Overview of content related to 'dissemination' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/53/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Editorial Introduction to Issue 72 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/editorial#author1">The new editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 72.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Change_Is_the_Only_Constant">Change Is the Only Constant</h2> <p>Issue 72 is the product of a long period of almost constant change. In the last issue, Richard Waller waved adieu as the outgoing editor, explaining the circumstances around the change in the Editorial for Issue 71 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 editorial kara jones queensland university of technology sherpa-leap university of bath linkedup project altmetrics cataloguing copyright data data set digitisation dissemination eprints higher education lod metadata open access open data open education repositories research Wed, 26 Feb 2014 21:49:54 +0000 lisrw 2518 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk LinkedUp: Linking Open Data for Education http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author1">Marieke Guy</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author2">Mathieu d’Aquin</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author3">Stefan Dietze</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author4">Hendrik Drachsler</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author5">Eelco Herder</a> and <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author6">Elisabetta Parodi</a> describe the activities carried out by the LinkedUp Project looking at the promotion of open data in education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the past, discussions around Open Education have tended to focus on content and primarily Open Educational Resources (OER), freely accessible, openly licensed resources that are used for teaching, learning, assessment and research purposes. However Open Education is a complex beast made up of many aspects, of which the opening up of data is one important element.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article eelco herder elisabetta parodi hendrik drachsler marieke guy mathieu d’aquin stefan dietze bbc dcc elsevier knowledge media institute mimas open knowledge foundation open university ordnance survey ukoln university of bath university of manchester university of southampton w3c dbpedia europeana linkedup project wikipedia blog cataloguing cloud computing data data management data mining data set data visualisation dissemination facebook framework higher education hypertext ict identifier information retrieval infrastructure interoperability learning analytics learning management system linked data lod mashup metadata mobile mobile learning mooc oer open data open education personalisation portal privacy rdf remote working repositories research search technology semantic web sparql topic map twitter uri usability video visualisation web resources web standards xml Tue, 04 Feb 2014 13:12:30 +0000 editor 2503 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Access and Research Conference 2013: Discovery, Impact and Innovation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author1">Paula Callan</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author2">Stephanie Bradbury</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author3">Sarah Brown</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author4">Philippa Broadley</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author5">Emma Nelms</a> and <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author6">Christopher Hart</a> report on Open Access and Research 2013 which focused on recent developments and the strategic advantages they bring to the research sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Brisbane, Queensland, Australia was the host location for the second Open Access and Research 2013 conference [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The conference was held at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Gardens Point campus over 31 October – 1 November 2013. QUT has over 45,000 students and has a wide range of specialist research areas.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 event report christopher hart emma nelms paula callan philippa broadley sarah brown stephanie bradbury apple badc elsevier griffith university massachusetts institute of technology niso queensland university of technology university of sydney victoria university aggregation altmetrics archives collection development copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data set dissemination doi e-research eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata open access open data open source portfolio rae repositories research search technology software video Sun, 16 Feb 2014 18:46:48 +0000 2507 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author1">Ikuko Tsuchide</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author2">Yui Nishizono</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author3">Masako Suzuki</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author4">Shigeki Sugita</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author5">Kazuo Yamamoto</a> and <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author6">Hideki Uchijima</a> introduce a number of ideas and projects that have enhanced the progress of the Open Access movement and institutional repositories in Japan over the last ten years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In Japan, Chiba University established the country's first institutional repository, CURATOR [<a href="#1">1</a>] in 2003. Since then, over the last 10 years or so, more than 300 universities and research institutions have set up repositories and the number of full-text items on repositories has exceeded one million [<a href="#2">2</a>]. All the contents are available on Japanese Institutional Repositories Online (JAIRO) [<a href="#3">3</a>] operated by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) [<a href="#4">4</a>] in Japan.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article hideki uchijima ikuko tsuchide kazuo yamamoto masako suzuki shigeki sugita yui nishizono asahikawa medical university cranfield university digital repository federation hokkaido university kagoshima university national institute of informatics osaka university otaru university of commerce sherpa sherpa-leap university of tokyo university of tsukuba repositories support project romeo rsp wikipedia archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data database digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access repositories research search technology standardisation twitter Wed, 10 Jul 2013 17:03:28 +0000 lisrw 2480 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Performance-based Funding Model: Creating New Research Databases in Sweden and Norway http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eriksson#author1">Leif Eriksson</a> describes how the introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) has created new forms of research databases in Sweden and Norway.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) models has helped to set the focus on scientific publishing since this is one of the major indicators for measuring research output. As a secondary result, it has also forced the countries that have introduced a model that is not solely based on citations to create a new form of research database; the national portal for scientific literature.</p> <p>Even in countries that have not adapted a PRFS model, these forms of portals are common. In Sweden, the national database has been the result of local universities’ and Higher Education institutions’ efforts towards a mutual search interface to the different local repositories that have emerged.&nbsp; The repositories are sometimes created to support a local funding model, but the most common reason is simply to disseminate scientific publishing.</p> <p>The contribution of publications that cannot be found in the international citation indexes are substantial even for peer-reviewed publications especially for literature in the Humanities and the Social Sciences but also in Natural Sciences by adding a lot of conference papers that would otherwise not be recognised.&nbsp; This can be seen as a side-effect of the discussions on the introduction of PRFS models. Even if not all publications meet the criteria to be recognised as scientific, a significant number of them are still added to the base of publications that can be analysed from a PRFS perspective.</p> <p>The incentive to disseminate search results is the other driving force for the national catalogues and, in this case, the portals are playing an important role since many of the publications mainly written in domestic languages are otherwise seldom visible to other researchers and the public.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The change in the Higher Education landscape has been significant over the last decades. One of the major changes has been the introduction of performance-based research funding systems (PRFS) starting with the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) in the United Kingdom in 1986 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The incentive offered by a PRFS model is that it overturns the allocation of funding often based on historical grounds which are no longer valid. It can also be considered as a part of an orientation towards more effective management of the public sector, based on principles derived from the private sector. The central idea in this transformation is the drive to increase productivity without adding resources to the system, while replacing traditional command-and-control systems with market-style incentives [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Publications are playing a more and more important role in the process of evaluating research and also as an indicator in the performance-based research funding systems (PRFS). Of 14 countries which were identified as having PRFSs, at least 10 have publication output as an indicator of research quality [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>The reason why publications are used as a PRFS indicator is that the latter measures the output of research both quantitatively and qualitatively. Moreover, those publication data are easily found in bibliographic databases.&nbsp; However, the introduction of an indicator for publications has not been without controversy in the countries that have adopted PRFS. The resulting discussions have generally focused on two main issues:</p> <ol> <li>Should publications be used as a first-order or a second-order indicator?</li> <li>Which data source would best reflect the research output in a particular country?</li> </ol> <p>OECD launched a report on various PRFS models in 2010 including a systematic exposition of the different indicators being used [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Publications are often found among the first-order indicators which are aimed directly at measuring research performance. This can be done by simply counting publications in relation to the number of research staff of a certain institution but the common practice is to add a qualitative element, either by ranking of publication channels as occurs in Denmark and Norway, or by citation analysis as operates in Belgium, that is, in the Flemish community, and Sweden.</p> <p>Second-order indicators are based on indexes instead of direct measurements. These indexes are often created as a reaction to the methodological difficulties when dealing with citation analysis. The best known indexes are Journal Impact Factor (JIF) which measures a journal’s impact through the number of citations its articles receive, and H-index which is often used on an individual level when comparing the citation history of different authors. However, both indicators are simplifications of more complex structures and have been criticised when being used for research assessment purposes [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <p>The second question has created even more controversy in those countries which have adopted a PRFS model. When deciding on which database would best support the publication indicator, the issue as to which type of publications should be counted immediately comes to the fore.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article leif eriksson oracle uppsala university worldcat aggregation bibliographic data bibliographic database cataloguing data database dissemination doi higher education national library open access portal rae repositories research search technology ssh visualisation Wed, 03 Jul 2013 17:38:13 +0000 lisrw 2465 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JABES 2013 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/jabes-rpt#author1">Marlène Delhaye</a> reports on the two-day annual conference organised by the French Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES) held in Montpellier, France over 14-15 May 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In what has now become something of a tradition, the ‘Corum’ Congress Centre in Montpellier, France, hosted the twelfth in the series of the Journées de l’Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES - Higher Education Bibliographic Agency) [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marlene delhaye bnf editeur google jisc jisc collections national library of australia oclc orcid universite d’aix-marseille open library worldcat api archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing collection development controlled vocabularies data digital object identifier digitisation dissemination doi ebook epub freemium hashtag higher education html identifier infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge base library management systems licence metadata mooc national library open access open data portal privacy repositories research resource description and access standards sushi tagging text mining twitter video web app Mon, 01 Jul 2013 12:11:53 +0000 lisrw 2459 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Crisis Information Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> offers a review of a thought-provoking overview of crisis informatics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In her introduction to this collection, Hagar [<a href="#1">1</a>] – who coined the term ‘crisis informatics’ [<a href="#2">2</a>] - begins by providing the following definition of the term ‘crisis’ (taken from Johnston, <em>The Dictionary of Human Geography</em>,&nbsp; 2002 [<a href="#3">3</a>]) - ‘an interruption in the reproduction of economic, cultural, social and/or political life’. This book discusses crises as diverse as wartime disruption, earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, viruses and terrorist activity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review emma tonkin american library association bbc jisc library of congress ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of oxford jisc information environment data management data visualisation dissemination dublin core framework infrastructure metadata preservation repositories research search technology tagging twitter usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 21:26:52 +0000 lisrw 2474 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 'Does He Take Sugar?': The Risks of Standardising Easy-to-read Language http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author2">Dominik Lukeš</a> and <a href="/issue70/kelly-et-al#author3">Alistair McNaught</a> highlight the risks of attempting to standardise easy-to-read language for online resources.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The idea that if we could only improve how we communicate, there would be less misunderstanding among people is as old as the hills. Historically, this notion has been expressed through things like school reform, spelling reform, publication of communication manuals, etc. The most radical expression of the desire for better understanding is the invention of a whole new artificial language with the intention of providing a universal language for humanity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article alistair mcnaught brian kelly dominik lukes alt alt-c bbc google jisc jisc techdis rdwg ukoln university of bath w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility algorithm blog bs8878 dissemination doi e-learning framework higher education internet explorer multimedia operating system research search technology software standards vocabularies wcag web 2.0 web resources Sat, 15 Dec 2012 15:18:25 +0000 lisrw 2431 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk CURATEcamp iPres 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author1">Mark Jordan</a>, <a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author2">Courtney Mumma</a>, <a href="/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt#author3">Nick Ruest</a> and the participants of CURATEcamp iPres 2012 report on this unconference for digital curation practitioners and researchers, held on 2 October 2012 in Toronto.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CURATEcamp is ‘A series of unconference-style events focused on connecting practitioners and technologists interested in digital curation.’ [<a href="#1">1</a>] The first CURATEcamp was held in the summer of 2010, and there have been just over 10 Camps since then.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/ipres-curatecamp-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report courtney mumma mark jordan nick ruest british library library of congress ndsa premis simon fraser university york university apache archives blog cloud computing curation data digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination ebook file format google docs hashtag identifier infrastructure linux metadata open source operating system preservation programming language python repositories software standards taxonomy twitter vocabularies Thu, 13 Dec 2012 12:21:18 +0000 lisrw 2409 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc3"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hydra UK: Flexible Repository Solutions to Meet Varied Needs http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the Hydra UK event held on 22 November 2012 at the Library of the London School of Economics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Hydra, as described in the opening presentation of this event, is a project initiated in 2008 by the University of Hull, Stanford University, University of Virginia, and DuraSpace to work towards a reusable framework for multi-purpose, multi-functional, multi-institutional repository-enabled solutions for the management of digital content collections [<a href="#1">1</a>]. An initial timeframe for the project of three years had seen all founding institutional partners successfully implement a repository demonstrating these characteristics.&nbsp; Key to the aims of the project has always been to generate wider interest outside the partners to foster not only sustainability in the technology, but also sustainability of the community around this open source development.&nbsp; Hydra has been disseminated through a range of events, particularly through the international Open Repositories conferences [<a href="#2">2</a>], but the sphere of interest in Hydra has now stimulated the holding of specific events in different countries: Hydra UK is one of them.</p> <p>The Hydra UK event was held on 22 November 2012, kindly hosted by the Library at the London School of Economics.&nbsp; Representatives from institutions across the UK, but also Ireland, Austria and Switzerland, came together to learn about the Hydra Project, and to discuss how Hydra might serve their digital content collection management needs.&nbsp; 29 delegates from 21 institutions were present, representing mostly universities but also the archive, museum and commercial sectors.&nbsp; Five presentations were given on Hydra, focusing on the practical experience of using this framework and how it fits into overall system architectures, and time was also deliberately given over to discussion of more specific topics of interest and to allow delegates the opportunity to voice their requirements.&nbsp; The presentations were:</p> <ul> <li>Introduction to Hydra</li> <li>Hydra @ Hull</li> <li>Hydra @ Glasgow Caledonian University</li> <li>Hydra @ LSE</li> <li>Hydra @ Oxford</li> </ul> <h2 id="Introduction_to_Hydra">Introduction to Hydra</h2> <p>Chris Awre from the University of Hull gave the opening presentation.&nbsp; The starting basis for Hydra was mutual recognition by all the founding partners that a repository should be an enabler for managing digital content collections, not a constraint or simply a silo of content.&nbsp; Digital repositories have been put forward and applied as a potential solution for a variety of use cases over the years, and been used at different stages of a content lifecycle.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure1-hydra-rpt-lse-library.jpg" style="width: 178px; height: 178px;" title="LSE Library (Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: LSE Library</strong><br /><small>(Photo courtesy of Simon Lamb, University of Hull.)</small></p> <p>To avoid producing a landscape of multiple repositories all having to be managed to cover these use cases, the Hydra Project sought to identify a way in which one repository solution could be applied flexibly to meet the requirements of different use cases. The idea of a single repository with multiple points of interaction came into being – Hydra – and the concept of individual Hydra ‘head’ solutions.</p> <p>The Hydra Project is informed by two main principles:</p> <ul> <li>No single system can provide the full range of repository-based solutions for a given institution’s needs,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet sustainable solutions require a common repository infrastructure.</li> <li>No single institution can resource the development of a full range of solutions on its own,<br />o&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; …yet each needs the flexibility to tailor solutions to local demands and workflows.</li> </ul> <p>The Hydra Project has sought to provide the common infrastructure upon which flexible solutions can be built, and shared.</p> <p>The recognition that no single institution can achieve everything it might want for its repository has influenced the project from the start. &nbsp;To quote an African proverb, ‘If you want to go fast go alone, if you want to go far, go together’. Working together has been vital.&nbsp; To organise this interaction, Hydra has structured itself through three interleaving sub-communities, the Steering Group, the Partners and Developers, as shown by Figure 2.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/hydra-community-structure-v4.jpg" style="width: 661px; height: 506px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 2: Hydra community structure" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure2-hydra-community-structure.jpg" style="width: 640px; height: 490px;" title="Figure 2: Hydra community structure"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 2: Hydra community structure</strong></p> --><p>The concept of a Hydra Partner has emerged from this model of actively working together, and the project has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) process for any institution wishing to have its use of, and contribution and commitment to Hydra recognised.&nbsp; Starting with the original four partners in 2008, Hydra now has 11 partners, with two more in the process of joining.&nbsp; All have made valuable contributions and helped to make Hydra better.&nbsp; Hydra partnership is not the only route to involvement, though, and there are many in the Hydra developer community who are adopters of the software, but who have not reached a stage where partnership is appropriate.</p> <p>The technical implementation of Hydra was supported through early involvement in the project by MediaShelf, a commercial technical consultancy focused on repository solutions.&nbsp; All Hydra software is, though, open source, available under the Apache 2.0 licence, and all software code contributions are managed in this way.&nbsp; The technical implementation is based on a set of core principles that describe how content objects should be structured within the repository, and with an understanding that different content types can be managed using different workflows.&nbsp; Following these principles, Hydra could be implemented in a variety of ways: the technical direction taken by the project is simply the one that suited the partners at the time.</p> <p>Hydra as currently implemented is built on existing open source components, and the project partners are committed to supporting these over time:</p> <ul> <li>Fedora: one of the digital repository systems maintained through DuraSpace [<a href="#3">3</a>]</li> <li>Apache Solr: powerful indexing software now being used in a variety of discovery solutions [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Blacklight: a next-generation discovery interface, which has its own community around it [<a href="#5">5</a>]</li> <li>Hydra plugin: a collection of components that facilitate workflow in managing digital content [<a href="#6">6</a>]</li> <li>Solrizer: a component that indexes Fedora-held content into a Solr index</li> </ul> <p>These components are arranged in the architecture shown in Figure 3.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/figure3-hydra-architecture-v4.jpg" style="width: 543px; height: 258px;" title="Figure 3: Hydra architecture" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 3: Hydra architecture</strong></p> <!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><!-- <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Hydra architecture" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-hydra-2012-11-rpt/architecture.png" style="width: 547px; height: 262px;" title="Hydra architecture"></p><p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Hydra architecture</strong></p> --><p>A common feature of the last three components in the list above is the use of Ruby on Rails as the coding language and its ability to package up functionality in discrete ‘gems’.&nbsp; This was consciously chosen for Hydra because of its agile programming capabilities, its use of the MVC (Model–View–Controller) structure, and its testing infrastructure.&nbsp; The choice has been validated on a number of occasions as Hydra has developed.&nbsp; However, it was noted that other coding languages and systems could be used to implement Hydra where appropriate.&nbsp; This applies to all the main components, even Fedora.&nbsp; Whilst a powerful and flexible repository solution in its own right, Fedora has proved to be complex to use: Hydra has sought in part to tap this capability through simpler interfaces and interactions.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/hydra-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report chris awre bbc bodleian libraries california digital library duraspace glasgow caledonian university jisc london school of economics sakai stanford university university of hull university of oxford university of virginia hydra jisc information environment remap project apache api archives authentication cataloguing collection development content management data data management data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digital repositories dissemination eprints fedora commons framework google maps infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata multimedia open source preservation repositories research ruby search technology sharepoint software solr streaming video vle Thu, 13 Dec 2012 19:24:07 +0000 lisrw 2411 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL) 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt#author1">Anna Mastora</a> and <a href="/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt#author2">Sarantos Kapidakis</a> report on TPDL 2012 held at Paphos, Cyprus, over 23-27 September 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The 16<sup>th</sup> International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL) 2012 [<a href="#1">1</a>] was another successful event in the series of ECDL/TPDL conferences which has been the leading European scientific forum on digital libraries for 15 years. Across these years, the conference has brought together researchers, developers, content providers and users in the field of digital libraries by addressing issues in the area where theoretical and applied research meet, such as digital library models, architectures, functionality, users, and quality.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/tpdl-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report anna mastora sarantos kapidakis city university london cni coalition for networked information google ionian university iso massachusetts institute of technology microsoft national technical university of athens open university princeton university the national archives university of cyprus university of malta university of strathclyde europeana archives blog data data set digital archive digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination facebook frbr graphics information retrieval interoperability linked data metadata multimedia natural language processing ontologies preservation research resource discovery search technology semantic web skos software standards thesaurus twitter visualisation Sun, 16 Dec 2012 13:44:54 +0000 lisrw 2432 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The E-copyright Handbook http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at the latest of Paul Pedley’s copyright guidance books, and, in some respects, finds it wanting.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Pedley is a name that needs no introduction to <em>aficionados</em> of copyright textbooks, being the author of several such books published by Facet Publishing in the past (and reviewed by <em>Ariadne </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>][<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>]).&nbsp; His latest effort, <em>The E-copyright Handbook</em>, attempts to cover the fast-moving and complex world of electronic copyright, using an interesting approach.&nbsp; Rather than the traditional way of such books, describing the media and describing the rights granted to copyright owners, the way the law applies to each media type, exceptions to copyright and so on, his approach is a mixture but with some emphasis on activities, as a glance at the chapter titles shows: Introduction, Content Types, Activities, Copyright Exceptions, Licences, the Digital Economy Act, Enforcement and The Hargreaves Review.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is a complex approach, which requires careful cross-referencing and also checking that material is neither duplicated, nor that is anything is overlooked.&nbsp; It is not clear to me whether the book is meant for reading through, or whether it should be just dipped into when a particular issue causes someone to check the law; but I found the approach confusing.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book also suffers from being in a fast-moving area, where the law, and technology, change fast and although it is clear that Facet got the book published in record time, as there are numerous references to 2012 developments in the text, the work is already out of date in several places, and will no doubt get more out of date as the months go on.&nbsp; Another problem is that the book cannot make up its mind whether it is written for UK readers, or readers in the EU, or in the USA.&nbsp; All too often, different countries’ court cases are mentioned together; one is (say) a UK case and another is a US case.&nbsp; Without the understanding that US law and UK law in this field are very different, people will come to incorrect conclusions about the significance of the cases to them in their day to day work. Moreover, all too often the cases are described without any court decisions relating to them being provided; so one is left with the worry ‘why did the author mention this case at all?’</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review charles oppenheim bbc de montfort university google jisc loughborough university university of strathclyde bibliographic data bibliometrics cloud computing copyright data database dissemination google books open access research standards streaming url web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:30:54 +0000 lisrw 2415 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Enhancing Collaboration and Interaction in a Post-graduate Research Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for post-graduate students where RefShare is deployed for digital storage and retrieval, alongside Blackboard for the purposes of communication. She also describes the role of the information specialist in the programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p align="left">The Phytomedicine Programme is a multidisciplinary and collaborative research programme investigating therapeutically useful compounds present in plants growing in South Africa. &nbsp;The programme was started in 1995 and was transferred to the Department of Paraclinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria in 2002. In 2007 it was designated as a National Research Foundation Developed Research Niche Area [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article tertia coetsee blackboard elsevier google harvard university ibm ifla university of cambridge university of melbourne university of pretoria archives authentication bibliographic data blackboard learning system blog collection development copyright data data mining database digital preservation dissemination electronic theses facebook ict information society knowledge management mobile learning open access passwords podcast privacy refworks research search technology software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 08:39:58 +0000 lisrw 2350 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Evaluation of Assessment Diaries and GradeMark at the University of Glamorgan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau#author1">Karen Fitzgibbon</a> and <a href="/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau#author2">Alice Lau</a> describe a JISC-funded project in evaluating the pedagogical and workload impact that two assessment- and feedback-related innovations have on students and staff and report on lessons for the sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Assessment and feedback practice in Higher Education has long been the major source of student dissatisfaction (National Student Surveys) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. While technologies are increasingly being used as a tool to improve the learning experience for students and staff, the use of technologies in improving the assessment experience is still patchy.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/fitzgibbon-lau" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article alice lau karen fitzgibbon blackboard jisc university of glamorgan blog data database dissemination higher education internet explorer research software vle Sat, 28 Jul 2012 12:26:56 +0000 lisrw 2351 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making the Most of a Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/taylor#author1">Stephanie Taylor</a> writes about how she made the most of a conference to promote and inform the work of a project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working with repositories in various ways for over five years, so I have, of course, attended the major international conference Open Repositories before. I have never actually presented anything or represented a specific project at the event, though. This year was different. This year I had a mission -&nbsp; to present a poster on the DataFlow Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] and to talk to people about the work we had been doing for the past 12 months and (I hoped) to interest them in using the Open Source (OS) systems we had developed during that period.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/taylor" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article stephanie taylor ukoln university of glasgow university of oxford university of southampton devcsi hydra rsp api archives blog cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital library digital repositories dissemination doi flickr framework hashtag higher education infrastructure javascript licence linked data linux metadata open access open source provenance rdf repositories research research information management software standards sword protocol tagging text mining twitter visualisation widget wiki zip Tue, 31 Jul 2012 15:05:33 +0000 lisrw 2374 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Collaborations Workshop 2012: Software, Sharing and Collaboration in Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/cw12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/cw12-rpt#author1">Simon Choppin</a> reports on a two-day software workshop held at The Queen’s College, Oxford over 21 - 22 March 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On the 21 and 22 March 2012 I attended a workshop which was unlike the stolid conferences I was used to. In the space of two sunny days I found I had spoken to more people and learnt more about them than I usually managed in an entire week. Presentations were short and focused, discussions were varied and fascinating, and the relaxed, open format was very effective in bringing people from differing disciplines together to consider a common theme. In this case the theme was software, and whether you used or developed it, there was plenty of food for thought.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/cw12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report simon choppin national grid service sheffield hallam university software sustainability institute university of oxford university of sheffield blog copyright curation data dissemination framework genetic algorithm licence machine learning open access open source repositories research software twitter video web 2.0 Thu, 26 Apr 2012 13:57:05 +0000 lisrw 2326 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/elbert-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/elbert-et-al#author1">Monika Elbert</a>, <a href="/issue68/elbert-et-al#author2">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue68/elbert-et-al#author3">Ugne Lipeikaite</a> describe the principal findings of the study <em>Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa</em> which served to provide evidence of how public libraries are perceived by their stakeholders.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article presents a summary of some results of the study <em>Perceptions of Public Libraries in Africa</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>] which was conducted to research perceptions of stakeholders and the public towards public libraries in six African countries. The study is closely linked with the EIFL Public Library Innovation Programme [<a href="#2">2</a>], which awarded grants to public libraries in developing and transition countries to address a range of socio-economic issues facing their communities, including projects in Kenya, Ghana and Zambia.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/elbert-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article david fuegi monika elbert ugne lipeikaite eifl ifla oclc tns rms eifl-plip europeana archives cataloguing data digital library dissemination e-government ejournal framework ict infrastructure national library research search technology sms software Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 1690 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 68 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> issue 68.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I am pleased to introduce you to the content of Issue 68, and to have the opportunity to remind you that you have a far larger number of channels into the publication’s content.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 editorial richard waller british library jisc massachusetts institute of technology national academy of sciences royal holloway sakai clif depositmo hydra opendoar repositories support project rsp aggregation archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data data citation data set digital repositories digitisation dissemination doi eprints facebook fedora commons foi framework higher education ict identifier information retrieval instant messaging institutional repository library management systems lucene metadata ms word multimedia ocr oer opac open source openurl preservation repositories research resource description resource discovery rss search technology second life sfx sharepoint software solr standardisation sword protocol taxonomy twitter vufind web 2.0 wordpress xml Mon, 12 Mar 2012 15:17:06 +0000 lisrw 2322 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of the Past of the Web http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/fpw11-rpt#author1">Matthew Brack</a> reports on the one-day international workshop 'The Future of the Past of the Web' held at the British Library Conference Centre, London on 7 October, 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have all heard at least some of the extraordinary statistics that attempt to capture the sheer size and ephemeral nature of the Web. According to the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), more than 70 new domains are registered and more than 500,000 documents are added to the Web every minute [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This scale, coupled with its ever-evolving use, present significant challenges to those concerned with preserving both the content and context of the Web.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report matthew brack bbc british library bsi dcc digital preservation coalition google hanzo archives institute of historical research iso jisc kings college london library of congress nhs oxford internet institute the national archives university of oxford university of sheffield wellcome library arcomem internet archive memento uk government web archive aggregation algorithm api archives big data blog browser cache curation data data mining data model digital asset management digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi flickr identifier interoperability library data lod metadata preservation repositories research search technology social web software tag cloud twitter ulcc uri url visualisation warc wayback machine web resources wordpress youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:52 +0000 lisrw 2236 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk IMPACT Final Conference 2011 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/impact-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the two-day conference looking at the results of the IMPACT Project in making digitisation and OCR better, faster and cheaper.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The IMPACT Project (<strong>Imp</strong>roving <strong>Ac</strong>cess to <strong>T</strong>ext) [<a href="#1">1</a>] was funded by the European Commission back in 2007 to look at significantly advancing access to historical text using Optical Character Recognition (OCR) methods. As the project reaches its conclusion, one of its key objectives is sharing project outputs.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/impact-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report marieke guy abbyy austrian national library bnf brightsolid british library california digital library content conversion specialists d-lib magazine dcc google ibm institute for dutch lexicology national and university library of slovenia national library of finland national library of the netherlands stanford university tufts university ukoln university of bath university of munich university of oxford university of salford university of utrecht ahlib europeana impact project archives blog copyright data data management data mining data set database digital library digitisation dissemination finereader framework google books ict information retrieval information society interoperability metadata mets national library ocr oer open source optical character recognition preservation research search technology software solr tagging tesseract twitter unicode wiki wordpress Sun, 26 Feb 2012 13:36:33 +0000 lisrw 2233 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Research Excellence and Methods (DREaM) Project Launch Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt#author1">Ray Harper</a> reports on a one-day conference which launched the DREaM Project, held by the Library and Information Science Research Coalition in London on 19 July 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The DREaM (Developing Research Excellence and Methods) Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held at the British Library Conference Centre in London in July 2011. The conference was attended by 86 delegates, and consisted of an overview of the DREaM Project, two keynote papers, a one-minute madness session, and four parallel breakout sessions. I had the opportunity to attend as a sponsored delegate, thanks to Glen Recruitment, Sue Hill Recruitment and TFPL.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lis-rc-dream-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report ray harper american library association bbc british library cilip edinburgh napier university imperial college london indiana university information today loughborough university nhs northumbria university university college cork university of cambridge university of oxford university of sheffield lis research coalition blog cookie data dissemination framework information society knowledge management metadata open access repositories research search technology social networks taxonomy Mon, 27 Feb 2012 16:59:05 +0000 lisrw 2237 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Future of Archives and Recordkeeping http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews an anthology of perceptive essays on the challenges presented to archival thought and practice by Web 2.0, postmodern perspectives, and cross-disciplinary interchanges.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians, archivists, and records managers do not share identical challenges or controversies in their practical endeavours or theoretical queries. However, a common issue for all the information professions and a dominating topic of discussion in their literature is the fundamental change in the structure and distribution of knowledge caused by mass digitisation. The proliferation of daily digital content, in quantity, reach, and manifestation, is confronting them all with a disquieting role ambiguity. The expanding tools and expectations of Web 2.0 have made this self-questioning a recurrent one, but they have also stimulated invigorating debate on the purpose and direction of these fields. The perception is one of extraordinary change initiated by emerging technologies, unprecedented knowledge production and dissemination, and a new centralised role for the information user. In these galvanising changes leading library and archives practitioners are sensing opportunities for confirming the professions’ relevance, in the estimation of other scholarly disciplines and of society at large, but, perhaps most of all, in their own eyes as well.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review john azzolini clifford chance archives blog cataloguing digital library digitisation dissemination facebook flickr framework knowledge management metadata personalisation preservation provenance research semiotic twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Tue, 08 Nov 2011 14:50:08 +0000 lisrw 1689 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eSciDoc Days 2011: The Challenges for Collaborative eResearch Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/escidoc-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/escidoc-rpt#author1">Ute Rusnak</a> reports on the fourth in a series of two-day conferences called eSciDoc Days, organised by FIZ Karlsruhe and the Max Planck Digital Library in Berlin over 26-27 October 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>eSciDoc is a well-known open source platform for creating eResearch environments using generic services and tools based on a shared infrastructure. This concept allows for managing research and publication data together with related metadata, internal and/or external links and access rights. Development of eSciDoc was initiated by a collaborative venture between FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz Institute for Information Infrastructure and the Max Planck Digital Library (MPDL) and was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/escidoc-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report ute rusnak fiz karlsruhe jisc archives authentication big data browser copyright curation data data management data set database digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination e-research ebook ejournal fedora commons framework higher education infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge management licence metadata open source preservation provenance repositories research rich internet application soa software virtual research environment visualisation web services Mon, 27 Feb 2012 20:20:52 +0000 lisrw 2239 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Connecting Researchers at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author1">Jez Cope</a> and <a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author2">Geraldine Jones</a> describe a recent series of events introducing social media to research students at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Connected Researcher initiative is a response to both local and sector-wide events. At the University of Bath groups of postgraduate research students from Chemistry and Social Sciences separately expressed an interest in finding out how to profile their own research and establish links with other researchers in their fields.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article geraldine jones jez cope google research information network university of bath university of derby citeulike wikipedia bibliographic data blog curation database digital media dissemination doi e-learning hashtag higher education ict identifier microblogging mobile preservation research rss search technology social software social web syndication twitter video virtual research environment web 2.0 web services wiki wordpress Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1621 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk MyMobileBristol http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author1">Mike Jones</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author2">Simon Price</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author3">Nikki Rogers</a> and <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author4">Damian Steer</a> describe the rationale, aims and progress of MyMobileBristol, highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities that have arisen during the project.</p> </div> </div> </div> The MyMobileBristol Project is managed and developed by the Web Futures group at the Institute for Learning and Research Technology (ILRT), University of Bristol [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The project has a number of broad and ambitious aims and objectives, including collaboration with Bristol City Council on the development or adoption of standards with regard to the exchange of time- and location-sensitive data within the Bristol region, with particular emphasis on transport, the environment and sustainability. <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article damian steer mike jones nikki rogers simon price ilrt jisc jisc techdis ordnance survey ukoln university of bristol w3c web futures datagovuk devcsi mca mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol apache api atom authentication blog browser bsd cataloguing content management data data set database dissemination e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis higher education html intellectual property java javascript jena ldap licence machine learning mobile mobile phone native app native applications open data open source operating system portal portfolio rdf research resource description restful rss search technology semantic web smartphone software sparql sql standards usability web app web browser web services wiki wireless xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1622 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Double-edged Sword: What Are the Implications of Freedom of Information for the HE Sector? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rin-foi-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/rin-foi-rpt#author1">Amy Gibbons</a> reports on the second in a series of workshops organised by the Research Information Network to explore the impact of the Freedom of Information Act on the Higher Education sector, held at University College London on 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rin-foi-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report amy gibbons hefce jisc kings college london queens university belfast research information network the national archives university college london university of central lancashire university of east anglia archives blog copyright data data set dissemination foi foia framework higher education infrastructure intellectual property open access privacy research social networks sword protocol Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1628 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UK Reading Experience Database http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt#author1">Bethan Ruddock</a> reports from the launch event for the UK Reading Experience Database, held at the Betty Boothroyd Library, the Open University, Milton Keynes, on 24 February 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><p>I was invited down to the Open University (OU) Betty Boothroyd Library in Milton Keynes for the launch of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. I had been asked to attend to talk about the LOCAH Project and Linked Data, but I was also looking forward to learning about the RED Project.</p> <p>This was the first of two launch days, and was designed for librarians, archivists, and information managers. A second launch day for teachers in Higher Education was to be held in London the next day.</p> <h2 id="What_Is_UK_RED">What Is UK RED?</h2> <p>The tagline for UK RED is 'the experience of reading in Britain from 1450 to 1945', and the database brings together reading experiences, making them both searchable and browsable. What is a reading experience? It is evidence of anyone alive between the mid-15th and 20thcenturies having read and interacted with a book or other piece of writing, such as magazines, newspapers, letters - even playbills and advertisements. Ownership alone is not enough; there must be something to show that the person in question actually read the work or at least part of it.</p> <p>This information can be found in a number of places - a printed book review would be an obvious example. The RED team also find many entries in diaries. Such entries can range from simple lists of books that someone has read over the course of a year, to detailed descriptions of when and where they read a particular book, and how they felt about it. Often diary entries are not actually about the book; it is mentioned in passing and in the context of a number of other activities.</p> <p>While the owner's name on the flyleaf is not itself enough to justify a 'reading experience', annotations to the text are, as they show that the person has actually interacted with the text. Of course, you then have to consider whether the person whose name is on the flyleaf is the same as the person doing the annotating!</p> <p>RED is much more than a list of 'people who have read books'. The database aims to bring out as much information as possible about the reading experience. The interface to submit a new entry allows you to specify where the reading was taking place, all the way down to a particular room in a particular house. It also aims to identify if the reading was silent or aloud, alone or with other people; whether the book was owned by the reader, a library book, borrowed, or even stolen. All these data are then used to build up a rich database of information on who was reading what (and how!) in Britain.</p> <p>UK RED is not just concerned with reading experiences within Britain: team members also look at the reading experiences of citizens abroad. <strong>Edmund King</strong>, Research Associate, Reading Experience Database, OU, told us that, as a consequence, there are fascinating examples of what captured British soldiers were reading in prisoner-of-war (POW) camps as well as examples of what they were not allowed to read. Books in Welsh and Pakistani were banned, as well as atlases and anything about the Russian revolution. I do not know if there are corresponding records for what prisoners in UK POW camps were forbidden to read, but it would be very interesting to find out.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report bethan ruddock ahrc eduserv jisc mimas newcastle university open university talis ukoln university of manchester university of oxford archives hub dbpedia locah lucero wikipedia apache archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copac copyright data data set database dissemination flickr higher education intellectual property linked data linux open source php provenance research software sparql sql twitter video Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1629 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Envisioning Future Academic Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a timely collection of essays that highlights the values of institutional leadership and resourcefulness in academic librarianship's engagements with Web 2.0.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Since networked information technology has initiated a breathtaking transformation of knowledge practices, librarians have had a generous supply of thought leaders whose lifetime experience has permitted them to issue credible translations of the 'writing on the wall'. Recently, however, there seems to be many more analysts (and soothsayers) and much more anxious observation and published interpretation of such writing. And the message comes in a red ink, in bold, and with distinct portent, when not downright ominous.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review john azzolini british library clifford chance google university of melbourne yale university bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set digital library digitisation disruptive innovation dissemination ebook framework higher education ict knowledge management mobile muves open access personalisation preservation research search technology second life web 2.0 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1632 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk RefShare: A Community of Practice to Enhance Research Collaboration http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coetsee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/coetsee#author1">Tertia Coetsee</a> describes a community of practice for postgraduate students in phytomedicine using RefShare, to enhance collaborative research.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coetsee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article tertia coetsee ifla university of melbourne university of pretoria jisc information environment bibliographic data copyright data database digital preservation dissemination e-research electronic theses ict infrastructure open data preservation privacy refworks research search technology web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1605 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> describes new tools and services that can help you get your event heard.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><p>In 2007 Lorcan Dempsey coined the phrase 'the amplified conference' [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He used the term to refer to how event outputs (such as talks and presentations) were being amplified 'through a variety of network tools and collateral communications'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article marieke guy eduserv google jisc mpeg qik ukoln university of bath beginners guide to digital preservation internet archive jisc powr project powr amplified event archives avi blog copyright creative commons digital preservation dissemination elluminate facebook flickr hashtag intellectual property licence metadata mobile mobile phone mp4 netvibes odp open source opml pageflakes podcast preservation remote working research rss search technology software storify streaming tagging twitter usb ustream video web development webinar wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1607 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Characterising and Preserving Digital Repositories: File Format Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> and <a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author2">David Tarrant</a> show how file format profiles, the starting point for preservation plans and actions, can also be used to reveal the fingerprints of emerging types of institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article david tarrant steve hitchcock amazon google harvard university jisc microsoft mpeg the national archives university of illinois university of northampton university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome library jisc information environment keepit wikipedia accessibility adobe archives bibliographic data blog cloud computing css csv curation data data management database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination document format droid eprints file format flash flash video framework gif graphics html hypertext identifier institutional repository java jpeg latex linked data metadata mpeg-1 open access open source photoshop php plain text preservation quicktime repositories research schema semantic web software standards vector graphics video web 2.0 wiki windows windows media xml xml schema Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1608 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Fringe 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> (and friends) report on the Repository Fringe "unconference" held at the National e-Science Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, over 2-3 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>2010 was the third year of Repository Fringe, and slightly more formally organised than its antecedents, with an increased number of discursive presentations and less in the way of organised chaos! The proceedings began on Wednesday 1 September with a one-day, pre-event SHERPA/RoMEO API Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project team.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report martin donnelly cetis dcc duraspace edina google jisc open university sherpa ukoln university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of hull university of southampton university of st andrews addressing history crispool datashare depositmo hydra jorum memento repomman reposit repositories support project romeo sharegeo sneep wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data blog content management content negotiation csv curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi dspace eprints fedora commons file format framework geospatial data gis google maps hashtag html hypertext identifier infrastructure institutional repository ipad kml learning objects mashup metadata national library oer ontologies open access open source preservation repositories research rss search technology social networks solr standards tagging twitter uri video visualisation wordpress yahoo pipes Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1592 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Survive or Thrive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt#author1">Ed Fay</a> reports on a two-day conference organised by UKOLN on behalf of JISC to consider growth and use of digital content on the Web, which was held in Manchester in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Survive or Thrive [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the punchy title given to an event intended to stimulate serious consideration amongst digital collections practitioners about future directions in our field - opportunities but also potential pitfalls. The event, which focused on content in HE, comes at a time of financial uncertainty when proving value is of increasing importance in the sector and at a point when significant investment has already been made in the UK into content creation, set against a backdrop of increasingly available content on the open Web from a multitude of sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report ed fay apple bbc california digital library cerlim edina eduserv google jisc jisc digital media london school of economics massachusetts institute of technology ordnance survey rdtf talis the national archives university of huddersfield accessibility aggregation agile development api archives blog cataloguing data digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dissemination domain model e-learning flickr geospatial data gis html identifier information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository interoperability itunes javascript linked data mashup metadata mobile personalisation preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks software solr standards tagging text mining twitter usability widget Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1593 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute Reflections at the End of an Era http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author1">Angela Joyce</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author2">Linda Kerr</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author3">Tim Machin</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author4">Paul Meehan</a> and <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author5">Caroline Williams</a> look back at the history and achievements of Intute, and reflect on lessons learned as the service enters its final year.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article angela joyce caroline williams linda kerr paul meehan tim machin ahrc bbc british library google hea heriot-watt university intute jisc linden lab mimas ukoln university of bristol university of glamorgan university of huddersfield university of manchester university of oxford wellcome trust automatic metadata generation eevl elib jisc information environment mobile internet detective sosig wikipedia blog cataloguing collection development curation data database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education metadata mobile personalisation research resource discovery search technology second life software tagging twitter vim vocabularies web 2.0 web browser web resources widget Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1564 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk