Overview of content related to 'wiki' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/36/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en The Value of Open Access Publishing to Health and Social Care Professionals in Ireland http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/lawton-flynn <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/lawton-flynn#author1"><u><font color="#0066cc">Aoife Lawton</font></u></a> and <a href="/issue73/lawton-flynn#author2"><u><font color="#0066cc">Eimear Flynn</font></u></a> discuss the value of open access publishing for allied health professions and their work in the health services with particular reference to Ireland.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article will focus on how open access publishing may add value to a number of health and social care professionals and their work in the health services. The results of two recent surveys are explored in relation to the research activity, barriers and awareness about open access publishing by health and social care professionals (HSCPs) working in the Irish health system.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/lawton-flynn" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 feature article aoife lawton eimear flynn elsevier hea health service executive ireland imperial college london nhs opendoar accessibility altmetrics archives bibliographic data bibliometrics data database doi dspace google analytics google scholar higher education infrastructure internet explorer national library open access portal repositories research search technology soap standards wiki Fri, 13 Feb 2015 14:04:47 +0000 editor 2537 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jennings-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/jennings-rvw#author1">Lizz Jennings</a> reviews a concise and practical guide to marketing library e-resources which offers the busy professional a structured approach to planning a successful campaign.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Marketing Your Electronic Resources</em> immediately strikes the reader as a very practical book.&nbsp; With wide margins for notes and easy reference, a large section giving examples of best practice, and the main text extending over just 100 pages, this book is designed for busy practitioners.&nbsp; For many librarians tasked with marketing, this kind of work forms a small part of the whole of their role and this short, practical guide is pitched very much at this type of reader.&nbsp; It is not sector-specific, although many of the examples are drawn from public and academic librarie</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jennings-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university university of bath cookie data graphics metadata research resource discovery wiki Thu, 27 Jun 2013 15:14:42 +0000 lisrw 2456 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 70 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 70.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Issue 70 of <em>Ariadne </em>which is full to the brim with feature articles and a wide range of event reports and book reviews.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 editorial richard waller alt amazon google hefce jisc portico rdwg ukoln university of oxford w3c ark project jisc information environment jusp liparm rdmrose web accessibility initiative wikipedia accessibility aggregation archives bs8878 controlled vocabularies data data management database digital curation digitisation ejournal framework higher education identifier internet explorer jstor licence metadata microsoft reporting services mobile open access perl portal preservation privacy raptor repositories research resource management schema search technology software standardisation standards sushi wcag web resources web services wiki xml xml schema Fri, 14 Dec 2012 14:20:23 +0000 lisrw 2417 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The ARK Project: Analysing Raptor at Kent http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lyons <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lyons#author1">Leo Lyons</a> describes how University of Kent librarians are benefitting from Raptor's ability to produce e-resource usage statistics and charts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>It is indisputable that the use of e-resources in university libraries has increased exponentially over the last decade and there would be little disagreement with a prediction that usage is set to continue to increase for the foreseeable future. The majority of students both at undergraduate and post-graduate level now come from a background where online access is the <em>de facto</em> standard.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lyons" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article leo lyons cardiff university jisc microsoft newcastle university university of huddersfield university of kent ark project authentication blog cataloguing csv data data set database further education identifier infrastructure internet explorer ldap licence microsoft reporting services mobile native app raptor repositories research sharepoint shibboleth software sql standards wiki xml Tue, 04 Dec 2012 17:21:49 +0000 lisrw 2394 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 21st-century Scholarship and Wikipedia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/thomas#author1">Amber Thomas</a> explores the ways in which emerging research practices and Wikipedia illustrate the changing boundaries of academic work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia, the world’s fifth most-used Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>], is a good illustration of the growing credibility of online resources. In his article in <em>Ariadne </em>earlier this year, “Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Academic Acceptance” [<a href="#2">2</a>], Brian Whalley described the debates around accuracy and review, in the context of geology.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article amber thomas bbc becta british library jisc open university orcid ukoln university of warwick jorum myexperiment wikipedia archives blog data dewey decimal e-learning framework further education google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure linked data oer open access open education open source rdf repositories research search technology semantic web smartphone software uri web 2.0 wiki Fri, 30 Nov 2012 13:18:23 +0000 lisrw 2390 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/dobreva-rvw#author1">Milena Dobreva</a> reviews the newly published book of Martin de Saulles which looks at the new models of information production, distribution and consumption.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Writing about information and the changes in the models of its production, distribution and consumption is no simple task. Besides the long-standing debate on what information and knowledge really mean, the world of current technologies is changing at a pace which inevitably influences all spheres of human activity. But the first of those spheres to tackle is perhaps that of information – how we create, disseminate, and use it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review milena dobreva amazon jisc university of brighton university of malta archives big data blog cloud computing data data mining digital library digital preservation digitisation google search information society institutional repository mobile podcast research search technology video wiki Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:49:00 +0000 lisrw 2414 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache collection development content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog collection development copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Most of a Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/taylor#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> writes about how she made the most of a conference to promote and inform the work of a project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working with repositories in various ways for over five years, so I have, of course, attended the major international conference Open Repositories before. I have never actually presented anything or represented a specific project at the event, though. This year was different. This year I had a mission -&nbsp; to present a poster on the DataFlow Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] and to talk to people about the work we had been doing for the past 12 months and (I hoped) to interest them in using the Open Source (OS) systems we had developed during that period.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article stephanie taylor ukoln university of glasgow university of oxford university of southampton devcsi hydra rsp api archives blog cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital library digital repositories dissemination doi flickr framework hashtag higher education infrastructure javascript licence linked data linux metadata open access open source provenance rdf repositories research research information management software standards sword protocol tagging text mining twitter visualisation widget wiki zip Tue, 31 Jul 2012 15:05:33 +0000 lisrw 2374 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing collection development data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Managing Research Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rumsey-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rumsey-rvw#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> reviews a book which describes and explains the topics of interest central to practitioners involved with research data management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Higher Education institutions (HEIs) in the UK are planning and implementing infrastructure and services to manage research data more urgently than they did for research publications. One policy framework sent to UK vice-chancellors from a major UK funding body (EPSRC), which set out clear expectations of responsibilities for data management at institutions within a given timetable, appears to have been the spark that prompted research data management (RDM) to be taken up by the upper echelons of management, and concrete activities set in place to start addressing the problem.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rumsey-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review sally rumsey bbc bodleian libraries datacite dcc jisc oais university of oxford archives blog curation data data citation data management data set doi foi framework higher education identifier infrastructure repositories research social networks wiki Sun, 29 Jul 2012 13:51:34 +0000 lisrw 2361 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Has Second Life Lived up to Expectations? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/gorman#author1">Paul Gorman</a> examines to what degree Second Life has justified the claims made for it by its evangelists with particular regard to education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Second Life (SL) is a virtual world created and owned by a company called Linden Lab and was launched in 2003. By 2006, SL was increasingly visible in the UK media and by 2007 SL had secured over 600 mentions in UK newspapers and magazines [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, media interest in SL evaporated rapidly with references to it dropping by more than 40% in 2008 and even further since. During this peak period SL attracted large investment in virtual land from multi-national corporations, businesses and also attracted significant interest from educational institutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article paul gorman bbc city of glasgow college glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc linden lab university of edinburgh avatar blog e-learning facebook graphics instant messaging research second life twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2224 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Adapting VuFind as a Front-end to a Commercial Discovery System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/seaman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/seaman#author1">Graham Seaman</a> describes the adaptation of an open source discovery tool, VuFind, to local needs, discusses the decisions which needed to be made in the process, and considers the implications of this process for future library discovery systems.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>VuFind is an open source discovery system originally created by Villanova University near Philadelphia [<a href="#1">1</a>] and now supported by Villanova with the participation in development of libraries around the world. It was one of the first next-generation library discovery systems in the world, made possible by the open source Solr/Lucene text indexing and search system which lies at the heart of VuFind (Solr also underlies several of the current commercial offerings, including Serials Solutions' Summon and ExLibris' Primo).</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/seaman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 tooled up graham seaman google minnesota state colleges and universities national library of australia royal holloway serials solutions university of london villanova university western michigan university worldcat ajax api archives authentication cataloguing data database ejournal free software identifier institutional repository library catalogs library management systems lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh opac open source openurl php repositories resource discovery restful ruby search technology sfx software solr standards usability vufind wiki Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2226 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Welsh Libraries and Social Media: A Survey http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/tyler#author1">Alyson Tyler</a> outlines the results of a survey of Welsh libraries, their access to, and use of, social media, and offers a sample business case.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians are, in general, often quick to pick up and experiment with new technologies, integrating them into their work to improve the library service. Social media are no exception. This article seeks to show how the adoption of social media by different library sectors in Wales is helping to deliver and promote their library services.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article alyson tyler cymal ukoln welsh government aggregation archives blog ebook facebook file sharing flickr foi further education higher education instant messaging internet explorer moodle multimedia netvibes pageflakes repositories rss social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2227 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk IMPACT Final Conference 2011 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/impact-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the two-day conference looking at the results of the IMPACT Project in making digitisation and OCR better, faster and cheaper.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The IMPACT Project (<strong>Imp</strong>roving <strong>Ac</strong>cess to <strong>T</strong>ext) [<a href="#1">1</a>] was funded by the European Commission back in 2007 to look at significantly advancing access to historical text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) methods. As the project reaches its conclusion, one of its key objectives is sharing project outputs.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report marieke guy abbyy austrian national library bnf brightsolid british library california digital library content conversion specialists d-lib magazine dcc google ibm institute for dutch lexicology national and university library of slovenia national library of finland national library of the netherlands stanford university tufts university ukoln university of bath university of munich university of oxford university of salford university of utrecht ahlib europeana impact project archives blog copyright data data management data mining data set database digital library digitisation dissemination finereader framework google books ict information retrieval information society interoperability metadata mets national library ocr oer open source optical character recognition preservation research search technology software solr tagging tesseract twitter unicode wiki wordpress Sun, 26 Feb 2012 13:36:33 +0000 lisrw 2233 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Future of Archives and Recordkeeping http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews an anthology of perceptive essays on the challenges presented to archival thought and practice by Web 2.0, postmodern perspectives, and cross-disciplinary interchanges.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians, archivists, and records managers do not share identical challenges or controversies in their practical endeavours or theoretical queries. However, a common issue for all the information professions and a dominating topic of discussion in their literature is the fundamental change in the structure and distribution of knowledge caused by mass digitisation. The proliferation of daily digital content, in quantity, reach, and manifestation, is confronting them all with a disquieting role ambiguity. The expanding tools and expectations of Web 2.0 have made this self-questioning a recurrent one, but they have also stimulated invigorating debate on the purpose and direction of these fields. The perception is one of extraordinary change initiated by emerging technologies, unprecedented knowledge production and dissemination, and a new centralised role for the information user. In these galvanising changes leading library and archives practitioners are sensing opportunities for confirming the professions’ relevance, in the estimation of other scholarly disciplines and of society at large, but, perhaps most of all, in their own eyes as well.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review john azzolini clifford chance archives blog cataloguing digital library digitisation dissemination facebook flickr framework knowledge management metadata personalisation preservation provenance research semiotic twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Tue, 08 Nov 2011 14:50:08 +0000 lisrw 1689 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Connecting Researchers at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author1">Jez Cope</a> and <a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author2">Geraldine Jones</a> describe a recent series of events introducing social media to research students at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Connected Researcher initiative is a response to both local and sector-wide events. At the University of Bath groups of postgraduate research students from Chemistry and Social Sciences separately expressed an interest in finding out how to profile their own research and establish links with other researchers in their fields.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article geraldine jones jez cope google research information network university of bath university of derby citeulike wikipedia bibliographic data blog curation database digital media dissemination doi e-learning hashtag higher education ict identifier microblogging mobile preservation research rss search technology social software social web syndication twitter video virtual research environment web 2.0 web services wiki wordpress Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1621 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk MyMobileBristol http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author1">Mike Jones</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author2">Simon Price</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author3">Nikki Rogers</a> and <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author4">Damian Steer</a> describe the rationale, aims and progress of MyMobileBristol, highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities that have arisen during the project.</p> </div> </div> </div> The MyMobileBristol Project is managed and developed by the Web Futures group at the Institute for Learning and Research Technology (ILRT), University of Bristol [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The project has a number of broad and ambitious aims and objectives, including collaboration with Bristol City Council on the development or adoption of standards with regard to the exchange of time- and location-sensitive data within the Bristol region, with particular emphasis on transport, the environment and sustainability. <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article damian steer mike jones nikki rogers simon price ilrt jisc jisc techdis ordnance survey ukoln university of bristol w3c web futures datagovuk devcsi mca mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol apache api atom authentication blog browser bsd cataloguing content management data data set database dissemination e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis higher education html intellectual property java javascript jena ldap licence machine learning mobile mobile phone native app native applications open data open source operating system portal portfolio rdf research resource description restful rss search technology semantic web smartphone software sparql sql standards usability web app web browser web services wiki wireless xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1622 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Special Collections Digitisation in the Age of Mass Scanning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author1">Constance Rinaldo</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author2">Judith Warnement</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author3">Tom Baione</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author4">Martin R. Kalfatovic</a> and <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author5">Susan Fraser</a> describe results from a study to identify and develop a cost-effective and efficient large-scale digitisation workflow for special collections library materials.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a consortium of 12 natural history and botanical libraries that co-operate to digitise and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global 'biodiversity commons.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] The participating libraries hold more than two million volumes of biodiversity literature collected over 200 years to support the work of scientists, researchers and students in their home insti</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article constance rinaldo judith warnement martin r. kalfatovic susan fraser tom baione american museum of natural history california digital library harvard university ifla library of congress new york botanical garden oclc smithsonian institution university of cambridge university of oxford internet archive open library wikipedia archives bibliographic data cataloguing csv data database digital library digitisation dublin core framework infrastructure intellectual property librarything metadata opac open access repositories research tagging url video web services wiki z39.50 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1624 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Looking for the Link Between Library Usage and Student Attainment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/stone-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/stone-et-al#author1">Graham Stone</a>, <a href="/issue67/stone-et-al#author2">Bryony Ramsden</a> and <a href="/issue67/stone-et-al#author3">Dave Pattern</a> introduce the JISC-funded Library Impact Data Project (LIDP).</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/stone-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article bryony ramsden dave pattern graham stone de montfort university edina jisc leeds metropolitan university liverpool john moores university sconul university of bradford university of exeter university of huddersfield university of salford jisc information environment authentication blog data data set ebook hashtag higher education identifier library data licence opac open access open data openurl repositories research shibboleth software twitter web 2.0 web services wiki Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1626 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Educational Resources Hack Day http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on a two-day practical hack event focusing on Open Educational Resources (OER), held by DevCSI and JISC CETIS in Manchester on 31 March - 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Open Educational Resources Hack Day event was designed to bring together those interested in rapidly developing tools and prototypes to solve problems related to OER. Whilst there is a growing interest in the potential for learning resources created and shared openly by academics and teachers, a number of technical challenges still exist, including resource retrieval, evaluation and reuse. This event aimed to explore some of these problem areas by partnering developers with the creators and users of OER to identify needs and potential solutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report kirsty pitkin cetis google harper adams university college jisc leeds metropolitan university oai open university ukoln university of bolton university of oxford w3c devcsi jorum oerbital xpert accessibility aggregation api authentication blog browser cataloguing creative commons data data set doi drupal facebook identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects licence linked data metadata mobile moodle oai-pmh oer open source openoffice portal provenance repositories resource sharing rss search engine optimisation search technology software storify sword protocol ukoer url video visualisation vle widget wiki wookie wordpress youtube Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1630 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> describes new tools and services that can help you get your event heard.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><p>In 2007 Lorcan Dempsey coined the phrase 'the amplified conference' [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He used the term to refer to how event outputs (such as talks and presentations) were being amplified 'through a variety of network tools and collateral communications'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article marieke guy eduserv google jisc mpeg qik ukoln university of bath beginners guide to digital preservation internet archive jisc powr project powr amplified event archives avi blog copyright creative commons digital preservation dissemination elluminate facebook flickr hashtag intellectual property licence metadata mobile mobile phone mp4 netvibes odp open source opml pageflakes podcast preservation remote working research rss search technology software storify streaming tagging twitter usb ustream video web development webinar wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1607 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Characterising and Preserving Digital Repositories: File Format Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> and <a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author2">David Tarrant</a> show how file format profiles, the starting point for preservation plans and actions, can also be used to reveal the fingerprints of emerging types of institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article david tarrant steve hitchcock amazon google harvard university jisc microsoft mpeg the national archives university of illinois university of northampton university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome library jisc information environment keepit wikipedia accessibility adobe archives bibliographic data blog cloud computing css csv curation data data management database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination document format droid eprints file format flash flash video framework gif graphics html hypertext identifier institutional repository java jpeg latex linked data metadata mpeg-1 open access open source photoshop php plain text preservation quicktime repositories research schema semantic web software standards vector graphics video web 2.0 wiki windows windows media xml xml schema Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1608 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International Digital Curation Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 6th International Digital Curation Conference, held on 7-8 December 2010 in Chicago.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><!-- version v2: final edits after author review 2011-01-12 REW --><p>The International Digital Curation Conference has been held annually by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) [<a href="#1">1</a>] since 2005, quickly establishing a reputation for high-quality presentations and papers. So much so that, as co-chair Allen Renear explained in his opening remarks, after attending the 2006 Conference in Glasgow [<a href="#2">2</a>] delegates from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) offered to bring the event to Chicago.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/idcc-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report alex ball cni coalition for networked information cornell university datacite dcc indiana university johns hopkins university leiden university massachusetts institute of technology michigan state university national library of australia national science foundation research information network rutgers university ukoln university of arizona university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of chicago university of edinburgh university of illinois university of oxford university of sheffield university of southampton datashare i2s2 idmb myexperiment sagecite sudamih aggregation archives ark authentication blog cataloguing collection development content management curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital curation digital library e-science eprints framework identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability irods linked data linux metadata mobile national library ontologies open access open data operating system persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata provenance rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web sharepoint software standards tagging tei text mining twitter video virtual research environment visualisation wiki windows xml Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1611 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Never Waste a Good Crisis: Innovation and Technology in Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt#author1">Tore Hoel</a> reports on the CETIS 2010 Conference, 15 - 16 November 2010 at the National College for Leadership of Schools and Childrens' Services Conference Centre, Nottingham.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'I get a feeling that we are on a...' [The hands make a gesture to show the stern of a sinking ship].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report tore hoel cetis iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology national university of ireland oslo university college university of bristol university of nottingham university of southampton e-framework wikipedia archimate blog cloud computing creative commons data e-learning facebook framework higher education ict identifier linked data lod machine learning mashup metadata mobile oer open data open source passwords rdf rdfa research search technology semantic web social software sparql standardisation standards uri wiki windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1612 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Beyond the PDF http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt#author1">Jodi Schneider</a> reports on a three-day workshop about the future of scientific communication, held in San Diego CA, USA, in January 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Beyond the PDF' brought together around 80 people to the University of California San Diego to discuss scholarly communication, primarily in the sciences. The main topic: How can we apply emergent technologies to improve measurably the way that scholarship is conveyed and comprehended? The group included domain scientists, researchers and software developers, librarians, funders, publishers, journal editors - a mix which organiser <strong>Phil Bourne</strong> described as 'visionaries, developers, consumers, and conveyors' of scholarship.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report jodi schneider deri elsevier google microsoft national university of ireland science and technology facilities council w3c archives blog cloud computing copyright data data citation data set dexy epub framework git google scholar html html5 identifier intellectual property linked data metadata open access opm persistent identifier provenance repositories research semantic web social networks software standards streaming text mining twitter video visualisation wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1613 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Introducing RDA http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/clifford-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/clifford-rvw#author1">Katrina Clifford</a> reviews a work covering the long-heralded change in the cataloguing rule set - RDA (Resource Description and Access).</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3: author final edits implemented 2011-02-22 REW --><!-- v3: author final edits implemented 2011-02-22 REW --><p>The world of information description and retrieval is one of constant change and RDA (Resource Description and Access) is often touted as being one of the most radical changes on the horizon. Early discussions were often couched very much in terms of the principles behind the move from AACR2 (Anglo American Cataloguing Rules) and the principles of a FRBR (Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records)-based system. We gradually move closer to the Library of Congress' decision on whether to adopt RDA or not, raising questions of what adoption will mean in terms not just of day-to-day cataloguing but the wider retrieval world. Therefore, it is not just cataloguers who may feel they need to gain an understanding of exactly what RDA is and what moving to it will involve. The title of Chris Oliver's book, <em>Introducing RDA: A Guide to the Basics</em>, will, as a result, catch the eye of people from many spheres of information work.</p> <h2 id="Content_of_the_Book">Content of the Book</h2> <p>Although this book is just over 100 pages long, I would say it is not necessary to start at the beginning and work your way through the book to get the most out of it. If you're looking for something that places RDA squarely within the historical context of information retrieval and the rationale behind its development then the first two chapters give a comprehensive overview in relatively few pages. Chapter 1, 'What is RDA?' introduces the idea of RDA being designed as a result of an increasingly varied range of resources in need of description, especially those that are digital in nature. Additionally there is the need to search multiple datasets at once, including those beyond libraries, in allied institutions such as museums and archives. Chapter 2, 'RDA and the international context', as implied by the title explores the relationship of RDA to international documentation standards such as ISBD (International Standard Bibliographic Description) and how it copes in terms of handling language issues of catalogue records. It is just a brief overview however, all the ideas are discussed in one or two paragraphs each. Together, these two initial chapters would easily fill in the background for an uninitiated professional, such as a library school student and indeed they show that RDA is built upon many of the key concepts touched upon in library school courses, such as Cutter's<em> Rules for a dictionary catalog</em>.</p> <p>Chapter 3 furthers this introduction by describing FRBR and FRAD (Functional Requirements for Authority Data) and how they relate to RDA. In all the more recent discussions surrounding practical aspects of the uptake of RDA, the theoretical principles underlying it are often forgotten and revisiting them can be an interesting exercise. After an overview of how FRBR and FRAD are constructed, it moves on to why they are important. One figure lays out a MARC record and labels the fields with the appropriate FRBR entities which is helpful in understanding them in context. The remainder of the chapter shows how the RDA terms have been incorporated into the layout of the sections of RDA and the wording of the rules themselves. The chapter shows why RDA is laid out in a very different way to AACR2, grouping rules by the attribute described rather than by item format. This chapter is perhaps the most difficult to work through, but I feel this is due to the nature of the content, rather than any failing on the part of the author.</p> <p>Chapter 4 is entitled 'Continuity with AACR2' and while this may indicate it will describe how catalogues may appear different, the start of the chapter focuses more on continuity in terms of governance and principles rather than on the nuts and bolts of the records themselves. It does move to describing how AACR2 has been reworked into RDA, rather than RDA being written from scratch and illustrates this with a couple of rules and wordings from both products to compare the differences and similarities. It then moves back to what is essentially an historical account of the 'deconstruction' of AACR2, which is interesting in itself; but it would have been better placed near the start of the chapter to distinguish better between the historical description and the examples from RDA which follow.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/clifford-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review katrina clifford kingston university library of congress aacr2 archives authority data bibliographic data cataloguing data data set frad frbr information retrieval isbd marc marc21 metadata resource description and access search technology standards video wiki Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1614 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Practical Open Source Software for Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/rafiq-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/rafiq-rvw#author1">Muhammad Rafiq</a> takes a look at a work on the open source community and open source software.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2 inserting author's final edits 2011-02-20-18-44 REW --><!-- v2 inserting author's final edits 2011-02-20-18-44 REW --><p>Open source (OS) usually refers to an application whose source code is made available for use or modification in line with users' needs and requirements. OS projects usually develop in the public domain where contributors participate in a collaborative manner and update or refine the product. OS offers more flexibility and freedom than software purchased with licence restrictions. Both the OS community and the library world share many common principles. They share and promote open standards and believe in sharing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/rafiq-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review muhammad rafiq cd-rom content management data database digital library digital media drupal dspace dvd firefox graphics instant messaging internet explorer interoperability licence linux moodle open source openoffice operating system podcast repositories research software vufind wiki wordpress Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1617 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CIG Conference 2010: Changes in Cataloguing in 'Interesting Times' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/cig-2010-rpt#author1">Rhiannon McLoughlin</a> reports on a three-day conference on cataloguing in a time of financial stringency, held by the CILIP Cataloguing and Indexing Group at Exeter University, from 13-15 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The focus of this conference was initiatives to get through the current economic climate. Cataloguing departments are under threat of cutbacks as never before. Papers on streamlining, collaborative enterprises, shared catalogues and services, recycling and repurposing of content using metadata extraction techniques combined to give a flavour of the new thrift driving management. The continuing progress of the long awaited Resource Description and Access (RDA)[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] towards becoming the new international cataloguing standard was another hot topic.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/cig-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report rhiannon mcloughlin british library british museum cilip google ifla jisc leeds metropolitan university library of congress mla research information network sconul ukoln university of aberdeen university of exeter university of leeds university of strathclyde university of warwick aacr2 aggregation archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cidoc-crm crm data data management digital repositories digitisation ebook frbr google search higher education lcsh learning object metadata learning objects lom marc marc21 metadata ontologies open data open source repositories research resource description and access resource discovery resource sharing schema search technology semantic web software standards vle wiki xml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1595 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc1"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> looks at a student survival aid in the information age that should also be valuable for tutors.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies' is an example of an ever-increasing range of 'self-help' books for students on a variety of topics relating skills, tips and education. Such books range from 'Critical thinking skills' [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the quite specific, for example, 'Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and more' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This offering from Gower/Ashgate comes somewhere in between. It introduces students to the main current technologies and some of the pedagogic devices they might find in modern education.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review brian whalley apple google microsoft queens university belfast wikipedia blog data e-learning ebook higher education ict linux mobile open source openoffice png podcast repositories software usb wiki youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1601 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Public Library 2.0: Culture Change? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/hammond#author1">Sarah Hammond</a> explores UK public libraries' growing participation in social media to reach their audiences online, with a focus on blogging.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Beginning in the mid 2000s I began keeping an eye on how libraries have been getting involved with social software - I started this haphazardly just out of interest but then I started to be more systematic when I needed to explore online resources for my organisation, the National Railway Museum. When I left to pursue my MA in Librarianship at the University of Sheffield I took the opportunity to do some serious research into the subject with a focus on UK public libraries as it seemed to me that they were hugely under-represented online.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article sarah hammond bbc british library information today nhs oxford university press robert gordon university university of oxford university of sheffield university of the west of england archives blog doi facebook flickr framework higher education librarything microblogging mobile netvibes opac podcast research search technology social software software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1562 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23 Things in Public Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/leech#author1">Helen Leech</a> describes a collaborative project to increase front-line staff's understanding and use of Web 2.0 in public libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you know that:</p> <ul> <li>Of the Generation Y – the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s – 96% are members of a social network</li> <li>There are some 200 million blogs on the World Wide Web</li> <li>One in eight couples who married in the USA in 2009 met over the Internet</li> <li>If Facebook were a country, it would be the fourth largest by population in the world after China, the USA and India</li> </ul> <p>All the statistics emanate from Socialnomics [<a href="#1">1</a>]. They are designed to be attention-grabbers, and they will no doubt provoke ferocious debate. However, what is unarguable is that some seismic shifts have taken place on the Internet in the past ten years, and social media and user-generated content now play a huge role in the way many people create and share information and how they communicate with each other.</p> <p>These changes have crept up on public libraries. Ten years ago, we became Internet experts when the People's Network initiative put 30,000 computers into our buildings. We became used to the new role of teaching people how to use a mouse, what a search engine is, how to create an email account. But when it came to content, we tended to leave that to our customers. Friends Reunited came along, followed by Myspace, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, and we were dimly aware of them as social phenomena, but we did not have much to do with them in our day-to-day work.</p> <h2 id="Changes_in_Public_Libraries">Changes in Public Libraries</h2> <p>So what has changed and why do we need to know about them now? The list below is by no means exhaustive but represents some of the main drivers behind changes emerging within public libraries in the UK.</p> <ol> <li>The need to help people get online. As I write, every public library in the UK is being asked to sign up to Race Online [<a href="#2">2</a>], the initiative to get 100% of the population clued up by the time the Olympics happens. The reappointed UK Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox launched the Race Online 2012 campaign in March 2010. The initiative reports that more than 600 partners have pledged to help more than 1.7 million new people to get online by the end of 2012. Its rationale is "to build a UK of near-universal web literacy by the time of the Olympics, with access as easy and affordable as water, electricity or gas and skills considered as fundamental as literacy and numeracy: [its] ambition is to get everyone of working-age online by the end of this Parliament." People need to know the key skills for getting around online, and a large part of these skills involves social networking.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>Changes in the way people communicate. There is a subtle shift taking place in electronic communication, moving onwards from email towards more collaborative methods: file sharing and cloud computing, social media that include information 'walls,' instant messaging and mobile apps. There is growing evidence that Generation Y and the Millenials – the generations born after the late 1980s – are moving towards very different methods of communication. It is important that library staff understand these technologies, since they are going to become as mainstream as email very shortly.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><em>Communities in Control</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>]: you might recognise this as the title of a recent government paper, looking at the need to pass control over political processes to local communities, and how this could be achieved. The principle is being reinforced through the new administration's Big Society initiative [<a href="#4">4</a>]. New technologies are allowing people to mobilise in a way that simply has not been possible before, to create and share content, and to become involved in the running of public libraries in radical new ways. It is also worth looking at the International Association for Public Participation's <em>Spectrum of Public Participation </em>[<a href="#5">5</a>] which gives some idea of the range of ways in which we need to work with our communities, from providing them with information all the way up to acting as facilitators so that they can manage and run services themselves. It is also worth watching the film <em>Us Now</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], which gives a glimpse of the way that new technologies might affect people's relationships with central government and public services. It highlights the way that social networking applications allow huge numbers of people to collaborate to do previously unthinkable things, like run a bank. If communities can make the day-to-day decisions necessary to run a bank or a second division football club, then it starts to become possible that they could do the same for political processes or delivery of public services. Library staff need to understand this culture of engagement, and to understand the tools that facilitate it.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>The economic environment. The next four years, 2010-14, are going to be the hardest public services have seen, and we are going to have to make cost savings everywhere we can. There are clear benefits in collaboration, and the tools that are available for this are improving rapidly. Which is where <em>23 Things</em> comes in.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article helen leech bbc google imperial college london university of huddersfield wikipedia archives blog cataloguing cloud computing database facebook file sharing flickr google wave instant messaging librarything mobile podcast rss search technology social networks software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1565 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Libraries for the Data Challenge http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/salo#author1">Dorothea Salo</a> examines how library systems and procedures need to change to accommodate research data.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Eager to prove their relevance among scholars leaving print behind, libraries have participated vocally in the last half-decade's conversation about digital research data. On the surface, libraries would seem to have much human and technological infrastructure ready-constructed to repurpose for data: digital library platforms and institutional repositories may appear fit for purpose. However, unless libraries understand the salient characteristics of research data, and how they do and do not fit with library processes and infrastructure, they run the risk of embarrassing missteps as they come to grips with the data challenge.</p> <p>Whether managing research data is 'the new special collections,'[<a href="#1">1</a>] a new form of regular academic-library collection development, or a brand-new library specialty, the possibilities have excited a great deal of talk, planning, and educational opportunity in a profession seeking to expand its boundaries.</p> <p>Faced with shrinking budgets and staffs, library administrators may well be tempted to repurpose existing technology infrastructure and staff to address the data curation challenge. Existing digital libraries and institutional repositories seem on the surface to be a natural fit for housing digital research data. Unfortunately, significant mismatches exist between research data and library digital warehouses, as well as the processes and procedures librarians typically use to fill those warehouses. Repurposing warehouses and staff for research data is therefore neither straightforward nor simple; in some cases, it may even prove impossible.</p> <h2 id="Characteristics_of_Research_Data">Characteristics of Research Data</h2> <p>What do we know about research data? What are its salient characteristics with respect to stewardship?</p> <h3 id="Size_and_Scope">Size and Scope</h3> <p>Perhaps the commonest mental image of research data is terabytes of information pouring out of the merest twitch of the Large Hadron Collider Project. So-called 'Big Data' both captures the imagination of and creates sheer terror in the practical librarian or technologist. 'Small data,' however, may prove to be the bigger problem: data emerging from individual researchers and labs, especially those with little or no access to grants, or a hyperlocal research focus. Though each small-data producer produces only a trickle of data compared to the like of the Large Hadron Collider Project, the tens of thousands of small-data producers in aggregate may well produce as much data (or more, measured in bytes) as their Big Data counterparts [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Securely and reliably storing and auditing this amount of data is a serious challenge. The burgeoning 'small data' store means that institutions without local Big Data projects are by no means exempt from large-scale storage considerations.</p> <p>Small data also represents a serious challenge in terms of human resources. Best practices instituted in a Big Data project reach all affected scientists quickly and completely; conversely, a small amount of expert intervention in such a project pays immense dividends. Because of the great numbers of individual scientists and labs producing small data, however, immensely more consultations and consultants are necessary to bring practices and the resulting data to an acceptable standard.</p> <h3 id="Variability">Variability</h3> <p>Digital research data comes in every imaginable shape and form. Even narrowing the universe of research data to 'image' yields everything from scans of historical glass negative photographs to digital microscope images of unicellular organisms taken hundreds at a time at varying depths of field so that the organism can be examined in three dimensions. The tools that researchers use naturally shape the resulting data. When the tool is proprietary, unfortunately, so may be the file format that it produced. When that tool does not include long-term data viability as a development goal, the data it produces are often neither interoperable nor preservable.</p> <p>A major consequence of the diversity of forms and formats of digital research data is a concomitant diversity in desired interactions. The biologist with a 3-D stack of microscope images interacts very differently with those images than does a manuscript scholar trying to extract the underlying half-erased text from a palimpsest. These varying affordances <em>must</em> be respected by dissemination platforms if research data are to enjoy continued use.</p> <p>One important set of interactions involves actual changes to data. Many sorts of research data are considerably less usable in their raw state than after they have had filters or algorithms or other processing performed on them. Others welcome correction, or are refined by comparison with other datasets. Two corollaries emerge: first, that planning and acting for data stewardship must take place throughout the research process, rather than being an add-on at the end; and second, that digital preservation systems designed to steward only final, unchanging materials can only fail faced with real-world datasets and data-use practices.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article dorothea salo california digital library dcc google oai university of wisconsin hydra algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog collection development cookie curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination drupal dspace dublin core eprints fedora commons file format flickr google docs infrastructure institutional repository interoperability library management systems linked data marc metadata mods oai-pmh open source preservation rdf repositories research search technology software standardisation standards sword protocol wiki xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1566 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Evidence, Value and Impact: The LIS Research Landscape in 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/lisrc10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/lisrc10-rpt#author1">Stephanie Kenna</a> reports on the Library and Information Science Research Coalition conference, held at the British Library on 28 June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having been involved in developing the concept of a coalition for research in Library and Information Science (LIS) since 2006, it was with both pride and excitement that I took my place in the British Library's auditorium on Monday 28 June. There was a buzz of anticipation. We were not disappointed.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/lisrc10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report stephanie kenna british library cilip edinburgh napier university jisc loughborough university mla research information network university college london lis research coalition archives blog data e-learning framework higher education information architecture information retrieval iphone research search technology twitter usability video wiki Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1572 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk