Overview of content related to 'web browser' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/38/0?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Developing a Prototype Library WebApp for Mobile Devices http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author1">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author2">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the development of a prototype WebApp to improve access to Library systems at Loughborough University for mobile devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Reviewing Loughborough University Library’s Web site statistics over a 12-month period (October 2011 – September 2012) showed a monthly average of 1,200 visits via mobile devices (eg smart phones and tablet computers). These visits account for 4% of the total monthly average visits; but plotting the percentage of visits per month from such mobile devices demonstrated over the period a steady increase, rising from 2% to 8%. These figures were supported by comparison with statistics from the Library’s blog, where, over the same period, there was also a steady increase in the percentage of visits from mobile devices.&nbsp; This increase was on a smaller scale than the Web site, rising from 0.5% up to 4%.</p> <p>Having identified this increase in the usage of mobile devices, it was decided to investigate ways to support mobile access more effectively.&nbsp; As part of this investigation, the Library's Systems Team undertook the development of a prototype mobile app.</p> <h2 id="Deciding_the_Prototype-s_Features">Deciding the Prototype's Features</h2> <p>The first task undertaken was to produce a list of functionality that could be included in the Library WebApp.&nbsp; The list was based upon current Library services and consisted of the following:</p> <ul> <li>Support library catalogue searching</li> <li>Display opening hours (pulled from the Library Web site so data can be maintained in one location)</li> <li>Display current item loans, requests and holds <ul> <li>Indicate overdue items</li> <li>Indicate recalled items</li> <li>Offer option to renew loaned items</li> <li>Offer option to cancel requests for items</li> </ul> </li> <li>Reading lists <ul> <li>Ensure module list displays all modules for which the user is registered</li> <li>Should handle multiple levels of reading lists</li> <li>Include thumbnails</li> <li>Include library holding information</li> </ul> </li> <li>Display current room/PC bookings <ul> <li>Display list of bookings including resource name, start time and end time for each booking.</li> <li>Offer option to cancel a room/PC booking</li> <li>Offer option to make a room/PC booking</li> </ul> </li> <li>Display upcoming library events (pulled from the Library Web site) <ul> <li>Include both upcoming workshops and events</li> </ul> </li> <li>Display library news (taken as a feed from our Library blog)</li> <li>Offer feedback option</li> </ul> <p>After reviewing this list, it was decided to leave out the searching of the Library Catalogue feature as the Library's discovery tool (Ex Libris’s Primo [<a href="#1">1</a>]) was scheduled for a number of updates that would improve the support of mobile devices. Therefore it was decided to wait and see how the improved mobile interface performed before deciding how to integrate it into the mobile app.</p> <p>Additionally it was decided not to implement a number of the other features, those that would either require new APIs to be created for other systems or those that would alter the information stored in the other systems.&nbsp; These features would be carried forward for implementation in a future version of the mobile app.&nbsp; Consequently features excluded from the pilot version were:</p> <ul> <li>library catalogue searching</li> <li>the option to renew loaned items and cancel requested items</li> <li>the option to make or cancel a room/PC booking</li> </ul> <h2 id="WebApp_versus_Native_Apps">WebApp versus Native Apps</h2> <p>An important early decision was whether to create the Mobile App as a WebApp or as a number of native apps?&nbsp; A native app is one that is developed in the native language for the platform (Objective-C for iPhone/iPad devices, Java for Android devices, etc) and usually delivered via an app-store (iTunes for Apple, Google Play for Android, etc).&nbsp; A WebApp is developed in HTML5 and JavaScript, being delivered to the mobile device via the World Wide Web.</p> <p>There are pros and cons to developing a mobile app as a native app or as a WebApp. Native apps have full access to a mobile device's resources but need to be developed as a separate app for each platform on which they are to be made available.&nbsp; Conversely developing a mobile app as a WebApp restricts the resources that can be accessed to those available to the device's Web browser, although a single developed WebApp can work on multiple platforms.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper apple google loughborough university w3c adobe ajax android apache api authentication blog browser cache cataloguing content management cookie css data framework google books html html5 ipad iphone itunes java javascript jquery json library management systems local storage metadata mobile native app native apps open source passwords perl restful rss standards tablet computer url vocabularies web app web browser web development widget xhtml xml Mon, 10 Jun 2013 13:33:09 +0000 admin 2438 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Augmented Reality in Education: The SCARLET+ Experience http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author1">Laura Skilton</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author2">Matt Ramirez</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author3">Guyda Armstrong</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author4">Rose Lock</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author5">Jean Vacher</a> and <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author6">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> describe augmented reality in education case studies from the University of Sussex and the University for the Creative Arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:36.0pt;">&nbsp;Augmented reality, a capability that has been around for decades, is shifting from what was once seen as a gimmick to a bona fide game-changer. [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> </blockquote> <p>Augmented Reality (AR) has been listed in the Horizon Reports, key predictors of the potential impact of new technology on education. The 2011 Report [<a href="#1">1</a>] sparked the idea for an innovative project - SCARLET: Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article guyda armstrong jean vacher laura skilton marie-therese gramstadt matt ramirez rose lock alt courtauld institute of art glasgow school of art jisc mimas museum of london university for the creative arts university of london university of manchester university of sussex university of the arts london vads jorum kaptur scarlet accessibility archives augmented reality blog copyright data data set digitisation e-learning firefox framework ftp graphics infrastructure internet explorer ipad mobile multimedia oer portal research search technology smartphone url video web browser windows wireless youtube Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:38:54 +0000 lisrw 2439 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Redeveloping the Loughborough Online Reading List System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author1">Jon Knight</a>, <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author2">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue69/knight-et-al#author3">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the redevelopment of Loughborough University’s open source reading list system.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Loughborough Online Reading Lists System (LORLS) [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been developed at Loughborough University since the late 1990s.&nbsp; LORLS was originally implemented at the request of the University’s Learning and Teaching Committee simply to make reading lists available online to students.&nbsp; The Library staff immediately saw the benefit of such a system in not only allowing students ready access to academics’ reading lists but also in having such access themselves. This was because a significant number of academics were bypassing the library when generating and distributing lists to their students who were then in turn surprised when the library did not have the recommended books either in stock or in sufficient numbers to meet demand.</p> <p>The first version of the system produced by the Library Systems Team was part of a project that also had a ‘reading lists amnesty’ in which academics were encouraged to provide their reading lists to the library which then employed some temporary staff over the summer to enter them into the new system.&nbsp; This meant that the first version of LORLS went live in July 2000 with a reasonable percentage of lists already in place.&nbsp; Subsequently the creation and editing of reading lists was made the responsibility of the academics or departmental admin staff, with some assistance from library staff.</p> <p>LORLS was written in Perl, with a MySQL database back-end.&nbsp; Most user interfaces were delivered via the web, with a limited number of back-end scripts that helped the systems staff maintain the system and alert library staff to changes that had been made to reading lists.</p> <p>Soon after the first version of LORLS went live at Loughborough, a number of other universities expressed an interest in using or modifying the system. Permission was granted by the University to release it as open source under the General Public Licence (GPL)[<a href="#2">2</a>].&nbsp; New versions were released as the system was developed and bugs were fixed. The last version of the original LORLS code base/data design was version 5, which was downloaded by sites worldwide.</p> <h2 id="Redesign">Redesign</h2> <p>By early 2007 it was decided to take a step back and see if there were things that could be done better in LORLS.&nbsp; Some design decisions made in 1999 no longer made sense eight years later.&nbsp; Indeed some of the database design was predicated on how teaching modules were supposed to work at Loughborough and it had already become clear that the reality of how they were deployed was often quite different.&nbsp; For example, during the original design, the principle was that each module would have a single reading list associated with it.&nbsp; Within a few years several modules had been found that were being taught by two (or more!) academics, all wanting their own independent reading list.</p> <p>Some of the structuring of the data in the MySQL database began to limit how the system could be developed.&nbsp; The University began to plan an organisational restructuring shortly after the redesign of LORLS was commenced, and it was clear that the simple departmental structure was likely to be replaced by a more fluid school and department mix.</p> <p>Library staff were also beginning to request new features that were thus increasingly awkward to implement.&nbsp; Rather than leap through hoops to satisfy them within the framework of the existing system, it made sense to add them into the design process for a full redesign.</p> <p>It was also felt that the pure CGI-driven user interface could do with a revamp.&nbsp; The earlier LORLS user interfaces used only basic HTML forms, with little in the way of client-side scripting.&nbsp; Whilst that meant that they tended to work on any web browser and were pretty accessible, they were also a bit clunky compared to some of the newer dynamic web sites.</p> <p>A distinct separation of the user interface from the back-end database was decided upon to improve localization and portability of the system as earlier versions of LORLS had already shown that many sites took the base code and then customised the user interface parts of the CGI scripts to their own look and feel.&nbsp; The older CGI scripts were a mix of user interaction elements and database access and processing, which made this task a bit more difficult than it really needed to be.</p> <p>Separating the database code from the user interface code would let people easily tinker with one without unduly affecting the other.&nbsp; It would also allow local experimentation with multiple user-interface designs for different user communities or devices.</p> <p>This implied that a set of application programming interfaces (APIs) would need to be defined. As asynchronous JavaScript and XML (AJAX)[<a href="#3">3</a>] interactions had been successful applied in a number of recent projects the team had worked on, XML was chosen as the format to be used.&nbsp; At first simple object access protocol (SOAP) style XML requests was experimented with, as well as XML responses, but it was soon realised that SOAP was far too heavy-weight for most of the API calls, so a lighter ‘RESTful’ API was selected.&nbsp; The API was formed of CGI scripts that took normal parameters as input and returned XML documents for the client to parse and display.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/knight-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper jon knight google harvard university loughborough university microsoft gnu access control ajax api archives authentication bibliographic data blog cache chrome cookie data database digital library e-learning framework google books gpl html javascript jquery json library management systems licence metadata moodle mysql open source perl refworks restful schema shibboleth soap software sql standards web browser xml z39.50 zip Sat, 28 Jul 2012 14:32:55 +0000 lisrw 2354 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Image 'Quotation' Using the C.I.T.E. Architecture http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author1">Christopher Blackwell</a> and <a href="/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell#author2">Amy Hackney Blackwell</a> describe with examples a digital library infrastructure that affords canonical citation for 'quoting' images, useful for creating commentaries, arguments, and teaching tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Quotation is the heart of scholarly argument and teaching, the activity of bringing insight to something complex by focused discussion of its parts. Philosophers who have reflected on the question of quotation have identified two necessary components: a name, pointer, or citation on the one hand and a reproduction or repetition on the other. Robert Sokolowski calls quotation a 'curious conjunction of being able to name and to contain' [<a href="#1">1</a>]; V.A. Howard is more succinct: quotation is 'replication-plus-reference' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. We are less interested in the metaphysical aspects of quotation than in the practical ones.</p> <p>The tools and techniques described here were supported by the National Science Foundation under Grants No. 0916148 &amp; No. 0916421. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation (NSF).</p> <h2 id="Quotation">Quotation</h2> <p>Quotation, when accompanied by citation, allows us to bring the reader's attention to bear on a particular part of a larger whole efficiently and without losing the surrounding context. A work of Biblical exegesis, for example, can quote or merely cite 'Genesis 1:29' without having to reproduce the entire Hebrew Bible, or even the Book of Genesis; a reader can resolve that citation to a particular passage about the creation of plants, and can see that passage as a discrete node at the bottom of a narrowing hierarchy: Hebrew Bible, Genesis, Chapter 1, Verse 29. We take this for granted.</p> <p>Quoting a text is easy. But how can we quote an image? This remains difficult even in the 21st century where it is easy to reproduce digital images, pass them around through networks, and manipulate them on our desks.</p> <p>A scholar wishing to refer to a particular part of an image will generally do something like this: She will open one version of an image in some editing software, select and 'cut' a section from it, and 'paste' that section into a document containing the text of her commentary or argument. She might add to the text of her argument a reference to the source of the image. The language that describes this process is that of mechanical work&nbsp;– cutting and pasting&nbsp;– rather than the language of quotation and citation. The process yields a fragment of an image with only a tenuous connection to the ontological hierarchy of the object of study. The same scholar who would never give a citation to '<em>The Bible</em>, page 12' rather than to 'Genesis 1:29' will, of necessity, cite an image-fragment in a way similarly unlikely to help readers find the source and locate the fragment in its natural context.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/blackwell-hackneyBlackwell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article amy hackney blackwell christopher blackwell clemson university furman university google harvard university national academy of sciences national science foundation university of virginia gnu homer multitext archives browser creative commons css data digital library doi dublin core firefox free software html identifier infrastructure java licence metadata namespace openoffice research safari schema software standards stylesheet tei thesaurus url urn vocabularies web browser xhtml xml xsl xslt zip Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1620 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk MyMobileBristol http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author1">Mike Jones</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author2">Simon Price</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author3">Nikki Rogers</a> and <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author4">Damian Steer</a> describe the rationale, aims and progress of MyMobileBristol, highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities that have arisen during the project.</p> </div> </div> </div> The MyMobileBristol Project is managed and developed by the Web Futures group at the Institute for Learning and Research Technology (ILRT), University of Bristol [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The project has a number of broad and ambitious aims and objectives, including collaboration with Bristol City Council on the development or adoption of standards with regard to the exchange of time- and location-sensitive data within the Bristol region, with particular emphasis on transport, the environment and sustainability. <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article damian steer mike jones nikki rogers simon price ilrt jisc jisc techdis ordnance survey ukoln university of bristol w3c web futures datagovuk devcsi mca mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol apache api atom authentication blog browser bsd cataloguing content management data data set database dissemination e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis higher education html intellectual property java javascript jena ldap licence machine learning mobile mobile phone native app native applications open data open source operating system portal portfolio rdf research resource description restful rss search technology semantic web smartphone software sparql sql standards usability web app web browser web services wiki wireless xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1622 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Piloting Web Conferencing Software: Experiences and Challenges http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author1">Julian Prior</a> and <a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author2">Marie Salter</a> report on their experiences piloting Elluminate Live! at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>In the current fiscal climate faced by educational institutions in the UK, elearning tools and technologies that promise efficiency savings as well as enhancing the quality and quantity of course offerings are gaining popularity. One such technology is Web conferencing where lectures, seminars, meetings or presentations take place online and allow for remote participation and collaboration via audio, video, instant chat and a virtual 'whiteboard.'[<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article julian prior marie salter alt alt-c aston university blackboard google jisc open university qik ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of exeter university of hertfordshire university of winchester samson wikipedia adobe blog browser data e-learning elluminate firefox further education higher education internet explorer java licence mobile moodle multimedia oer open access open source operating system portfolio safari software streaming usb video vle web browser webinar windows Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1623 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute Reflections at the End of an Era http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author1">Angela Joyce</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author2">Linda Kerr</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author3">Tim Machin</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author4">Paul Meehan</a> and <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author5">Caroline Williams</a> look back at the history and achievements of Intute, and reflect on lessons learned as the service enters its final year.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article angela joyce caroline williams linda kerr paul meehan tim machin ahrc bbc british library google hea heriot-watt university intute jisc linden lab mimas ukoln university of bristol university of glamorgan university of huddersfield university of manchester university of oxford wellcome trust automatic metadata generation eevl elib jisc information environment mobile internet detective sosig wikipedia blog cataloguing curation data database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education metadata mobile personalisation research resource discovery search technology second life software tagging twitter vim vocabularies web 2.0 web browser web resources widget Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1564 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Volcanic Eruptions Fail to Thwart Digital Preservation - the Planets Way http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author1">Matthew Barr</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author2">Amir Bernstein</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author3">Clive Billenness</a> and <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author4">Manfred Thaller</a> report on the final Planets training event Digital Preservation - The Planets Way held in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div align="center"> <p style="text-align: left;">In far more dramatic circumstances than expected, the Planets Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] held its 3-day training event<em> Digital Preservation – The Planets Way</em> in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010. This article reports its proceedings.</p> </div><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report amir bernstein clive billenness manfred thaller matthew barr austrian national library british library national library of the netherlands oais open planets foundation opf swiss federal archives university of cologne university of glasgow archives bibliographic data browser cataloguing cloud computing data database digital preservation digital repositories digitisation file format framework graphics identifier interoperability java metadata national library operating system preservation repositories research software usb visualisation web browser web services xml youtube zip Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1549 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Abstract Modelling of Digital Identifiers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/nicholas-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author1">Nick Nicholas</a>, <a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author2">Nigel Ward</a> and <a href="/issue62/nicholas-et-al#author3">Kerry Blinco</a> present an information model of digital identifiers, to help bring clarity to the vocabulary debates from which this field has suffered.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, incorporating author review edits inc. lead-ins to bullet lists - 2010-02-12-19-30-rew--><!-- v2, incorporating author review edits inc. lead-ins to bullet lists - 2010-02-12-19-30-rew--><p>Discussion of digital identifiers, and persistent identifiers in particular, has often been confused by differences in underlying assumptions and approaches. To bring more clarity to such discussions, the PILIN Project has devised an abstract model of identifiers and identifier services, which is presented here in summary. Given such an abstract model, it is possible to compare different identifier schemes, despite variations in terminology; and policies and strategies can be formulated for persistence without committing to particular systems. The abstract model is formal and layered; in this article, we give an overview of the distinctions made in the model. This presentation is not exhaustive, but it presents some of the key concepts represented, and some of the insights that result.</p> <p>The main goal of the Persistent Identifier Linking Infrastructure (PILIN) project [<a href="#1">1</a>] has been to scope the infrastructure necessary for a national persistent identifier service. There are a variety of approaches and technologies already on offer for persistent digital identification of objects. But true identity persistence cannot be bound to particular technologies, domain policies, or information models: any formulation of a persistent identifier strategy needs to outlast current technologies, if the identifiers are to remain persistent in the long term.</p> <p>For that reason, PILIN has modelled the digital identifier space in the abstract. It has arrived at an ontology [<a href="#2">2</a>] and a service model [<a href="#3">3</a>] for digital identifiers, and for how they are used and managed, building on previous work in the identifier field [<a href="#4">4</a>] (including the thinking behind URI [<a href="#5">5</a>], DOI [<a href="#6">6</a>], XRI [<a href="#7">7</a>] and ARK [<a href="#8">8</a>]), as well as semiotic theory [<a href="#9">9</a>]. The ontology, as an abstract model, addresses the question 'what is (and isn't) an identifier?' and 'what does an identifier management system do?'. This more abstract view also brings clarity to the ongoing conversation of whether URIs can be (and should be) universal persistent identifiers.</p> <h2 id="Identifier_Model">Identifier Model</h2> <p>For the identifier model to be abstract, it cannot commit to a particular information model. The notion of an identifier depends crucially on the understanding that an identifier only identifies one distinct thing. But different domains will have different understandings of what things are distinct from each other, and what can legitimately count as a single thing. (This includes aggregations of objects, and different versions or snapshots of objects.) In order for the abstract identifier model to be applicable to all those domains, it cannot impose its own definitions of what things are distinct: it must rely on the distinctions specific to the domain.</p> <p>This means that information modelling is a critical prerequisite to introducing identifiers to a domain, as we discuss elsewhere [<a href="#10">10</a>]: identifier users should be able to tell whether any changes in a thing's content, presentation, or location mean it is no longer identified by the same identifier (i.e. whether the identifier is restricted to a particular version, format, or copy).</p> <p>The abstract identifier model also cannot commit to any particular protocols or service models. In fact, the abstract identifier model should not even presume the Internet as a medium. A sufficiently abstract model of identifiers should apply just as much to URLs as it does to ISBNs, or names of sheep; the model should not be inherently digital, in order to avoid restricting our understanding of identifiers to the current state of digital technologies. This means that our model of identifiers comes close to the understanding in semiotics of signs, as our definitions below make clear.</p> <p>There are two important distinctions between digital identifiers and other signs which we needed to capture. First, identifiers are managed through some system, in order to guarantee the stability of certain properties of the identifier. This is different to other signs, whose meaning is constantly renegotiated in a community. Those identifier properties requiring guarantees include the accountability and persistence of various facets of the identifier—most crucially, what is being identified. For digital identifiers, the <strong>identifier management system</strong> involves registries, accessed through defined services. An HTTP server, a PURL [<a href="#11">11</a>] registry, and an XRI registry are all instances of identifier management systems.</p> <p>Second, digital identifiers are straightforwardly <strong>actionable</strong>: actions can be made to happen in connection with the identifier. Those actions involve interacting with computers, rather than other people: the computer consistently does what the system specifies is to be done with the identifier, and has no latitude for subjective interpretation. This is in contrast with human language, which can involve complex processes of interpretation, and where there can be considerable disconnect between what a speaker intends and how a listener reacts. Because the interactions involved are much simpler, the model can concentrate on two actions which are core to digital identifiers, but which are only part of the picture in human communication: working out what is being identified (<em>resolution</em>), and accessing a representation of what is identified (<em>retrieval</em>).</p> <p>So to model managing and acting on digital identifiers, we need a concept of things that can be identified, names for things, and the relations between them. (Semiotics already gives us such concepts.) We also need a model of the systems through which identifiers are managed and acted on; what those systems do, and who requests them to do so; and what aspects of identifiers the systems manage.</p> <p>Our identifier model (as an ontology) thus encompasses:</p> <ul> <li><strong>Entities</strong> - including actors and identifier systems;</li> <li><strong>Relations</strong> between entities;</li> <li><strong>Qualities</strong>, as desirable properties of entities. Actions are typically undertaken in order to make qualities apply to entities.</li> <li><strong>Actions</strong>, as the processes carried out on entities (and corresponding to <strong>services</strong> in implementations);</li> </ul> <p>An individual identifier system can be modelled using concepts from the ontology, with an identifier system model.</p> <p>In the remainder of this article, we go through the various concepts introduced in the model under these classes. We present the concept definitions under each section, before discussing issues that arise out of them. <em>Resolution</em> and <em>Retrieval</em> are crucial actions for identifiers, whose definition involves distinct issues; they are discussed separately from other Actions. We briefly discuss the standing of HTTP URIs in the model at the end.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/nicholas-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article kerry blinco nick nicholas nigel ward d-lib magazine dest ietf oasis internet archive aggregation archives ark ascii browser cataloguing cool uri cordra curation data database digital object identifier dns document management doi e-learning ftp identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone namespace ontologies openurl persistent identifier purl repositories research rfc search technology semantic web semiotic service usage model uri url vocabularies wayback machine web browser xml xml namespaces Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1528 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intranet Management: Divine Comedy or Strategic Imperative? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/white#author1">Martin White</a> suggests that a failure to recognise the value of intranets is a symptom of a failure to recognise information as a strategic asset.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to Dante in his Divine Comedy the inscription above the door to Hades reads "Abandon hope all ye who enter here". For many this could also be the sign on the home page of their organisation's intranet as, with business-critical decisions to make, they begin the daily hunt for information that they are sure should be somewhere in the application. It could just as easily be the sign on the door of the intranet manager of the organisation, though this door usually also carries a number of other job descriptions, all of which seem to be given more priority by the organisation than the care and development of the intranet. Most organisations of any size will have a full-time web manager, often with a support team, but this is rarely the case with the intranet.</p> <p>There are a substantial number of intranets in the UK. Statistics from the Office for National Statistics indicate that 22% of all businesses have an intranet [<a href="#1">1</a>]. As the size of the business increases so does the level of penetration, and most businesses of more than 500 people will now have some form of intranet. Given the number of businesses in the UK the author estimates that there are probably around 300,000 intranets in the commercial sector, and at a guess a further 100,000 in the public sector, charities, Higher Education institutions (HEIs) and other organisations. Only over the last few years has any reliable statistical information become available on intranet use and development, and this is a in-depth global survey of only around 300 intranets [<a href="#2">2</a>]. In the UK HEI sector a major opportunity was lost in a survey commissioned in 2009 by Eduserv into the management of web content in the HEI sector as no account of intranet use of CMS applications was included in the scope of the survey [<a href="#3">3</a>]. A survey of SharePoint use in HEIs undertaken for Eduserv in late 2009 [<a href="#4">4</a>] did indicate that a number of institutions were using SharePoint for intranet applications but the survey did not look in detail at intranet implementation.</p> <p>It is also only over the last few years have forums been set up in which intranet managers are able to share experiences and challenges with others. The work of the Intranet Benchmark Forum [<a href="#5">5</a>] is focused on providing services to large organisations, but there are also other virtual and physical discussion forums, such as the Intranet Forum [<a href="#6">6</a>] run by UKeiG for its members. It is probably reasonable to suggest that the majority of intranet managers have seen very few intranets from which to gain a sense of good practice, whereas web managers have an almost unlimited supply of sites from which to gain ideas for their own use. This is as true in the HEI sector as in other sectors. Given the installed base of intranets in the UK it is also surprising that there is no 'intranet conference' event even though intranet management does feature in events such as Online Information [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Most countries in northern Europe have an intranet conference [<a href="#8">8</a>], often with several hundred delegates, so why there is no equivalent in the UK is a mystery.</p> <h2 id="Intranets_Are_Different">Intranets Are Different</h2> <p>All too often an intranet is regarded as an internal web site. The reality is that about the only commonality between an intranet and a web site is the use of web browser technology. Many very successful intranets do not even use a web content management application but instead are based on Notes technology or portal applications. Intranet content contribution is usually highly distributed, with individual members of staff publishing content direct to the intranet perhaps only a few times a year. This means that the web content management system has to be highly intuitive, and enable Word documents to be rendered into clean HTML code to create web pages. The teams supporting public web sites are using the systems every working day, working often in HTML and having a much more limited range of content to cope with. Many of the problems that arise in keeping content current on an intranet are a result of staff having to use a complex Web publishing system that was specified for Web site management and not intranet management.</p> <p>Another factor to be considered is that increasingly intranets are federated applications [<a href="#9">9</a>]. This is often the situation in HEIs where each department wants to have its own intranet, and on top of all these individual intranets there is some form of top-level 'corporate' home page and navigation. Often there is no central coordination of these intranets, and so each adopts some or none of the visual design standards of the HEI.</p> <p>As far as enterprise applications are concerned, intranets are different because they are not based on business processes or work-flow. Finance, registry, personnel and most other applications support well-defined processes, usually within a specific department, and where the content requirements are usually specified in database terms. Anything approaching text content is usually relegated to a single field in the database. Intranets exist because there is a substantial amount of information in any organisation that is not based on business processes and cannot be managed within a formal database structure, such as policies, procedures, campus maps, events, staff notices and hundreds of other information formats produced by every department and location within the organisation.</p> <p>As a result the intranet becomes an information dumping ground. Under-resourced intranet managers do not have the resources to maintain content quality, and so multiple versions of documents with no visible ownership or provenance proliferate. Employees leave or change responsibility but the intranet is based on a 'file-and-forget' principle and no effort is taken to ensure that document ownership is transferred to another member of staff. Very quickly the information architecture of the intranet, based usually on the structure of the organisation at the time of the last WCMS (Web content management system) deployment, is not fit for purpose. The decision is taken to implement a search engine, and only then does the scale of the problem of information decay become apparent. It can also be an interesting exercise to search for 'Confidential' and see just how many documents are returned!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article martin white eduserv google harvard university ibm intranet focus ltd jisc microsoft open university university of sheffield adobe blog content management creative commons data database dissemination document management drupal foi higher education html ict information architecture intellectual property intranet knowledge management licence metadata mobile open source passwords portal privacy provenance repositories research rss schema search technology sharepoint standards taxonomy usability web 2.0 web browser wiki Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1530 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk How to Publish Data Using Overlay Journals: The OJIMS Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/callaghan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author1">Sarah Callaghan</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author2">Sam Pepler</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author3">Fiona Hewer</a>, <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author4">Paul Hardaker</a> and <a href="/issue61/callaghan-et-al#author5">Alan Gadian</a> describe the implementation details that can be used to create overlay journals for data publishing in the meteorological sciences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The previous article about the Overlay Journal Infrastructure for Meteorological Sciences (OJIMS) Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] dealt with an introduction to the concept of overlay journals and their potential impact on the meteorological sciences. It also discussed the business cases and requirements that must be met for overlay journals to become operational as data publications.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/callaghan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article alan gadian fiona hewer paul hardaker sam pepler sarah callaghan badc jisc ncas oai royal meteorological society university of leeds ojims opendoar rioja sneep archives browser copyright data data management data set database dissemination dublin core eprints flickr framework identifier infrastructure metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source podcast preservation programming language python rdf repositories research schema search technology software standards video web app web browser wiki xml xml schema xslt Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1508 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Missing Links: The Enduring Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/missing-links-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/missing-links-rpt#author1">Alexandra Eveleigh</a> reports on a workshop on Web archiving, organised by the DPC, JISC and UKWAC at the British Library on 21 July 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2 - 2009-08-06 minor edits from v2.1.1 -REW --><!-- v2 - 2009-08-06 minor edits from v2.1.1 -REW --><p>This workshop, jointly sponsored by the DPC [<a href="#1">1</a>], JISC [<a href="#2">2</a>] and UKWAC [<a href="#3">3</a>], aimed to bring together content creators and tool developers with key stakeholders from the library and archives domains, in the quest for a technically feasible, socially and historically acceptable, legacy for the World Wide Web.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/missing-links-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report alexandra eveleigh british library digital preservation coalition google iso jisc leiden university oxford internet institute the national archives university of london university of oxford west yorkshire archive service internet archive accessibility archives blog data digital preservation file format framework mashup metadata mobile preservation repositories research software standards streaming twitter warc web browser web resources Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1494 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk OAI-ORE, PRESERV2 and Digital Preservation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/rumsey-osteen <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/rumsey-osteen#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> and <a href="/issue57/rumsey-osteen#author2">Ben O'Steen</a> describe OAI-ORE and how it can contribute to digital preservation activities.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The new framework for the description and exchange of aggregations of Web resources, OAI-ORE, had its European release in April 2008 [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Amongst its practical uses, OAI-ORE has a role to play in digital preservation and continued access to files. This article describes the basic outline of the framework and how it can support the PRESERV2 project digital preservation model of provision of preservation services and interoperability for digital repositories.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/rumsey-osteen" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article ben osteen sally rumsey jisc oai the national archives university of oxford brii preserv aggregation archives curation data data management data mining dcmi digital preservation digital record object identification digital repositories dissemination droid dspace eprints fedora commons framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability metadata oai-ore oai-pmh ontologies open archives initiative preservation provenance rdf repositories research resource description search technology semantic web software standards uri url video vocabularies web browser web resources web storage xml Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1435 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Second Life of UK Academics http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kirriemuir <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/kirriemuir#author1">John Kirriemuir</a> introduces a series of studies investigating how the Second Life environment is being used in UK Higher and Further Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/kirriemuir" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article john kirriemuir anglia ruskin university becta coventry university eduserv hefce imperial college london jisc leeds metropolitan university linden lab nesta university of aberdeen university of derby university of hertfordshire university of huddersfield university of hull university of liverpool university of oxford university of strathclyde university of the west of england university of the west of scotland wikipedia avatar browser digital media e-learning further education ict infrastructure interoperability research search technology second life url visualisation web browser Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1353 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Capacity Building: Spoken Word at Glasgow Caledonian University http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/wallace-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue52/wallace-et-al#author1">Iain Wallace</a>, <a href="/issue52/wallace-et-al#author2">Graeme West</a> and <a href="/issue52/wallace-et-al#author3">David Donald</a> give an account of the origins, nature and establishment of Spoken Word Services at Glasgow Caledonian University.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) the <em>Spoken Word</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], a project in the JISC / NSF Digital Libraries in the Classroom (DLiC) programme [<a href="#2">2</a>], was conceived in 2001-2002 in response to a set of pedagogical and institutional imperatives. A small group of social scientists had, since the 1990s, been promoting the idea of using 'an information technology-intensive learning environment' to recapture some of the traditional aspirations of Scottish Higher Education, in particular independent, critical and co-operative learning [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue52/wallace-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue52 feature article david donald graeme west iain wallace apple bbc edina glasgow caledonian university google jisc michigan state university mpeg sakai staffordshire university university of chicago university of hull university of oxford university of strathclyde dlic remap project repomman vsm wikipedia accessibility adobe archives atom authentication bibliographic data browser cataloguing copyright curation data data set database digital library digital media digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination dublin core fedora commons flash flash video google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability java javascript learning objects licence lom metadata mp3 multimedia mysql open access open data open source php plone podcast portal preservation provenance repositories research rss search technology software standards streaming tagging uk lom core url usability video wav web browser web services wiki xml Sun, 29 Jul 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1334 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Citeulike: A Researcher's Social Bookmarking Service http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/emamy-cameron <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/emamy-cameron#author1">Kevin Emamy</a> and <a href="/issue51/emamy-cameron#author2">Richard Cameron</a> describe a tool that helps researchers gather, collect and share papers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3 where the ref 4 is suppressed since information on the projects mentioned not provided by publication date: references were re-ordered don to 6 REW --><!-- v3 where the ref 4 is suppressed since information on the projects mentioned not provided by publication date: references were re-ordered don to 6 REW --><p>This article describes Citeulike, a fusion of Web-based social bookmarking services and traditional bibliographic management tools. It discusses how Citeulike turns the linear 'gather, collect, share' process inherent in academic research into a circular 'gather, collect, share and network' process, enabling the sharing and discovery of academic literature and research papers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/emamy-cameron" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article kevin emamy richard cameron amazon google ieee citeulike wikipedia archives bibliographic data bibliographic database bibliographic record blog browser data data mining data set database google analytics jstor linux metadata opac open source portal research rss search technology social software software standards tagging url web 2.0 web browser web services Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1311 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The JISC Annual Conference 2007 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/jisc-conf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/jisc-conf-rpt#author1">Philip Pothen</a> and colleagues provide an overview of the proceedings of this Spring's JISC Annual Conference.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Opening_Keynote_Address">Opening Keynote Address</h2> <p>The 2007 JISC conference began with a welcome from JISC Executive Secretary <strong>Dr Malcolm Read</strong> who thanked the more than 600 delegates for attending the conference, held for the fifth year running at the ICC in Birmingham.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/jisc-conf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 event report philip pothen ahrc amazon bbc becta british library cetis dcc digital preservation coalition edina eduserv google hefce jisc jisc collections jisc infonet liverpool john moores university microsoft mimas mla nhs oxford brookes university rnib robert gordon university staffordshire university uk data archive ukerna ukoln university of greenwich university of oxford university of southampton university of wales university of wolverhampton wellcome trust e-framework gmsa jisc information environment memetic perseus accessibility aggregation archives browser cataloguing copyright crm curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination e-business e-learning e-science ejournal eportfolio flickr foi foia framework further education higher education ict infrastructure intellectual property interoperability knowledge base mobile mobile phone open access open source openid personalisation portfolio preservation rae repositories research search technology second life sms soa social software software tagging video virtual research environment vle web 2.0 web browser web development web resources wireless application profile youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1315 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Limits to Information Transfer: The Boundary Problem http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/lervik-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue50/lervik-et-al#author1">Jon E. Lervik</a>, <a href="/issue50/lervik-et-al#author2">Mark Easterby-Smith</a>, <a href="/issue50/lervik-et-al#author3">Kathryn Fahy</a> and <a href="/issue50/lervik-et-al#author4">Carole Elliott</a> discuss the challenges in integrating knowledge across boundaries between specialised knowledge communities within an organisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue50/lervik-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue50 feature article carole elliott jon e. lervik kathryn fahy mark easterby-smith harvard university oxford university press university of cambridge university of illinois university of oxford browser database dissemination framework gis hypertext ict infrastructure knowledge management ontologies repositories research visualisation vocabularies web browser Tue, 30 Jan 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1292 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Introducing UnAPI http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/chudnov-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/chudnov-et-al#author1">Dan Chudnov</a> and a team of colleagues describe unAPI, a tiny HTTP API for serving information objects in next-generation Web applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Common Web tools and techniques cannot easily manipulate library resources. While photo sharing, link logging, and Web logging sites make it easy to use and reuse content, barriers still exist that limit the reuse of library resources within new Web services. [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>] To support the reuse of library information in Web 2.0-style services, we need to allow many types of applications to connect with our information resources more easily. One such connection is a universal method to copy any resource of interest.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/chudnov-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article dan chudnov ed summers jeremy frumkin michael j. giarlo mike rylander peter binkley ross singer amazon andrew w mellon foundation ansi ciac d-lib magazine georgia institute of technology google library of congress microsoft mpeg national science foundation niso oai oregon state university university of alberta university of washington yale university apache api archives atom bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing data database didl digital library dublin core fedora commons firefox flickr foaf framework google books html identifier interoperability javascript json library management systems metadata microformats mods namespace oai-pmh opac open archives initiative openurl php plain text rdf repositories rfc rss ruby schema search technology software sru srw standards syndication uri url web 2.0 web app web browser web services wiki wordpress xml xslt z39.50 z39.88 Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1248 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digitising an Archive: The Factory Approach http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/burbridge <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/burbridge#author1">Duncan Burbidge</a> describes a new approach to digitising an archive both as a future-proof substitute and for Web delivery.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The FP6 PrestoSpace Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] aims to develop systems that will permit quick, efficient and economically accessible preservation of analogue media [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/burbridge" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 feature article duncan burbidge apple mpeg archives audio codec avi browser codec copyright data database digitisation drm flash ftp metadata mp3 mpeg-1 mpeg-2 mpeg-4 multimedia preservation quicktime software standards video video codec wav web browser windows windows media Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1227 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk QMSearch: A Quality Metrics-aware Search Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/krowne <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue47/krowne#author1">Aaron Krowne</a> and <a href="/issue47/krowne#author2">Urvashi Gadi</a> present a framework which improves searching in the context of scholarly digital libraries by taking a 'quality metrics-aware' approach.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In this article we present a framework, QMSearch, which improves searching in the context of scholarly digital libraries by taking a 'quality metrics-aware' approach. This means the digital library deployer or end-user can customise how results are presented, including aspects of both ranking and organisation in general, based upon standard metadata attributes and quality indicators derived from the general library information environment.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue47/krowne" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue47 feature article aaron krowne urvashi gadi amazon d-lib magazine emory university google microsoft oai jisc information environment aggregation apache archives browser cache css data data mining data model database digital library doc dublin core fedora commons framework genetic algorithm google scholar html identifier information retrieval interoperability java javascript lucene metadata modelling open archives initiative open source provenance repositories research schema search technology software standards stylesheet usability video visualisation web browser xml xsl xslt Sat, 29 Apr 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1230 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Excuse Me... Some Digital Preservation Fallacies? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/rusbridge#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> argues with himself about some of the assumptions behind digital preservation thinking.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Excuse_me...">Excuse me...</h2> <p>I have been asked to write an article for the tenth anniversary of <em>Ariadne</em>, a venture that I have enjoyed, off and on, since its inception in 1996 as part of the eLib Programme, of which I was then Programme Director.</p> <p>Some years ago I wrote an article entitled "After eLib" [<a href="#1">1</a>] for <em>Ariadne</em>. The original suggestion was for a follow-up "even more after eLib"; however, I now work for JISC, and that probably makes it hard to be objective!</p> <p>In "After eLib", I wrote this paragraph about digital preservation:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/rusbridge" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article chris rusbridge andrew w mellon foundation british library california digital library d-lib magazine dcc harvard university jisc microsoft national library of the netherlands oais the national archives university of edinburgh elib internet archive archives browser curation data digital curation digital library digital preservation digital repositories file format gopher graphics infrastructure interoperability metadata microsoft office national library open source preservation preservation metadata provenance repositories research software wayback machine web browser Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1211 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Accessibility Testing and Reporting With TAW3 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/lauke <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/lauke#author1">Patrick Lauke</a> gives a run-down of the free TAW3 tool to aid in accessibility testing of Web pages.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>When it comes to assessing a Web site's accessibility, any Web designer should know by now that simply running the mark-up though an automated testing tool is not enough. Automated tools are limited, purely testing for syntax, easily ascertained "yes or no" situations and a set of (sometimes quite arbitrary) heuristics, which are often based on an interpretation of accessibility guidelines on the part of the tool's developers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/lauke" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 tooled up patrick lauke university of salford w3c accessibility browser css file format firefox html java schema software standards wcag web browser xml Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1212 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web 2.0: Building the New Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/miller#author1">Paul Miller</a> explores some of the recent buzz around the concept of 'Web 2.0' and asks what it means for libraries and related organisations.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Web 2.0' is a hot story out on the blogosphere right now, with an army of advocates facing off against those who argue that it is nothing new, and their allies with painful memories of Dot Com hysteria in the 1990s. Even respectable media outlets such as <em>Business Week</em> are getting excited, and an expensive conference in San Francisco at the start of October had to turn people away as it passed over 800 registrations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/miller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 feature article paul miller amazon bbc cni coalition for networked information google oreilly talis university of hull wikipedia api blog browser data flickr foi framework google maps html interoperability podcast portal privacy research search technology software technorati uri web 2.0 web browser web services wsrp Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1184 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Opening Up OpenURLs with Autodiscovery http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/chudnov <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/chudnov#author1">Daniel Chudnov</a>, <a href="/issue43/chudnov#author2">Richard Cameron</a>, <a href="/issue43/chudnov#author3">Jeremy Frumkin</a>, <a href="/issue43/chudnov#author4">Ross Singer</a> and <a href="/issue43/chudnov#author5">Raymond Yee</a> demonstrate a 'gather locally, share globally' approach to OpenURLs and metadata autodiscovery in scholarly and non-scholarly environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Library users have never before had so many options for finding, collecting and sharing information. Many users abandon old information management tools whenever new tools are easier, faster, more comprehensive, more intuitive, or simply 'cooler.' Many successful new tools adhere to a principle of simplicity - HTML made it simple for anyone to publish on the Web; XML made it simple for anyone to exchange more strictly defined data; and RSS made it simple to extract and repurpose information from any kind of published resource [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/chudnov" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 feature article daniel chudnov jeremy frumkin raymond yee richard cameron ross singer d-lib magazine georgia institute of technology google ims ims global learning consortium jisc library of congress niso oai oclc oregon state university sakai university of california berkeley yale university citeulike iesr jisc information environment archives bibliographic data bison blog browser cataloguing cookie data database digital library firefox framework google scholar html identifier infrastructure interoperability javascript lucene metadata mets mods oai-pmh open archives initiative openurl personalisation repositories research rss schema search technology service registry sfx software sru srw standards technorati uddi url usability web browser web resources web services wordpress wsdl xml Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1136 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Focus: Using Collaborative Technologies When on the Road http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/web-focus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/web-focus#author1">Brian Kelly</a> argues that since conference delegates now expect to be able to read email on the road, there are additional technologies which might enhance our effectiveness when away from the office.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In today's networked environment conference delegates expect to be able to access their email when attending events away from their normal place of work. It is increasingly the norm to be given a guest username and password which can be used in PC areas, primarily to access email and the Web. However such facilities are not always flexible enough to support the changed working environment in which conference delegates may find themselves, such as being out-of-sync with local working hours during a conference on the other side of the globe.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/web-focus" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 tooled up brian kelly microsoft ucisa ukoln university of bath blog browser instant messaging interoperability microsoft office mobile mobile phone passwords privacy software web browser wiki Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1149 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Advanced Collaboration With the Access Grid http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/daw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue42/daw#author1">Michael Daw</a> describes the Access Grid system and its claim to be an Advanced Collaboration Environment.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Collaboration between institutions based in different cities, countries or continents is becoming the norm in both commercial and academic worlds. The ability to attend meetings and interact with people effectively without incurring all the negative implications associated with travel - such as cost, expense, environmental impact and reduction in productivity - is a truly worthwhile goal.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/daw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue42 feature article michael daw jisc microsoft ukerna university of manchester archives browser data interoperability jabber research software standards video videoconferencing web browser Sun, 30 Jan 2005 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1109 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mozilla Firefox for Rapid Web Development and Testing http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/lauke <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue42/lauke#author1">Patrick Lauke</a> takes a quick look at Firefox, the new browser released by the Mozilla Foundation, and points out useful features and extensions for Web developers.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.mozilla.org/products/firefox/">Mozilla Firefox</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a free, open-source Web browser based on the Mozilla codebase.</p> <p>Version 1.0 was recently released after two years of development, so now may be a good time to evaluate this browser's capabilities.</p> <p>"Out of the box" Mozilla Firefox offers a variety of features catering to both occasional Web surfers and power users. The more advanced functionality can be particularly noted as a real time saver during the Web development process.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue42/lauke" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue42 tooled up patrick lauke alt university of salford w3c browser character encoding css dom firefox framework html internet explorer intranet javascript php repositories url web browser web development web standards xml xul Sun, 30 Jan 2005 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1120 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Cornucopia: An Open Collection Description Service http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/turner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue40/turner#author1">Chris Turner</a> describes the latest phase of Cornucopia development and the opportunities this is opening up for the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="A_Little_History">A Little History</h2> <p>Cornucopia is a searchable database of collections held by cultural heritage institutions throughout the UK. It is developed and managed by the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) and was initially established in response to the Government's <em>Treasures in Trust</em> report which called for a way to be found of recognising the richness and diversity of our collections.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/turner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue40 feature article chris turner ahds british library mla oai ukoln elib apache archives browser collection description content management data data set database html ict infrastructure internet explorer interoperability java linux metadata mysql oai-pmh open archives initiative open source php preservation repositories research rslp schema scripting language search technology software sql standards url web browser web services windows wsdl Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1055 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Focus: The Web on Your TV http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/web-focus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue40/web-focus#author1">Brian Kelly</a> takes a look at a digital TV box which provides Web and email access in your living room.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The potential for use of television for accessing Web resources has been suggested for a number of years without having any significant impact. However the growth in use of digital TV technologies may provide another opportunity for accessing Web and other networked resources from the comfort of your living room.</p> <p>This article introduces the Netgem i-Player digital TV player and describes the implications for Web developers if such devices grow in popularity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/web-focus" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue40 tooled up brian kelly ukoln university of bath w3c accessibility blog browser css flash further education html javascript linux mp3 operating system standards streaming url usb web browser web resources web standards wiki windows xhtml Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1064 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The European Library: Integrated Access to the National Libraries of Europe http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue38/woldering <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue38/woldering#author1">Britta Woldering</a> describes the findings of the recently completed EU Project The European Library, focusing on technical solutions and metadata development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The European Library (<a href="http://www.europeanlibrary.org ">TEL</a>) Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] completed at the end of January 2004. The key aim of TEL was to investigate the feasibility of establishing a new Pan-European service which would ultimately give access to the combined resources of the national libraries of Europe [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The project was partly funded by the European Commission as an accompanying measure under the cultural heritage applications area of Key Action 3 of the Information Societies Technology (IST) research programme.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue38/woldering" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue38 feature article britta woldering oai application profile archives authentication bibliographic data browser cataloguing collection description copyright data database dcmi dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-business html hypertext identifier infrastructure interoperability javascript metadata metadata model namespace national library oai-pmh open archives initiative open source openurl portal python research rslp search technology soap software sru srw url web browser web services xhtml xml xsl z39.50 Fri, 30 Jan 2004 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1007 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Focus: Improving the Quality of Your HTML http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue38/web-focus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue38/web-focus#author1">Brian Kelly</a> outlines a strategy for fixing the most important HTML resources on a Web site.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="The_Importance_of_HTML_Compliance">The Importance of HTML Compliance</h2> <p>A recent Web Focus article [<a href="#1">1</a>] argued that there was a need to ensure HTML resources complied strictly with HTML standards in order to ensure that they would be functional, widely accessible and interoperable. The importance of HTML compliance is growing as the HTML format develops from being primarily an output format used for display by Web browsers to its use as XHTML in which the resource can be transformed for a variety of purposes.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue38/web-focus" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue38 tooled up brian kelly jisc ukoln university of bath w3c blog content management css digital library html interoperability standards web browser web standards xhtml Fri, 30 Jan 2004 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1014 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk OSS Inaugural Conference: Open Source Deployment and Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue38/oss-watch-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue38/oss-watch-rpt#author1">Sebastian Rahtz</a> and <a href="/issue38/oss-watch-rpt#author2">Randy Metcalfe</a> give an overview of the first conference of the Open Source Advisory Service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.oss-watch.ac.uk/">OSS Watch</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a pilot advisory service set up by the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) to provide UK higher and further education with neutral and authoritative guidance about free and open source software and related standards.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue38/oss-watch-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue38 event report randy metcalfe sebastian rahtz andrew w mellon foundation ibm jisc microsoft oss watch oxford university computing services ukoln university of bristol university of oxford jisc information environment browser data framework free software further education intellectual property interoperability java licence linux open source operating system portal research resource discovery software uportal video vle web browser windows xml Fri, 30 Jan 2004 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1018 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Towards a Typology for Portals http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/miller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue37/miller#author1">Paul Miller</a> looks at some of the services we call portals, and argues for better words to describe them.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Regular readers of <em>Ariadne</em> and related publications possibly feel more than a little overwhelmed by the current deluge of portal-related literature; a deluge for which my colleagues and I on the <a href="http://www.fair-portal.hull.ac.uk/">PORTAL</a> Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] must of course accept some responsibility.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/miller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue37 feature article paul miller british museum jisc oai ukoln university of hull university of oxford jisc information environment aggregation archives browser cataloguing graphics higher education html internet explorer interoperability metadata network service personalisation portal rdf research resource discovery rss search technology soap standards uddi url web browser web portal xhtml z39.50 Thu, 30 Oct 2003 00:00:00 +0000 editor 992 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EEVL News http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/eevl <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue37/eevl#author1">Roddy MacLeod</a> describes how EEVL is putting RSS to work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.eevl.ac.uk/">EEVL</a> is the Hub for engineering, mathematics and computing. It is an award-winning free service, which provides quick and reliable access to the best engineering, mathematics, and computing information available on the Internet. It is created and run by a team of information specialists from a number of universities and institutions in the UK, lead by Heriot Watt University.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/eevl" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue37 regular column roddy macleod heriot-watt university jisc oracle centaur eevl browser cataloguing copyright data further education interoperability metadata portal rdf resource discovery rss software syndication url web browser Thu, 30 Oct 2003 00:00:00 +0000 editor 996 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECDL-2003 Web Archiving http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/ecdl-web-archiving-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue37/ecdl-web-archiving-rpt#author1">Michael Day</a> reports on the 3rd ECDL Workshop on Web Archives held in Trondheim, August 2003.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On 21 August 2003, the 3rd ECDL Workshop on Web Archives [<a href="#1">1</a>] [<a href="#2">2</a>] was held in Trondheim, Norway in association with the 7th European Conference on Digital Libraries (ECDL) [<a href="#3">3</a>]. This event was the third in a series of annual workshops that have been held in association with the ECDL conferences held in Darmstadt [<a href="#4">4</a>] and Rome [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue37/ecdl-web-archiving-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue37 event report michael day bnf california digital library d-lib magazine ietf ifla library of congress national library of new zealand the national archives ukoln university of bath university of lisbon internet archive archives ark bibliographic data cataloguing data database digital archive digital library digital preservation document format electronic theses frbr html identifier metadata mets mods naan name mapping authority national library persistent identifier portal preservation repositories research rfc schema search technology software url urn usability web browser xml xml schema Thu, 30 Oct 2003 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1637 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk