Overview of content related to 'flickr' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/172/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Most of a Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/taylor#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> writes about how she made the most of a conference to promote and inform the work of a project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working with repositories in various ways for over five years, so I have, of course, attended the major international conference Open Repositories before. I have never actually presented anything or represented a specific project at the event, though. This year was different. This year I had a mission -&nbsp; to present a poster on the DataFlow Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] and to talk to people about the work we had been doing for the past 12 months and (I hoped) to interest them in using the Open Source (OS) systems we had developed during that period.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article stephanie taylor ukoln university of glasgow university of oxford university of southampton devcsi hydra rsp api archives blog cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital library digital repositories dissemination doi flickr framework hashtag higher education infrastructure javascript licence linked data linux metadata open access open source provenance rdf repositories research research information management software standards sword protocol tagging text mining twitter visualisation widget wiki zip Tue, 31 Jul 2012 15:05:33 +0000 lisrw 2374 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Welsh Libraries and Social Media: A Survey http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/tyler#author1">Alyson Tyler</a> outlines the results of a survey of Welsh libraries, their access to, and use of, social media, and offers a sample business case.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians are, in general, often quick to pick up and experiment with new technologies, integrating them into their work to improve the library service. Social media are no exception. This article seeks to show how the adoption of social media by different library sectors in Wales is helping to deliver and promote their library services.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article alyson tyler cymal ukoln welsh government aggregation archives blog ebook facebook file sharing flickr foi further education higher education instant messaging internet explorer moodle multimedia netvibes pageflakes repositories rss social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2227 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of the Past of the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/fpw11-rpt#author1">Matthew Brack</a> reports on the one-day international workshop 'The Future of the Past of the Web' held at the British Library Conference Centre, London on 7 October, 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have all heard at least some of the extraordinary statistics that attempt to capture the sheer size and ephemeral nature of the Web. According to the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), more than 70 new domains are registered and more than 500,000 documents are added to the Web every minute [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This scale, coupled with its ever-evolving use, present significant challenges to those concerned with preserving both the content and context of the Web.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report matthew brack bbc british library bsi dcc digital preservation coalition google hanzo archives institute of historical research iso jisc kings college london library of congress nhs oxford internet institute the national archives university of oxford university of sheffield wellcome library arcomem internet archive memento uk government web archive aggregation algorithm api archives big data blog browser cache curation data data mining data model digital asset management digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi flickr identifier interoperability library data lod metadata preservation repositories research search technology social web software tag cloud twitter ulcc uri url visualisation warc wayback machine web resources wordpress youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:52 +0000 lisrw 2236 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Future of Archives and Recordkeeping http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews an anthology of perceptive essays on the challenges presented to archival thought and practice by Web 2.0, postmodern perspectives, and cross-disciplinary interchanges.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians, archivists, and records managers do not share identical challenges or controversies in their practical endeavours or theoretical queries. However, a common issue for all the information professions and a dominating topic of discussion in their literature is the fundamental change in the structure and distribution of knowledge caused by mass digitisation. The proliferation of daily digital content, in quantity, reach, and manifestation, is confronting them all with a disquieting role ambiguity. The expanding tools and expectations of Web 2.0 have made this self-questioning a recurrent one, but they have also stimulated invigorating debate on the purpose and direction of these fields. The perception is one of extraordinary change initiated by emerging technologies, unprecedented knowledge production and dissemination, and a new centralised role for the information user. In these galvanising changes leading library and archives practitioners are sensing opportunities for confirming the professions’ relevance, in the estimation of other scholarly disciplines and of society at large, but, perhaps most of all, in their own eyes as well.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review john azzolini clifford chance archives blog cataloguing digital library digitisation dissemination facebook flickr framework knowledge management metadata personalisation preservation provenance research semiotic twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Tue, 08 Nov 2011 14:50:08 +0000 lisrw 1689 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UK Reading Experience Database http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt#author1">Bethan Ruddock</a> reports from the launch event for the UK Reading Experience Database, held at the Betty Boothroyd Library, the Open University, Milton Keynes, on 24 February 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><p>I was invited down to the Open University (OU) Betty Boothroyd Library in Milton Keynes for the launch of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. I had been asked to attend to talk about the LOCAH Project and Linked Data, but I was also looking forward to learning about the RED Project.</p> <p>This was the first of two launch days, and was designed for librarians, archivists, and information managers. A second launch day for teachers in Higher Education was to be held in London the next day.</p> <h2 id="What_Is_UK_RED">What Is UK RED?</h2> <p>The tagline for UK RED is 'the experience of reading in Britain from 1450 to 1945', and the database brings together reading experiences, making them both searchable and browsable. What is a reading experience? It is evidence of anyone alive between the mid-15th and 20thcenturies having read and interacted with a book or other piece of writing, such as magazines, newspapers, letters - even playbills and advertisements. Ownership alone is not enough; there must be something to show that the person in question actually read the work or at least part of it.</p> <p>This information can be found in a number of places - a printed book review would be an obvious example. The RED team also find many entries in diaries. Such entries can range from simple lists of books that someone has read over the course of a year, to detailed descriptions of when and where they read a particular book, and how they felt about it. Often diary entries are not actually about the book; it is mentioned in passing and in the context of a number of other activities.</p> <p>While the owner's name on the flyleaf is not itself enough to justify a 'reading experience', annotations to the text are, as they show that the person has actually interacted with the text. Of course, you then have to consider whether the person whose name is on the flyleaf is the same as the person doing the annotating!</p> <p>RED is much more than a list of 'people who have read books'. The database aims to bring out as much information as possible about the reading experience. The interface to submit a new entry allows you to specify where the reading was taking place, all the way down to a particular room in a particular house. It also aims to identify if the reading was silent or aloud, alone or with other people; whether the book was owned by the reader, a library book, borrowed, or even stolen. All these data are then used to build up a rich database of information on who was reading what (and how!) in Britain.</p> <p>UK RED is not just concerned with reading experiences within Britain: team members also look at the reading experiences of citizens abroad. <strong>Edmund King</strong>, Research Associate, Reading Experience Database, OU, told us that, as a consequence, there are fascinating examples of what captured British soldiers were reading in prisoner-of-war (POW) camps as well as examples of what they were not allowed to read. Books in Welsh and Pakistani were banned, as well as atlases and anything about the Russian revolution. I do not know if there are corresponding records for what prisoners in UK POW camps were forbidden to read, but it would be very interesting to find out.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report bethan ruddock ahrc eduserv jisc mimas newcastle university open university talis ukoln university of manchester university of oxford archives hub dbpedia locah lucero wikipedia apache archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copac copyright data data set database dissemination flickr higher education intellectual property linked data linux open source php provenance research software sparql sql twitter video Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1629 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 66: Sanity Check http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 66.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With institutions searching to increase the impact of the work they do, and conscious of the immediate impact of any event they organise, many will be interested to read of <a href="/issue66/guy/">10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event</a> in which <strong>Marieke Guy</strong> provides a raft of suggestions to enhance the participants' experience of and involvement in, the event they are attending.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 editorial richard waller british library google jisc ukoln university of pretoria e-curator keepit zetoc aggregation archives blog browser copyright curation data database digital audio digital preservation digital repositories file format flickr framework geospatial data gis identifier institutional repository learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone netvibes open access open source personalisation podcast preservation privacy refworks repositories research resource description and access rss search technology software streaming tagging twitter usability video web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1602 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> describes new tools and services that can help you get your event heard.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><p>In 2007 Lorcan Dempsey coined the phrase 'the amplified conference' [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He used the term to refer to how event outputs (such as talks and presentations) were being amplified 'through a variety of network tools and collateral communications'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article marieke guy eduserv google jisc mpeg qik ukoln university of bath beginners guide to digital preservation internet archive jisc powr project powr amplified event archives avi blog copyright creative commons digital preservation dissemination elluminate facebook flickr hashtag intellectual property licence metadata mobile mobile phone mp4 netvibes odp open source opml pageflakes podcast preservation remote working research rss search technology software storify streaming tagging twitter usb ustream video web development webinar wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1607 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Survive or Thrive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt#author1">Ed Fay</a> reports on a two-day conference organised by UKOLN on behalf of JISC to consider growth and use of digital content on the Web, which was held in Manchester in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Survive or Thrive [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the punchy title given to an event intended to stimulate serious consideration amongst digital collections practitioners about future directions in our field - opportunities but also potential pitfalls. The event, which focused on content in HE, comes at a time of financial uncertainty when proving value is of increasing importance in the sector and at a point when significant investment has already been made in the UK into content creation, set against a backdrop of increasingly available content on the open Web from a multitude of sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report ed fay apple bbc california digital library cerlim edina eduserv google jisc jisc digital media london school of economics massachusetts institute of technology ordnance survey rdtf talis the national archives university of huddersfield accessibility aggregation agile development api archives blog cataloguing data digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dissemination domain model e-learning flickr geospatial data gis html identifier information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository interoperability itunes javascript linked data mashup metadata mobile personalisation preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks software solr standards tagging text mining twitter usability widget Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1593 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc1"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Public Library 2.0: Culture Change? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/hammond#author1">Sarah Hammond</a> explores UK public libraries' growing participation in social media to reach their audiences online, with a focus on blogging.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Beginning in the mid 2000s I began keeping an eye on how libraries have been getting involved with social software - I started this haphazardly just out of interest but then I started to be more systematic when I needed to explore online resources for my organisation, the National Railway Museum. When I left to pursue my MA in Librarianship at the University of Sheffield I took the opportunity to do some serious research into the subject with a focus on UK public libraries as it seemed to me that they were hugely under-represented online.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article sarah hammond bbc british library information today nhs oxford university press robert gordon university university of oxford university of sheffield university of the west of england archives blog doi facebook flickr framework higher education librarything microblogging mobile netvibes opac podcast research search technology social software software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1562 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23 Things in Public Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/leech#author1">Helen Leech</a> describes a collaborative project to increase front-line staff's understanding and use of Web 2.0 in public libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you know that:</p> <ul> <li>Of the Generation Y – the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s – 96% are members of a social network</li> <li>There are some 200 million blogs on the World Wide Web</li> <li>One in eight couples who married in the USA in 2009 met over the Internet</li> <li>If Facebook were a country, it would be the fourth largest by population in the world after China, the USA and India</li> </ul> <p>All the statistics emanate from Socialnomics [<a href="#1">1</a>]. They are designed to be attention-grabbers, and they will no doubt provoke ferocious debate. However, what is unarguable is that some seismic shifts have taken place on the Internet in the past ten years, and social media and user-generated content now play a huge role in the way many people create and share information and how they communicate with each other.</p> <p>These changes have crept up on public libraries. Ten years ago, we became Internet experts when the People's Network initiative put 30,000 computers into our buildings. We became used to the new role of teaching people how to use a mouse, what a search engine is, how to create an email account. But when it came to content, we tended to leave that to our customers. Friends Reunited came along, followed by Myspace, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, and we were dimly aware of them as social phenomena, but we did not have much to do with them in our day-to-day work.</p> <h2 id="Changes_in_Public_Libraries">Changes in Public Libraries</h2> <p>So what has changed and why do we need to know about them now? The list below is by no means exhaustive but represents some of the main drivers behind changes emerging within public libraries in the UK.</p> <ol> <li>The need to help people get online. As I write, every public library in the UK is being asked to sign up to Race Online [<a href="#2">2</a>], the initiative to get 100% of the population clued up by the time the Olympics happens. The reappointed UK Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox launched the Race Online 2012 campaign in March 2010. The initiative reports that more than 600 partners have pledged to help more than 1.7 million new people to get online by the end of 2012. Its rationale is "to build a UK of near-universal web literacy by the time of the Olympics, with access as easy and affordable as water, electricity or gas and skills considered as fundamental as literacy and numeracy: [its] ambition is to get everyone of working-age online by the end of this Parliament." People need to know the key skills for getting around online, and a large part of these skills involves social networking.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>Changes in the way people communicate. There is a subtle shift taking place in electronic communication, moving onwards from email towards more collaborative methods: file sharing and cloud computing, social media that include information 'walls,' instant messaging and mobile apps. There is growing evidence that Generation Y and the Millenials – the generations born after the late 1980s – are moving towards very different methods of communication. It is important that library staff understand these technologies, since they are going to become as mainstream as email very shortly.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><em>Communities in Control</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>]: you might recognise this as the title of a recent government paper, looking at the need to pass control over political processes to local communities, and how this could be achieved. The principle is being reinforced through the new administration's Big Society initiative [<a href="#4">4</a>]. New technologies are allowing people to mobilise in a way that simply has not been possible before, to create and share content, and to become involved in the running of public libraries in radical new ways. It is also worth looking at the International Association for Public Participation's <em>Spectrum of Public Participation </em>[<a href="#5">5</a>] which gives some idea of the range of ways in which we need to work with our communities, from providing them with information all the way up to acting as facilitators so that they can manage and run services themselves. It is also worth watching the film <em>Us Now</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], which gives a glimpse of the way that new technologies might affect people's relationships with central government and public services. It highlights the way that social networking applications allow huge numbers of people to collaborate to do previously unthinkable things, like run a bank. If communities can make the day-to-day decisions necessary to run a bank or a second division football club, then it starts to become possible that they could do the same for political processes or delivery of public services. Library staff need to understand this culture of engagement, and to understand the tools that facilitate it.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>The economic environment. The next four years, 2010-14, are going to be the hardest public services have seen, and we are going to have to make cost savings everywhere we can. There are clear benefits in collaboration, and the tools that are available for this are improving rapidly. Which is where <em>23 Things</em> comes in.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article helen leech bbc google imperial college london university of huddersfield wikipedia archives blog cataloguing cloud computing database facebook file sharing flickr google wave instant messaging librarything mobile podcast rss search technology social networks software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1565 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Libraries for the Data Challenge http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/salo#author1">Dorothea Salo</a> examines how library systems and procedures need to change to accommodate research data.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Eager to prove their relevance among scholars leaving print behind, libraries have participated vocally in the last half-decade's conversation about digital research data. On the surface, libraries would seem to have much human and technological infrastructure ready-constructed to repurpose for data: digital library platforms and institutional repositories may appear fit for purpose. However, unless libraries understand the salient characteristics of research data, and how they do and do not fit with library processes and infrastructure, they run the risk of embarrassing missteps as they come to grips with the data challenge.</p> <p>Whether managing research data is 'the new special collections,'[<a href="#1">1</a>] a new form of regular academic-library collection development, or a brand-new library specialty, the possibilities have excited a great deal of talk, planning, and educational opportunity in a profession seeking to expand its boundaries.</p> <p>Faced with shrinking budgets and staffs, library administrators may well be tempted to repurpose existing technology infrastructure and staff to address the data curation challenge. Existing digital libraries and institutional repositories seem on the surface to be a natural fit for housing digital research data. Unfortunately, significant mismatches exist between research data and library digital warehouses, as well as the processes and procedures librarians typically use to fill those warehouses. Repurposing warehouses and staff for research data is therefore neither straightforward nor simple; in some cases, it may even prove impossible.</p> <h2 id="Characteristics_of_Research_Data">Characteristics of Research Data</h2> <p>What do we know about research data? What are its salient characteristics with respect to stewardship?</p> <h3 id="Size_and_Scope">Size and Scope</h3> <p>Perhaps the commonest mental image of research data is terabytes of information pouring out of the merest twitch of the Large Hadron Collider Project. So-called 'Big Data' both captures the imagination of and creates sheer terror in the practical librarian or technologist. 'Small data,' however, may prove to be the bigger problem: data emerging from individual researchers and labs, especially those with little or no access to grants, or a hyperlocal research focus. Though each small-data producer produces only a trickle of data compared to the like of the Large Hadron Collider Project, the tens of thousands of small-data producers in aggregate may well produce as much data (or more, measured in bytes) as their Big Data counterparts [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Securely and reliably storing and auditing this amount of data is a serious challenge. The burgeoning 'small data' store means that institutions without local Big Data projects are by no means exempt from large-scale storage considerations.</p> <p>Small data also represents a serious challenge in terms of human resources. Best practices instituted in a Big Data project reach all affected scientists quickly and completely; conversely, a small amount of expert intervention in such a project pays immense dividends. Because of the great numbers of individual scientists and labs producing small data, however, immensely more consultations and consultants are necessary to bring practices and the resulting data to an acceptable standard.</p> <h3 id="Variability">Variability</h3> <p>Digital research data comes in every imaginable shape and form. Even narrowing the universe of research data to 'image' yields everything from scans of historical glass negative photographs to digital microscope images of unicellular organisms taken hundreds at a time at varying depths of field so that the organism can be examined in three dimensions. The tools that researchers use naturally shape the resulting data. When the tool is proprietary, unfortunately, so may be the file format that it produced. When that tool does not include long-term data viability as a development goal, the data it produces are often neither interoperable nor preservable.</p> <p>A major consequence of the diversity of forms and formats of digital research data is a concomitant diversity in desired interactions. The biologist with a 3-D stack of microscope images interacts very differently with those images than does a manuscript scholar trying to extract the underlying half-erased text from a palimpsest. These varying affordances <em>must</em> be respected by dissemination platforms if research data are to enjoy continued use.</p> <p>One important set of interactions involves actual changes to data. Many sorts of research data are considerably less usable in their raw state than after they have had filters or algorithms or other processing performed on them. Others welcome correction, or are refined by comparison with other datasets. Two corollaries emerge: first, that planning and acting for data stewardship must take place throughout the research process, rather than being an add-on at the end; and second, that digital preservation systems designed to steward only final, unchanging materials can only fail faced with real-world datasets and data-use practices.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article dorothea salo california digital library dcc google oai university of wisconsin hydra algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cookie curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination drupal dspace dublin core eprints fedora commons file format flickr google docs infrastructure institutional repository interoperability library management systems linked data marc metadata mods oai-pmh open source preservation rdf repositories research search technology software standardisation standards sword protocol wiki xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1566 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Access, Delivery, Performance - The Future of Libraries Without Walls http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a Festschrift celebrating the work of Professor Peter Brophy, founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is normal in some subject disciplines to publish volumes of edited papers in honour of a respected colleague, usually to mark a significant birthday or career change. The contributors to such Festschriften<a href="#editors-note">*</a> are usually made up of former colleagues or pupils of the person being honoured. This volume celebrates the work of Professor Peter Brophy, the founder of the Centre for Research in Library and Information Management (CERLIM), which since 1998 has been based at the Manchester Metropolitan University. This volume contains twelve chapters written by sixteen contributors, many of them colleagues or ex-colleagues of Professor Brophy.</p> <p>Peter Brophy has had an outstanding career both as a librarian and researcher. Alan MacDougall, Visiting Professor at Manchester Metropolitan University provides an outline in the opening chapter. A career that started at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster University in the early 1970s progressed to professional posts at Strathclyde University and Teeside Polytechnic, before Brophy eventually became Librarian at Bristol Polytechnic. From there, he moved to the University of Central Lancashire in 1989, where in 1993 he set up CERLIM. A selected bibliography of works by Professor Brophy fills eleven pages at the end of the volume, revealing the range and diversity of his research interests over the past few decades.</p> <p>The contexts of the early years of Professor Brophy's career are sketched in more detail in the opening chapter by Michael Buckland, Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. Buckland was a colleague of Brophy's at the Library Research Unit at Lancaster in the early 1970s.This chapter gives a good flavour of how library and information research was undertaken in this time when the libraries at what were then 'new universities' had an active interest in innovation and when almost all library research in the UK was funded by the Office for Scientific and Technical Information of the Department of Education and Science.</p> <h2 id="Libraries_and_e-Learning">Libraries and e-Learning</h2> <p>The remainder of the book is organised into four broad themes. The first covers libraries' role in supporting e-learning. The opening chapter in this section is by Gill Needham and Nicky Whitsed of the Open University. It is a series of reflections on a decade of developing library services for distance learners. Starting with the Follett Report of 1993 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the chapter identifies three main phases in the Open University's approach to delivering services to around 200,000 students and 8,000 tutors. The first phase was concerned with fairness; knowing exactly when to introduce online services at a time when a majority of Open University students did not have access to the relevant technologies or skills and when many tutors were reluctant to change their traditional ways of working. Responses to this included the development of library-mediated collections of quality-controlled Internet resources, supplemented by an online skills tutorial focused on generic information skills. Despite all of this, actual use of online resources remained relatively low (p. 30). The second phase, therefore, was mainly about integrating online services more deeply into the core learning activities of courses. The focus switched to the training of tutors and the integration of information resources within the university's emerging virtual learning environment (VLE), based on Moodle. In the interim, a pilot project using the open source MyLibrary software was found to be useful in helping to integrate library services into the learning experiences of individual students. The third phase - which Needham and Whitsed note is still ongoing - concerns the embedding of information literacy and resource-based learning concepts within the university more widely. The chapter ends with some comments on the, perhaps inevitable, tension between the 'invisible library' – 'quietly and strategically … [insinuating] resources and services into all those places where they have the most impact' - and the need to defend library budgets and status within the wider institution (pp. 35-36).</p> <p>The following chapter, by Professor David Baker of the University College Plymouth St Mark and St John, is a general overview of the development of e-learning technologies in UK Higher Education over the past decade. Starting again with Follett, Baker explains how e-learning concepts and technologies have been taken up, focusing in particular on the facilitating role taken by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) in providing a national-level approach to the provision of both infrastructure (e.g., networks, access management tools) and content. In addition, the chapter refers to a number of JISC-funded programmes and initiatives focused on breaking down the barriers that prevent the sharing and re-use of e-learning content. The final sections look at some wider factors influencing the current transformation of learning, teaching and assessment practices. These include the need to integrate institutional services like VLEs with the generic social networking tools and mobile devices familiar to new generations of learners. However, successful integration is not just a matter of technology but of overcoming cultural differences. Baker uses a synthesis of the JISC-funded Learner Experiences of e-Learning projects [<a href="#2">2</a>] to note that there might have been 'an increasing "divide" between the needs, expectations and wishes of the learners and the expectations of the teachers, who were more "traditional" and perhaps not engaged with e-learning in the same way' (p. 49).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review michael day british library cerlim google jisc manchester metropolitan university mla open university oreilly rnib talis ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of california berkeley university of central lancashire victoria university w3c jisc information environment web accessibility initiative accessibility archives bibliographic data cataloguing controlled vocabularies digital library e-learning facebook flickr framework higher education infrastructure knowledge management metadata mobile moodle open source preservation repositories research semantic web software vle vocabularies wcag web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1580 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Archives in Web 2.0: New Opportunities http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/nogueira <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/nogueira#author1">Marta Nogueira</a> describes how three Web 2.0 applications (Facebook, Flickr, YouTube) can work as a virtual extension for archives and other cultural organisations, by identifying benefits obtained from the use of Web 2.0 applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Archives are using Web 2.0 applications in a context that allows for new types of interaction, new opportunities regarding institutional promotion, new ways of providing their services and making their heritage known to the community. Applications such as Facebook (online social network), Flickr (online image-sharing community) and YouTube (online video sharing community) are already used by cultural organisations that interact in the informal context of Web 2.0.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/nogueira" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article marta nogueira google library of congress new university of lisbon the national archives university of lisbon archives blog data database e-government facebook flickr geospatial data gis information retrieval institutional repository national library ontologies portal privacy repositories rss search technology social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 web services youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1541 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Science in Transition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews an edited volume published to commemorate the founding of the Institute of Information Scientists in 1958.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><p>Until it joined with the Library Association in 2002 to form the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), the Institute of Information Scientists was a professional organisation for those primarily working in scientific and technical information work. The chapters in this volume were first published in 2008 as a special issue of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> to commemorate the founding of the institute in 1958. In accordance with this, many of the chapters provide a retrospective - sometimes even anecdotal - overview of developments in information science in the UK since the 1950s. While the approach of the volume is thematic, a major focus is on key initiatives and individuals, the latter including such luminaries as Jason Farradane, Cyril Cleverden and Karen Spärk Jones.</p> <p>Following a guest editorial by Brian Vickery, there are sixteen chapters in the book. While each chapter stands alone, conceptually the volume moves - with some exceptions - from largely retrospective reviews of past progress in information science by scholars of the older generation to overviews of current trends and technologies by their younger colleagues. Vickery's editorial tries to place information science in its historical context, explaining how the advent of digital computers and the Internet has transformed the discipline dramatically while simultaneously making its future more uncertain. This is also a view articulated by several of the volume contributors.</p> <p>The opening chapter is an attempt by Jack Meadows to discern the main research themes in UK information science over the past 50 years. A survey of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> and other journals showed that the predominant theme was information retrieval, but that there was also important research being undertaken into information seeking, communication and bibliometrics. The chapter also tries to delineate some of the factors affecting information science research in the UK, for example noting the negative consequences of the demise of the old British Library Research and Development Department in the 1990s [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He concludes, however, on a positive note, pointing out that 'activities that were relatively marginal decades ago - such as automated information retrieval - are now at the heart of major growth industries' (p. 17). He also notes that the widening interest in information science concepts has brought in researchers from other disciplines - which is probably one of the key lessons of the whole book. In the second chapter, David Bawden (City University) again uses the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> as a means of exploring the development of the information science discipline itself, focusing on the underlying philosophical bases of the subject proposed by scholars like Bertie Brookes and Jason Farradane.</p> <p>The third chapter is by Stella Dextre Clarke. This is a retrospective of fifty years of knowledge organisation work in the information science domain that takes a partly anecdotal approach, attempting to illustrate 'how it felt to work in those times' (p. 45). Perhaps the best aspect of this is that it enables Dextre Clarke to give the reader a feel for what information retrieval could be like in the card-based pre-computer age. The chapter opens with a brief overview of the state of subject classification in the late 1950s, noting the continued practical predominance of enumerative schemes like the Dewey Decimal Classification while the theoreticians S. R. Ranganathan and Henry E. Bliss were still working away developing their (then) revolutionary ideas of 'faceted classification.' The focus then changes to the development of thesauri, noting the importance of Jean Aitchison's pioneering work on thesaurus construction. Dextre Clarke then provides a very brief overview of the role of controlled vocabularies in the early information retrieval tests conducted as part of the Aslib-Cranfield Research Project, a topic covered in more detail in the following chapter. Finally, moving to the present day, Dextre Clarke notes the continued importance of controlled vocabularies in the form of taxonomies and provides some pointers for a future Semantic Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review michael day british library cilip edinburgh napier university indiana university library association london school of economics loughborough university microsoft stm ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of wolverhampton citeulike bibliographic data bibliometrics blog controlled vocabularies copyright data data mining data set database dewey decimal digital library ejournal facebook flickr ict information retrieval institutional repository metadata national library open access privacy repositories research rss second life semantic web social software standards thesaurus twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1555 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Library Mashups http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw#author1">Aldalin Lyngdoh</a> reviews a book on the basics of mashups and how they have been used in libraries worldwide.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This book is intended for readers who have some knowledge of computers, computer programming and libraries.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/lyngdoh-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review aldalin lyngdoh british medical association google api browser cataloguing computer programming data database flickr google maps library data mashup opac repositories search technology web 2.0 web services yahoo pipes Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1556 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Fedora UK & Ireland / EU Joint User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the first coming together of two regional user groups for the Fedora digital repository system, hosted by the University of Oxford in December 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><p>The Fedora digital repository system [<a href="#1">1</a>] (as opposed to the Fedora Linux distribution, with which there is no connection) is an open source solution for the management of all types of digital content. Its development is managed through DuraSpace [<a href="#2">2</a>], the same organisation that now oversees DSpace, and carried out by developers around the world. The developers, alongside the extensive body of Fedora users, form the community that sustains Fedora.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report chris awre bbc duraspace ieee jisc kings college london stanford university technical university of denmark university of edinburgh university of hull university of oxford university of southampton university of virginia bril datashare hydra idmb cloud computing content management data data management database digital repositories dspace e-research e-science eprints fedora commons flickr framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository linux metadata mobile open source portal qr code rdbms rdf repositories research search technology software usability virtual research environment wiki xml youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1531 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events1"></a></p> <h3 id="UKeiG_Intranet-s_Forum:_ERM-s_Knowledge_Sharing_Platform_February_2010">UKeiG Intranet's Forum: ERM's Knowledge Sharing Platform – February 2010</h3> <p>UKeiG Intranet's Forum: ERM's Knowledge Sharing Platform:<br />A chance to see one of the world's top 10 best intranets<br />Free informal Intranets Forum meeting for UKeiG members</p> <p>ERM, 2/F Exchequer Court, 33 St. Mary Axe, London EC3A 8AA<br />Friday 26 February 2010, 4.00 - 5.30 p.m.<br /><a href="http://www.ukeig.org.uk/">http://www.ukeig.org.uk/</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 news and events richard waller british library cetis cilip coalition for networked information cornell university dcc georgia institute of technology imperial college london jisc loughborough university mla niso oclc serials solutions surffoundation ucisa uk data archive ukoln university college london university of london university of manchester university of utrecht europeana internet archive accessibility archives authentication bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set database digital repositories dissemination e-government facebook flickr foi framework further education google analytics higher education ict infrastructure intellectual property interoperability intranet knowledge base knowledge management marc21 metadata ontologies open access openurl podcast portal preservation privacy repositories research resource description and access resource sharing second life social networks software standards twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1535 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Share. Collaborate. Innovate. Building an Organisational Approach to Web 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/bevan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/bevan#author1">Paul Bevan</a> outlines the National Library of Wales' development of a strategic approach to meeting user needs in a post-Web 2.0 world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The National Library of Wales has recently published a new Strategy for the Web [<a href="#1">1</a>] which integrates Web 2.0 with the existing Web portfolio and seeks to provide an approach to Web 2.0 which is focused on the organisation. Rather than centring on technical developments, this paper outlines a strategic research approach and discusses some of the outcomes which may speak to others seeking to engage with emerging Web technologies and approaches.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/bevan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article paul bevan bbc google national library of wales archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data digital media digitisation facebook flickr framework google analytics html ict infrastructure licence metadata mobile mobile phone national library open source portfolio research search engine optimisation search technology software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 web app web services windows youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1506 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Search Engines: Real-time Search http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> looks at the concept of real-time search and points to some of the functionality that users can and should expect to find when exploring these engines.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article phil bradley google microsoft archives avatar blog cloud computing data database facebook flickr hashtag html microblogging rss search technology tag cloud twitter url ustream video windows youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1507 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk How to Publish Data Using Overlay Journals: The OJIMS Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/callaghan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author1">Sarah Callaghan</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author2">Sam Pepler</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author3">Fiona Hewer</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author4">Paul Hardaker</a> and <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author5">Alan Gadian</a> describe the implementation details that can be used to create overlay journals for data publishing in the meteorological sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The previous article about the Overlay Journal Infrastructure for Meteorological Sciences (OJIMS) Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] dealt with an introduction to the concept of overlay journals and their potential impact on the meteorological sciences. It also discussed the business cases and requirements that must be met for overlay journals to become operational as data publications.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/callaghan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article alan gadian fiona hewer paul hardaker sam pepler sarah callaghan badc jisc ncas oai royal meteorological society university of leeds ojims opendoar rioja sneep archives browser copyright data data management data set database dissemination dublin core eprints flickr framework identifier infrastructure metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source podcast preservation programming language python rdf repositories research schema search technology software standards video web app web browser wiki xml xml schema xslt Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1508 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Why Are Users So Useful? User Engagement and the Experience of the JISC Digitisation Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/marchionni#author1">Paola Marchionni</a> discusses the importance of user engagement in the creation of digitised scholarly resources with case studies from the JISC Digitisation Programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do we know enough about what our users' needs are when creating online digitised scholarly resources? What are the benefits of engaging users? In what way can they be useful to the process?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article paola marchionni british library google jisc oxford internet institute university college london university of oxford asr2 first world war poetry wikipedia archives blog cataloguing content management data digital archive digitisation dissemination facebook flickr google search higher education ict identifier itunes metadata multimedia podcast research search technology twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1512 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Live Blogging @ IWMW 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt#author1">Kirsty McGill</a> provides a live blogger perspective on the three-day Institutional Web Managers Workshop, held by UKOLN at the University of Essex, Colchester, in July 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 12th annual Institutional Web Managers Workshop (IWMW) attracted nearly 200 delegates, making it the largest workshop in the event's history. Whilst the popularity of the physical event has grown, so too has the remote audience. So this year organisers Marieke Guy and Brian Kelly decided that it was time to start treating this remote audience as first class citizens.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/iwmw-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 event report kirsty pitkin amazon bbc cardiff university edge hill university google jisc ukoln university of essex university of glasgow university of southampton university of strathclyde devcsi iwmw accessibility ajax amazon web services api blog browser cloud computing content management css curation data database domain model e-learning facebook flickr html interoperability javascript metadata mobile netvibes photoshop preservation privacy research schema social web software streaming twitter uri video web 2.0 web development web resources web services wireframe Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1515 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Collecting Evidence in a Web 2.0 Context http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/chapman-russell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/chapman-russell#author1">Ann Chapman</a> and <a href="/issue60/chapman-russell#author2">Rosemary Russell</a> describe the challenge of collecting evidence for a study of how Web 2.0 is being used in the UK HE sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/chapman-russell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article ann chapman rosemary russell google jisc ukoln university of bath citeulike good apis jorum sharegeo wikipedia archives blog cataloguing data database facebook flickr geospatial data gis google scholar google search higher education librarything mashup netvibes pageflakes passwords podcast repositories research rss search technology second life social networks software standards twitter video vle web 2.0 web app web development wiki wordpress youtube Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1488 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Repositories 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/or-09-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/or-09-rpt#author1">Adrian Stevenson</a> reports on the four-day annual Open Repositories conference held at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, GA, USA over 18 - 21 May 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I recently attended the annual Open Repositories 2009 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] in Atlanta, Georgia which hosted 326 delegates from 23 countries. For myself, as the SWORD [<a href="#2">2</a>] Project Manager, the event proved to be very worthwhile. My colleague Julie Allinson and I were both able to give a plenary presentation on the first day and a half-day workshop on the final day.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/or-09-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report adrian stevenson cetis duraspace georgia institute of technology jisc massachusetts institute of technology microsoft national library of wales oai ukoln university of bath university of illinois university of southampton university of york repositories research team sherpa romeo sword project adobe aggregation api archives atom bibliographic data blog cloud computing copyright creative commons data data model digital library digital repositories digitisation dissemination dspace eprints facebook fedora commons flickr html institutional repository internet explorer interoperability jpeg metadata mets national library oai-ore oai-pmh ontologies open archives initiative open source rdf repositories research semantic web software standardisation sword protocol twitter url xml zip Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1498 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2009: Evolution Or Revolution: The Future of Identity and Access Management for Research http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt#author1">Shirley Williams</a> reports on the Eduserv Foundation Symposium which took as its theme investigate the intersection between identity management, access management and scholarly research collaboration across institutional and geographic boundaries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/eduserv-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report shirley williams eduserv jisc london school of economics national e-science centre science and technology facilities council university of glasgow university of reading access control authentication blog data e-research e-science facebook flickr mobile passwords research shibboleth streaming twitter video wireless Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1500 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Encouraging More Open Educational Resources With Southampton's EdShare http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/morris <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/morris#author1">Debra Morris</a> describes the EdSpace Institutional Exemplar Project and the early development of EdShare for sharing learning and teaching materials within and beyond the institution.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- Version 3: Accommodating new reference from Debra Morris and ++1 reference list; 20090611 REW --><!-- Version 3: Accommodating new reference from Debra Morris and ++1 reference list; 20090611 REW --><p>The University of Southampton has around 22,000 students across six campuses: five in the city of Southampton and one in Winchester. It is a broad-based, research-intensive institution, a member of the Russell Group of UK Universities.</p> <p>The University comprises three Faculties: Faculty of Engineering, Science and Maths; Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences, and the Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/morris" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article debra morris blackboard cilip google ieee jisc university of southampton edspace jorum accessibility bibliometrics blackboard learning system content management copyright creative commons curation e-learning eprints facebook flickr framework infrastructure intellectual property managed learning environment metadata oer open access open source portal repositories research search technology software tagging url usability vle web 2.0 webct wiki youtube Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1468 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Staying Connected: Technologies Supporting Remote Workers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Having considered organisational issues in her previous article, <a href="/issue57/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> takes a look at the many technologies that support remote working, from broadband to Web 2.0 social networking tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article marieke guy bbc google jisc microsoft ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of london internet archive powr wikipedia adobe archives authentication blog browser data database dissemination e-learning eportfolio facebook flickr google docs higher education infrastructure jabber microblogging mobile mobile phone mp3 multimedia operating system passwords podcast portfolio preservation remote working repositories research search technology smartphone social networks software standards streaming twitter usability video videoconferencing web 2.0 web app web development web resources wiki windows wireless wordpress youtube Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Bug's Life?: How Metaphors from Ecology Can Articulate the Messy Details of Repository Interactions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/robertson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/robertson-et-al#author1">R. John Robertson</a>, <a href="/issue57/robertson-et-al#author2">Mahendra Mahey</a> and <a href="/issue57/robertson-et-al#author3">Phil Barker</a> introduce work investigating an alternative model of repository and service interaction.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Visions">Visions</h2> <p>In 'Lost in the IE', published in the last issue of <em>Ariadne</em> and in subsequent discussion on various blogs [<a href="#1">1</a>], [<a href="#2">2</a>] there has some thoughtful reflection on the vision of the JISC Information Environment (IE), its architecture and standards, the role of the IE and the role of 'that diagram' [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/robertson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article mahendra mahey phil barker r. john robertson cetis d-lib magazine jisc oai sherpa ukoln university of bath university of strathclyde jisc information environment repositories research team archives bibliographic data blog bpmn business process modelling creative commons digital library dissemination dspace dublin core e-learning eprints fedora commons flickr identifier institutional repository internet explorer metadata oai-pmh open access preservation repositories research social networks software sword protocol uml web 2.0 Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1432 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Selection of Social Media Search Engines http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> takes a look at how social media output is being indexed, sorted and made available for searching by looking at some representative samples.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article phil bradley google blog data diigo facebook flickr iphone microblogging mobile pageflakes research rss search technology twitter video web 2.0 youtube Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1433 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group Annual Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/cig-2008-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/cig-2008-rpt#author1">Christina Claridge</a> reports on the conference, held 3-5 September 2008, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scotland.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/cig-2008-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 event report christina claridge amazon bbc british library cilip dnb glasgow school of art intute nhs royal college of music talis ukoln university of huddersfield university of pennsylvania university of strathclyde university of warwick aida aacr2 archives bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing controlled vocabularies copyright data digital library flickr framework frbr identifier information architecture interoperability lcsh library management systems librarything marc metadata national library portal rdf research resource description resource description and access schema search technology semantic web skos standards subject heading tag cloud tagging tgn thesaurus udc vocabularies Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Pro Web 2.0 Mashups http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/levan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/levan-rvw#author1">Ralph LeVan</a> looks at a comprehensive work on how to consume and repurpose Web services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- 2008-11-11 REW v2; final editing from re-read --><!-- 2008-11-11 REW v2; final editing from re-read --><p>Raymond Yee has produced a comprehensive book on how to consume and repurpose Web services, even for Web sites that do not intentionally expose Web services. The book is broken into four sections; understanding how to use Web content, understanding Web services, combining the data from multiple services (mashups) and detailed examples of specific mashup opportunities.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/levan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 review ralph levan google microsoft oclc ajax api atom blog data flickr google maps javascript json mashup microformats microsoft office openoffice php python research rss search technology soap syndication tagging url web 2.0 web services xml Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1446 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Search Engines: Google Still Growing http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> finds it difficult to ignore some of the latest developments from Google - particularly the ones that are actually quite good.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article phil bradley google microsoft wikipedia adobe archives ark blog cataloguing creative commons data database digital media flash flickr google docs google maps google search html search technology url video web 2.0 youtube Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2008: The Great Debate http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt#author1">Adrian Tribe</a> reports on a three-day conference designed for professionals involved in the provision of institutional Web services, organised by UKOLN and held at King's College, University of Aberdeen in July 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Aberdeen??!! Make sure you take some woolly jumpers and a sou'wester then.'</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 event report adrian tribe british antarctic survey edge hill university eduserv google jisc microsoft ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of birmingham university of bradford university of glasgow university of kent university of london university of southampton iwmw accessibility api archives blog browser content management css data facebook flash flickr framework google analytics google docs google maps higher education institutional repository javascript mashup microformats mobile open source personalisation php portal preservation repositories research rss schema search technology second life social networks software twitter usability video web 2.0 web app web development web services wiki wordpress xcri xcri-cap xml xml schema youtube Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1414 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The 2008 Mashed Museum Day and UK Museums on the Web Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/ukmw08-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/ukmw08-rpt#author1">Mia Ridge</a> reports on the Mashed Museum day and the Museums Computer Group UK Museums on the Web Conference, held at the University of Leicester in June 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Following the success of the inaugural event last year [<a href="#1">1</a>], the Mashed Museum day was again held the day before the Museums Computer Group UK Museums on the Web Conference. The theme of the conference was 'connecting collections online', and the Mashed Museum day was a chance for museum ICT staff to put this into practice.</p> <h2 id="The_Mashed_Museum_Day">The Mashed Museum Day</h2> <p>Earlier this year I received an email that read:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/ukmw08-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 event report mia ridge bbc ibm library of congress massachusetts institute of technology museum of london oai university of leicester europeana freebase romeo wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives blog cataloguing copyright csv data data set data visualisation database digital library digital media digitisation exif file format flickr foi framework geospatial data gis ict infrastructure metadata ontologies rdf rdfa repositories research resource description rss search technology semantic web standardisation syndication twitter video visualisation vocabularies web 2.0 web services xml Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1415 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk