Overview of content related to 'digital archive' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/2669/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataFinder: A Research Data Catalogue for Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> and <a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author2">Neil Jefferies</a> explain the context and the decisions guiding the development of DataFinder, a data catalogue for the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2012 the University of Oxford Research Committee endorsed a university ‘Policy on the management of research data and records’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Much of the infrastructure to support this policy is being developed under the Jisc-funded Damaro Project [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The nascent services that underpin the University’s RDM (research data management) infrastructure have been divided into four themes:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article neil jefferies sally rumsey bodleian libraries datacite jisc orcid uk data archive university of oxford dmponline impact project aggregation algorithm api archives cataloguing controlled vocabularies curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital archive digital library eprints fedora commons identifier infrastructure jacs linked data metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative passwords preservation purl rdf repositories research research information management schema search technology semantic web software solr standards uri url vocabularies wireframe xml Thu, 13 Jun 2013 20:23:22 +0000 lisrw 2446 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECLAP 2013: Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eclap-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the second international conference held by ECLAP, the e-library for performing arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The beautiful city of Porto was the host location for ECLAP 2013 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the 2nd International Conference on Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment. &nbsp;Porto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon and home of the Instituto Politécnico do Porto (IPP), the largest polytechnic in the country, with over 18,500 students.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marieke guy bbc coventry university dcc microsoft oais ukoln university of leeds university of lisbon w3c europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons data data management digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dublin core dvd ebook epub foaf framework geospatial data haptics higher education ict internet explorer interoperability knowledge base lod metadata multimedia ontologies open data owl preservation rdf remote working repositories research schema social networks software standards streaming usability video vocabularies Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:46:57 +0000 lisrw 2471 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Powering Search - The Role of Thesauri in New Information Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/will-rvw#author1">Leonard Will</a> reviews a comprehensive survey of the literature on the use of thesauri in information search processes and interfaces.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Powering Search</em> is a comprehensive review and synthesis of work that has been done over the past 50 years on the use of thesauri to make searching for information more effective. The book does not discuss the principles and practice of construction of information retrieval thesauri in any detail, but concentrates on the search process and on the user interface through which a searcher interacts with a body of information resources. It is written clearly: each chapter begins and ends with a summary of its content, and the first and last chapters summarise the whole book. There are copious references throughout and a full index.</p> <p>As the author says in his conclusion:</p> <blockquote><p>'This book has taken a new approach to thesauri by critiquing the relevant literatures of a variety of communities who share an interest in thesauri and their functions but who are not, it should be noted, closely collaborating at this time – research communities such as library and information science, information retrieval, knowledge organization, human-computer interaction, information architecture, information search behavior, usability studies, search user interface, metadata-enabled information access, interactive information retrieval, and searcher education.'</p> </blockquote> <p>One consequence of these disparate approaches is that terminology varies across communities: there are many interpretations of the meaning of <em>facet, category, keyword </em>or<em> taxonomy</em>, for example, which the author acknowledges, but he then uses these terms without saying precisely what definition he gives them.</p> <h2 id="Information_Search_Processes">Information Search Processes</h2> <p>Chapters 2 and 3 review studies on how people go about searching for information, leading to the perhaps self-evident conclusion that there are two types of approach. If a specific and well-defined piece of information is sought, people will amend and refine their queries in the light of initial results to get closer to what they seek. On the other hand, if the search requirement is less well defined, a browsing or 'berrypicking' approach is adopted to explore a subject area, picking up and assembling pieces of information and changing the destination as the exploration progresses. Both these approaches use an iterative procedure, within which a thesaurus can serve to make a search more precise, in the first case, or to show the broader context, in the second.</p> <p>Chapter 4 deals with thesauri in Web-based search systems, and gives several examples of thesauri in digital libraries, subject gateways and portals, digital archives and linked data repositories. This is one way of grouping these examples, but it is not clear that there is any distinction in principle between the way thesauri can be used in each of them, or indeed in search interfaces to other types of document collections. The main distinction, which is not fully addressed, is whether the information resources being searched have been indexed with terms from the thesaurus being used, or whether the thesaurus is just a source of possible terms for searching the text, and possibly the metadata, of documents. More weight needs to be given to the statement in the introduction to ISO 25964 -1:</p> <blockquote><p>'If both the indexer and the searcher are guided to choose the same term for the same concept, then relevant documents will be retrieved. This is the main principle underlying thesaurus design ...'</p> </blockquote> <p>In fact the book generally talks about <em>terms</em> rather than the approach taken by the current standards of considering unambiguously defined <em>concepts</em>, with terms just serving as convenient labels for these. Each concept may have many labels by which it can be retrieved, including one chosen as <em>preferred</em> for each language covered by the thesaurus.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review leonard will ansi cilip iso niso willpower information accessibility controlled vocabularies dewey decimal digital archive digital library graphics information architecture information retrieval interoperability lcsh linked data metadata repositories research search technology standards taxonomy thesaurus url usability visualisation vocabularies Wed, 26 Jun 2013 18:00:00 +0000 lisrw 2451 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hydra UK: Flexible Repository Solutions to Meet Varied Needs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the Hydra UK event held on 22 November 2012 at the Library of the London School of Economics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hydra, as described in the opening presentation of this event, is a project initiated in 2008 by the University of Hull, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and DuraSpace to work towards a reusable framework for multi-purpose, multi-functional, multi-institutional repository-enabled solutions for the management of digital content collections [<a href="#1">1</a>]. An initial timeframe for the project of three years had seen all founding institutional partners successfully implement a repository demonstrating these characteristics.&nbsp; Key to the aims of the project has always been to generate wider interest outside the partners to foster not only sustainability in the technology, but also sustainability of the community around this open source development.&nbsp; Hydra has been disseminated through a range of events, particularly through the international Open Repositories conferences [<a href="#2">2</a>], but the sphere of interest in Hydra has now stimulated the holding of specific events in different countries: Hydra UK is one of them.</p> <p>The Hydra UK event was held on 22 November 2012, kindly hosted by the Library at the London School of Economics.&nbsp; Representatives from institutions across the UK, but also Ireland, Austria and Switzerland, came together to learn about the Hydra Project, and to discuss how Hydra might serve their digital content collection management needs.&nbsp; 29 delegates from 21 institutions were present, representing mostly universities but also the archive, museum and commercial sectors.&nbsp; Five presentations were given on Hydra, focusing on the practical experience of using this framework and how it fits into overall system architectures, and time was also deliberately given over to discussion of more specific topics of interest and to allow delegates the opportunity to voice their requirements.&nbsp; The presentations were:</p> <ul> <li>Introduction to Hydra</li> <li>Hydra @ Hull</li> <li>Hydra @ Glasgow Caledonian University</li> <li>Hydra @ LSE</li> <li>Hydra @ Oxford</li> </ul> <h2 id="Introduction_to_Hydra">Introduction to Hydra</h2> <p>Chris Awre from the University of Hull gave the opening presentation.&nbsp; The starting basis for Hydra was mutual recognition by all the founding partners that a repository should be an enabler for managing digital content collections, not a constraint or simply a silo of content.&nbsp; Digital repositories have been put forward and applied as a potential solution for a variety of use cases over the years, and been used at different stages of a content lifecycle.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure1-hydra-rpt-lse-library.jpg" style="width: 178px; height: 178px;" title="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: LSE Library</strong><br /><small>(Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)</small></p> <p>To avoid producing a landscape of multiple repositories all having to be managed to cover these use cases, the Hydra Project sought to identify a way in which one repository solution could be applied flexibly to meet the requirements of different use cases. The idea of a single repository with multiple points of interaction came into being – Hydra – and the concept of individual Hydra ‘head’ solutions.</p> <p>The Hydra Project is informed by two main principles:</p> <ul> <li>No single system can provide the full range of repository-based solutions for a given institution’s needs,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet sustainable solutions require a common repository infrastructure.</li> <li>No single institution can resource the development of a full range of solutions on its own,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet each needs the flexibility to tailor solutions to local demands and workflows.</li> </ul> <p>The Hydra Project has sought to provide the common infrastructure upon which flexible solutions can be built, and shared.</p> <p>The recognition that no single institution can achieve everything it might want for its repository has influenced the project from the start. &nbsp;To quote an African proverb, ‘If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far, go together’. Working together has been vital.&nbsp; To organise this interaction, Hydra has structured itself through three interleaving sub-communities, the Steering Group, the Partners and Developers, as shown by Figure 2.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/hydra-community-structure-v4.jpg" style="width: 661px; height: 506px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><p>The concept of a Hydra Partner has emerged from this model of actively working together, and the project has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) process for any institution wishing to have its use of, and contribution and commitment to Hydra recognised.&nbsp; Starting with the original four partners in 2008, Hydra now has 11 partners, with two more in the process of joining.&nbsp; All have made valuable contributions and helped to make Hydra better.&nbsp; Hydra partnership is not the only route to involvement, though, and there are many in the Hydra developer community who are adopters of the software, but who have not reached a stage where partnership is appropriate.</p> <p>The technical implementation of Hydra was supported through early involvement in the project by MediaShelf, a commercial technical consultancy focused on repository solutions.&nbsp; All Hydra software is, though, open source, available under the Apache 2.0 licence, and all software code contributions are managed in this way.&nbsp; The technical implementation is based on a set of core principles that describe how content objects should be structured within the repository, and with an understanding that different content types can be managed using different workflows.&nbsp; Following these principles, Hydra could be implemented in a variety of ways: the technical direction taken by the project is simply the one that suited the partners at the time.</p> <p>Hydra as currently implemented is built on existing open source components, and the project partners are committed to supporting these over time:</p> <ul> <li>Fedora: one of the digital repository systems maintained through DuraSpace [<a href="#3">3</a>]</li> <li>Apache Solr: powerful indexing software now being used in a variety of discovery solutions [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Blacklight: a next-generation discovery interface, which has its own community around it [<a href="#5">5</a>]</li> <li>Hydra plugin: a collection of components that facilitate workflow in managing digital content [<a href="#6">6</a>]</li> <li>Solrizer: a component that indexes Fedora-held content into a Solr index</li> </ul> <p>These components are arranged in the architecture shown in Figure 3.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure3-hydra-architecture-v4.jpg" style="width: 543px; height: 258px;" title="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 3: Hydra architecture</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><p>A common feature of the last three components in the list above is the use of Ruby on Rails as the coding language and its ability to package up functionality in discrete ‘gems’.&nbsp; This was consciously chosen for Hydra because of its agile programming capabilities, its use of the MVC (Model–View–Controller) structure, and its testing infrastructure.&nbsp; The choice has been validated on a number of occasions as Hydra has developed.&nbsp; However, it was noted that other coding languages and systems could be used to implement Hydra where appropriate.&nbsp; This applies to all the main components, even Fedora.&nbsp; Whilst a powerful and flexible repository solution in its own right, Fedora has proved to be complex to use: Hydra has sought in part to tap this capability through simpler interfaces and interactions.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report chris awre bbc bodleian libraries california digital library duraspace glasgow caledonian university jisc london school of economics sakai stanford university university of hull university of oxford university of virginia hydra jisc information environment remap project apache api archives authentication cataloguing content management data data management data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination eprints fedora commons framework google maps infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata multimedia open source preservation repositories research ruby search technology sharepoint software solr streaming video vle Thu, 13 Dec 2012 19:24:07 +0000 lisrw 2411 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL) 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt#author1">Anna Mastora</a> and <a href="/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt#author2">Sarantos Kapidakis</a> report on TPDL 2012 held at Paphos, Cyprus, over 23-27 September 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 16<sup>th</sup> International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL) 2012 [<a href="#1">1</a>] was another successful event in the series of ECDL/TPDL conferences which has been the leading European scientific forum on digital libraries for 15 years. Across these years, the conference has brought together researchers, developers, content providers and users in the field of digital libraries by addressing issues in the area where theoretical and applied research meet, such as digital library models, architectures, functionality, users, and quality.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report anna mastora sarantos kapidakis city university london cni coalition for networked information google ionian university iso massachusetts institute of technology microsoft national technical university of athens open university princeton university the national archives university of cyprus university of malta university of strathclyde europeana archives blog data data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination facebook frbr graphics information retrieval interoperability linked data metadata multimedia natural language processing ontologies preservation research resource discovery search technology semantic web skos software standards thesaurus twitter visualisation Sun, 16 Dec 2012 13:44:54 +0000 lisrw 2432 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 65: Ariadne in Search of Your Views http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 65.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>You may have already noted in the editorial section of this issue a link to the Reader Survey which I ask you seriously to consider completing, whether you are a frequent <em>Ariadne</em> reader or are reading the Magazine for the first time. Moves are afoot to give <em>Ariadne</em> some effort towards improvements in your experience of the publication and I cannot emphasise enough the value I place on suggestions and comments from you. I am very keen to know what readers value and dislike in <em>Ariadne</em>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 editorial richard waller dcc google griffith university jisc queensland university of technology university of oregon university of oxford wellcome trust devcsi eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih aggregation ajax archives browser curation data data management data set database digital archive droid e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis google maps higher education ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service interoperability ipad javascript metadata mobile multimedia ontologies open source preservation provenance repositories research resource description and access schema search technology software tagging taxonomy uri visualisation web 2.0 web portal xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1647 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trust Me, I'm an Archivist http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/hilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author1">Christopher Hilton</a>, <a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author2">Dave Thompson</a> and <a href="/issue65/hilton-et-al#author3">Natalie Walters</a> describe some of the issues of engaging with donors when it comes to transferring born-digital material to the Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!--v2: to reflect final author edits : 2010-11-18-21-54 rew --><!--v2: to reflect final author edits : 2010-11-18-21-54 rew --><p>Born-digital archival material represents the single most important challenge to the archival profession for a generation or more. It requires us to rethink issues and assumptions around acquisition, preservation, cataloguing and reader access. Not least is the problem of getting donors to transfer their born-digital material to us. We have encountered four common scenarios that seem to act as blocks to the transfer of such material. We also need to change the way we engage with donors. This is a challenge that we cannot duck unless we wish to condemn our collection to increasing irrelevance.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem?</h2> <p>Managing born-digital material is difficult. We all have trouble finding, storing and managing the data we create. Yet we have an attachment to this transient and ephemeral stuff that we find hard to relinquish. We seem to have a stronger emotional attachment to digital material than we did with paper. Thus, donors who have happily donated paper archival materials to the Library struggle with the challenges of donating born-digital material, challenges that are not always technical.</p> <h2 id="The_Current_State_of_Play">The Current State of Play</h2> <p>Two previous articles in <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] have reported on the Wellcome Library's engagement with born-digital material: for readers who have not seen these it is appropriate to begin by recapitulating the themes established there.</p> <p>The Wellcome Library is a collecting institution and the majority of its archival holdings are acquired from outside bodies or individuals by purchase, deposit or gift. The Library has no mandate to require an organisation or individual to lodge their records in the Library, and little influence over their use of particular formats or technologies. Conversely the Library is not required to take in any given material. The archivists have the freedom to decide what material to accept or if a particular format is too problematic to acquire when set against the material's informational value.</p> <p>The Library's work with digital material is based on two central principles:</p> <ol> <li>That sound archival practice is wholly appropriate to working with born-digital materials.</li> <li>That if the Library does not acquire born-digital archival material then its future relevance as a research Library is compromised.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/hilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article christopher hilton dave thompson natalie walters wellcome library archives blog born digital cataloguing data digital archive digital curation preservation provenance research software standards Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1586 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Software Comparison: Building Digital Library Infrastructure at LSE http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/fay#author1">Ed Fay</a> presents a comparison of repository software that was carried out at LSE in support of digital library infrastructure development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article ed fay british library d-lib magazine london school of economics oai oais university of york wellcome library safir access control aggregation api archives authentication authentication service blog cataloguing content management data data management data model database digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure institutional repository ldap library management systems linked data metadata mobile multimedia national library open access open source persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata repositories research schema search technology shibboleth software standards twitter uri video vle web app xacml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1560 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 63: Consider the Users in the Field http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 63.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those who can either remember or are battling still to make the technology work, be it coding, integration or test, it is easy and understandable enough if the technology assumes an overwhelming profile on the horizon of one's project and daily work. It is very understandable when they privately grumble that colleagues unburdened with the minutiae of such work display a breath-taking insouciance to the consequences of asking for a change in spec because there has been an unexpected development in the requirements of the users.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 editorial richard waller apple eifl intute iso jisc michigan state university mimas wellcome library archives hub identity management toolkit identity project mobile internet detective ux2.0 aggregation archives blog born digital data digital archive digital identity digital library digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier interoperability ipad mashup metadata mis mobile national library podcast repositories research search technology software standards ukad usability video web 2.0 youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1539 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Balancing Stakeholder Needs: Archive 2.0 As Community-centred Design http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/ridolfo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author1">Jim Ridolfo</a>, <a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author2">William Hart-Davidson</a> and <a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author3">Michael McLeod</a> present a case example on building a digital archive with cultural and scholarly stakeholder groups - to provide a model for balancing stakeholder needs.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5. 2010-05-25 revised to accommodate improved images figs 1 & 2 REW --><!-- v5. 2010-05-25 revised to accommodate improved images figs 1 & 2 REW --><p>Archive 2.0 is relatively new concept for us, one that we have only worked with since 2007 and the beginning of our Samaritan Digital Archive Project at Michigan State University (MSU). Our project started with the intention of building a digital archive; the Archive 2.0 nature of the project surfaced when we realised that in order to build a useful archive, we would need to engage multiple stakeholder communities. In our project this meant working with the cultural stakeholders, the Samaritans, as well as academic stakeholders, including Samaritan and Biblical scholars. Initially we thought that applying Web 2.0 technologies such as social networking, image tagging, etc, to a digital archive would be our most important contribution to the project. As the project unfolded and we identified stakeholder needs more precisely however, we realised that our role was as much about balancing stakeholders' representational needs as much as it was about the application of Web 2.0 technologies.</p> <p>The project began in December of 2007 when Writing in Digital Environments (WIDE) Research Center [<a href="#1">1</a>] Research Assistant Jim Ridolfo was browsing the digital MSU Special Collections catalogue, and discovered the library index for the MSU Chamberlain-Warren collection of Samaritan texts. While investigating the history of the collection, Ridolfo learnt that in 2003 a Samaritan elder had travelled to MSU and had spoken to the Board of Trustees. The elder, Binyamim Tsedaka, had 'encouraged the university to utilise the collection to promote Samaritan studies.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] On learning of Tsedaka's speech, Ridolfo e-mailed Tsedaka and enquired about the community's possible interest in collaborating on a digitisation project. Tsedaka responded with his full blessing and an offer of collaboration [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Who_Are_the_Samaritans">Who Are the Samaritans?</h2> <p>The Samaritans have existed as a community for thousands of years. They are an ancient biblical people living primarily in Holon, Israel and Mt. Gerizim, West Bank. Their Torah is similar in content to that of Jewish people, but with several major theological differences. For example, the Samaritan Torah maintains that Mt. Gerizim rather than Jerusalem is holy. The Samaritan Pentateuch also contains thousands of textual differences from the Masoretic Hebrew text; consequently, their theological interpretations and practices differ from common Jewish interpretations and traditions. In addition, the script of the Samaritan Torah is written in Samaritan Hebrew, which includes a unique script, pronunciation scheme, and grammar. Starting at a very early age, all Samaritan children learn to read, write, and chant in Samaritan Hebrew.</p> <p>The Samaritan community includes 712 members, with approximately half the population living in Holon, Israel, and the other half living in the Mt. Gerizim village of Kiryat Luza. The community in Holon speaks Modern Hebrew as a first language, while the community in Kiryat Luza speaks Palestinian Arabic as a first language. The Samaritans living in Kiryat Luza maintain a delicate relationship with the Israeli government and the Palestinian Authority. Being few in number and vulnerable to larger political trends, they seek a peaceful relationship with both authorities. For example, the residents of Kiryat Luza possess both Palestinian Authority and Israeli passports, vote in both elections, and work, travel, and study on both sides of the Green Line. Since the Samaritans of Holon and Kiryat Luza commemorate all festivals, holidays, and life cycle celebrations together on Mt. Gerizim, they are very keen to maintain contact between both communities [<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/ridolfo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article jim ridolfo michael mcleod william hart-davidson michigan state university university of cincinnati archives cataloguing database digital archive digitisation facebook framework metadata mysql php portal research software tagging usability web 2.0 web portal Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1544 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Planning the Future of the National Library of Mongolia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/segbertElbert-fuegi <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/segbertElbert-fuegi#author1">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> and <a href="/issue63/segbertElbert-fuegi#author2">David Fuegi</a> describe the National Library of Mongolia's plans to modernise its infrastructure and services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In November 2008, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded a grant to Stichting eIFL.net to help the National Library of Mongolia (NLM) create a strategic plan in the course of 2009.</p> <p><a href="http://www.eifl.net/">eIFL.net</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an international not-for-profit organisation with a base in Europe and a global network of partners. It works with libraries around the world to enable sustainable access to high-quality digital information for people in developing and transition countries [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Founded in 1999, eIFL.net began by advocating for affordable access to commercial e-journals for academic and research libraries in Central and Eastern Europe. Today, eIFL.net partners with libraries and library consortia in over 45 developing and transition countries in Africa, Asia and Europe. Its work has also expanded to include other programmes designed to increase access to knowledge. eIFL.net's approach is to partner with libraries organised in national library consortia - groups of libraries that share common goals - thereby effectively reaching millions of people. Library consortia can speak with one voice to stakeholders and policy makers, and share resources and activities in order to serve their communities.</p> <p>Mongolia is a huge land-locked country bordering Russia and China. Its 3 million inhabitants are somewhat isolated geographically and linguistically and by comparative poverty. English is not much used and the National Library of Mongolia is little known in the West. Even its links with China and Russia are not strong though many of its senior staff were trained in the former Soviet Union.</p> <p>The circumstances creating the opportunity for the National Library of Mongolia to raise its profile and potentially transform the library scene in Mongolia depended on two main events: the decision of the Emir of Kuwait announced late in 2007 to gift a new national library building to Mongolia [<a href="#3">3</a>]; and the development of the eIFL-supported Consortium of Mongolian Libraries in Mongolia [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The former raised the profile of the Library in government and necessitated a focus on planning. The latter helped provide a professional forum in which issues could be examined and library stakeholders consulted.</p> <p>The National Library of Mongolia, also known as the State Central Library, is the largest library in Mongolia with more than 3 million books and publications, and an outstanding collection of 1 million rare and valuable [mainly religious] books and manuscripts. Potentially one of its most important roles is to act as the 'methodological centre' for professional in-service training for public librarians in Mongolia. The national library has been connected to the Internet since 2001 and is also a key member of the recently founded Consortium of Mongolian Libraries that aims to expand access to electronic resources for academics and researchers, students and citizens.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/segbertElbert-fuegi" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article david fuegi monika elbert andrew w mellon foundation eifl library association archives copyright database digital archive digital library ejournal framework geospatial data gis ict infrastructure intellectual property national library research search technology software standards Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1545 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Towards Interoperability: Experiences of the Archives Hub http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/stevenson-ruddock <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/stevenson-ruddock#author1">Jane Stevenson</a> and <a href="/issue63/stevenson-ruddock#author2">Bethan Ruddock</a> describe the work that the Archives Hub team has been doing to promote the sharing of content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/stevenson-ruddock" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article bethan ruddock jane stevenson courtauld institute of art jisc mimas university of london university of manchester archives hub dealing with data aggregation archives cataloguing data database digital archive ead interoperability portal repositories research resource discovery search technology software standards thesaurus ukad usability xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1546 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Pragmatic Approach to Preferred File Formats for Acquisition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/thompson#author1">Dave Thompson</a> sets out the pragmatic approach to preferred file formats for long-term preservation used at the Wellcome Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article sets out the Wellcome Library's decision not explicitly to specify preferred file formats for long-term preservation. It discusses a pragmatic approach in which technical appraisal of the material is used to assess the Library's likelihood of preserving one format over another. The Library takes as its starting point work done by the Florida Digital Archive in setting a level of 'confidence' in its preferred formats. The Library's approach provides for nine principles to consider as part of appraisal. These principles balance economically sustainable preservation and intellectual 'value' with the practicalities of working with specific, and especially proprietary, file formats. Scenarios are used to show the application of principles (see <a href="#annex">Annex</a> below).</p> <p>This article will take a technical perspective when assessing material for acquisition by the Library. In reality technical factors are only part of the assessment of material for inclusion in the Library's collections. Other factors such as intellectual content, significance of the material, significance of the donor/creator and any relationship to material already in the Library also play a part. On this basis, the article considers 'original' formats accepted for long-term preservation, and does not consider formats appropriate for dissemination.</p> <p>This reflects the Library's overall approach to working with born digital archival material. Born digital material is treated similarly to other, analogue archival materials. The Library expects archivists to apply their professional skills regardless of the format of any material, to make choices and decisions about material based on a range of factors and not to see the technical issues surrounding born digital archival material as in any way limiting.</p> <h2 id="Why_Worry_about_Formats">Why Worry about Formats?</h2> <p>Institutions looking to preserve born digital material permanently, the Wellcome Library included, may have little control over the formats in which material is transferred or deposited. The ideal intervention point from a preservation perspective is at the point digital material is first created. However this may be unrealistic. Many working within organisations have no choice in the applications they use, cost of applications may be an issue, or there may simply be a limited number of applications available on which to perform specialist tasks. Material donated after an individual retires or dies can prove especially problematic. It may be obsolete, in obscure formats, on obsolete media and without any metadata describing its context, creation or rendering environment.</p> <p>Computer applications 'save' their data in formats, each application typically having its own file format. The Web site filext [<a href="#1">1</a>] lists some 25,000 file extensions in its database.</p> <p>The long-term preservation of any format depends on the type of format, issues of obsolescence, and availability of hardware and/or software, resources, experience and expertise. Any archive looking to preserve born digital archival material needs to have the means and confidence to move material across the 'gap' that exists between material 'in the wild' and holding it securely in an archive.</p> <p>This presents a number of problems: first, in the proliferation of file formats; second, in the use of proprietary file formats, and third, in formats becoming obsolete, either by being incompatible with later versions of the applications that created them, or by those applications no longer existing. This assumes that proprietary formats are more problematic to preserve as their structure and composition are not known, which hinders preservation intervention by imposing the necessity for specialist expertise. Moreover, as new software is created, so new file formats proliferate, and consequently exacerbate the problem.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article dave thompson microsoft mpeg wellcome library aggregation archives born digital cd-rom data database digital archive digital preservation dissemination drm file format framework internet explorer jpeg jpeg 2000 metadata microsoft office open source openoffice preservation provenance real audio repositories software standards tiff usb video xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1547 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Fourth DCC-RIN Research Data Management Forum http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rdmf4-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/rdmf4-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> and <a href="/issue63/rdmf4-rpt#author2">Graham Pryor</a> report on the fourth Research Data Management Forum event, on the theme "Dealing with Sensitive Data: Managing Ethics, Security and Trust," organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) and Research Information Network (RIN) in Manchester, England, over 10 - 11 March, 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The fourth meeting of the Research Data Management Forum was held in Manchester on 10 and 11 March 2010, co-sponsored by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and the Research Information Network (RIN) [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The event took <em>Dealing with Sensitive Data: Managing Ethics, Security and Trust</em> as its theme [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Day_1:_10_March_2010">Day 1: 10 March 2010</h2> <p>DCC Associate Director <strong>Liz Lyon</strong> and RIN Head of Programmes <strong>Stéphane Goldstein </strong>welcomed the 45 delegates to the event, and began by introducing the keynote speaker, <strong>Iain Buchan</strong>, Professor of Public Health Informatics and Director of the Northwest Institute for Bio-Health Informatics (NIBHI), University of Manchester.</p> <p>Iain's talk was entitled <em>Opening Bio-Health Data and Models Securely and Effectively for Public Benefit</em>, and addressed three main questions:</p> <ol> <li>Where does the public's health need digital innovation?</li> <li>How can research curators promote this innovation (and what are the implications for Ethics, Security and Trust)?</li> <li>Is a framework required (covering the Social Contract and a digital and operational infrastructure)?</li> </ol> <p>A major theme in contemporary healthcare is that of <em>prevention</em>, and the need for proactive 'citizen buy-in' in order to avert NHS bankruptcy, a need supported by the use of 'persuasive technologies.' There is, however, a disconnect between the proactive public health model, and the reactive clinical model, and between expectations and available resource. 'Digital bridges', composed of new information technologies, are used to close the gaps between primary and secondary care, and to link disease-specific pathways.</p> <p>Iain touched on the impact that the data deluge is having on healthcare, reflecting that knowledge can no longer be managed solely by reading scholarly papers: the datasets and structures now extend far beyond any single study's observations. It is now necessary to build data-centred models, and to interrogate them for clusters via dedicated algorithms.</p> <p>However, there are holes in the datasets – for example, clinical trials exclude women of childbearing age and subjects undergoing certain treatments – hence electronic health records must be mined in order to fill these gaps, but this can be problematised by a lack of useful metadata, leading to 'healthcare data tombs,' repositories of health records lacking the contextual information to make them useful. Such data resources may be worse than useless: they may be misinformation.</p> <p>Comprehensible social networks with user-friendly interfaces can be used to improve the quality of metadata, based on the principle that more frequent use leads to better quality information. These networks can also bridge the Balkanisation that can occur when different groups tackle the same issue from varying standpoints (e.g. examining obesity from dietary- and exercise-based perspectives, but not sharing data across these boundaries.) The vision is for a joint, open, unifying and interdisciplinary framework and understanding wherein resources and expertise are shared. Of course, crossing these divides is accompanied by a raft of trust and security issues, and Iain described the various measures that are implemented to cope with them.</p> <p>Iain discussed the ethical issues surrounding wider use of health record information across the NHS, including consent (opt-in versus opt-out), the right (or lack thereof) of an investigator to go to a patient directly, and – perhaps most controversially – whether it was actually <em>unethical </em>to allow a health dataset to go under-exploited. If this is indeed the case, it follows that there is a real need to audit the demonstrable good that is derived from datasets.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/rdmf4-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report graham pryor martin donnelly bbc dcc jisc nhs research information network the national archives uk data archive university of bristol university of edinburgh university of london university of manchester algorithm archives curation data data management data set digital archive digital curation foi framework higher education infrastructure licence metadata preservation repositories research social networks standards ulcc Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1551 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Targets: Web Preservation and Reference Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/davis <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/davis#author1">Richard Davis</a> discusses the role of Web preservation in reference management. This article is based on a presentation given at the Innovations in Reference Management workshop, January 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3: amended in light of author's further final-read revisions 2010-02-12-11-11 rew --><!-- v3: amended in light of author's further final-read revisions 2010-02-12-11-11 rew --><p>It seems fair to say that the lion's share of work on developing online tools for reference and citation management by students and researchers has focused on familiar types of publication. They generally comprise resources that can be neatly and discretely bound in the covers of a book or journal, or their electronic analogues, like the Portable Document Format (PDF): objects in established library or database systems, with ISBNs and ISSNs underwritten by the authority of formal publication and legal deposit.</p> <p>Yet, increasingly, native Web resources are also becoming eminently citable, and managing both the resources, and references to them, is an ongoing challenge. Moreover, the issues associated with referencing this kind of material have received comparatively little attention, beyond introducing the convention that includes the URL and the date it was accessed in bibliographies. While it may be hard to quantify the "average lifespan of a web page" [<a href="#1">1</a>], what is undeniable is that Web resources are highly volatile and prone to deletion or amendment without warning.</p> <p>Web Preservation is one field of endeavour which attempts to counter the Web's transient tendency, and a variety of approaches continue to be explored. The aim of this article is to convey the fairly simple message that many themes and concerns of Web preservation are equally relevant in the quest for effective reference management in academic research, particularly given the rate at which our dependence on Web-delivered resources is growing.</p> <p>Digital preservation is, naturally, a strong theme in the work of the University of London Computer Centre (ULCC)'s Digital Archives Department, and Web preservation has featured particularly strongly in recent years. This article will draw upon several initiatives with which we have been involved recently. These include: the 2008 JISC Preservation of Web Resources Project (JISC-PoWR) [<a href="#2">2</a>], on which we worked with Brian Kelly and Marieke Guy of UKOLN; our work for the UK Web Archiving Consortium; and the ongoing JISC ArchivePress Project [<a href="#3">3</a>] (itself, in many ways, a sequel to JISC-PoWR).</p> <p>Another perspective that I bring is as a part-time student myself, on the MSc E-Learning programme at Edinburgh University. As a consequence I have papers to read, and write, and a dissertation imminent. So for this reason too I have a stake in making it easier to keep track of information for reading lists, footnotes and bibliographies, whether with desktop tools or Web-based tools, or through features in online VLEs, databases and repositories.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/davis" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article richard davis british library dcc digital preservation coalition google intute jisc leiden university the national archives ukoln university of edinburgh university of london wellcome trust internet archive jisc information environment powr wikipedia archives atom blog browser cache content management cool uri copyright data database digital archive digital curation digital preservation document format e-learning framework higher education identifier metadata open access open source preservation repositories research rss standards ulcc uri url wayback machine web 2.0 web app web resources web standards wiki wordpress Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1523 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Digital Preservation Roadshow 2009-10: The Incomplete Diaries of Optimistic Travellers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/dp-rdshw-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/dp-rdshw-rpt#author1">William Kilbride</a> and <a href="/issue62/dp-rdshw-rpt#author2">Malcolm Todd</a> report on the Digital Preservation Roadshow - an eleven month tour of the UK and Ireland designed to provide archivists and record managers with practical advice and support in managing digital resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/dp-rdshw-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report malcolm todd william kilbride aberystwyth university cymal digital preservation coalition jisc library of congress mla national library of wales oasis the national archives ukoln university college dublin university of glasgow university of hull university of york wellcome library wellcome trust west yorkshire archive service archives born digital curation data data management digital archive digital audio digital preservation digital repositories digitisation droid higher education institutional repository metadata national library podcast preservation repositories research vocabularies Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1533 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Why Are Users So Useful? User Engagement and the Experience of the JISC Digitisation Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/marchionni#author1">Paola Marchionni</a> discusses the importance of user engagement in the creation of digitised scholarly resources with case studies from the JISC Digitisation Programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do we know enough about what our users' needs are when creating online digitised scholarly resources? What are the benefits of engaging users? In what way can they be useful to the process?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article paola marchionni british library google jisc oxford internet institute university college london university of oxford asr2 first world war poetry wikipedia archives blog cataloguing content management data digital archive digitisation dissemination facebook flickr google search higher education ict identifier itunes metadata multimedia podcast research search technology twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1512 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The RSP Goes 'Back to School' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/strsp-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/strsp-rpt#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> reports on the three-day residential school for repository managers run by the Repositories Support Project (RSP), held on 14-16 September 2009 in Northumberland.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I recently attended the Back to School event [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project (RSP)[<a href="#2">2</a>] at Matfen Hall [<a href="#3">3</a>], Northumberland, where I gave a workshop on metadata and also attended the second and third days of the event as a delegate. I was sorry not to be able to attend the sessions on the first day, but arrived in time for dinner so was able to meet the delegates and other presenters.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/strsp-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 event report stephanie taylor bbc british library google jisc jisc collections kings college london open university sherpa ukoln university of bath university of east anglia university of edinburgh university of nottingham university of sunderland eris r4r recruitment toolkit repositories support project rsp wrn application profile archives avi cataloguing cerif content provider copyright data database digital archive digital media digital preservation digital repositories digitisation ejournal framework higher education infrastructure interoperability metadata preservation rae repositories research schema scholarly works application profile tagging Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1516 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Archives 2.0: If We Build It, Will They Come? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/palmer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/palmer#author1">Joy Palmer</a> discusses some of the opportunities and tensions emerging around Archives 2.0, crowd-sourcing, and archival authority.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/palmer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article joy palmer amazon d-lib magazine jisc mimas oclc research information network the national archives university of manchester archives hub wikipedia archives blog cataloguing copac curation data digital archive digital library digitisation ead interoperability metadata preservation provenance research resource discovery search engine optimisation search technology social software software web 2.0 wiki Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1492 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Norwegian National Digital Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/takle <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/takle#author1">Marianne Takle</a> describes the National Library of Norway's digitisation strategy and how the National Library is taking on a key role in the country's digital library service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/takle" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article marianne takle alt google library association europeana archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright data digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination framework infrastructure licence metadata national library portal preservation privacy repositories research search technology web services Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk From Cultural Heritage to Digital Knowledge: Building Infrastructures for a Global Knowledge Society http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/ifla-3p-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/ifla-3p-rpt#author1">Astrid Recker</a> reports on the 3rd IFLA Presidential Meeting, held by the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) in Berlin over 19-20 February 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/ifla-3p-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 event report astrid recker ifla europeana aggregation archives bibliographic data cataloguing data digital archive digital library digitisation e-learning higher education ict information society infrastructure learning platforms metadata mobile moodle national library portal repositories research resource sharing search technology software standardisation Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1476 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Preserving Local Archival Heritage for Ongoing Accessibility http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/boyle-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue58/boyle-et-al#author1">Frances Boyle</a>, <a href="/issue58/boyle-et-al#author2">Alexandra Eveleigh</a> and <a href="/issue58/boyle-et-al#author3">Heather Needham</a> describe the recent digital preservation initiatives in the local authority archives sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Digital preservation is an area which is pervasive and challenging for many sectors – it impinges on the landscape from high-level business and e-government to an individual's personal digital memories. One sector where the challenges of preservation and long-term access to resources are well rehearsed is within the archives sector. There has been innovative research within the archives community including the Paradigm [<a href="#1">1</a>] and the DARP [<a href="#2">2</a>] projects.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/boyle-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue58 feature article alexandra eveleigh frances boyle heather needham british library digital preservation coalition the national archives west yorkshire archive service accessibility archives cataloguing curation digital archive digital curation digital preservation digital repositories digitisation droid e-government edrms framework higher education ict infrastructure jpeg metadata preservation repositories research software tiff Fri, 30 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1450 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digital Preservation Planning: Principles, Examples and the Future With Planets http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/dpc-planets-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/dpc-planets-rpt#author1">Frances Boyle</a> and <a href="/issue57/dpc-planets-rpt#author2">Jane Humphreys</a> report on the one-day workshop on digital preservation planning jointly organised by the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC) and Planets held at the British Library, on Tuesday 29 July 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- 9 November 2009 v2 editing --><!-- 9 November 2009 v2 editing --><p>The aim of this one-day event was to provide an informal, interactive workshop that allowed delegates to share knowledge and experience in digital preservation planning, strategy and policy setting and of Planets [<a href="#1">1</a>] tools and technology.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/dpc-planets-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 event report frances boyle jane humphreys british library digital preservation coalition iso oais uk data archive university of cologne university of glasgow wellcome library archives data data management digital archive digital curation digital preservation e-learning file format framework identifier jpeg metadata preservation research resource discovery software usability Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1438 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eResearch Australasia 2008 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/eresearch-australasia-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/eresearch-australasia-rpt#author1">Tobias Blanke</a>, <a href="/issue57/eresearch-australasia-rpt#author2">Ann Borda</a>, <a href="/issue57/eresearch-australasia-rpt#author3">Gaby Bright</a> and <a href="/issue57/eresearch-australasia-rpt#author4">Bridget Soulsby</a> report on the annual eResearch Australasia Conference, held in Melbourne, Australia, 29 September - 3 October, 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The following overview of eResearch Australasia 2008 by Ann Borda is intended to give a sense of the diversity of the programme and key themes of the Conference at a glance. A selection of workshops and themes are explored in more detail by fellow contributing authors in the sections below: Bridget Soulsby on the 'Data Deluge', Gaby Bright on 'Uptake of eResearch' and Tobias Blanke on 'Arts &amp; Humanities eResearch'.</p> <p>The full eResearch Australasia 08 programme and copies of the speaker presentations are now accessible on the Conference Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/eresearch-australasia-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 event report ann borda bridget soulsby gaby bright tobias blanke jisc johns hopkins university kings college london microsoft monash university queensland university of technology sakai university of melbourne university of queensland university of reading university of sydney ahessc versi archives bibliographic data browser cloud computing content management copyright creative commons curation data data management database digital archive digital library digitisation dissemination e-research e-science framework higher education identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability metadata open access open data plone portal preservation repositories research resource sharing restful schema semantic web shibboleth software standards video virtual research environment visualisation web 2.0 web services wireless Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1440 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk iPRES 2008 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/ipres-2008-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/ipres-2008-rpt#author1">Frances Boyle</a> and <a href="/issue57/ipres-2008-rpt#author2">Adam Farquhar</a> report on the two-day international conference which was the fifth in the series on digital preservation of digital objects held at the British Library, on 29 - 30 September 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/ipres-2008-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 event report adam farquhar frances boyle british library california digital library cornell university dcc digital preservation coalition indiana university jisc national library of australia national library of new zealand national library of the netherlands oais premis the national archives ukoln university of bath university of virginia crib digital preservation training programme jisc information environment jisc powr project life2 ndiipp powr accessibility aggregation archives blog cd-rom copyright curation data data management digital archive digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation ejournal file format framework frbr identifier infrastructure metadata mets mods national library open data preservation preservation metadata repositories research schema service oriented architecture software standards video warc web resources xml xml schema Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1441 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Preservation of Web Resources: Making a Start http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/jisc-powr-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/jisc-powr-rpt#author1">Stephen Emmott</a> reports on a one-day workshop aimed at all those interested in issues relating to institutional Web resource preservation. The event was held by the JISC-PoWR team at the University of London in June 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/jisc-powr-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 event report stephen emmott jisc london school of economics ukoln university of bath university of london university of manchester powr archives cataloguing copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation e-learning facebook foia graphics institutional repository intellectual property internet explorer operating system preservation repositories research software ulcc web 2.0 web development web resources web services wiki Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1417 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Sun Preservation and Archive Special Interest Group: May 2008 Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/pasig-2008-05-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/pasig-2008-05-rpt#author1">Vicky Mays</a> and <a href="/issue56/pasig-2008-05-rpt#author2">Ian Dolphin</a> review the Sun Preservation and Archiving Special Interest Group (PASIG) meeting held in San Francisco in May 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third meeting of Sun's Preservation and Archiving Special Interest Group took place in San Francisco in May. The event, the third PASIG meeting in the last year, drew around 180 participants from Australasia, Asia, Europe and North America to discuss a broad range of issues surrounding digital repositories. Presentations ranged from geographically or community-themed high-level perspectives of repository- related activity, through to detailed technical analysis and reports of development activity at an institutional or project level.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/pasig-2008-05-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 event report ian dolphin vicky mays amazon california digital library coalition for networked information google jisc national library of new zealand pasig portico stanford university sun microsystems university of hull university of oxford electronic ephemera adobe archives blog cloud computing curation data data management digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons flickr framework higher education identifier infrastructure learning objects mp3 national library open access open source preservation repositories research resource discovery software web 2.0 Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1418 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 55: Digital Lives, Digital Values http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 55.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As far back as a work reviewed in <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 41 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the notion of personal collections was not exactly novel, but as <strong>Pete Williams</strong>, <strong>Katrina Dean</strong>, <strong>Ian Rowlands</strong> and <strong>Jeremy Leighton John</strong> remark in <a href="/issue55/williams-et-al/">Digital Lives: Report of Interviews with the Creators of Personal Digital Collections</a> 'the inexorable march of technological innovation' has served to encourage people to amass increasingly large and diverse personal collections of information about themselves and t</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 editorial richard waller bbc dcc google ieee intute iso jisc oclc university of east anglia images application profile accessibility application profile archives authentication cataloguing curation data digital archive digital curation dublin core e-learning e-research facebook frbr ict ieee lom interoperability lom metadata open access repositories research search technology software web 2.0 web app web resources Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1383 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digital Lives: Report of Interviews With the Creators of Personal Digital Collections http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/williams-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/williams-et-al#author1">Pete Williams</a>, <a href="/issue55/williams-et-al#author2">Ian Rowlands</a>, <a href="/issue55/williams-et-al#author3">Katrina Dean</a> and <a href="/issue55/williams-et-al#author4">Jeremy Leighton John</a> describe initial findings of the AHRC-funded Digital Lives Research Project studying personal digital collections and their relationship with research repositories such as the British Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/williams-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 feature article ian rowlands jeremy leighton john katrina dean peter williams british library d-lib magazine google university college london university of bristol archives blog computer programming copyright data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination google analytics ict information retrieval intellectual property knowledge management mac os portfolio preservation privacy repositories research search technology software standards video Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Future-Proofing the Past: LAI Joint Conference 2008 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/lai-2008-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue55/lai-2008-rpt#author1">Siobhan Fitzpatrick</a> reports on the Annual Joint Conference of the Library Association of Ireland and Cilip IRELAND.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue55/lai-2008-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue55 event report siobhan fitzpatrick american library association cilip google ifla library association ordnance survey royal irish academy the national archives ukoln europeana aacr2 archives bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing data digital archive digital library digitisation dublin core internet explorer marc metadata multimedia national library portal research resource description and access search technology standards Tue, 29 Apr 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1394 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk We Do Not Know We Are Born (Digital) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 54.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In his article <a href="/issue54/civallero/">Ancient Cultures Inside Modern Universes</a> <strong>Edgardo Civallero</strong> teases out for us the relationship between notions such as cultural heritage, cultural identity and what he terms intangible cultural heritage, in the context of indigenous peoples.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 editorial richard waller bbc british library jisc mla wellcome library repomman archives born digital data digital archive digital repositories higher education ict identifier institutional repository network service ontologies open access repositories research search technology standards sword protocol tagging web 2.0 web resources web services Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1364 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Ancient Cultures Inside Modern Universes http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/civallero <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/civallero#author1">Edgardo Civallero</a> writes on preservation and dissemination of intangible South American indigenous heritage and updating information using Web-based tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Cultural_Heritage">Cultural Heritage</h2> <p><em>Heritage</em> can be defined as a heterogeneous ensemble of environmental and cultural elements - material or otherwise - that are transmitted from generation to generation, creating the foundations on which people build and orientate their identity and vision of the world. According to the definition reached during the UNESCO Experts´ Round Table in Turin (Italy, 2001), <em>heritage</em> includes:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/civallero" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article edgardo civallero amazon imperial college london stanford university university of oxford cree wikipedia archives blog database digital archive digital library digitisation dissemination ebook flickr framework ict infrastructure mis mp3 multimedia open access portal preservation repositories research standards taxonomy vocabularies wiki youtube Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1368 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 53: Unlocking Our Televisual Past http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 53.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Given <em>Ariadne</em>'s recent attempts to gather in contributions in the field of digital cultural heritage, which once upon a time would have found a home in <a href="http://www.cultivate-int.org/"><em>Cultivate Interactive</em></a>, I am particularly pleased, after some enquiries and kind offers of help along the way, to secure an article entitled <a href="/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras/">The Video Active Consortium: Europe's Television History Online</a> by<strong> Johan Ooman</strong> and <strong>Vassilis Tzouvaras</strong>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 editorial richard waller bbc google jisc university of cambridge wellcome library archives born digital data management digital archive digital repositories further education higher education infrastructure intellectual property interoperability open access podcast portal preservation repositories research search technology second life text mining video web 2.0 youtube Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1346 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Video Active Consortium: Europe's Television History Online http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras#author1">Johan Oomen</a> and <a href="/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras#author2">Vassilis Tzouvaras</a> provide an insight into the background and development of the Video Active Portal which offers access to television heritage material from leading archives across Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Europe's audiovisual heritage contains both a record and a representation of the past and as such it demonstrates the development of the 'audiovisual culture' we inhabit today. In this article we hope to offer an insight into the development of the Video Active Portal [<a href="#1">1</a>] which provides access broadcast heritage material retained by archives across Europe. We will explain how Video Active needed to find solutions for managing intellectual property rights, semantic and linguistic interoperability and the design of a meaningful user experience.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article johan oomen vassilis tzouvaras apple google iso mpeg national technical university of athens netherlands institute for sound and vision oai royal holloway university of london university of utrecht w3c api archives data data management database digital archive digital library digitisation dublin core dublin core metadata initiative dvd flash framework hypertext ict information architecture infrastructure intellectual property interoperability itunes java jena learning objects metadata multimedia mysql oai-pmh ontologies open archives initiative open source owl portal preservation rdf rdfs repositories research resource description schema search technology semantic web sesame sparql standardisation standards streaming thesaurus video vocabularies web app web services windows windows media xml xml schema youtube Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1348 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The DARE Chronicle: Open Access to Research Results and Teaching Material in the Netherlands http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/waaijers <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/waaijers#author1">Leo Waaijers</a> reflects on four years of progress and also looks ahead.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>While Cream of Science (Keur der Wetenschap), Promise of Science and the HBO Knowledge Bank (HBO Kennisbank) are among the inspiring results of the DARE Programme for the period 2003-06, what is more important in the long run is the new infrastructure that enables Dutch Higher Education and research institutions to provide easy and reliable open access to research results and teaching material as quickly as possible. Such open access ought to be the standard in a knowledge-driven society, certainly if the material and data have been generated with public funding.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/waaijers" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article leo waaijers d-lib magazine google jisc leiden university mpeg national library of the netherlands oai royal netherlands academy of arts and sciences sakai surffoundation university of utrecht digital academic repositories opendoar access control accessibility archives cataloguing copyright data database didl digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination doc dublin core framework higher education html ict identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability intranet knowledge base learning objects licence lucene metadata national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source portal preservation rae repositories research rss rtf search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Further Experiences in Collecting Born Digital Archives at the Wellcome Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/hilton-thompson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/hilton-thompson#author1">Chris Hilton</a> and <a href="/issue53/hilton-thompson#author2">Dave Thompson</a> continue discussing plans for the engagement with born digital archival material at the Wellcome Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/hilton-thompson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article chris hilton dave thompson wellcome library wellcome trust archives born digital data digital archive digital curation digitisation fedora commons framework infrastructure metadata preservation provenance repositories software Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1351 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The KIDMM Community's 'MetaKnowledge Mash-up' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kidmm-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/kidmm-rpt#author1">Conrad Taylor</a> reports on the KIDMM knowledge community and its September 2007 one-day conference about data, information and knowledge management issues.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="About_KIDMM">About KIDMM</h2> <p>The British Computer Society [<a href="#1">1</a>], which in 2007 celebrates 50 years of existence, has a self-image around engineering, software, and systems design and implementation. However, within the BCS there are over fifty Specialist Groups (SGs); among these, some have a major focus on 'informatics', or the <em>content</em> of information systems.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kidmm-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 event report conrad taylor anglia ruskin university bsi google library of congress nhs ordnance survey the national archives ukoln university of bolton university of london university of manchester wikipedia adobe algorithm archives ascii born digital browser cataloguing controlled vocabularies csv cybernetics data data management data mining data set database digital archive digital asset management dublin core e-government e-learning ead eportfolio foia framework geospatial data gis google maps identifier information retrieval information society interoperability location-based services metadata mis named entity recognition ontologies portfolio preservation provenance repositories research search technology sgml software standards tagging text mining thesaurus vocabularies wiki xml Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1358 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Access to Scientific Knowledge for Sustainable Development: Options for Developing Countries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/kirsop-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/kirsop-et-al#author1">Barbara Kirsop</a>, <a href="/issue52/kirsop-et-al#author2">Leslie Chan</a> and <a href="/issue52/kirsop-et-al#author3">Subbiah Arunachalam</a> consider the impact of donor access and open access to research publications on the sustainable development of science in developing countries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/kirsop-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article barbara kirsop leslie chan subbiah arunachalam eifl elsevier ept fao google jisc microsoft oai sherpa university of southampton wellcome trust agora romeo accessibility archives authentication data data mining database digital archive digital repositories document management e-science framework free software google scholar infrastructure intellectual property interoperability metadata mobile oai-pmh open access open archives initiative passwords repositories research search technology semantic web software standards tagging Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1327 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk