Overview of content related to 'google' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/101/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=julia%20robinson&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Book Review: The New Digital Scholar - Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/robinson-rvw#author1">Julia Robinson</a> reviews a substantial and timely collection of essays related to the research and writing practices of NextGen students. Expressing a call for change in the way educators approach Information Literacy teaching, this book invites the reader to redefine, re-evaluate and reflect on what we think we know about students’ research practices today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>McClure and Purdy bring together a mix of perspectives, from librarians and lecturers to professors and programmers, to give voice to the very timely concern in Information Literacy (IL) teaching, that we are not equipping our students for the future as we hoped. So-called NextGen students are engaging with information online in their personal, social and educational lives in ways that are shaping new approaches to and conceptions of research. At the same time, those teaching IL, whether librarians or writing instructors, are basing lesson plans and interventions on traditional pedagogies, arguably unfit for a research landscape so altered by the pace and change of information technologies. Students, IL instructors and academics occupy different spaces in the digital environment and work at cross-purposes. Traditional IL instruction has encouraged students to understand information sources in binary terms, right or wrong, leaving them disoriented and disengaged as they undertake research. Students should instead be encouraged to see research as a recursive conversation. IL instructors need to collaborate with academics to reposition themselves in this conversation and join students in their digital space at the point of need.</p> <h2 id="Structure_and_Content">Structure and Content</h2> <p>The book is divided into four parts and sixteen chapters (see <a href="#appendix">Appendix</a> for full Table of Contents). In the introduction ‘Understanding the NextGen Researcher’, McClure and Purdy set out their premise that NextGen students are prolific writers, readers and researchers, using a multitude of digital technologies to engage in these activities simultaneously, and:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Because digital technologies intertwine research and writing, this book takes as its premise that we – as professionals from a variety of fields – cannot ignore, marginalize </em>(sic)<em>, or leave to others the commitment to understand and help the new digital scholar. In its four parts, this collection explores the facets of that commitment.</em> (p.2)</p> <p>Part One: NextGen Students and the Research Writing ‘Problem’ moves through defining <em>Information Behaviour</em> (Chapter 1), giving a history of the research paper (Chapter 2), identifying key IL frameworks (Chapter 3) and introducing <em>deep learning</em> (Chapter 4). All of these chapters set the scene by providing a broad theoretical basis and shared language with which the reader can access the rest of the book.</p> <p>Most interestingly, McClure defines <em>Information Behaviour</em> as separate and distinct from Information Literacy. He bases his argument on the American Library Association definition of IL, where information-literate people ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, he reframes the ALA’s definition, instead describing it as:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><strong><em>A set of abilities requiring individuals to</em></strong> (my emphasis)<em> recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.</em> (p.20)</p> <p>McClure goes on to argue that if IL is a finite set of skills or abilities then <em>Information Behaviour </em>‘is concerned with the complex processes and influences on the information seeker’ (p.20). Whilst his intention to highlight behaviour is laudable, he adapts the definition of IL to make his point. Indeed, many readers in the UK would see a focus on behaviour and influence as inherent to IL, and already accounted for within the term. For example, the SCONUL Seven Pillars Model of Information Literacy states that:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Information literate people will demonstrate an awareness of how they gather, use, manage, synthesise and create information and data in an ethical manner and will have the information skills to do so effectively.</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>]</p> <p>Information skills are separate here too, but they are part of IL, they do not constitute IL itself. The focus on how accounts for behaviour. Conceptions of IL are detailed and discussed throughout the book along with related but distinct terms such as <em>Digital Literacy</em>,<em> Multiliteracies</em> (both Chapter 7), <em>Digital Agency</em> (Chapter 9), <em>Hyperliteracy</em> (Chapter 13) and <em>Technological Literacy</em> (Chapter 16).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review julia robinson american library association google newcastle university sconul born digital copyright data database framework open access research search technology usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 20:34:48 +0000 lisrw 2472 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk