Overview of content related to 'institutional repository' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/4882/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Digitisation and e-Delivery of Theses from ePrints Soton http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author1">Julian Ball</a> and <a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author2">Christine Fowler</a> describe the partnership between the University of Southampton’s Library Digitisation Unit and its institutional repository for digitising and hosting theses.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Hartley Library at the University of Southampton has in excess of 15,000 bound PhD and MPhil theses on 340 linear metres of shelving. Consultation of the hard-copy version is now restricted to readers making a personal visit to the Library, as no further microfiche copies are being produced by the British Library and no master copies of theses are lent from the Library. Retrieval of theses from storage for readers and their subsequent return requires effort from a large number of staff.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article christine fowler julian ball abbyy british library jisc university of southampton uk theses digitisation project aggregation api archives cataloguing copyright data digitisation electronic theses eprints framework institutional repository jpeg jstor library management systems metadata oai-pmh ocr open access open archives initiative open source optical character recognition preservation repositories research search technology software url xml Tue, 30 Jul 2013 13:13:08 +0000 editor 2499 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Shared Repositories, Shared Benefits: Regional and Consortial Repositories in Japan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author1">Takeo Ozono</a>, <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author2">Daisuke Ueda</a> and <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author3">Fumiyo Ozaki</a> describe the work of the ShaRe Project and its influence upon the development of consortial repositories and the benefits they have brought to Japanese institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The ShaRe Project (Shared Repository Project 2008-2009), which aimed to promote the concept of consortial repositories and facilitate their implementation, has made a significant contribution to the rapid growth of institutional repositories (IRs) in Japan. Following precedents including White Rose Research Online (UK) and SHERPA-LEAP (UK), 14 regional consortial repositories have been set up on a prefectoral basis across Japan<a href="#editor1">*</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article daisuke ueda fumiyo ozaki takeo ozono digital repository federation hiroshima university kagawa university national institute of informatics sherpa sherpa-leap repositories support project rsp wikipedia archives cloud computing content management data database digitisation dspace eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer open access operating system portal repositories research search technology software Sun, 28 Jul 2013 15:11:28 +0000 lisrw 2495 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Access and Research Conference 2013: Discovery, Impact and Innovation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author1">Paula Callan</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author2">Stephanie Bradbury</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author3">Sarah Brown</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author4">Philippa Broadley</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author5">Emma Nelms</a> and <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author6">Christopher Hart</a> report on Open Access and Research 2013 which focused on recent developments and the strategic advantages they bring to the research sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Brisbane, Queensland, Australia was the host location for the second Open Access and Research 2013 conference [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The conference was held at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Gardens Point campus over 31 October – 1 November 2013. QUT has over 45,000 students and has a wide range of specialist research areas.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 event report christopher hart emma nelms paula callan philippa broadley sarah brown stephanie bradbury apple badc elsevier griffith university massachusetts institute of technology niso queensland university of technology university of sydney victoria university aggregation altmetrics archives copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data set dissemination doi e-research eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata open access open data open source portfolio rae repositories research search technology software video Sun, 16 Feb 2014 18:46:48 +0000 2507 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author1">Ikuko Tsuchide</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author2">Yui Nishizono</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author3">Masako Suzuki</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author4">Shigeki Sugita</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author5">Kazuo Yamamoto</a> and <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author6">Hideki Uchijima</a> introduce a number of ideas and projects that have enhanced the progress of the Open Access movement and institutional repositories in Japan over the last ten years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In Japan, Chiba University established the country's first institutional repository, CURATOR [<a href="#1">1</a>] in 2003. Since then, over the last 10 years or so, more than 300 universities and research institutions have set up repositories and the number of full-text items on repositories has exceeded one million [<a href="#2">2</a>]. All the contents are available on Japanese Institutional Repositories Online (JAIRO) [<a href="#3">3</a>] operated by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) [<a href="#4">4</a>] in Japan.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article hideki uchijima ikuko tsuchide kazuo yamamoto masako suzuki shigeki sugita yui nishizono asahikawa medical university cranfield university digital repository federation hokkaido university kagoshima university national institute of informatics osaka university otaru university of commerce sherpa sherpa-leap university of tokyo university of tsukuba repositories support project romeo rsp wikipedia archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data database digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access repositories research search technology standardisation twitter Wed, 10 Jul 2013 17:03:28 +0000 lisrw 2480 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making Citation Work: A British Library DataCite Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a workshop on practical data citation issues for institutions, held at the British Library, London, on 8 March 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Friday, 8 March 2013, I attended the fifth in the series of DataCite workshops run by the British Library [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The British Library Conference Centre was the venue for this workshop on the theme 'Making Citation Work: Practical Issues for Institutions'. I counted myself lucky to get a place: the organisers had had so much interest they had started a reserve list for the event.&nbsp; I could believe it as it was standing room only at one point, though an awkwardly placed pillar may have contributed to that.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/datacite-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report alex ball ahds badc british library california digital library datacite dcc science and technology facilities council ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of exeter university of nottingham university of york open exeter api archives blog cataloguing content negotiation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital object identifier doi framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property metadata open access persistent identifier preservation repositories research schema standards url video vocabularies Tue, 09 Jul 2013 15:38:46 +0000 lisrw 2478 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Upskilling Liaison Librarians for Research Data Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author1">Andrew Cox</a>, <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author2">Eddy Verbaan</a> and <a href="/issue70/cox-et-al#author3">Barbara Sen</a> explore the design of a curriculum to train academic librarians in the competencies to support Research Data Management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For many UK HEIs, especially research-intensive institutions, Research Data Management (RDM) is rising rapidly up the agenda. Working closely with other professional services, and with researchers themselves, libraries will probably have a key role to play in supporting RDM. This role might include signposting institutional expertise in RDM; inclusion of the topic in information literacy sessions for PhD students and other researchers; advocacy for open data sharing; or contributing to the management of an institutional data repository.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/cox-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article andrew cox barbara sen eddy verbaan dcc jisc northumbria university sconul uk data archive university of essex university of sheffield datum for health rdmrose archives bibliographic data bibliometrics cataloguing copyright curation data data citation data management data set digital curation digital library e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository knowledge base knowledge management licence metadata open access open data open education preservation repositories research software web portal Thu, 06 Dec 2012 19:27:43 +0000 lisrw 2402 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk euroCRIS Membership Meeting, Madrid http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> and <a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author2">Brigitte Jörg</a> report on the bi-annual euroCRIS membership and Task Groups meetings which took place in Madrid on 5-6 November 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>euroCRIS membership meetings [<a href="#1">1</a>] are held twice a year, providing members and invited participants with updates on strategic and Task Group progress and plans, as well as the opportunity to share experience of Current Research Information System (CRIS)-related developments and seek feedback. A CERIF (<em>Common European Research Information Format</em>) tutorial is usually included on the first morning for those new to the standard, and the host country reports on local CRIS initiatives in the ‘national’ session.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report brigitte jorg rosemary russell codata elsevier eurocris imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath reposit adobe aggregation bibliometrics blog cerif data data model data set database digital repositories dublin core framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability lod ontologies open access open source portal preservation rdf repositories research research information management software standards visualisation vocabularies xml Thu, 13 Dec 2012 09:07:57 +0000 lisrw 2408 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hydra UK: Flexible Repository Solutions to Meet Varied Needs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the Hydra UK event held on 22 November 2012 at the Library of the London School of Economics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hydra, as described in the opening presentation of this event, is a project initiated in 2008 by the University of Hull, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and DuraSpace to work towards a reusable framework for multi-purpose, multi-functional, multi-institutional repository-enabled solutions for the management of digital content collections [<a href="#1">1</a>]. An initial timeframe for the project of three years had seen all founding institutional partners successfully implement a repository demonstrating these characteristics.&nbsp; Key to the aims of the project has always been to generate wider interest outside the partners to foster not only sustainability in the technology, but also sustainability of the community around this open source development.&nbsp; Hydra has been disseminated through a range of events, particularly through the international Open Repositories conferences [<a href="#2">2</a>], but the sphere of interest in Hydra has now stimulated the holding of specific events in different countries: Hydra UK is one of them.</p> <p>The Hydra UK event was held on 22 November 2012, kindly hosted by the Library at the London School of Economics.&nbsp; Representatives from institutions across the UK, but also Ireland, Austria and Switzerland, came together to learn about the Hydra Project, and to discuss how Hydra might serve their digital content collection management needs.&nbsp; 29 delegates from 21 institutions were present, representing mostly universities but also the archive, museum and commercial sectors.&nbsp; Five presentations were given on Hydra, focusing on the practical experience of using this framework and how it fits into overall system architectures, and time was also deliberately given over to discussion of more specific topics of interest and to allow delegates the opportunity to voice their requirements.&nbsp; The presentations were:</p> <ul> <li>Introduction to Hydra</li> <li>Hydra @ Hull</li> <li>Hydra @ Glasgow Caledonian University</li> <li>Hydra @ LSE</li> <li>Hydra @ Oxford</li> </ul> <h2 id="Introduction_to_Hydra">Introduction to Hydra</h2> <p>Chris Awre from the University of Hull gave the opening presentation.&nbsp; The starting basis for Hydra was mutual recognition by all the founding partners that a repository should be an enabler for managing digital content collections, not a constraint or simply a silo of content.&nbsp; Digital repositories have been put forward and applied as a potential solution for a variety of use cases over the years, and been used at different stages of a content lifecycle.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure1-hydra-rpt-lse-library.jpg" style="width: 178px; height: 178px;" title="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: LSE Library</strong><br /><small>(Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)</small></p> <p>To avoid producing a landscape of multiple repositories all having to be managed to cover these use cases, the Hydra Project sought to identify a way in which one repository solution could be applied flexibly to meet the requirements of different use cases. The idea of a single repository with multiple points of interaction came into being – Hydra – and the concept of individual Hydra ‘head’ solutions.</p> <p>The Hydra Project is informed by two main principles:</p> <ul> <li>No single system can provide the full range of repository-based solutions for a given institution’s needs,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet sustainable solutions require a common repository infrastructure.</li> <li>No single institution can resource the development of a full range of solutions on its own,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet each needs the flexibility to tailor solutions to local demands and workflows.</li> </ul> <p>The Hydra Project has sought to provide the common infrastructure upon which flexible solutions can be built, and shared.</p> <p>The recognition that no single institution can achieve everything it might want for its repository has influenced the project from the start. &nbsp;To quote an African proverb, ‘If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far, go together’. Working together has been vital.&nbsp; To organise this interaction, Hydra has structured itself through three interleaving sub-communities, the Steering Group, the Partners and Developers, as shown by Figure 2.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/hydra-community-structure-v4.jpg" style="width: 661px; height: 506px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><p>The concept of a Hydra Partner has emerged from this model of actively working together, and the project has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) process for any institution wishing to have its use of, and contribution and commitment to Hydra recognised.&nbsp; Starting with the original four partners in 2008, Hydra now has 11 partners, with two more in the process of joining.&nbsp; All have made valuable contributions and helped to make Hydra better.&nbsp; Hydra partnership is not the only route to involvement, though, and there are many in the Hydra developer community who are adopters of the software, but who have not reached a stage where partnership is appropriate.</p> <p>The technical implementation of Hydra was supported through early involvement in the project by MediaShelf, a commercial technical consultancy focused on repository solutions.&nbsp; All Hydra software is, though, open source, available under the Apache 2.0 licence, and all software code contributions are managed in this way.&nbsp; The technical implementation is based on a set of core principles that describe how content objects should be structured within the repository, and with an understanding that different content types can be managed using different workflows.&nbsp; Following these principles, Hydra could be implemented in a variety of ways: the technical direction taken by the project is simply the one that suited the partners at the time.</p> <p>Hydra as currently implemented is built on existing open source components, and the project partners are committed to supporting these over time:</p> <ul> <li>Fedora: one of the digital repository systems maintained through DuraSpace [<a href="#3">3</a>]</li> <li>Apache Solr: powerful indexing software now being used in a variety of discovery solutions [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Blacklight: a next-generation discovery interface, which has its own community around it [<a href="#5">5</a>]</li> <li>Hydra plugin: a collection of components that facilitate workflow in managing digital content [<a href="#6">6</a>]</li> <li>Solrizer: a component that indexes Fedora-held content into a Solr index</li> </ul> <p>These components are arranged in the architecture shown in Figure 3.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure3-hydra-architecture-v4.jpg" style="width: 543px; height: 258px;" title="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 3: Hydra architecture</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><p>A common feature of the last three components in the list above is the use of Ruby on Rails as the coding language and its ability to package up functionality in discrete ‘gems’.&nbsp; This was consciously chosen for Hydra because of its agile programming capabilities, its use of the MVC (Model–View–Controller) structure, and its testing infrastructure.&nbsp; The choice has been validated on a number of occasions as Hydra has developed.&nbsp; However, it was noted that other coding languages and systems could be used to implement Hydra where appropriate.&nbsp; This applies to all the main components, even Fedora.&nbsp; Whilst a powerful and flexible repository solution in its own right, Fedora has proved to be complex to use: Hydra has sought in part to tap this capability through simpler interfaces and interactions.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report chris awre bbc bodleian libraries california digital library duraspace glasgow caledonian university jisc london school of economics sakai stanford university university of hull university of oxford university of virginia hydra jisc information environment remap project apache api archives authentication cataloguing content management data data management data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination eprints fedora commons framework google maps infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata multimedia open source preservation repositories research ruby search technology sharepoint software solr streaming video vle Thu, 13 Dec 2012 19:24:07 +0000 lisrw 2411 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/dobreva-rvw#author1">Milena Dobreva</a> reviews the newly published book of Martin de Saulles which looks at the new models of information production, distribution and consumption.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Writing about information and the changes in the models of its production, distribution and consumption is no simple task. Besides the long-standing debate on what information and knowledge really mean, the world of current technologies is changing at a pace which inevitably influences all spheres of human activity. But the first of those spheres to tackle is perhaps that of information – how we create, disseminate, and use it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review milena dobreva amazon jisc university of brighton university of malta archives big data blog cloud computing data data mining digital library digital preservation digitisation google search information society institutional repository mobile podcast research search technology video wiki Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:49:00 +0000 lisrw 2414 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JISC Research Information Management: CERIF Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> reports on a two-day workshop on research information management and CERIF held in Bristol over 27-28 June 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc1"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>A workshop on Research Information Management (RIM) and CERIF was held in Bristol on 27-28 June 2012, organised by the Innovation Support Centre [<a href="#1">1</a>] at UKOLN, together with the JISC RIM and RCSI (Repositories and Curation Shared Infrastructure) Programmes. It was a follow-up to the CERIF Tutorial and UK Data Surgery [<a href="#2">2</a>] held in Bath in February.</p> <h2 id="Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</h2> <p>The aim was to bring together people working on the various elements of the UK RIM jigsaw to share experience of using CERIF and explore ways of working together more closely. While the first day focused specifically on RIM, the second day widened to explore synergies with the repositories community. Participants therefore included JISC RIM and MRD projects and programme managers, support and evaluation projects, Research Councils, funders and repository infrastructure projects. There were around 30 participants [<a href="#3">3</a>] in total, with some variation across the two days, given the different content. The event was chaired by Josh Brown, RIM Programme Manager and Neil Jacobs, Programme Director, Digital Infrastructure, both at JISC. All presentations as well as breakout session outputs are available via the UKOLN ISC Events site [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <h2 id="The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</h2> <p>The UK community was pleased to welcome Brigitte Jörg [<a href="#5">5</a>] to the meeting, in the first week of her new role at UKOLN’s Innovation Support Centre as National Coordinator for the CERIF Support Project. Brigitte is already well known to British practitioners working with CERIF – both in her role as as CERIF Task Group Leader [<a href="#6">6</a>] at euroCRIS and as advisor to several existing JISC projects. We look forward to working with her on further initiatives – her CERIF expertise will be a huge asset for Research Information Management support and coordination in British Higher Education.</p> <h2 id="UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</h2> <p>There is certainly extensive RIM-related activity in the UK currently, which looks set to continue. The landscape was outlined in the scene setting sessions by myself, based on the CERIF adoption study [<a href="#7">7</a>] carried out earlier this year. The rate of CRIS (Current Research Information System) procurement has increased very rapidly in the last few years, particularly during 2011. For example the first Pure system in the UK was procured jointly by the Universities of Aberdeen and St Andrews in May 2009; now there are 19 UK universities using Pure. Since all CRIS on the market are CERIF-compatible (to a greater or lesser extent) this means that a large number of UK institutions are CERIF users (again, to varying degrees) – around 31% [<a href="#7">7</a>]. The two other CERIF CRIS being used in the UK are CONVERIS (Avedas, Germany) and Symplectic Elements (UK-based); only one UK CERIF CRIS is being developed in-house, at the University of Huddersfield. There is therefore a significant potential user base for the many CERIF-based services discussed over the course of the workshop. Particularly as more institutions reach the end of their CRIS implementation phase, they are going to be looking for opportunities to exploit the interchange benefits offered by CERIF.</p> <h2 id="UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</h2> <p>As a reflection of the intensity of UK CRIS activity, the UK has the largest number of institutional members of euroCRIS – 25. The next country in terms of membership is Germany, with just 13 members (and then the Netherlands, with seven). It is also notable that there were six UK papers (up from three in 2010) at the recent euroCRIS conference in Prague (all openly accessible from the euroCRIS website [<a href="#8">8</a>]), reflecting the growing UK presence at international level. This indicates the significant impact of JISC programmes - both RIM and MRD (Managing Research Data). At euroCRIS meetings other European countries have expressed some envy of the resources currently available in the UK to support RIM development!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report rosemary russell cornell university edina elsevier eurocris hefce imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath university of huddersfield university of oxford university of st andrews devcsi wikipedia blog cerif curation data data model data set dublin core file format framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata ontologies open access open source repositories research research information management schema software standards vocabularies xml Sun, 29 Jul 2012 19:46:13 +0000 lisrw 2367 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Kultivating Kultur: Increasing Arts Research Deposit http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> discusses how the JISC-funded Kultivate Project is encouraging arts research deposit in UK institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Funded by the Deposit strand [<a href="#1">1</a>] JISC Information Environment programme and led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), a Research Centre of the University for the Creative Arts, Kultivate will increase arts research deposit in UK institutional repositories.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article marie-therese gramstadt falmouth university goldsmiths college google jisc leiden university microsoft royal college of art university for the creative arts university of bristol university of chicago university of exeter university of glasgow university of huddersfield university of london university of nottingham university of southampton university of the arts london vads depositmo jisc information environment opendoar reposit repositories support project romeo rsp web2rights archives blog cataloguing copyright curation data database dspace eprints exif framework google search graphics institutional repository metadata multimedia open access open source portfolio repositories research research information management schema screencast search technology software sword protocol vocabularies Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2140 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The CLIF Project: The Repository as Part of a Content Lifecycle http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/green-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/green-et-al#author1">Richard Green</a>, <a href="/issue68/green-et-al#author2">Chris Awre</a> and <a href="/issue68/green-et-al#author3">Simon Waddington</a> describe how a digital repository can become part of the technical landscape within an institution and support digital content lifecycle management across systems.&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At the heart of meeting institutional requirements for managing digital content is the need to understand the different operations through which content goes, from planning and creation through to disposal or preservation.&nbsp; Digital content is created using a variety of authoring tools.&nbsp; Once created, the content is often stored somewhere different, made accessible in possibly more than one way, altered as required, and then moved for deletion or preservation at an appropriate point.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/green-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article chris awre richard green simon waddington bbc jisc kings college london microsoft sakai stanford university university of hull university of virginia clif hydra jisc information environment remap project repomman archives cataloguing content management content management interoperability services data data management digital repositories dublin core e-research fedora commons framework higher education institutional repository metadata mods opac open source preservation repositories research search technology sharepoint software solr standards url Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2225 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Adapting VuFind as a Front-end to a Commercial Discovery System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/seaman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/seaman#author1">Graham Seaman</a> describes the adaptation of an open source discovery tool, VuFind, to local needs, discusses the decisions which needed to be made in the process, and considers the implications of this process for future library discovery systems.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>VuFind is an open source discovery system originally created by Villanova University near Philadelphia [<a href="#1">1</a>] and now supported by Villanova with the participation in development of libraries around the world. It was one of the first next-generation library discovery systems in the world, made possible by the open source Solr/Lucene text indexing and search system which lies at the heart of VuFind (Solr also underlies several of the current commercial offerings, including Serials Solutions' Summon and ExLibris' Primo).</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/seaman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 tooled up graham seaman google minnesota state colleges and universities national library of australia royal holloway serials solutions university of london villanova university western michigan university worldcat ajax api archives authentication cataloguing data database ejournal free software identifier institutional repository library catalogs library management systems lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh opac open source openurl php repositories resource discovery restful ruby search technology sfx software solr standards usability vufind wiki Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2226 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 68 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> issue 68.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I am pleased to introduce you to the content of Issue 68, and to have the opportunity to remind you that you have a far larger number of channels into the publication’s content.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 editorial richard waller british library jisc massachusetts institute of technology national academy of sciences royal holloway sakai clif depositmo hydra opendoar repositories support project rsp aggregation archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data data citation data set digital repositories digitisation dissemination doi eprints facebook fedora commons foi framework higher education ict identifier information retrieval instant messaging institutional repository library management systems lucene metadata ms word multimedia ocr oer opac open source openurl preservation repositories research resource description resource discovery rss search technology second life sfx sharepoint software solr standardisation sword protocol taxonomy twitter vufind web 2.0 wordpress xml Mon, 12 Mar 2012 15:17:06 +0000 lisrw 2322 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 66: Sanity Check http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 66.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With institutions searching to increase the impact of the work they do, and conscious of the immediate impact of any event they organise, many will be interested to read of <a href="/issue66/guy/">10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event</a> in which <strong>Marieke Guy</strong> provides a raft of suggestions to enhance the participants' experience of and involvement in, the event they are attending.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 editorial richard waller british library google jisc ukoln university of pretoria e-curator keepit zetoc aggregation archives blog browser copyright curation data database digital audio digital preservation digital repositories file format flickr framework geospatial data gis identifier institutional repository learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone netvibes open access open source personalisation podcast preservation privacy refworks repositories research resource description and access rss search technology software streaming tagging twitter usability video web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1602 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Characterising and Preserving Digital Repositories: File Format Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> and <a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author2">David Tarrant</a> show how file format profiles, the starting point for preservation plans and actions, can also be used to reveal the fingerprints of emerging types of institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article david tarrant steve hitchcock amazon google harvard university jisc microsoft mpeg the national archives university of illinois university of northampton university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome library jisc information environment keepit wikipedia accessibility adobe archives bibliographic data blog cloud computing css csv curation data data management database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination document format droid eprints file format flash flash video framework gif graphics html hypertext identifier institutional repository java jpeg latex linked data metadata mpeg-1 open access open source photoshop php plain text preservation quicktime repositories research schema semantic web software standards vector graphics video web 2.0 wiki windows windows media xml xml schema Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1608 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk From Passive to Active Preservation of Electronic Records http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/briston-estlund <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/briston-estlund#author1">Heather Briston</a> and <a href="/issue65/briston-estlund#author2">Karen Estlund</a> provide a narrative of the process adopted by the University of Oregon in order to integrate electronic records management into its staff's workflow.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2 of article incorporating edits from XHTML view 20101123 - rew --><!-- v2 of article incorporating edits from XHTML view 20101123 - rew --><p>Permanent records of the University of Oregon (UO) are archived by the Special Collections and University Archives located within the University Libraries. In the digital environment, a new model is being created to ingest, curate and preserve electronic records. This article discusses two case studies working with the Office of the President to preserve electronic records.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/briston-estlund" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article heather briston karen estlund google microsoft oais the national archives university of oregon adobe archives blog cataloguing content management data management digital asset management digital preservation digital record object identification digital repositories droid dspace dvd ead eportfolio file format identifier infrastructure institutional repository microsoft office ocr optical character recognition preservation privacy repositories standards tagging video web 2.0 xml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1584 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Researchers across the EResearch Chasm http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wolski-richardson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wolski-richardson#author1">Malcolm Wolski</a> and <a href="/issue65/wolski-richardson#author2">Joanna Richardson</a> outline an Australian initiative to address technology challenges within current research paradigms.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 1999 Sir John Taylor [<a href="#1">1</a>], then Director General of the UK Research Councils, talked about <em>e-Science</em>, i.e. global collaboration in key areas of science and the next generation of infrastructure that will support it. It encompasses computationally intensive science that is carried out in highly distributed network environments or that uses immense datasets that require grid computing. In the US the term <em>cyberinfrastructure</em> has been used to describe the new research environments that support advanced data acquisition, data storage, data management, data integration, data mining, data visualisation and other computing and information processing services over the Internet. In Australia—and other countries—the term <em>eResearch</em> extends e-Science and cyberinfrastructure to other disciplines, including the humanities and social sciences, and denotes the use of information technology to support existing and new forms of research.</p> <p>It is within this rapidly evolving context that the researcher of the 21st century now operates. However not all researchers are responding to changes in this new environment. In this article we will examine the current research paradigm, the main drivers for researchers to engage with this paradigm, reasons for lack of engagement, and a project undertaken at an Australian university—as part of a national initiative—to start to address the problem of making data from research activity, past and current, more discoverable and accessible.</p> <h2 id="Trends_in_the_Evolution_of_Research_Paradigms">Trends in the Evolution of Research Paradigms</h2> <p>Gray [<a href="#2">2</a>] discusses the evolution of research paradigms which has led to the increasingly important role that information technology now plays in supporting research. For thousands of years there was experimental / empirical science followed in the last few hundred years by theoretical science. The third research paradigm, which evolved in the last few decades, was characterised by increasingly complex research challenges based principally on large-scale computational simulation. This led to the concept of holistic systems of systems; the evolution from wet labs (hands-on scientific research and experimentation) to virtual labs; and an emphasis on modelling, simulation, projection and prediction.</p> <p>E-Science / cyberinfrastructure / eResearch are short-hand terms for a new fourth paradigm which is characterised by data-intensive science. The focus is on data analysis and mining; patterns discovery; and the evolution of large databases and data archives. One by-product is the so-called 'data deluge', which has led to enormous challenges in research data management. The fourth paradigm is changing the longstanding model of scholarly communication as, in the words of Clifford Lynch [<a href="#2">2</a>], 'the paper becomes a window for a scientist to not only actively understand a scientific result, but also reproduce it or extend it'. This latest paradigm is also characterised by the collaborative and multidisciplinary nature of the research being undertaken at both national and international levels.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wolski-richardson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article joanna richardson malcolm wolski cornell university griffith university iso microsoft national library of australia national science foundation oai oclc queensland university of technology accessibility archives content management creative commons data data management data mining data set data visualisation database disruptive innovation dublin core e-research e-science foaf framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata namespace national library oai-pmh ontologies open access open archives initiative open source owl preservation rae rdf repositories research resource description and access semantic web skos software standards visualisation Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1591 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Fringe 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> (and friends) report on the Repository Fringe "unconference" held at the National e-Science Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, over 2-3 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>2010 was the third year of Repository Fringe, and slightly more formally organised than its antecedents, with an increased number of discursive presentations and less in the way of organised chaos! The proceedings began on Wednesday 1 September with a one-day, pre-event SHERPA/RoMEO API Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project team.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report martin donnelly cetis dcc duraspace edina google jisc open university sherpa ukoln university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of hull university of southampton university of st andrews addressing history crispool datashare depositmo hydra jorum memento repomman reposit repositories support project romeo sharegeo sneep wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data blog content management content negotiation csv curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi dspace eprints fedora commons file format framework geospatial data gis google maps hashtag html hypertext identifier infrastructure institutional repository ipad kml learning objects mashup metadata national library oer ontologies open access open source preservation repositories research rss search technology social networks solr standards tagging twitter uri video visualisation wordpress yahoo pipes Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1592 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Survive or Thrive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt#author1">Ed Fay</a> reports on a two-day conference organised by UKOLN on behalf of JISC to consider growth and use of digital content on the Web, which was held in Manchester in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Survive or Thrive [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the punchy title given to an event intended to stimulate serious consideration amongst digital collections practitioners about future directions in our field - opportunities but also potential pitfalls. The event, which focused on content in HE, comes at a time of financial uncertainty when proving value is of increasing importance in the sector and at a point when significant investment has already been made in the UK into content creation, set against a backdrop of increasingly available content on the open Web from a multitude of sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report ed fay apple bbc california digital library cerlim edina eduserv google jisc jisc digital media london school of economics massachusetts institute of technology ordnance survey rdtf talis the national archives university of huddersfield accessibility aggregation agile development api archives blog cataloguing data digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dissemination domain model e-learning flickr geospatial data gis html identifier information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository interoperability itunes javascript linked data mashup metadata mobile personalisation preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks software solr standards tagging text mining twitter usability widget Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1593 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Software Comparison: Building Digital Library Infrastructure at LSE http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/fay#author1">Ed Fay</a> presents a comparison of repository software that was carried out at LSE in support of digital library infrastructure development.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/fay" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article ed fay british library d-lib magazine london school of economics oai oais university of york wellcome library safir access control aggregation api archives authentication authentication service blog cataloguing content management data data management data model database digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dspace eprints fedora commons geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure institutional repository ldap library management systems linked data metadata mobile multimedia national library open access open source persistent identifier preservation preservation metadata repositories research schema search technology shibboleth software standards twitter uri video vle web app xacml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1560 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Libraries for the Data Challenge http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/salo#author1">Dorothea Salo</a> examines how library systems and procedures need to change to accommodate research data.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Eager to prove their relevance among scholars leaving print behind, libraries have participated vocally in the last half-decade's conversation about digital research data. On the surface, libraries would seem to have much human and technological infrastructure ready-constructed to repurpose for data: digital library platforms and institutional repositories may appear fit for purpose. However, unless libraries understand the salient characteristics of research data, and how they do and do not fit with library processes and infrastructure, they run the risk of embarrassing missteps as they come to grips with the data challenge.</p> <p>Whether managing research data is 'the new special collections,'[<a href="#1">1</a>] a new form of regular academic-library collection development, or a brand-new library specialty, the possibilities have excited a great deal of talk, planning, and educational opportunity in a profession seeking to expand its boundaries.</p> <p>Faced with shrinking budgets and staffs, library administrators may well be tempted to repurpose existing technology infrastructure and staff to address the data curation challenge. Existing digital libraries and institutional repositories seem on the surface to be a natural fit for housing digital research data. Unfortunately, significant mismatches exist between research data and library digital warehouses, as well as the processes and procedures librarians typically use to fill those warehouses. Repurposing warehouses and staff for research data is therefore neither straightforward nor simple; in some cases, it may even prove impossible.</p> <h2 id="Characteristics_of_Research_Data">Characteristics of Research Data</h2> <p>What do we know about research data? What are its salient characteristics with respect to stewardship?</p> <h3 id="Size_and_Scope">Size and Scope</h3> <p>Perhaps the commonest mental image of research data is terabytes of information pouring out of the merest twitch of the Large Hadron Collider Project. So-called 'Big Data' both captures the imagination of and creates sheer terror in the practical librarian or technologist. 'Small data,' however, may prove to be the bigger problem: data emerging from individual researchers and labs, especially those with little or no access to grants, or a hyperlocal research focus. Though each small-data producer produces only a trickle of data compared to the like of the Large Hadron Collider Project, the tens of thousands of small-data producers in aggregate may well produce as much data (or more, measured in bytes) as their Big Data counterparts [<a href="#2">2</a>]. Securely and reliably storing and auditing this amount of data is a serious challenge. The burgeoning 'small data' store means that institutions without local Big Data projects are by no means exempt from large-scale storage considerations.</p> <p>Small data also represents a serious challenge in terms of human resources. Best practices instituted in a Big Data project reach all affected scientists quickly and completely; conversely, a small amount of expert intervention in such a project pays immense dividends. Because of the great numbers of individual scientists and labs producing small data, however, immensely more consultations and consultants are necessary to bring practices and the resulting data to an acceptable standard.</p> <h3 id="Variability">Variability</h3> <p>Digital research data comes in every imaginable shape and form. Even narrowing the universe of research data to 'image' yields everything from scans of historical glass negative photographs to digital microscope images of unicellular organisms taken hundreds at a time at varying depths of field so that the organism can be examined in three dimensions. The tools that researchers use naturally shape the resulting data. When the tool is proprietary, unfortunately, so may be the file format that it produced. When that tool does not include long-term data viability as a development goal, the data it produces are often neither interoperable nor preservable.</p> <p>A major consequence of the diversity of forms and formats of digital research data is a concomitant diversity in desired interactions. The biologist with a 3-D stack of microscope images interacts very differently with those images than does a manuscript scholar trying to extract the underlying half-erased text from a palimpsest. These varying affordances <em>must</em> be respected by dissemination platforms if research data are to enjoy continued use.</p> <p>One important set of interactions involves actual changes to data. Many sorts of research data are considerably less usable in their raw state than after they have had filters or algorithms or other processing performed on them. Others welcome correction, or are refined by comparison with other datasets. Two corollaries emerge: first, that planning and acting for data stewardship must take place throughout the research process, rather than being an add-on at the end; and second, that digital preservation systems designed to steward only final, unchanging materials can only fail faced with real-world datasets and data-use practices.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/salo" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article dorothea salo california digital library dcc google oai university of wisconsin hydra algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cookie curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination drupal dspace dublin core eprints fedora commons file format flickr google docs infrastructure institutional repository interoperability library management systems linked data marc metadata mods oai-pmh open source preservation rdf repositories research search technology software standardisation standards sword protocol wiki xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1566 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Data Services for the Sciences: A Needs Assessment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/westra#author1">Brian Westra</a> describes a data services needs assessment for science research staff at the University of Oregon.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Computational science and raw and derivative scientific data are increasingly important to the research enterprise of higher education institutions. Academic libraries are beginning to examine what the expansion of data-intensive e-science means to scholarly communication and information services, and some are reshaping their own programmes to support the digital curation needs of research staff. These changes in libraries may involve repurposing or leveraging existing services, and the development or acquisition of new skills, roles, and organisational structures [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>Scientific research data management is a fluid and evolving endeavour, reflective of the high rate of change in the information technology landscape, increasing levels of multi-disciplinary research, complex data structures and linkages, advances in data visualisation and analysis, and new tools capable of generating or capturing massive amounts of data.</p> <p>These factors can create a complex and challenging environment for managing data, and one in which libraries can have a significant positive role supporting e-science. A needs assessment can help to characterise scientists' research methods and data management practices, highlighting gaps and barriers [<a href="#2">2</a>], and thereby improve the odds for libraries to plan appropriately and effectively implement services in the local setting [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Methods">Methods</h2> <p>An initiative to conduct a science data services needs assessment was developed and approved in early 2009 at the University of Oregon. The initiative coincided with the hiring of a science data services librarian, and served as an initial project for the position. A researcher-centric approach to the development of services was a primary factor in using an assessment to shape services [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The goals of the project were to:</p> <ul> <li>define the information services needs of science research staff;</li> <li>inform the Libraries and other stakeholders of gaps in the current service structures; and</li> <li>identify research groups or staff who would be willing to participate in, and whose datasets would be good subjects for, pilot data curation projects.</li> </ul> <p>The library took the lead role on the assessment, consulting with other stakeholders in its development and implementation. Campus Information Services provided input on questions regarding campus information technology infrastructure, and to avoid unnecessary overlap with other IT service activities focused on research staff. The Vice President for Research and other organisational units were advised of the project and were asked for referrals to potential project participants. These units provided valuable input in the selection of staff contacts. Librarian subject specialists also suggested staff who might be working with data and interested in participating. Librarians responsible for digital collections, records management, scholarly communications, and the institutional repository were involved in the development of the assessment questions and project plan.</p> <p>The questions used in the assessment were developed through an iterative process. A literature and Web review located several useful resources and examples. These included the University of Minnesota Libraries' study of scientists' research behaviours [<a href="#3">3</a>], and a study by Henty, et al. on the data management practices of Australian researchers [<a href="#5">5</a>]. The Data Audit Framework (DAF - now called the Data Asset Framework) methodology was considered to provide the most comprehensive set of questions with a field-tested methodology and guidelines [<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>][<a href="#8">8</a>][<a href="#9">9</a>][<a href="#10">10</a>][<a href="#11">11</a>]. The stages outlined in the DAF methodology were also instructive, although we elected not to execute a process for identifying and classifying assets (DAF Stage 2), since the organisational structure of our departments and institutes are not conducive to that level of investigation. From the beginning it was recognised that recruitment of scientists was based as much on their willingness to participate as their responsibility for any specific class or type of research-generated data.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article brian westra arl edina imperial college london jisc johns hopkins university microsoft uk data archive university of edinburgh university of essex university of glasgow university of illinois university of oregon university of oxford university of washington archives authentication csv curation data data management data set data visualisation database digital curation digital library drupal e-research e-science file format framework gis higher education infrastructure institutional repository metadata mysql open access provenance repositories research usability visualisation Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1568 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Repositories 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/or-10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/or-10-rpt#author1">Philip Hunter</a> and <a href="/issue64/or-10-rpt#author2">Robin Taylor</a> report on the Open Repositories Conference held in Madrid between 6 -9 July 2010 at the Palacio de Congresos.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The air temperature in Madrid was around 37ºC when the Edinburgh contingent arrived in mid-afternoon on 5 July. The excellent air-conditioned Metro took us all the way into town - about 14km - for only 2 Euros. We were told later that the temperature during the preceding week had been about 21ºC, but by the end of the conference week we were enjoying 39ºC. The conference venue turned out to be opposite the Santiago Bernabeu stadium (home of Real Madrid), in Paseo de la Castellana.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/or-10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report philip hunter robin taylor cornell university duraspace elsevier google microsoft orcid university of edinburgh university of london university of oxford university of southampton depositmo devcsi blog curation data database digital library digital repositories dspace eprints equella facebook fedora commons framework google analytics higher education identifier institutional repository metadata microsoft office open access repositories research research information management search technology software solr standards sword protocol tagging Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1571 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Learning How to Play Nicely: Repositories and CRIS http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/wrn-repos-2010-05-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/wrn-repos-2010-05-rpt#author1">Nick Sheppard</a> reports on the event examining integrated, systemic approaches to research information management organised by the Welsh Repository Network and supported by JISC and ARMA at Leeds Metropolitan University, in May 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>More than 60 delegates convened at the Rose Bowl in Leeds on 7 May 2010 for this event to explore the developing relationship and overlap between Open Access research repositories and so called 'CRISs' – Current Research Information Systems – that are increasingly being implemented at universities.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/wrn-repos-2010-05-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report nick sheppard eurocris hefce jisc leeds metropolitan university oai university of aberdeen university of glasgow university of st andrews university of sunderland wellcome trust wrn archives bibliographic data blog cerif copyright data data management data model database dspace eprints framework guid higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability ldap linked data metadata oai-pmh open access preservation rae repositories research research information management semantic web software standards Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1575 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Archives in Web 2.0: New Opportunities http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/nogueira <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/nogueira#author1">Marta Nogueira</a> describes how three Web 2.0 applications (Facebook, Flickr, YouTube) can work as a virtual extension for archives and other cultural organisations, by identifying benefits obtained from the use of Web 2.0 applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Archives are using Web 2.0 applications in a context that allows for new types of interaction, new opportunities regarding institutional promotion, new ways of providing their services and making their heritage known to the community. Applications such as Facebook (online social network), Flickr (online image-sharing community) and YouTube (online video sharing community) are already used by cultural organisations that interact in the informal context of Web 2.0.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/nogueira" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article marta nogueira google library of congress new university of lisbon the national archives university of lisbon archives blog data database e-government facebook flickr geospatial data gis information retrieval institutional repository national library ontologies portal privacy repositories rss search technology social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 web services youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1541 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Science in Transition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews an edited volume published to commemorate the founding of the Institute of Information Scientists in 1958.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><p>Until it joined with the Library Association in 2002 to form the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), the Institute of Information Scientists was a professional organisation for those primarily working in scientific and technical information work. The chapters in this volume were first published in 2008 as a special issue of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> to commemorate the founding of the institute in 1958. In accordance with this, many of the chapters provide a retrospective - sometimes even anecdotal - overview of developments in information science in the UK since the 1950s. While the approach of the volume is thematic, a major focus is on key initiatives and individuals, the latter including such luminaries as Jason Farradane, Cyril Cleverden and Karen Spärk Jones.</p> <p>Following a guest editorial by Brian Vickery, there are sixteen chapters in the book. While each chapter stands alone, conceptually the volume moves - with some exceptions - from largely retrospective reviews of past progress in information science by scholars of the older generation to overviews of current trends and technologies by their younger colleagues. Vickery's editorial tries to place information science in its historical context, explaining how the advent of digital computers and the Internet has transformed the discipline dramatically while simultaneously making its future more uncertain. This is also a view articulated by several of the volume contributors.</p> <p>The opening chapter is an attempt by Jack Meadows to discern the main research themes in UK information science over the past 50 years. A survey of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> and other journals showed that the predominant theme was information retrieval, but that there was also important research being undertaken into information seeking, communication and bibliometrics. The chapter also tries to delineate some of the factors affecting information science research in the UK, for example noting the negative consequences of the demise of the old British Library Research and Development Department in the 1990s [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He concludes, however, on a positive note, pointing out that 'activities that were relatively marginal decades ago - such as automated information retrieval - are now at the heart of major growth industries' (p. 17). He also notes that the widening interest in information science concepts has brought in researchers from other disciplines - which is probably one of the key lessons of the whole book. In the second chapter, David Bawden (City University) again uses the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> as a means of exploring the development of the information science discipline itself, focusing on the underlying philosophical bases of the subject proposed by scholars like Bertie Brookes and Jason Farradane.</p> <p>The third chapter is by Stella Dextre Clarke. This is a retrospective of fifty years of knowledge organisation work in the information science domain that takes a partly anecdotal approach, attempting to illustrate 'how it felt to work in those times' (p. 45). Perhaps the best aspect of this is that it enables Dextre Clarke to give the reader a feel for what information retrieval could be like in the card-based pre-computer age. The chapter opens with a brief overview of the state of subject classification in the late 1950s, noting the continued practical predominance of enumerative schemes like the Dewey Decimal Classification while the theoreticians S. R. Ranganathan and Henry E. Bliss were still working away developing their (then) revolutionary ideas of 'faceted classification.' The focus then changes to the development of thesauri, noting the importance of Jean Aitchison's pioneering work on thesaurus construction. Dextre Clarke then provides a very brief overview of the role of controlled vocabularies in the early information retrieval tests conducted as part of the Aslib-Cranfield Research Project, a topic covered in more detail in the following chapter. Finally, moving to the present day, Dextre Clarke notes the continued importance of controlled vocabularies in the form of taxonomies and provides some pointers for a future Semantic Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review michael day british library cilip edinburgh napier university indiana university library association london school of economics loughborough university microsoft stm ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of wolverhampton citeulike bibliographic data bibliometrics blog controlled vocabularies copyright data data mining data set database dewey decimal digital library ejournal facebook flickr ict information retrieval institutional repository metadata national library open access privacy repositories research rss second life semantic web social software standards thesaurus twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1555 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Towards a Toolkit for Implementing Application Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/chaudhri-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author1">Talat Chaudhri</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author2">Julian Cheal</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author3">Richard Jones</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author4">Mahendra Mahey</a> and <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author5">Emma Tonkin</a> propose a user-driven methodology for the iterative development, testing and implementation of Dublin Core Application Profiles in diverse repository software environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/chaudhri-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin julian cheal mahendra mahey richard jones talat chaudhri cetis jisc oai ukoln university of bath geospatial application profile gnu iemsr images application profile jisc information environment lmap opendoar tbmap wikipedia application profile archives blog cerif data data model database dcap dcmi digital repositories domain model dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-government eprints fedora commons framework frbr geospatial data gis higher education identifier information architecture institutional repository interoperability metadata metadata model oai-ore open access open archives initiative open source rdf repositories research resource description ruby schema scholarly works application profile search technology software standards sword protocol uri usability virtual research environment vocabularies xml Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1522 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Fedora UK & Ireland / EU Joint User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the first coming together of two regional user groups for the Fedora digital repository system, hosted by the University of Oxford in December 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><p>The Fedora digital repository system [<a href="#1">1</a>] (as opposed to the Fedora Linux distribution, with which there is no connection) is an open source solution for the management of all types of digital content. Its development is managed through DuraSpace [<a href="#2">2</a>], the same organisation that now oversees DSpace, and carried out by developers around the world. The developers, alongside the extensive body of Fedora users, form the community that sustains Fedora.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report chris awre bbc duraspace ieee jisc kings college london stanford university technical university of denmark university of edinburgh university of hull university of oxford university of southampton university of virginia bril datashare hydra idmb cloud computing content management data data management database digital repositories dspace e-research e-science eprints fedora commons flickr framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository linux metadata mobile open source portal qr code rdbms rdf repositories research search technology software usability virtual research environment wiki xml youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1531 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Digital Preservation Roadshow 2009-10: The Incomplete Diaries of Optimistic Travellers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/dp-rdshw-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/dp-rdshw-rpt#author1">William Kilbride</a> and <a href="/issue62/dp-rdshw-rpt#author2">Malcolm Todd</a> report on the Digital Preservation Roadshow - an eleven month tour of the UK and Ireland designed to provide archivists and record managers with practical advice and support in managing digital resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/dp-rdshw-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report malcolm todd william kilbride aberystwyth university cymal digital preservation coalition jisc library of congress mla national library of wales oasis the national archives ukoln university college dublin university of glasgow university of hull university of york wellcome library wellcome trust west yorkshire archive service archives born digital curation data data management digital archive digital audio digital preservation digital repositories digitisation droid higher education institutional repository metadata national library podcast preservation repositories research vocabularies Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1533 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt#author1">Dave Puplett</a> reports on the conference Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context held at the British Library in January 2010. The conference launched Economists Online (EO), an innovative economics subject repository.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Institutional repositories are now common in Higher Education, but successful examples of subject repositories, which cater to an entire discipline, are much rarer. The Subject Repositories conference taught some key lessons about the role of transnational collaboration in setting up a subject repository. The conference drew on the expertise of renowned specialists in the field and the two and a half-year-long development process of Economists Online [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report dave puplett cni coalition for networked information google harvard university jisc london school of economics monash university tilburg university university college london repec bibliographic data data data management data set database digital preservation digitisation e-research framework google scholar higher education information society infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability metadata national library open access portal preservation repositories research research information management resource discovery search technology software sword protocol usability video Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1534 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 61: The Double-edged Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 61.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Perhaps one of the current benchmarks for gauging when a Web technology has migrated from the cluttered desks of the technorati to the dining tables of the chatterati is if it becomes a topic for BBC Radio 4's <em>The Moral Maze</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>]. More accustomed to discussing matters such as child-rearing or a controversial pronouncement of the Archbishop of Canterbury, the panel members who, over the years have ranged from the liberal to the harrumphing illiberal (and in one case, both at the same time), recently did battle over Twitter [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 editorial richard waller bbc jisc mimas national library of wales sherpa ukoln university of birmingham university of york ojims yodl yodl-ing access control ajax archives blog curation data data set digital library digital repositories digitisation fedora commons framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository javascript ldap mobile national library open access provenance repositories research search technology software technorati twitter web 2.0 xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1505 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Scientific Communication through Aggregated Publications http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/hogenaar <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/hogenaar#author1">Arjan Hogenaar</a> describes changes in the publication and communication process which will mean that the role of authors will become a more prominent one.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2, 2009-11-23-09-43, incorporating AH's 2 final edits REW --><!-- version 2, 2009-11-23-09-43, incorporating AH's 2 final edits REW --><p>The Internet has caused a revolution in the way scientists and scholars have access to scholarly output. Only 15 years ago, the (university) library decided what sources should be offered to the staff and individual scientists could only hope the librarian would listen to their wishes. In this system scientists frequently had no instantaneous access to the information they wanted. In such instances they had to rely on the Interlibrary Loan System.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/hogenaar" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article arjan hogenaar bbc elsevier oai royal netherlands academy of arts and sciences surffoundation university of groningen w3c escape project preserv aggregation archives atom content management data data model data set didl digital curation digital preservation e-research e-science fedora commons foaf frbr identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability linked data metadata oai-ore oai-pmh ontologies open access open archives initiative preservation rdf repositories research search technology semantic web tagging uri url video vocabularies web app web resources xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1509 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UK Institutional Repository Search: Innovation and Discovery http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/lyte-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/lyte-et-al#author1">Vic Lyte</a>, <a href="/issue61/lyte-et-al#author2">Sophia Jones</a>, <a href="/issue61/lyte-et-al#author3">Sophia Ananiadou</a> and <a href="/issue61/lyte-et-al#author4">Linda Kerr</a> describe an innovative tool to showcase UK research output through advanced discovery and retrieval facilities.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Institutional repositories are a major element of the Open Access movement. More specifically in research and education, the main purpose is to make available as much of the research output of an institution as possible.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/lyte-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article linda kerr sophia ananiadou sophia jones vic lyte google ibm intute jisc microsoft mimas oclc sherpa ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of cambridge university of manchester university of nottingham automatic metadata generation opendoar repomman wikipedia aggregation algorithm apache archives bibliographic data cloud computing data digital library e-research framework google scholar google search higher education information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository lucene metadata open access personalisation preservation repositories research search technology semantic web taxonomy text mining uima visualisation web 2.0 Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1511 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk SHERPA to YODL-ING: Digital Mountaineering at York http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/allinson-harbord <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/allinson-harbord#author1">Julie Allinson</a> and <a href="/issue60/allinson-harbord#author2">Elizabeth Harbord</a> describe the development of digital repositories for the University of York.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The University Library &amp; Archives' first venture into digital repositories was as part of the White Rose partnership in the original SHERPA Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Leeds, Sheffield and York universities have had a research partnership for some years and the library services became a consortial partner in SHERPA in 2002 to set up a joint e-prints repository called White Rose Research Online (WRRO) [<a href="#2">2</a>] . During the project which ran from 2002-2006, advocacy about Open Access and the need for wider dissemination of research outputs got underway at York.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/allinson-harbord" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article elizabeth harbord julie allinson jisc sherpa the national archives university of york archives hub ethosnet safir yodl yodl-ing access control archives authentication content management copyright data digital library digital repositories digitisation dissemination ead fedora commons framework institutional repository interoperability licence metadata multimedia open access open source preservation repositories research software streaming sword protocol vle Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1485 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Repositories for Creative and Applied Arts Research: The Kultur Project http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/gray <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/gray#author1">Andrew Gray</a> discusses institutional repositories and the creative and applied arts specifically in relation to the JISC-funded Kultur Project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Those involved in Higher Education (HE) may have started to sense the approach of Institutional Repositories (IRs). Leaving aside the unfortunate nomenclature, IRs are becoming a fact of life in many educational institutions. The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) has invested £14million in the Repositories and Preservation Programme [<a href="#1">1</a>] and the recent Repositories and Preservation Programme Meeting in Birmingham [<a href="#2">2</a>] celebrated the end of over 40 individual repository projects under the Start Up and Enhancement [<a href="#3">3</a>] strand.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/gray" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article andrew gray google jisc monash university university for the creative arts university of southampton university of the arts london vads archives avi blog copyright data digital repositories digitisation dissemination eprints flash framework ftp google docs higher education institutional repository intellectual property jpeg metadata mp3 multimedia open access photoshop preservation provenance quicktime rae repositories research schema software standards streaming tiff url usability video wav windows windows media Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1489 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Repositories 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/or-09-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/or-09-rpt#author1">Adrian Stevenson</a> reports on the four-day annual Open Repositories conference held at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, GA, USA over 18 - 21 May 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I recently attended the annual Open Repositories 2009 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] in Atlanta, Georgia which hosted 326 delegates from 23 countries. For myself, as the SWORD [<a href="#2">2</a>] Project Manager, the event proved to be very worthwhile. My colleague Julie Allinson and I were both able to give a plenary presentation on the first day and a half-day workshop on the final day.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/or-09-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 event report adrian stevenson cetis duraspace georgia institute of technology jisc massachusetts institute of technology microsoft national library of wales oai ukoln university of bath university of illinois university of southampton university of york repositories research team sherpa romeo sword project adobe aggregation api archives atom bibliographic data blog cloud computing copyright creative commons data data model digital library digital repositories digitisation dissemination dspace eprints facebook fedora commons flickr html institutional repository internet explorer interoperability jpeg metadata mets national library oai-ore oai-pmh ontologies open archives initiative open source rdf repositories research semantic web software standardisation sword protocol twitter url xml zip Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1498 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The REMAP Project: Steps Towards a Repository-enabled Information Environment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/green-awre <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/green-awre#author1">Richard Green</a> and <a href="/issue59/green-awre#author2">Chris Awre</a> investigate what role a repository can play in enabling and supporting the management and preservation of its own digital content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2 following receipt of authorial byline : REW --><!-- version 2 following receipt of authorial byline : REW --><p>This article describes the recently completed REMAP Project undertaken at the University of Hull, which has been a key step toward realising a larger vision of the role a repository can play in supporting digital content management for an institution. The first step was the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC)-funded RepoMMan Project that the team undertook between 2005 and 2007 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/green-awre" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article chris awre richard green glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc kings college london stanford university the national archives university of hull university of virginia clif hydra jisc information environment remap project repomman archives browser content management data digital preservation doc droid dublin core fedora commons framework information architecture institutional repository metadata mods preservation repositories rss schema search technology software standards tiff url web services Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1466 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk