Overview of content related to 'review' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/583/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Book Review: Digital Dieting - From Information Obesity to Intellectual Fitness http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/sanders-rvw#author1">Kevin Sanders</a> examines Tara Brabazon’s latest analytical work which investigates the proliferation of low-quality information in the digital realm and the issues of excessive reliance on social tools for learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Following a body of work that includes <em>The University of Google: Education in the (post) Information Age</em> (2007) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and <em>Digital Hemlock: Internet Education and the Poisoning of Teaching</em> (2002), Brabazon has developed a central position within the debate surrounding technology and pedagogy, although there is very little that is centrist about Brabazon's writing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 review kevin sanders apple google ibm university of bath university of cambridge heron blog facebook framework higher education ict internet explorer managerialism multimedia neoliberalism open access research search technology software youtube Mon, 03 Mar 2014 18:41:44 +0000 lisrw 2519 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Marketing Your Library’s Electronic Resources http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jennings-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/jennings-rvw#author1">Lizz Jennings</a> reviews a concise and practical guide to marketing library e-resources which offers the busy professional a structured approach to planning a successful campaign.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Marketing Your Electronic Resources</em> immediately strikes the reader as a very practical book.&nbsp; With wide margins for notes and easy reference, a large section giving examples of best practice, and the main text extending over just 100 pages, this book is designed for busy practitioners.&nbsp; For many librarians tasked with marketing, this kind of work forms a small part of the whole of their role and this short, practical guide is pitched very much at this type of reader.&nbsp; It is not sector-specific, although many of the examples are drawn from public and academic librarie</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jennings-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university university of bath cookie data graphics research resource discovery wiki Thu, 27 Jun 2013 15:14:42 +0000 lisrw 2456 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: University Libraries and Space in the Digital World http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/murphy-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/murphy-rvw#author1">Hugh Murphy</a> reviews a collection of essays which charts the development and impact of the physical library space and its use in our digital world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Despite the economic adversity faced by many academic bodies and their libraries, there are still some institutions lucky enough to be in a position to refurbish, extend or commission a new building. <em>University Libraries and Space in the Digital World</em> is undoubtedly for the many people involved in such projects, but is quite clearly designed for a wider readership too. This is a good thing, as it would be hard to think of a library user or staff member who is not affected by the issue of library space.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/murphy-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review hugh murphy national university of ireland university college dublin university of leicester university of melbourne internet explorer national library prism research resource description social networks web 2.0 Wed, 26 Jun 2013 21:23:02 +0000 lisrw 2454 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Information Society - A Study of Continuity and Change http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rafiq-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/rafiq-rvw#author1">Muhammad Rafiq</a> offers us a detailed review of a work, now in its sixth edition, which examines the information society, its origin, development, its associated issues and the current landscape.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>The Information Society</em> offers a detailed discussion on the concept and dynamics of the information society from a historical perspective to the present era of information societies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rafiq-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review muhammad rafiq american library association google ifla oclc university of sargodha blog data digitisation ebook foi information society infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer mobile phone privacy research web 2.0 Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:03:56 +0000 lisrw 2470 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The New Digital Scholar - Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/robinson-rvw#author1">Julia Robinson</a> reviews a substantial and timely collection of essays related to the research and writing practices of NextGen students. Expressing a call for change in the way educators approach Information Literacy teaching, this book invites the reader to redefine, re-evaluate and reflect on what we think we know about students’ research practices today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>McClure and Purdy bring together a mix of perspectives, from librarians and lecturers to professors and programmers, to give voice to the very timely concern in Information Literacy (IL) teaching, that we are not equipping our students for the future as we hoped. So-called NextGen students are engaging with information online in their personal, social and educational lives in ways that are shaping new approaches to and conceptions of research. At the same time, those teaching IL, whether librarians or writing instructors, are basing lesson plans and interventions on traditional pedagogies, arguably unfit for a research landscape so altered by the pace and change of information technologies. Students, IL instructors and academics occupy different spaces in the digital environment and work at cross-purposes. Traditional IL instruction has encouraged students to understand information sources in binary terms, right or wrong, leaving them disoriented and disengaged as they undertake research. Students should instead be encouraged to see research as a recursive conversation. IL instructors need to collaborate with academics to reposition themselves in this conversation and join students in their digital space at the point of need.</p> <h2 id="Structure_and_Content">Structure and Content</h2> <p>The book is divided into four parts and sixteen chapters (see <a href="#appendix">Appendix</a> for full Table of Contents). In the introduction ‘Understanding the NextGen Researcher’, McClure and Purdy set out their premise that NextGen students are prolific writers, readers and researchers, using a multitude of digital technologies to engage in these activities simultaneously, and:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Because digital technologies intertwine research and writing, this book takes as its premise that we – as professionals from a variety of fields – cannot ignore, marginalize </em>(sic)<em>, or leave to others the commitment to understand and help the new digital scholar. In its four parts, this collection explores the facets of that commitment.</em> (p.2)</p> <p>Part One: NextGen Students and the Research Writing ‘Problem’ moves through defining <em>Information Behaviour</em> (Chapter 1), giving a history of the research paper (Chapter 2), identifying key IL frameworks (Chapter 3) and introducing <em>deep learning</em> (Chapter 4). All of these chapters set the scene by providing a broad theoretical basis and shared language with which the reader can access the rest of the book.</p> <p>Most interestingly, McClure defines <em>Information Behaviour</em> as separate and distinct from Information Literacy. He bases his argument on the American Library Association definition of IL, where information-literate people ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, he reframes the ALA’s definition, instead describing it as:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><strong><em>A set of abilities requiring individuals to</em></strong> (my emphasis)<em> recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.</em> (p.20)</p> <p>McClure goes on to argue that if IL is a finite set of skills or abilities then <em>Information Behaviour </em>‘is concerned with the complex processes and influences on the information seeker’ (p.20). Whilst his intention to highlight behaviour is laudable, he adapts the definition of IL to make his point. Indeed, many readers in the UK would see a focus on behaviour and influence as inherent to IL, and already accounted for within the term. For example, the SCONUL Seven Pillars Model of Information Literacy states that:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Information literate people will demonstrate an awareness of how they gather, use, manage, synthesise and create information and data in an ethical manner and will have the information skills to do so effectively.</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>]</p> <p>Information skills are separate here too, but they are part of IL, they do not constitute IL itself. The focus on how accounts for behaviour. Conceptions of IL are detailed and discussed throughout the book along with related but distinct terms such as <em>Digital Literacy</em>,<em> Multiliteracies</em> (both Chapter 7), <em>Digital Agency</em> (Chapter 9), <em>Hyperliteracy</em> (Chapter 13) and <em>Technological Literacy</em> (Chapter 16).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review julia robinson american library association google newcastle university sconul born digital copyright data database framework open access research search technology usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 20:34:48 +0000 lisrw 2472 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Crisis Information Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> offers a review of a thought-provoking overview of crisis informatics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In her introduction to this collection, Hagar [<a href="#1">1</a>] – who coined the term ‘crisis informatics’ [<a href="#2">2</a>] - begins by providing the following definition of the term ‘crisis’ (taken from Johnston, <em>The Dictionary of Human Geography</em>,&nbsp; 2002 [<a href="#3">3</a>]) - ‘an interruption in the reproduction of economic, cultural, social and/or political life’. This book discusses crises as diverse as wartime disruption, earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, viruses and terrorist activity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review emma tonkin american library association bbc jisc library of congress ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of oxford jisc information environment data management data visualisation dissemination dublin core framework infrastructure metadata preservation repositories research search technology tagging twitter usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 21:26:52 +0000 lisrw 2474 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Consulting - Guide to good practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a book written by three experienced consultants that seeks to support information professionals in setting themselves up as consultants.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I’ve been working in information consultancy for over 35 years and not regretted for a moment my choice of career. It’s taken me to over 30 countries and the opportunity to work with an amazing array of organisations in temperatures ranging from 47C to minus 25C. I’ve had project meetings on the top floor of the United Nations building, on a boat anchored in the harbour at Cannes, a luxury hotel in Oman and in a London convent. I’ve flown on HP’s corporate jet, had lunch with Henry Kissinger and was inside the IMF in Washington on 9/11.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review martin white british library intranet focus ltd university of sheffield bibliographic data data e-science file sharing framework information retrieval intranet research search technology Wed, 26 Jun 2013 19:57:38 +0000 lisrw 2453 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Powering Search - The Role of Thesauri in New Information Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/will-rvw#author1">Leonard Will</a> reviews a comprehensive survey of the literature on the use of thesauri in information search processes and interfaces.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Powering Search</em> is a comprehensive review and synthesis of work that has been done over the past 50 years on the use of thesauri to make searching for information more effective. The book does not discuss the principles and practice of construction of information retrieval thesauri in any detail, but concentrates on the search process and on the user interface through which a searcher interacts with a body of information resources. It is written clearly: each chapter begins and ends with a summary of its content, and the first and last chapters summarise the whole book. There are copious references throughout and a full index.</p> <p>As the author says in his conclusion:</p> <blockquote><p>'This book has taken a new approach to thesauri by critiquing the relevant literatures of a variety of communities who share an interest in thesauri and their functions but who are not, it should be noted, closely collaborating at this time – research communities such as library and information science, information retrieval, knowledge organization, human-computer interaction, information architecture, information search behavior, usability studies, search user interface, metadata-enabled information access, interactive information retrieval, and searcher education.'</p> </blockquote> <p>One consequence of these disparate approaches is that terminology varies across communities: there are many interpretations of the meaning of <em>facet, category, keyword </em>or<em> taxonomy</em>, for example, which the author acknowledges, but he then uses these terms without saying precisely what definition he gives them.</p> <h2 id="Information_Search_Processes">Information Search Processes</h2> <p>Chapters 2 and 3 review studies on how people go about searching for information, leading to the perhaps self-evident conclusion that there are two types of approach. If a specific and well-defined piece of information is sought, people will amend and refine their queries in the light of initial results to get closer to what they seek. On the other hand, if the search requirement is less well defined, a browsing or 'berrypicking' approach is adopted to explore a subject area, picking up and assembling pieces of information and changing the destination as the exploration progresses. Both these approaches use an iterative procedure, within which a thesaurus can serve to make a search more precise, in the first case, or to show the broader context, in the second.</p> <p>Chapter 4 deals with thesauri in Web-based search systems, and gives several examples of thesauri in digital libraries, subject gateways and portals, digital archives and linked data repositories. This is one way of grouping these examples, but it is not clear that there is any distinction in principle between the way thesauri can be used in each of them, or indeed in search interfaces to other types of document collections. The main distinction, which is not fully addressed, is whether the information resources being searched have been indexed with terms from the thesaurus being used, or whether the thesaurus is just a source of possible terms for searching the text, and possibly the metadata, of documents. More weight needs to be given to the statement in the introduction to ISO 25964 -1:</p> <blockquote><p>'If both the indexer and the searcher are guided to choose the same term for the same concept, then relevant documents will be retrieved. This is the main principle underlying thesaurus design ...'</p> </blockquote> <p>In fact the book generally talks about <em>terms</em> rather than the approach taken by the current standards of considering unambiguously defined <em>concepts</em>, with terms just serving as convenient labels for these. Each concept may have many labels by which it can be retrieved, including one chosen as <em>preferred</em> for each language covered by the thesaurus.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review leonard will ansi cilip iso niso willpower information accessibility controlled vocabularies dewey decimal digital archive digital library graphics information architecture information retrieval interoperability lcsh linked data metadata repositories research search technology standards taxonomy thesaurus url usability visualisation vocabularies Wed, 26 Jun 2013 18:00:00 +0000 lisrw 2451 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: User Studies for Digital Library Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/aytac-rvw#author1">Selenay Aytac</a> reviews a collection of essays on user studies and digital library development that provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>User Studies for Digital Library Development</em> provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries. While there are many books on user studies and digital library development, this work operates at the junction of these two domains and stands out for its insights, balance, and quality of its case-based investigations. The book brings together points of view from different professional communities, including practitioners as well as researchers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review selenay aytac bbc glasgow caledonian university library of congress long island university manchester metropolitan university national library of australia university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of malta university of oxford university of sheffield university of strathclyde europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data course design creative commons data digital library digital preservation e-learning framework information society metadata mobile multimedia national library open access research resource discovery usability web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:10:17 +0000 lisrw 2412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Embedded Librarian http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a comprehensive overview of embedded librarianship, a new model of library service that promises to enhance the strategic value of contemporary knowledge work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarianship as a profession is confronting a growing demand to prove its worth. Library patrons expect utility. The organisations that fund them pre-suppose a contribution to their bottom lines.</p> <p>The calls for this proof come from librarians themselves as much as from their employers. And the tone of the questioning is persistent if not redundant. It can be distilled to a fundamental query: Can the library sustain its basic mission of effectively and efficiently fulfilling its users' information needs given the technological, social, and economic developments that are transforming how people interact with data, documents, and each other?</p> <h2 id="Librarianship:_In_Search_of_the_Value_Proposition">Librarianship: In Search of the Value Proposition</h2> <p>These transformations have been occurring for some time, in different areas of living and working. Though not flowing from a single source, for librarians the impacts from these changes have seemingly converged on their profession as if they were collusive forces.</p> <p>A global financial crisis and its lingering downturns have resulted in deeper budget cuts for many departments in every type of institution, public and private. A rising trend toward direct information consumption has caused many everyday users as well as executives to believe that removing librarians from the knowledge cycle is the next logical step. Caught within the sights of cost-conscious decision makers, libraries and information centres have become vulnerable to downsizing.</p> <p>Students enter universities - even secondary schools - wedded unconsciously to their handhelds, always connected, assuming unmitigated and near-immediate digital satisfaction for their knowledge wants. Most of them were born into this socio-technical life-world as if it were a natural order. They know and expect nothing else. In such an environment, librarians orchestrate access but need not be confronted. They maintain crucial databases and finding aids, but can do so unseen and disembodied. They can be relegated to infrastructural innards.</p> <p>For-profit organisations, the home of law firm and business librarians, are looking upon the outsourcing of support staff with increasing favour. And while library positions have not yet been handed over wholesale to third-party providers, there is industry trepidation that it could move in that direction. The threat is vague but distinctly present.</p> <p>Many have taken to the outlets of library opinion and prediction, warning of impending disintermediation and possible obsolescence if the field fails to embrace drastic changes in how it carries out its service mission. Blogs, journals, and conferences are animated with calls to re-conceptualise philosophies and re-direct core methods. Some commentators merely emit distress signals on behalf of the library community. They are invocations of crisis without even a stab at real solutions. Others, however, are serious attempts to map out alternative pathways to a more stable occupational future. These need to be reckoned with.</p> <p>A common path taken by the more constructive endeavours is demonstrating how librarianship can re-establish its value in a rapidly changing environment. This value is understood to be the knowledge-creating and disseminating efficacies that libraries bring to their users more ably and with less cost than other institutions. Since libraries are housed and financially supported by parent organisations of some kind, the value is usually construed as a combination of business and mission-relevant attributes. The emphasis on mission may be more pronounced in academic and public libraries, while corporate and firm libraries stress the financial aspects, but it is ultimately about how management assesses the library's contributions to the organisation's long-term integrity. Granted, the value has a large practical component for a library's patrons; the direct benefits are the answers, leads, and guidance they obtain when visiting the reference desk or searching the collections. However, the final criterion for most libraries will be the value proposition attributed to them by upper-level decision makers. User satisfaction is a valuable standard, but in the end it is often translated into a determination of whether the library produces distinct results in light of the resources devoted to maintaining it.</p> <p>A concrete attempt to re-assert the business and service value of librarians has been the adoption of the practice model known as embedded librarianship. Although it has been applied in libraries in one form or another for a few decades - without necessarily using the word ‘embedded’ - only in the past several years has it risen to widespread notability. Judging by the upsurge in professional discussions and published cases devoted to this approach, librarians of many types are expressing keen interest in the value-enhancing potential of embedding themselves. Its contemporary significance is fully examined by David Shumaker in <em>The Embedded Librarian: Innovative Strategies for Taking Knowledge Where It's Needed</em>. The author, an associate professor at The Catholic University of America's School of Library and Information Science in Washington, D.C., is a well-known chronicler of embedded practices. This book is the field's first attempt at a comprehensive review of embedded librarianship's shared features, variable manifestations, and elements for success among major types of libraries.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review john azzolini clifford chance blog cataloguing data database digital library framework higher education research search technology standards Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:32:15 +0000 lisrw 2413 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information 2.0 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/dobreva-rvw#author1">Milena Dobreva</a> reviews the newly published book of Martin de Saulles which looks at the new models of information production, distribution and consumption.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Writing about information and the changes in the models of its production, distribution and consumption is no simple task. Besides the long-standing debate on what information and knowledge really mean, the world of current technologies is changing at a pace which inevitably influences all spheres of human activity. But the first of those spheres to tackle is perhaps that of information – how we create, disseminate, and use it.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/dobreva-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review milena dobreva amazon jisc university of brighton university of malta archives big data blog cloud computing data data mining digital library digital preservation digitisation google search information society institutional repository mobile podcast research search technology video wiki Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:49:00 +0000 lisrw 2414 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Using Mobile Technology to Deliver Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/maclellan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/maclellan-rvw#author1">Fiona MacLellan</a> reviews a practical guide to mobile technology and its use in delivering library services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My initial thought upon seeing <em>Using Mobile Technology to Deliver Library Services</em> was available for review was that it was a topic of which I have limited knowledge – but part of its appeal was that I could learn about a new subject.&nbsp; After I registered to review the book I then had second thoughts. I began to worry that the book would be too advanced for me.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/maclellan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review fiona maclellan university of northampton augmented reality bibliographic data ebook licence mobile mobile phone qr code research rfid sms Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:05:05 +0000 lisrw 2429 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The E-copyright Handbook http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at the latest of Paul Pedley’s copyright guidance books, and, in some respects, finds it wanting.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Paul Pedley is a name that needs no introduction to <em>aficionados</em> of copyright textbooks, being the author of several such books published by Facet Publishing in the past (and reviewed by <em>Ariadne </em>[<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>][<a href="#3">3</a>][<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>]).&nbsp; His latest effort, <em>The E-copyright Handbook</em>, attempts to cover the fast-moving and complex world of electronic copyright, using an interesting approach.&nbsp; Rather than the traditional way of such books, describing the media and describing the rights granted to copyright owners, the way the law applies to each media type, exceptions to copyright and so on, his approach is a mixture but with some emphasis on activities, as a glance at the chapter titles shows: Introduction, Content Types, Activities, Copyright Exceptions, Licences, the Digital Economy Act, Enforcement and The Hargreaves Review.&nbsp;</p> <p>It is a complex approach, which requires careful cross-referencing and also checking that material is neither duplicated, nor that is anything is overlooked.&nbsp; It is not clear to me whether the book is meant for reading through, or whether it should be just dipped into when a particular issue causes someone to check the law; but I found the approach confusing.&nbsp;</p> <p>The book also suffers from being in a fast-moving area, where the law, and technology, change fast and although it is clear that Facet got the book published in record time, as there are numerous references to 2012 developments in the text, the work is already out of date in several places, and will no doubt get more out of date as the months go on.&nbsp; Another problem is that the book cannot make up its mind whether it is written for UK readers, or readers in the EU, or in the USA.&nbsp; All too often, different countries’ court cases are mentioned together; one is (say) a UK case and another is a US case.&nbsp; Without the understanding that US law and UK law in this field are very different, people will come to incorrect conclusions about the significance of the cases to them in their day to day work. Moreover, all too often the cases are described without any court decisions relating to them being provided; so one is left with the worry ‘why did the author mention this case at all?’</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review charles oppenheim bbc de montfort university google jisc loughborough university university of strathclyde bibliographic data bibliometrics cloud computing copyright data database dissemination google books open access research standards streaming url web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:30:54 +0000 lisrw 2415 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Understanding Information and Computation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a very individual perspective on the extent to which the growth and structure of the World Wide Web is governed by the fundamental laws of physics and mathematics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have been a member of the information profession for almost 60 years, but then I started at a very young age.&nbsp;&nbsp; Indeed I was a library assistant at the age of four.&nbsp; My grandfather was the volunteer librarian for the small library in Clanfield, Hampshire, which opened up for a couple of afternoons each week.&nbsp; My job was to stack the books up, and help him put them back on the shelves.&nbsp; I felt very important.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review martin white ibm intranet focus ltd oxford university press university of oxford university of sheffield bibliographic data content management data information retrieval intranet research search technology Thu, 13 Dec 2012 23:51:07 +0000 lisrw 2416 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Using Games to Enhance Learning and Teaching http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/aayeshah-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/aayeshah-rvw#author1">Wajeehah Aayeshah</a> reviews a comprehensive book on educational games that highlights the attributes of effective games usage but which also identifies the potential problems when using them in a pedagogical context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Using Games to Enhance Learning and Teaching: A Beginner’s Guide</em> is exactly what the title maintains: a beginner’s guide. The editors and primary authors, Nicola Whitton and Alex Moseley, have provided an extensive overview of using games as a pedagogical resource. While this title highlights the benefits of effective games usage, it nonetheless also identifies the potential problems when employing games in a pedagogical context.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/aayeshah-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review wajeehah aayeshah swinburne university of technology framework research Sun, 29 Jul 2012 17:07:52 +0000 lisrw 2363 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Mob Rule Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/maclellan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/maclellan-rvw#author1">Fiona MacLellan</a> reviews a book which discusses the current unconference phenomenon and highlights the learning opportunities that these environments offer.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The unconference phenomenon is something that I have heard lots about and have previously tried to read information about; however what this basic research has never been able to do is convince me of the necessity for the unconference or camp environment.&nbsp; Michelle Boule in this concise and easy-to-read book has managed to go at least part way to achieving this.&nbsp; Through use of case study, interview and example, the book provides an overview of the history of the unconference alongside the benefits it may represent to individuals and organisations.&nbsp; Boule illustrates the bene</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/maclellan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review fiona maclellan university of northampton archives blog hashtag research search technology twitter web resources Sun, 29 Jul 2012 12:15:59 +0000 lisrw 2359 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Implementing Technology in Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/mchugh-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/mchugh-rvw#author1">Elizabeth McHugh</a> reviews a first published work that she feels is a straightforward, jargon-free guide on how to implement technology solutions in libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At some point in our careers there may, indeed in these fast moving technological times, will be a period or periods when we will be required to be part of, lead or manage a project implementing technology solutions in libraries.&nbsp; At 173 pages long, with 13 chapters and 5 appendices, the author seeks to provide the reader with a clear, practitioner-written, jargon-free guide to doing so.&nbsp;<br /></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/mchugh-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review elizabeth mchugh amazon university of the highlands and islands ebook further education higher education licence research resource discovery Sun, 29 Jul 2012 14:49:35 +0000 lisrw 2362 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Managing Research Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rumsey-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rumsey-rvw#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> reviews a book which describes and explains the topics of interest central to practitioners involved with research data management.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Higher Education institutions (HEIs) in the UK are planning and implementing infrastructure and services to manage research data more urgently than they did for research publications. One policy framework sent to UK vice-chancellors from a major UK funding body (EPSRC), which set out clear expectations of responsibilities for data management at institutions within a given timetable, appears to have been the spark that prompted research data management (RDM) to be taken up by the upper echelons of management, and concrete activities set in place to start addressing the problem.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rumsey-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review sally rumsey bbc bodleian libraries datacite dcc jisc oais university of oxford archives blog curation data data citation data management data set doi foi framework higher education identifier infrastructure repositories research social networks wiki Sun, 29 Jul 2012 13:51:34 +0000 lisrw 2361 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: I, Digital – A History Devoid of the Personal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rusbridge-rvw#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> reviews an edited volume that aims to fill a gap in ‘literature designed specifically to guide archivists’ thinking about personal digital materials’.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We are all too familiar with the dire predictions of coming Digital Dark Ages, when All Shall be Lost because of the fragility of our digital files and the transience of the formats. We forget, of course, that loss was always the norm. The wonderful documents in papyrus, parchment and paper that we so admire and wonder at, are the few lucky survivors of their times. Sometimes they have been carefully nurtured, sometimes they have been accidentally preserved. But almost all were lost!</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review chris rusbridge british library dcc jisc national library of australia university of glasgow university of oxford university of virginia elib wikipedia archives bibliographic data curation data digital library digital preservation digital repositories ebook facebook internet explorer mis preservation privacy repositories research social web twitter web services wordpress youtube Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:17:27 +0000 lisrw 2365 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Need - A Theory Connecting Information Search to Knowledge Formation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a book about a new theory of ‘information need’ that builds upon the ideas of Allen and Taylor from the 1960s to provide a basis for information searching.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The front cover tells you succinctly what this book is about; 'A theory Connecting&nbsp; - Information Search – to – Knowledge Formation.'&nbsp; Equally bluntly, I shall set out my credentials for this review. I am not a library/informational professional but I have an interest in delivering digital and information skills to students. I have read and reviewed this book to further my own knowledge of the subject, as well as to see what (new?) ways there are for students to use search tools and methods as well as enhance both their digital and information literacies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review brian whalley google jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of cambridge university of oxford university of sheffield data further education higher education knowledge base metadata modelling ontologies research search technology semantic web tablet computer Mon, 30 Jul 2012 20:10:55 +0000 lisrw 2371 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Getting Started with Cloud Computing http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a collection of essays on cloud computing that attempts to clarify the technology and its applications for librarians and information professionals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I will admit to having read very little in the way of fiction writing over the last half-century though perhaps as a chemist by training I do enjoy science fiction from authors such as Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov and Fred Hoyle. All were distinguished scientists, none more so than Fred Hoyle, who was Plumian Professor of Astronomy and Experimental Philosophy at the University of Cambridge.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review martin white american library association apple eduserv google intranet focus ltd jisc oclc university of cambridge university of sheffield cloud computing content management data information retrieval infrastructure as a service intranet ipad microsoft office mobile privacy search technology sharepoint software Sat, 28 Jul 2012 22:42:54 +0000 lisrw 2358 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Future of Archives and Recordkeeping http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews an anthology of perceptive essays on the challenges presented to archival thought and practice by Web 2.0, postmodern perspectives, and cross-disciplinary interchanges.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians, archivists, and records managers do not share identical challenges or controversies in their practical endeavours or theoretical queries. However, a common issue for all the information professions and a dominating topic of discussion in their literature is the fundamental change in the structure and distribution of knowledge caused by mass digitisation. The proliferation of daily digital content, in quantity, reach, and manifestation, is confronting them all with a disquieting role ambiguity. The expanding tools and expectations of Web 2.0 have made this self-questioning a recurrent one, but they have also stimulated invigorating debate on the purpose and direction of these fields. The perception is one of extraordinary change initiated by emerging technologies, unprecedented knowledge production and dissemination, and a new centralised role for the information user. In these galvanising changes leading library and archives practitioners are sensing opportunities for confirming the professions’ relevance, in the estimation of other scholarly disciplines and of society at large, but, perhaps most of all, in their own eyes as well.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review john azzolini clifford chance archives blog cataloguing digital library digitisation dissemination facebook flickr framework knowledge management metadata personalisation preservation provenance research semiotic twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Tue, 08 Nov 2011 14:50:08 +0000 lisrw 1689 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: From Lending to Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/davies-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/davies-rvw#author1">Tim Davies</a> reviews a spirited defence of public libraries, which tries to define their core purpose and which argues for a re-positioning of their place in society.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those of us who work in public libraries these are, in the words of the old Chinese proverb, 'interesting times'. The service is under scrutiny at both local and national levels, with an intensity unknown in previous generations. Public libraries are in the news, with headline stories on the BBC's <em>Today</em> and <em>Newsnight</em>. They are the focus of demonstrations and read-ins, as councils struggle to balance severely reduced budgets.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/davies-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review tim davies bbc north lincolnshire library jisc information environment wikipedia dvd ebook information retrieval information society plain text research standards Sat, 18 Feb 2012 23:25:28 +0000 lisrw 2228 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: University Libraries and Digital Learning Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lafortune-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/lafortune-rvw#author1">Sylvie Lafortune</a> reviews a collection of essays that examine the transformation of academic libraries as they become part of digital learning environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This book examines how academic libraries are realigning themselves with the university of the 21<sup>st</sup> century, which is increasingly becoming a digital learning environment. The expectations of the Google generation, the interdependence of teaching and research, and the changing roles of library staff&nbsp; and technology all play a fundamental part in this environment–and to lead the discussions in this book, the editors have called on 18 experts and practitioners.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/lafortune-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review sylvie lafortune google laurentian university archives copyright curation data database digital repositories e-learning framework further education gis graphics higher education interoperability library management systems licence mobile preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology software standards tag cloud virtual research environment web 2.0 wireless Sun, 19 Feb 2012 16:38:31 +0000 lisrw 2229 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Being an Information Innovator http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/paschoud-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/paschoud#author1">John Paschoud</a> reviews a book which formalises the processes of being what many of us would like to be within our information-based organisations - innovators and entrepreneurs of the Information Age.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="For_Learners..._and_Practitioners">For Learners... and Practitioners?</h2> <p>Superficially at least, this book seems to be very clearly designed for students on a structured course at first degree or masters level for would-be information management professionals. In terms of structure I’m sure it’s ideally suited to that audience, with each of five chapters including learning objectives, review questions to test understanding, and group discussion topics.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/paschoud-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review john paschoud google london school of economics manchester metropolitan university archives research youtube Tue, 01 Nov 2011 13:22:06 +0000 lisrw 1677 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Making Software - What Really Works, and Why We Believe It http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>While acknowledging the genuine usefulness of much of its content, <a href="/issue68/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> provides helpful pointers towards a second edition.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Published by O'Reilly, as part of the Theory In Practice series, this book is essentially academic in focus. It takes the form of thirty chapters. The first eight of these aim to provide an introduction to the area of software engineering, or more specifically, the collection and use of supporting evidence to support software engineering practices. These initial chapters are satisfyingly broad in scope, covering topics from human factors and personality to complexity metrics and the process of authoring a systematic review.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review emma tonkin oreilly ukoln university of bath aggregation algorithm api data data mining framework open source repositories research software Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 1650 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Innovations in Information Retrieval http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews a collection of essays on a wide range of current topics and challenges in information retrieval.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Information_Retrieval_and_Enterprise_Search">Information Retrieval and Enterprise Search</h2> <p>For much of 2011 I worked on a project commissioned by the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, on a techno-economic study of enterprise search in Europe.&nbsp; There is no dispute that the volume of information inside organisations is growing very rapidly, though much of this growth is the result of never discarding any digital information.&nbsp; The scale of the problem is well documented by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) in its report on 'Big Data' [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review martin white intranet focus ltd university of sheffield aida big data data document management higher education information retrieval internet explorer intranet research search technology tagging video Thu, 23 Feb 2012 17:11:39 +0000 lisrw 2232 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Envisioning Future Academic Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews a timely collection of essays that highlights the values of institutional leadership and resourcefulness in academic librarianship's engagements with Web 2.0.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Since networked information technology has initiated a breathtaking transformation of knowledge practices, librarians have had a generous supply of thought leaders whose lifetime experience has permitted them to issue credible translations of the 'writing on the wall'. Recently, however, there seems to be many more analysts (and soothsayers) and much more anxious observation and published interpretation of such writing. And the message comes in a red ink, in bold, and with distinct portent, when not downright ominous.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review john azzolini british library clifford chance google university of melbourne yale university bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set digital library digitisation disruptive innovation dissemination ebook framework higher education ict knowledge management mobile muves open access personalisation preservation research search technology second life web 2.0 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1632 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Preparing Collections for Digitization http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews a recently published book on the selection and preparation of archive and library collections for digitisation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Over the past 20 years a great deal of information and guidance has been published to support cultural heritage organisations interested in undertaking digitisation projects. It is well over a decade now since the seminal Joint National Preservation Office and Research Libraries Group Preservation Conference on <em>Guidelines for digital imaging</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>] and standard introductory texts on digitisation like Anne Kenney and Oya Rieger's <em>Moving theory into practice</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>] and Stuart Lee's <em>Digital imaging: a practical handbook</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] are of a similar age - although still extremely useful. More up-to-date guidance is also available from services like JISC Digital Media [<a href="#4">4</a>] and the Federal Agencies Digitization Guidelines Initiative [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --><!-- <img alt="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue67-day-rvw/711-1.jpg" style="float: right; width: 102px; height: 152px; " title="Book cover: Preparing Collections for Digitization" /> --></p><p>Into this mix comes this new book on the preparation of collections for digitisation by Anna Bülow and Jess Ahmon, respectively Head of Preservation and Preservation Officer at The National Archives in Kew, London. The book claims to fill a gap in the existing literature, covering the practical aspects of safeguarding collections during image capture. It is perhaps worth noting upfront that the main focus of the book is on textual resources and documentary records, meaning that it would seem to be most useful for those working in the libraries and archives sectors.</p> <p>The first chapter provides some essential context, linking digitisation initiatives to the ongoing collection management practices of archives and libraries. It makes the general point that collection management has three main aspects: the <em>development</em>, <em>use</em> and <em>preservation</em> of collections.</p> <blockquote><p>Collection management involves making well informed decisions in order to prioritise actions and optimise the allocation of resources to maintain as much accessible value as possible. (p. 5)</p></blockquote> <p>Bülow and Ahmon argue that digital technologies have created new challenges for collection management, e.g. being partly responsible for a shift in attention from the development and <em>preservation</em> role to the development and <em>use</em> role. In practice, however, the link between the roles can be more nuanced. For example, in some cases digitisation may benefit conservation aims by helping to reduce the physical handling of fragile materials. In general, however, the authors feel that while the long-term sustainability challenges of digital content remain unresolved, "digitization of any book or document cannot be seen as a preservation measure for the original itself." (p. 8). The chapter concludes with a brief outline of the four phases of digitisation, each of which is made up of multiple steps. Of these, this book focuses primarily on the first two stages, covering all of the tasks that need to be done prior to imaging (e.g. selection, rights clearance, document preparation) as well as those associated with the digitisation process itself (imaging, quality assurance, transcription, metadata creation). The remaining two stages, chiefly facilitating use and sustainability, are not dealt with in any detail by this book.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review michael day harvard university jisc jisc digital media library association the national archives ukoln university of bath algorithm archives digital media digital preservation digitisation file format interoperability metadata preservation provenance research resource description standards tiff Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1633 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Expert Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/lafortune-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/lafortune-rvw#author1">Sylvie Lafortune</a> reviews a book taking a hard look at academic libraries, how they are being redefined and what skills will be required of the staff who will move them forward.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>E-Science, creative disorder, innovators wanted, core competencies and hybridisation of library personnel are some of the concepts you will find in the titles of the 13 chapters which make up this collected work. The editors, both library administrators at two large universities in the US, introduce the book by asking: in view of the major changes that are taking place in academic libraries, who should we be hiring to provide services in areas of 'critical campus concern' such as undergraduate research, data curation, intellectual property management and e-science? Indeed, this question is not taken lightly, and some of the answers offered by the authors are the result of extensive, ongoing discussion and reflection on how best to build capacity in libraries to deal with emerging resources and services.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/lafortune-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 review sylvie lafortune laurentian university university of illinois archives cataloguing curation data e-science gis instructional design intellectual property metadata preservation research visualisation Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1634 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Introducing RDA http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/clifford-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/clifford-rvw#author1">Katrina Clifford</a> reviews a work covering the long-heralded change in the cataloguing rule set - RDA (Resource Description and Access).</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3: author final edits implemented 2011-02-22 REW --><!-- v3: author final edits implemented 2011-02-22 REW --><p>The world of information description and retrieval is one of constant change and RDA (Resource Description and Access) is often touted as being one of the most radical changes on the horizon. Early discussions were often couched very much in terms of the principles behind the move from AACR2 (Anglo American Cataloguing Rules) and the principles of a FRBR (Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records)-based system. We gradually move closer to the Library of Congress' decision on whether to adopt RDA or not, raising questions of what adoption will mean in terms not just of day-to-day cataloguing but the wider retrieval world. Therefore, it is not just cataloguers who may feel they need to gain an understanding of exactly what RDA is and what moving to it will involve. The title of Chris Oliver's book, <em>Introducing RDA: A Guide to the Basics</em>, will, as a result, catch the eye of people from many spheres of information work.</p> <h2 id="Content_of_the_Book">Content of the Book</h2> <p>Although this book is just over 100 pages long, I would say it is not necessary to start at the beginning and work your way through the book to get the most out of it. If you're looking for something that places RDA squarely within the historical context of information retrieval and the rationale behind its development then the first two chapters give a comprehensive overview in relatively few pages. Chapter 1, 'What is RDA?' introduces the idea of RDA being designed as a result of an increasingly varied range of resources in need of description, especially those that are digital in nature. Additionally there is the need to search multiple datasets at once, including those beyond libraries, in allied institutions such as museums and archives. Chapter 2, 'RDA and the international context', as implied by the title explores the relationship of RDA to international documentation standards such as ISBD (International Standard Bibliographic Description) and how it copes in terms of handling language issues of catalogue records. It is just a brief overview however, all the ideas are discussed in one or two paragraphs each. Together, these two initial chapters would easily fill in the background for an uninitiated professional, such as a library school student and indeed they show that RDA is built upon many of the key concepts touched upon in library school courses, such as Cutter's<em> Rules for a dictionary catalog</em>.</p> <p>Chapter 3 furthers this introduction by describing FRBR and FRAD (Functional Requirements for Authority Data) and how they relate to RDA. In all the more recent discussions surrounding practical aspects of the uptake of RDA, the theoretical principles underlying it are often forgotten and revisiting them can be an interesting exercise. After an overview of how FRBR and FRAD are constructed, it moves on to why they are important. One figure lays out a MARC record and labels the fields with the appropriate FRBR entities which is helpful in understanding them in context. The remainder of the chapter shows how the RDA terms have been incorporated into the layout of the sections of RDA and the wording of the rules themselves. The chapter shows why RDA is laid out in a very different way to AACR2, grouping rules by the attribute described rather than by item format. This chapter is perhaps the most difficult to work through, but I feel this is due to the nature of the content, rather than any failing on the part of the author.</p> <p>Chapter 4 is entitled 'Continuity with AACR2' and while this may indicate it will describe how catalogues may appear different, the start of the chapter focuses more on continuity in terms of governance and principles rather than on the nuts and bolts of the records themselves. It does move to describing how AACR2 has been reworked into RDA, rather than RDA being written from scratch and illustrates this with a couple of rules and wordings from both products to compare the differences and similarities. It then moves back to what is essentially an historical account of the 'deconstruction' of AACR2, which is interesting in itself; but it would have been better placed near the start of the chapter to distinguish better between the historical description and the examples from RDA which follow.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/clifford-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review katrina clifford kingston university library of congress aacr2 archives authority data bibliographic data cataloguing data data set frad frbr information retrieval isbd marc marc21 metadata resource description and access search technology standards video wiki Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1614 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Myths of Innovation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coelho-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/coelho-rvw#author1">Lina Coelho</a> takes a look at Scott Berkun's challenging view of what innovation and creativity really mean.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The clue is in the title. This book sets out to dispel the myths about creativity and innovation which you have cherished so dearly. It tells you what 'not to do and what not to think' so that you can free yourself from common misguided notions on the subject. As a special bonus, this new paperback edition includes four new chapters which provide the practical tips you would need to help your ideas take off.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/coelho-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review lina coelho apple google microsoft university of washington bibliographic data internet explorer research search technology video Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1615 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Blogging and RSS - A Librarian's Guide, 2nd Edition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cope-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/cope-rvw#author1">Elly Cope</a> reviews the second edition of this book in which the author explains how RSS and blogging can be used by librarians and libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Michael P. Sauers is a trainer in Internet technologies and this book is intended for librarians who have heard of blogging and RSS and want to start using these tools as soon as possible, but who may not have the expertise or confidence in their ability to start by themselves.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cope-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review elly cope google university of bath aggregation blog cataloguing microblogging perl podcast rdf rss search technology syndication twitter url Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1616 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Practical Open Source Software for Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/rafiq-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/rafiq-rvw#author1">Muhammad Rafiq</a> takes a look at a work on the open source community and open source software.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2 inserting author's final edits 2011-02-20-18-44 REW --><!-- v2 inserting author's final edits 2011-02-20-18-44 REW --><p>Open source (OS) usually refers to an application whose source code is made available for use or modification in line with users' needs and requirements. OS projects usually develop in the public domain where contributors participate in a collaborative manner and update or refine the product. OS offers more flexibility and freedom than software purchased with licence restrictions. Both the OS community and the library world share many common principles. They share and promote open standards and believe in sharing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/rafiq-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 review muhammad rafiq cd-rom content management data database digital library digital media drupal dspace dvd firefox graphics instant messaging internet explorer interoperability licence linux moodle open source openoffice operating system podcast repositories research software vufind wiki wordpress Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1617 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Acquisitions in the New Information Universe http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mackay-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/mackay-rvw#author1">Eilidh Mackay</a> reviews a work which takes a concept-based approach to contemporary acquisitions practices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In <em>Acquisitions in the new information universe</em>, Jesse Holden provides a comprehensive introduction to fundamental acquisitions concepts, and strategies for translating these into practice in the twenty-first century.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/mackay-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review eilidh mackay university of the west of england jisc information environment archives ebook framework open access resource management Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1597 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Introductory Concepts in Information Science http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/oppenheim-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/oppenheim-rvw#author1">Charles Oppenheim</a> takes a look at an introduction to Information Science but fails to be impressed.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With a title like that, one would expect a primer, introducing all the key concepts of information science to someone studying the topic for the first time at undergraduate or Masters' level, and possibly for the interested layman. Such a book would be a worthy successor to Chris Hanson's <em>Introduction to Science Information Work</em>, and Roger Meetham's <em>Information Retrieval</em>, both of which were first published about 40 years ago. Sadly, however, this book does not fulfil the promise of its title.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/oppenheim-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review charles oppenheim british library british museum google loughborough university accessibility bibliometrics copyright digital library digital repositories information retrieval open access repositories research resource management software url Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1598 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Accidental Taxonomist http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> takes a look at a book on the work of the taxonomist and notes both merits and disappointments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Definitions">Definitions</h2> <p><strong>TAXON''OMY</strong>, n. [Gr. order, and law.] Classification; a term used by a French author to denote the classification of plants.<br />Webster's Revised Dictionary (1828 Edition) [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> <p><strong>Tax*on"o*my </strong>(?), n. [Gr. an arrangement, order + a law.] That division of the natural sciences which treats of the classification of animals and plants; the laws or principles of classification.<br />Webster's Revised Dictionary (1913 Edition) [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> <p>Taxonomy</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review emma tonkin ukoln university of bath university of oxford cataloguing content management controlled vocabularies ontologies research search technology semantic web software tagging taxonomy thesaurus visualisation vocabularies z39.50 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1599 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Conference Review: M-Libraries 2, A Virtual Library in Everyone's Pocket http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/white-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/white-rvw#author1">Martin White</a> reviews the proceedings of a 2009 M-Libraries conference on mobile applications in libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>I have no doubt at all that smart phones are going to cause a revolution in information access. People need location-free access to information, whether they are walking down a corridor in an office, working in a laboratory or sitting in a library. If you doubt that forecast, then just look at the speed with which around 300,000 applications have been developed for the Apple iPhone, a substantial number of which are information-centric rather than entertainment-centric. There is also a lot of interest in providing access to enterprise applications, notably intranets, from a smart phone.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/white-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review martin white apple cilip intranet focus ltd stm flash html5 intranet iphone mobile research smartphone sms wireless Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1600 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> looks at a student survival aid in the information age that should also be valuable for tutors.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies' is an example of an ever-increasing range of 'self-help' books for students on a variety of topics relating skills, tips and education. Such books range from 'Critical thinking skills' [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the quite specific, for example, 'Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and more' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This offering from Gower/Ashgate comes somewhere in between. It introduces students to the main current technologies and some of the pedagogic devices they might find in modern education.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review brian whalley apple google microsoft queens university belfast wikipedia blog data e-learning ebook higher education ict linux mobile open source openoffice png podcast repositories software usb wiki youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1601 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Art of Community - Building the New Age of Participation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/bremner-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/bremner-rvw#author1">Ed Bremner</a> reviews a work on building and supporting online communities.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="The_Preamble">The Preamble</h2> <p>I have been building online 'communities of practice' for about 10 years now. Some have thrived and others not. It started about 10 years ago with the formation of a small association with a shared interest in classic marine heritage. The community operated entirely online, mainly through a forum and we found that, with very little conscious effort, the community quickly grew and thrived. It was quickly taken up as an example of good practice and evidence for what could be achieved within a small community with similar interests and aspirations.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/bremner-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review ed bremner jisc jisc digital media tasi ukoln university of bath university of cambridge digital media digitisation linux research software Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1579 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk