found the approach confusing.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book also suffers from being in a fast-moving area, where the law, and technology, change fast and although it is clear that Facet got the book published in record time, as there are numerous references to 2012 developments in the text, the work is already out of date in several places, and will no doubt get more out of date as the months go on.&nbsp; Another problem is that the book cannot make up its mind whether it is written for UK readers, or readers in the EU, or in the USA.&nbsp; All too often, different countries’ court cases are mentioned together; one is (say) a UK case and another is a US case.&nbsp; Without the understanding that US law and UK law in this field are very different, people will come to incorrect conclusions about the significance of the cases to them in their day to day work. Moreover, all too often the cases are described without any court decisions relating to them being provided; so one is left with the worry ‘why did the author mention this case at all?’</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review charles oppenheim bbc de montfort university google jisc loughborough university university of strathclyde bibliographic data bibliometrics cloud computing copyright data database dissemination google books open access research standards streaming url web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:30:54 +0000 lisrw 2415 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog collection development copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Launching a New Community-owned Content Service http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/milloy#author1">Caren Milloy</a> describes some of the challenges overcome and lessons learned by JISC Collections during the development of JISC eCollections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>JISC eCollections is a set of e-resource platforms launched in November 2011 by JISC Collections, in partnership with the JISC data centres EDINA and Mimas. The platforms (Figure 1) are JISC MediaHub, JISC Historic Books and JISC Journal Archives; together, they are intended to provide a sustainable, value-for-money alternative to accessing licensed content on publisher platforms, by consolidating and hosting the broad range of historical book, journal archive and multimedia content purchased by JISC Collections on behalf of the UK education community. The vision is to provide a world-class collection that ensures users’ broadest information needs are well met, and to work in partnership with the community to improve and develop the platforms around evolving student and researcher expectations.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The primary role of JISC Collections is the licensing of content on behalf of its UK Higher Education (HE) and Further Education (FE) member organisations. Over the last 10 years, JISC Collections has invested over £40 million in centralised licensing of digital content, in perpetuity, on behalf of all its members. The first agreement was signed in 2002 for ProQuest’s Early English Books Online (EEBO). Since then, national licences have been negotiated for historic books, journal archives and multimedia content (Figure 1), such as documentaries and educational films. In 2010, JISC Collections invested a further £2.5 million in film and image content, representing UK and world history since 1987, specially selected for teaching and learning. The majority of JISC Collections’ member organisations would be unable to afford per-institution subscriptions to these book, journal and multimedia collections, so centralised licensing is critical to broadening access.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-milloy/fig1-jec-platforms.png" style="width: 680px; height: 213px;" title="Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: The three platforms that make up the JISC eCollections service</strong></p> <h2 id="Why_Develop_JISC_eCollections">Why Develop JISC eCollections?</h2> <p>The platforms contain more than 4.5 million resources from over 20 providers. JISC Collections members were previously required to access this content via a range of separate services, each with different user interfaces and administrative requirements, and with a complex funding set-up including both JISC subsidies and publisher access fees payable by each institution. JISC Collections felt that its existing – and future – investments in content would best be protected and preserved by developing an independent service, as an affordable alternative to relying on content providers for access to perpetually licensed content. Such a service would allow the education community to take ownership of its acquisitions and assure it of future control. In 2011 each group of resources was consolidated into one platform to increase discoverability, simplify the user experience (making it more inclusive to users at all academic levels), reduce the administrative burden, and thereby enable maximum value to be derived from the initial content investments.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/milloy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article caren milloy british library edina google jisc jisc collections middlesex university mimas research information network ubird aggregation archives cataloguing data data mining database ebook further education graphics higher education licence marc metadata multimedia ocr open access optical character recognition passwords portfolio preservation provenance research resource discovery schema search technology Sat, 28 Jul 2012 16:36:05 +0000 lisrw 2356 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Most of a Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/taylor#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> writes about how she made the most of a conference to promote and inform the work of a project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working with repositories in various ways for over five years, so I have, of course, attended the major international conference Open Repositories before. I have never actually presented anything or represented a specific project at the event, though. This year was different. This year I had a mission -&nbsp; to present a poster on the DataFlow Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] and to talk to people about the work we had been doing for the past 12 months and (I hoped) to interest them in using the Open Source (OS) systems we had developed during that period.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article stephanie taylor ukoln university of glasgow university of oxford university of southampton devcsi hydra rsp api archives blog cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital library digital repositories dissemination doi flickr framework hashtag higher education infrastructure javascript licence linked data linux metadata open access open source provenance rdf repositories research research information management software standards sword protocol tagging text mining twitter visualisation widget wiki zip Tue, 31 Jul 2012 15:05:33 +0000 lisrw 2374 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JISC Research Information Management: CERIF Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> reports on a two-day workshop on research information management and CERIF held in Bristol over 27-28 June 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc1"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>A workshop on Research Information Management (RIM) and CERIF was held in Bristol on 27-28 June 2012, organised by the Innovation Support Centre [<a href="#1">1</a>] at UKOLN, together with the JISC RIM and RCSI (Repositories and Curation Shared Infrastructure) Programmes. It was a follow-up to the CERIF Tutorial and UK Data Surgery [<a href="#2">2</a>] held in Bath in February.</p> <h2 id="Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</h2> <p>The aim was to bring together people working on the various elements of the UK RIM jigsaw to share experience of using CERIF and explore ways of working together more closely. While the first day focused specifically on RIM, the second day widened to explore synergies with the repositories community. Participants therefore included JISC RIM and MRD projects and programme managers, support and evaluation projects, Research Councils, funders and repository infrastructure projects. There were around 30 participants [<a href="#3">3</a>] in total, with some variation across the two days, given the different content. The event was chaired by Josh Brown, RIM Programme Manager and Neil Jacobs, Programme Director, Digital Infrastructure, both at JISC. All presentations as well as breakout session outputs are available via the UKOLN ISC Events site [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <h2 id="The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</h2> <p>The UK community was pleased to welcome Brigitte Jörg [<a href="#5">5</a>] to the meeting, in the first week of her new role at UKOLN’s Innovation Support Centre as National Coordinator for the CERIF Support Project. Brigitte is already well known to British practitioners working with CERIF – both in her role as as CERIF Task Group Leader [<a href="#6">6</a>] at euroCRIS and as advisor to several existing JISC projects. We look forward to working with her on further initiatives – her CERIF expertise will be a huge asset for Research Information Management support and coordination in British Higher Education.</p> <h2 id="UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</h2> <p>There is certainly extensive RIM-related activity in the UK currently, which looks set to continue. The landscape was outlined in the scene setting sessions by myself, based on the CERIF adoption study [<a href="#7">7</a>] carried out earlier this year. The rate of CRIS (Current Research Information System) procurement has increased very rapidly in the last few years, particularly during 2011. For example the first Pure system in the UK was procured jointly by the Universities of Aberdeen and St Andrews in May 2009; now there are 19 UK universities using Pure. Since all CRIS on the market are CERIF-compatible (to a greater or lesser extent) this means that a large number of UK institutions are CERIF users (again, to varying degrees) – around 31% [<a href="#7">7</a>]. The two other CERIF CRIS being used in the UK are CONVERIS (Avedas, Germany) and Symplectic Elements (UK-based); only one UK CERIF CRIS is being developed in-house, at the University of Huddersfield. There is therefore a significant potential user base for the many CERIF-based services discussed over the course of the workshop. Particularly as more institutions reach the end of their CRIS implementation phase, they are going to be looking for opportunities to exploit the interchange benefits offered by CERIF.</p> <h2 id="UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</h2> <p>As a reflection of the intensity of UK CRIS activity, the UK has the largest number of institutional members of euroCRIS – 25. The next country in terms of membership is Germany, with just 13 members (and then the Netherlands, with seven). It is also notable that there were six UK papers (up from three in 2010) at the recent euroCRIS conference in Prague (all openly accessible from the euroCRIS website [<a href="#8">8</a>]), reflecting the growing UK presence at international level. This indicates the significant impact of JISC programmes - both RIM and MRD (Managing Research Data). At euroCRIS meetings other European countries have expressed some envy of the resources currently available in the UK to support RIM development!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report rosemary russell cornell university edina elsevier eurocris hefce imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath university of huddersfield university of oxford university of st andrews devcsi wikipedia blog cerif curation data data model data set dublin core file format framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata ontologies open access open source repositories research research information management schema software standards vocabularies xml Sun, 29 Jul 2012 19:46:13 +0000 lisrw 2367 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Collaborations Workshop 2012: Software, Sharing and Collaboration in Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/cw12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/cw12-rpt#author1">Simon Choppin</a> reports on a two-day software workshop held at The Queen’s College, Oxford over 21 - 22 March 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On the 21 and 22 March 2012 I attended a workshop which was unlike the stolid conferences I was used to. In the space of two sunny days I found I had spoken to more people and learnt more about them than I usually managed in an entire week. Presentations were short and focused, discussions were varied and fascinating, and the relaxed, open format was very effective in bringing people from differing disciplines together to consider a common theme. In this case the theme was software, and whether you used or developed it, there was plenty of food for thought.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/cw12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report simon choppin national grid service sheffield hallam university software sustainability institute university of oxford university of sheffield blog copyright curation data dissemination framework genetic algorithm licence machine learning open access open source repositories research software twitter video web 2.0 Thu, 26 Apr 2012 13:57:05 +0000 lisrw 2326 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Data Citation and Publication by NERC’s Environmental Data Centres http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/callaghan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/callaghan-et-al#author1">Sarah Callaghan</a>, <a href="/issue68/callaghan-et-al#author2">Roy Lowry</a>, <a href="/issue68/callaghan-et-al#author3">David Walton</a> and members of the Natural Environment Research Council Science Information Strategy Data Citation and Publication Project team describe their work in NERC’s Environmental Data Centres.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Data are the foundation upon which scientific progress rests. Historically speaking, data were a scarce resource, but one which was (relatively) easy to publish in hard copy, as tables or graphs in journal papers. With modern scientific methods, and the increased ease in collecting and analysing vast quantities of data, there arises a corresponding difficulty in publishing this data in a form that can be considered part of the scientific record.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/callaghan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article david walton roy lowry sarah callaghan badc british antarctic survey british library british oceanographic data centre codata datacite jisc ncas royal meteorological society science and technology facilities council claddier ojims archives ascii cataloguing cd-rom curation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital repositories doi dspace dublin core e-science framework geospatial data google scholar guid higher education html identifier infrastructure internet explorer interoperability library data metadata open access rdf repositories research schema standards uri url vocabularies xml Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2223 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Kultivating Kultur: Increasing Arts Research Deposit http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> discusses how the JISC-funded Kultivate Project is encouraging arts research deposit in UK institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Funded by the Deposit strand [<a href="#1">1</a>] JISC Information Environment programme and led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), a Research Centre of the University for the Creative Arts, Kultivate will increase arts research deposit in UK institutional repositories.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article marie-therese gramstadt falmouth university goldsmiths college google jisc leiden university microsoft royal college of art university for the creative arts university of bristol university of chicago university of exeter university of glasgow university of huddersfield university of london university of nottingham university of southampton university of the arts london vads depositmo jisc information environment opendoar reposit repositories support project romeo rsp web2rights archives blog cataloguing copyright curation data database dspace eprints exif framework google search graphics institutional repository metadata multimedia open access open source portfolio repositories research research information management schema screencast search technology software sword protocol vocabularies Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2140 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Peculiarities of Digitising Materials from the Collections of the National Academy of Sciences, Armenia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan#author1">Alan Hopkinson</a> and <a href="/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan#author2">Tigran Zargaryan</a> give an overview of their experience of digitising paper-based materials in the Fundamental Scientific Library of the National Academy of Sciences, Armenia including some of the obstacles encountered during image processing and optical character recognition.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>Early writing which first appeared as cuneiform protocols and then emerged in manuscript form and as printed materials is currently entering a new stage in its development – in the form of electronic publications.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/hopkinson-zargaryan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article alan hopkinson tigran zargaryan abbyy british library eifl ifla jisc digital media microsoft middlesex university national academy of sciences national library of armenia stm tasi endangered archives programme adobe algorithm archives content management data database dcmi digital media digital repositories digitisation document format drupal dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative dvd eprints file format graphics infrastructure jpeg metadata national library ocr open access open source open standard optical character recognition preservation repositories research resource description schema software standards tiff Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2235 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) Project Launch Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt#author1">Ray Harper</a> reports on a one-day conference which launched the DREaM Project, held by the Library and Information Science Research Coalition in London on 19 July 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The DREaM (Developing Research Excellence and Methods) Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held at the British Library Conference Centre in London in July 2011. The conference was attended by 86 delegates, and consisted of an overview of the DREaM Project, two keynote papers, a one-minute madness session, and four parallel breakout sessions. I had the opportunity to attend as a sponsored delegate, thanks to Glen Recruitment, Sue Hill Recruitment and TFPL.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report ray harper american library association bbc british library cilip edinburgh napier university imperial college london indiana university information today loughborough university nhs northumbria university university college cork university of cambridge university of oxford university of sheffield lis research coalition blog cookie data dissemination framework information society knowledge management metadata open access repositories research search technology social networks taxonomy Mon, 27 Feb 2012 16:59:05 +0000 lisrw 2237 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Piloting Web Conferencing Software: Experiences and Challenges http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author1">Julian Prior</a> and <a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author2">Marie Salter</a> report on their experiences piloting Elluminate Live! at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>In the current fiscal climate faced by educational institutions in the UK, elearning tools and technologies that promise efficiency savings as well as enhancing the quality and quantity of course offerings are gaining popularity. One such technology is Web conferencing where lectures, seminars, meetings or presentations take place online and allow for remote participation and collaboration via audio, video, instant chat and a virtual 'whiteboard.'[<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article julian prior marie salter alt alt-c aston university blackboard google jisc open university qik ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of exeter university of hertfordshire university of winchester samson wikipedia adobe blog browser data e-learning elluminate firefox further education higher education internet explorer java licence mobile moodle multimedia oer open access open source operating system portfolio safari software streaming usb video vle web browser webinar windows Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1623 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Special Collections Digitisation in the Age of Mass Scanning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author1">Constance Rinaldo</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author2">Judith Warnement</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author3">Tom Baione</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author4">Martin R. Kalfatovic</a> and <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author5">Susan Fraser</a> describe results from a study to identify and develop a cost-effective and efficient large-scale digitisation workflow for special collections library materials.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a consortium of 12 natural history and botanical libraries that co-operate to digitise and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global 'biodiversity commons.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] The participating libraries hold more than two million volumes of biodiversity literature collected over 200 years to support the work of scientists, researchers and students in their home insti</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article constance rinaldo judith warnement martin r. kalfatovic susan fraser tom baione american museum of natural history california digital library harvard university ifla library of congress new york botanical garden oclc smithsonian institution university of cambridge university of oxford internet archive open library wikipedia archives bibliographic data cataloguing csv data database digital library digitisation dublin core framework infrastructure intellectual property librarything metadata opac open access repositories research tagging url video web services wiki z39.50 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1624 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk From Link Rot to Web Sanctuary: Creating the Digital Educational Resource Archive (DERA) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/scaife#author1">Bernard M Scaife</a> describes how an innovative use of the EPrints repository software is helping to preserve official documents from the Web.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>When I started as Technical Services Librarian at the Institute of Education (IOE) in September 2009, one of the first tasks I was given was to do something about all the broken links in the catalogue. Link rot [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the bane of the Systems Librarian's life and I was well aware that you had to run fast to stand still.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/scaife" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article bernard m scaife bbc becta google jisc national library of australia oai the national archives uk data archive university of london university of southampton archives bibliographic data cataloguing collection development content management copyright creative commons data data mining digital preservation digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons higher education html identifier infrastructure interoperability lcsh library management systems licence metadata ms word multimedia national library oai-pmh open access preservation provenance repositories research schema search technology software thesaurus ulcc url xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1625 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk