Overview of content related to 'file sharing' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/4575/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Book Review: Information Consulting - Guide to good practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a book written by three experienced consultants that seeks to support information professionals in setting themselves up as consultants.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working in information consultancy for over 35 years and not regretted for a moment my choice of career. It’s taken me to over 30 countries and the opportunity to work with an amazing array of organisations in temperatures ranging from 47C to minus 25C. I’ve had project meetings on the top floor of the United Nations building, on a boat anchored in the harbour at Cannes, a luxury hotel in Oman and in a London convent. I’ve flown on HP’s corporate jet, had lunch with Henry Kissinger and was inside the IMF in Washington on 9/11.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review martin white british library intranet focus ltd university of sheffield bibliographic data data e-science file sharing framework information retrieval intranet research search technology Wed, 26 Jun 2013 19:57:38 +0000 lisrw 2453 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Welsh Libraries and Social Media: A Survey http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/tyler#author1">Alyson Tyler</a> outlines the results of a survey of Welsh libraries, their access to, and use of, social media, and offers a sample business case.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians are, in general, often quick to pick up and experiment with new technologies, integrating them into their work to improve the library service. Social media are no exception. This article seeks to show how the adoption of social media by different library sectors in Wales is helping to deliver and promote their library services.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article alyson tyler cymal ukoln welsh government aggregation archives blog ebook facebook file sharing flickr foi further education higher education instant messaging internet explorer moodle multimedia netvibes pageflakes repositories rss social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2227 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23 Things in Public Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/leech#author1">Helen Leech</a> describes a collaborative project to increase front-line staff's understanding and use of Web 2.0 in public libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you know that:</p> <ul> <li>Of the Generation Y – the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s – 96% are members of a social network</li> <li>There are some 200 million blogs on the World Wide Web</li> <li>One in eight couples who married in the USA in 2009 met over the Internet</li> <li>If Facebook were a country, it would be the fourth largest by population in the world after China, the USA and India</li> </ul> <p>All the statistics emanate from Socialnomics [<a href="#1">1</a>]. They are designed to be attention-grabbers, and they will no doubt provoke ferocious debate. However, what is unarguable is that some seismic shifts have taken place on the Internet in the past ten years, and social media and user-generated content now play a huge role in the way many people create and share information and how they communicate with each other.</p> <p>These changes have crept up on public libraries. Ten years ago, we became Internet experts when the People's Network initiative put 30,000 computers into our buildings. We became used to the new role of teaching people how to use a mouse, what a search engine is, how to create an email account. But when it came to content, we tended to leave that to our customers. Friends Reunited came along, followed by Myspace, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, and we were dimly aware of them as social phenomena, but we did not have much to do with them in our day-to-day work.</p> <h2 id="Changes_in_Public_Libraries">Changes in Public Libraries</h2> <p>So what has changed and why do we need to know about them now? The list below is by no means exhaustive but represents some of the main drivers behind changes emerging within public libraries in the UK.</p> <ol> <li>The need to help people get online. As I write, every public library in the UK is being asked to sign up to Race Online [<a href="#2">2</a>], the initiative to get 100% of the population clued up by the time the Olympics happens. The reappointed UK Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox launched the Race Online 2012 campaign in March 2010. The initiative reports that more than 600 partners have pledged to help more than 1.7 million new people to get online by the end of 2012. Its rationale is "to build a UK of near-universal web literacy by the time of the Olympics, with access as easy and affordable as water, electricity or gas and skills considered as fundamental as literacy and numeracy: [its] ambition is to get everyone of working-age online by the end of this Parliament." People need to know the key skills for getting around online, and a large part of these skills involves social networking.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>Changes in the way people communicate. There is a subtle shift taking place in electronic communication, moving onwards from email towards more collaborative methods: file sharing and cloud computing, social media that include information 'walls,' instant messaging and mobile apps. There is growing evidence that Generation Y and the Millenials – the generations born after the late 1980s – are moving towards very different methods of communication. It is important that library staff understand these technologies, since they are going to become as mainstream as email very shortly.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><em>Communities in Control</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>]: you might recognise this as the title of a recent government paper, looking at the need to pass control over political processes to local communities, and how this could be achieved. The principle is being reinforced through the new administration's Big Society initiative [<a href="#4">4</a>]. New technologies are allowing people to mobilise in a way that simply has not been possible before, to create and share content, and to become involved in the running of public libraries in radical new ways. It is also worth looking at the International Association for Public Participation's <em>Spectrum of Public Participation </em>[<a href="#5">5</a>] which gives some idea of the range of ways in which we need to work with our communities, from providing them with information all the way up to acting as facilitators so that they can manage and run services themselves. It is also worth watching the film <em>Us Now</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], which gives a glimpse of the way that new technologies might affect people's relationships with central government and public services. It highlights the way that social networking applications allow huge numbers of people to collaborate to do previously unthinkable things, like run a bank. If communities can make the day-to-day decisions necessary to run a bank or a second division football club, then it starts to become possible that they could do the same for political processes or delivery of public services. Library staff need to understand this culture of engagement, and to understand the tools that facilitate it.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>The economic environment. The next four years, 2010-14, are going to be the hardest public services have seen, and we are going to have to make cost savings everywhere we can. There are clear benefits in collaboration, and the tools that are available for this are improving rapidly. Which is where <em>23 Things</em> comes in.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article helen leech bbc google imperial college london university of huddersfield wikipedia archives blog cataloguing cloud computing database facebook file sharing flickr google wave instant messaging librarything mobile podcast rss search technology social networks software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1565 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk FRBR in Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/taylor-teague <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/taylor-teague#author1">Wendy Taylor</a> and <a href="/issue64/taylor-teague#author2">Kathy Teague</a> describe what they learnt about how FRBR is used at the Celia Library for the Visually Impaired in Helsinki, during their Ulverscroft/IFLA-funded visit.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/taylor-teague" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article kathy teague wendy taylor ifla rnib ukoln bibliographic data bibliographic record cataloguing copyright data file sharing frbr library management systems licence marc21 national library opac search technology standards xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1567 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute: The New Best of the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/williams <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/williams#author1">Caroline Williams</a> describes Intute in the context of the online information environment and outlines aspirations for the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/williams" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article caroline williams ahrc google hefce ilrt intute jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas oreilly sherpa ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of bristol university of huddersfield university of leeds university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome trust ebank uk eprints uk jisc information environment accessibility blog cataloguing data data set database digital library digital repositories eprints file sharing higher education infrastructure personalisation podcast repositories research resource discovery search technology semantic web software vle web 2.0 web resources web services wiki Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1247 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 45: Smaller Might Be Beautiful http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue45/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 45.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>While as a fully paid-up cynic I could be forgiven for fingering the metaphorical revolver on sighting a technology evangelist, the evangelist in question has an excellent track record as <em>Ariadne</em> readers will know. <strong>Paul Miller</strong> in his article <a href="/issue45/miller/">Web 2.0: Building the New Library</a> would seem to lift our eyes above the merely technological and in a series of 'Principles' underpinning Web 2.0 provides us with a set of aims with which relatively few might argue violently - on the face of it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 editorial richard waller d-lib magazine jisc oreilly cree daedalus blog cataloguing copyright creative commons digitisation e-learning eprints file sharing framework open access portal repositories research search technology web 2.0 wsrp Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1183 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events0"></a>PV 2005: Ensuring long-term preservation and adding value to scientific and technical data</p> <p>Royal Society of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK<br />21-23 November 2005</p> <p>This conference is the third of a series on long-term preservation and adding value to scientific data. Topics covered include:</p> <h4 id="Ensuring_long-term_data_preservation">1. Ensuring long-term data preservation</h4> <p>State of the art of data archiving and access techniques, for example:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue45/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue45 news and events richard waller american library association british library cilip d-lib magazine ifla jisc library of congress liverpool john moores university london school of economics mla oai tasi ukoln university of manchester cree archives blog cataloguing content provider copyright data database digital curation digital library digital preservation e-business e-learning file sharing foi foia graphics higher education instructional design intellectual property interoperability marc metadata mobile oai-pmh ontologies open access open source photoshop portal preservation privacy rdf research resource description resource description and access search technology semantic web software standardisation standards svg url vle wsrp xml Sat, 29 Oct 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1200 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Creative Archive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/gerhardt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue44/gerhardt#author1">Paul Gerhardt</a> describes the origins and development of the Creative Archive Project at the BBC.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Last April the BBC, together with Channel 4 Television, the British Film Institute and the Open University, launched the Creative Archive Licence. It was a small act, but it could prove to be a momentous step in how we use moving image and audio in our public and cultural life.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue44/gerhardt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue44 feature article paul gerhardt bbc open university internet archive archives copyright creative commons data file sharing framework licence metadata search technology standards video Fri, 29 Jul 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1159 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Windows Explorer: The Index Server Companion http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue33/nt-explorer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue33/nt-explorer#author1">Brett Burridge</a> describes the Index Server Companion, an application he has created that allows Microsoft Index Server to index content from remote websites and ODBC databases.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Microsoft's Index Server is a service supplied with the Windows NT 4.0 Server and Windows 2000 Server products. The service indexes HTML and other content residing on the file system. These indexed files may be queried using a number of techniques, but of particular relevance to web developers is the ability to build completely customised search facilities based on Active Server Pages (ASP) by making use of Index Server's Component Object Model (COM) objects.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue33/nt-explorer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue33 tooled up brett burridge microsoft oracle university of essex adobe apache browser cataloguing css data database doc e-business file sharing html ldap linux microsoft office mobile mysql open source operating system perl php plain text rtf samba search technology software sql sql server standards url web app web browser windows Wed, 09 Oct 2002 23:00:00 +0000 editor 917 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Invisible Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue30/invisible-web <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue30/invisible-web#author1">Marieke Napier</a> reviews the book: The Invisible Web.</p> </div> </div> </div> <dl> <dd>Chris Sherman and Gary Price</dd> <dd><i>The Invisible Web: Uncovering Information Sources Search Engines Can’t see</i></dd> <dd>Cyber Age Books, 2001. ISBN 0-910965-51-X</dd> <dd>Price: $29.95</dd> </dl> <p>I first became interested in the Invisible Web after seeing Chris Sherman and Gary Price talking at the Internet Librarian International Conference in March this year.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue30/invisible-web" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue30 review marieke guy jisc oracle ukoln university of bath w3c archives browser copyright database file sharing framework ftp gopher graphics metadata passwords png rdf research resource description search technology software svg url vector graphics web resources web services xml Fri, 25 Jan 2002 00:00:00 +0000 editor 863 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk