Overview of content related to 'usb' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/6051/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en 23rd International CODATA Conference http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/codata-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a conference on ‘Open Data and Information for a Changing Planet’ held by the International Council for Science’s Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) at Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan on 28–31 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>CODATA was formed by the International Council for Science (ICSU) in 1966 to co-ordinate and harmonise the use of data in science and technology. One of its very earliest decisions was to hold a conference every two years at which new developments could be reported. The first conference was held in Germany in 1968, and over the following years it would be held in&nbsp; 15 different countries across 4 continents.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/codata-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report alex ball codata datacite dcc elsevier icsu jisc library of congress national academy of sciences niso oais orcid royal meteorological society sheffield hallam university stm ukoln university college london university of bath university of edinburgh university of queensland university of washington dealing with data europeana ojims accessibility algorithm api archives bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing creative commons crm curation data data citation data management data mining data model data set data visualisation database digital archive digital curation digitisation dissemination doi dvd e-learning facebook framework geospatial data gis google maps handle system identifier infrastructure intellectual property interoperability java knowledge base knowledge management licence linux lod metadata mobile moodle oer ontologies open access open data open source operating system optical character recognition portfolio preservation privacy provenance repositories research restful search technology sharepoint smartphone software standardisation standards tagging usb video visualisation vocabularies web resources web services widget wiki xml xmpp Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:41:16 +0000 lisrw 2430 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2012: Big Data, Big Deal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> attended the annual Eduserv Symposium on 10 May 2012 at the Royal College of Physicians, London to find out what are the implications of big data for Higher Education Institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The annual Eduserv Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] was billed as a ‘must-attend event for IT professionals in Higher Education’; the choice of topical subject matter being one of the biggest crowd-drawers (the other being the amazing venue: the Royal College of Physicians). The past few years have seen coverage of highly topical areas such as virtualisation and the cloud, the mobile university and access management.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/eduserv-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report marieke guy amazon cetis dcc eduserv google jisc orcid oreilly oxford internet institute ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of california berkeley university of leicester university of oxford webtrends wellcome trust dealing with data impact project accessibility algorithm big data blog cloud computing curation data data management data set database digitisation gis google analytics google trends hadoop higher education infrastructure intellectual property internet explorer irods learning analytics mobile nosql oer open data open source remote working research twitter usb Mon, 30 Jul 2012 17:48:45 +0000 lisrw 2370 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Piloting Web Conferencing Software: Experiences and Challenges http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author1">Julian Prior</a> and <a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author2">Marie Salter</a> report on their experiences piloting Elluminate Live! at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>In the current fiscal climate faced by educational institutions in the UK, elearning tools and technologies that promise efficiency savings as well as enhancing the quality and quantity of course offerings are gaining popularity. One such technology is Web conferencing where lectures, seminars, meetings or presentations take place online and allow for remote participation and collaboration via audio, video, instant chat and a virtual 'whiteboard.'[<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article julian prior marie salter alt alt-c aston university blackboard google jisc open university qik ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of exeter university of hertfordshire university of winchester samson wikipedia adobe blog browser data e-learning elluminate firefox further education higher education internet explorer java licence mobile moodle multimedia oer open access open source operating system portfolio safari software streaming usb video vle web browser webinar windows Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1623 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author1">Marion Tattersall</a>, <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author2">Carmen O'Dell</a> and <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author3">John Lewis</a> report on Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade, organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) in partnership with the White Rose University Consortium and held 1-3 March 2011 at the University of Sheffield.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report carmen odell john lewis marion tattersall dcc jisc national grid service national science foundation queensland university of technology uk data archive ukoln university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of leeds university of manchester university of melbourne university of oxford university of sheffield university of york beginners guide to digital preservation data train project dmtpsych jisc information environment wikipedia yodl archives blog cloud computing copyright creative commons curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation e-research fedora commons foi framework infrastructure licence metadata multimedia open data portal preservation privacy repositories research resource discovery software taxonomy usb video visualisation vle Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1631 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> describes new tools and services that can help you get your event heard.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><p>In 2007 Lorcan Dempsey coined the phrase 'the amplified conference' [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He used the term to refer to how event outputs (such as talks and presentations) were being amplified 'through a variety of network tools and collateral communications'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article marieke guy eduserv google jisc mpeg qik ukoln university of bath beginners guide to digital preservation internet archive jisc powr project powr amplified event archives avi blog copyright creative commons digital preservation dissemination elluminate facebook flickr hashtag intellectual property licence metadata mobile mobile phone mp4 netvibes odp open source opml pageflakes podcast preservation remote working research rss search technology software storify streaming tagging twitter usb ustream video web development webinar wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1607 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> looks at a student survival aid in the information age that should also be valuable for tutors.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies' is an example of an ever-increasing range of 'self-help' books for students on a variety of topics relating skills, tips and education. Such books range from 'Critical thinking skills' [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the quite specific, for example, 'Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and more' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This offering from Gower/Ashgate comes somewhere in between. It introduces students to the main current technologies and some of the pedagogic devices they might find in modern education.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review brian whalley apple google microsoft queens university belfast wikipedia blog data e-learning ebook higher education ict linux mobile open source openoffice png podcast repositories software usb wiki youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1601 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk A Pragmatic Approach to Preferred File Formats for Acquisition http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/thompson#author1">Dave Thompson</a> sets out the pragmatic approach to preferred file formats for long-term preservation used at the Wellcome Library.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article sets out the Wellcome Library's decision not explicitly to specify preferred file formats for long-term preservation. It discusses a pragmatic approach in which technical appraisal of the material is used to assess the Library's likelihood of preserving one format over another. The Library takes as its starting point work done by the Florida Digital Archive in setting a level of 'confidence' in its preferred formats. The Library's approach provides for nine principles to consider as part of appraisal. These principles balance economically sustainable preservation and intellectual 'value' with the practicalities of working with specific, and especially proprietary, file formats. Scenarios are used to show the application of principles (see <a href="#annex">Annex</a> below).</p> <p>This article will take a technical perspective when assessing material for acquisition by the Library. In reality technical factors are only part of the assessment of material for inclusion in the Library's collections. Other factors such as intellectual content, significance of the material, significance of the donor/creator and any relationship to material already in the Library also play a part. On this basis, the article considers 'original' formats accepted for long-term preservation, and does not consider formats appropriate for dissemination.</p> <p>This reflects the Library's overall approach to working with born digital archival material. Born digital material is treated similarly to other, analogue archival materials. The Library expects archivists to apply their professional skills regardless of the format of any material, to make choices and decisions about material based on a range of factors and not to see the technical issues surrounding born digital archival material as in any way limiting.</p> <h2 id="Why_Worry_about_Formats">Why Worry about Formats?</h2> <p>Institutions looking to preserve born digital material permanently, the Wellcome Library included, may have little control over the formats in which material is transferred or deposited. The ideal intervention point from a preservation perspective is at the point digital material is first created. However this may be unrealistic. Many working within organisations have no choice in the applications they use, cost of applications may be an issue, or there may simply be a limited number of applications available on which to perform specialist tasks. Material donated after an individual retires or dies can prove especially problematic. It may be obsolete, in obscure formats, on obsolete media and without any metadata describing its context, creation or rendering environment.</p> <p>Computer applications 'save' their data in formats, each application typically having its own file format. The Web site filext [<a href="#1">1</a>] lists some 25,000 file extensions in its database.</p> <p>The long-term preservation of any format depends on the type of format, issues of obsolescence, and availability of hardware and/or software, resources, experience and expertise. Any archive looking to preserve born digital archival material needs to have the means and confidence to move material across the 'gap' that exists between material 'in the wild' and holding it securely in an archive.</p> <p>This presents a number of problems: first, in the proliferation of file formats; second, in the use of proprietary file formats, and third, in formats becoming obsolete, either by being incompatible with later versions of the applications that created them, or by those applications no longer existing. This assumes that proprietary formats are more problematic to preserve as their structure and composition are not known, which hinders preservation intervention by imposing the necessity for specialist expertise. Moreover, as new software is created, so new file formats proliferate, and consequently exacerbate the problem.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/thompson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article dave thompson microsoft mpeg wellcome library aggregation archives born digital cd-rom data database digital archive digital preservation dissemination drm file format framework internet explorer jpeg jpeg 2000 metadata microsoft office open source openoffice preservation provenance real audio repositories software standards tiff usb video xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1547 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Volcanic Eruptions Fail to Thwart Digital Preservation - the Planets Way http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author1">Matthew Barr</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author2">Amir Bernstein</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author3">Clive Billenness</a> and <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author4">Manfred Thaller</a> report on the final Planets training event Digital Preservation - The Planets Way held in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div align="center"> <p style="text-align: left;">In far more dramatic circumstances than expected, the Planets Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] held its 3-day training event<em> Digital Preservation – The Planets Way</em> in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010. This article reports its proceedings.</p> </div><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report amir bernstein clive billenness manfred thaller matthew barr austrian national library british library national library of the netherlands oais open planets foundation opf swiss federal archives university of cologne university of glasgow archives bibliographic data browser cataloguing cloud computing data database digital preservation digital repositories digitisation file format framework graphics identifier interoperability java metadata national library operating system preservation repositories research software usb visualisation web browser web services xml youtube zip Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1549 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Product Review: The IPad and the Educator, First Impressions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw-2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/whalley-rvw-2#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reports on his initial impressions of the new Apple iPad in the first three weeks since its release in the USA and what it has to offer the mobile educator.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Triumph_of_Design_over_Function">Triumph of Design over Function?</h2> <p>So, you have seen and read the hype about the iPad [<a href="#1">1</a>]; the world release has been delayed until the US appetite has been satiated and it will be the end of May for the rest of the world. Should you buy one or is this an example of the triumph of elegant design over function? What follows is an initial view of an iPad bought in the US in April and the results of some playing around with it in the USA and then the UK. It is not a comparative test with 'netbooks' or other e-book readers (such as Kindle and Sony), although I shall make some discrete comparisons because this review stems from an earlier discussion about e-books in <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Main_Impressions">Main Impressions</h2> <p>One complaint about existing e-book readers was, and is, that they do not have colour screens. I want to view Web pages with images and text at a decent size and read e-books with coloured (and preferably hypertext) material. I'd like my students to have this capability too. The e-ink technology in a Kindle cannot currently offer anything other than greyscale so the iPad is immediately a 'wow' when you turn it on. The touch screen is excellent and a size that can be used to read books as well as Web pages without lots of scrolling. This was my main reason for trying the iPad as, apart of my desire to have students use a Personal Learning Environment (PLE, device plus appropriately chosen applications), the screen was a major consideration. Netbooks fill the bill to a limited extent but with the 9.7" diagonal (19.5 x 15 cm screen, portrait or landscape conversion in 1 second) the iPad is more than good. All my colleagues who have paid me £5 just to touch it have remarked on this. Have a look at the (<em>Guardian</em>) Eyewitness app [<a href="#3">3</a>] to see what it can do. The screen also provides a keyboard (scaling for the orientation) that can be used for typing rather than prodding with a finger or stylus but, as with the iPhone, you can only get numerals by shifting a key. A separate Apple Bluetooth keyboard is available which is very neat, light and allows proper typing. This review was initially typed on the iPad Notes application ('app' now of course), I have not yet tried the Apple iWorks suite and at this stage I am not using the iPad as a laptop replacement; but rather, as a lightweight device that can be used for basic notebook functionality with the ability to read text and view Web pages without strain or undue scrolling.</p> <p>The 3G version of the iPad is not yet out but, for the moment, this does not concern me; I can 'synch' my iPhone and Macbook Pro when needed and my iPhone gives me some iPhone applications of usefully increased screen size (there are lots more to come specifically for the iPad of course). Music and video (4:3 ratio) come over smoothly - and video is at a reasonable size to view rather than squinting myopically at an iPhone. The iPad was useful on a Transatlantic flight (steerage with restricted lapspace) for typing, music and film. When necessary, you can slip it beside you and need not worry about slopping your gin and tonic over a keyboard. Convenience is a great selling point about the iPad, battery life is excellent, a claimed 10 hours. It took about 6 hours to recharge from 4% capacity to full. The same power connector-USB cable (used also for data connectivity) works for the iPod and iPhone as well so you can easily charge from laptop, external AC sources, car adapter as well, as a <em>PowerMonkey </em>or similar external power source. Power efficiency is mainly due to the type of computer architecture the machine uses. It is the same Apple custom CPU (known as A4) that is used by the iPhone and so, from this point of view, the iPad is indeed a large iPhone. The architecture differs from that used on most netbooks, which are really stripped down and relatively slow and power-hungry versions of (x86 architecture) laptops. We should really think of the iPad as a new generation of small computer and it remains to be seen what Apple will develop in the future.</p> <p>Unfortunately, Digital Rights Management (DRM) meant that I could not access iTunes myself in the USA so I had to rely on my son's access to try a few things out. I now have a list of applications to experiment with but I shall not report on those here, they will have to wait until the App Store opens for iPad use in the UK. At present, you can only have one app open at a time (plus audio on the iPod application). Apple have already indicated that the next version of the OS will have multiple-tasking, that is, keeping two applications open at the same time; currently you have to switch using the discrete 'home' button. This button is on the screen, the on/off and volume controls are around the rim together with docking connector, earpiece jack socket, aperture for microphone (so you can use the iDictaphone app) and a switch to lock/unlock the screen orientation.</p> <p>I mentioned DRM earlier so the only iBooks downloaded so far are <em>Winnie the Pooh</em> and <em>Twelfth Night</em>. The former is really very good with the original E.H. Shepard coloured illustrations. They are text-searchable (did you know that the word 'hunny' only occurs three times in <em>Winnie the Pooh</em>?), there is a dictionary and the ability to change to one of five different typefaces and two sizes. The text is very clear and readable in either mode and the graphics can give you a page turn as slow or as fast as you like, neat. I also tried <em>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</em> downloaded from <em>Stanza</em> where there is more flexibility with fonts but the text is less crisp. I downloaded apps for <em>Kindle </em>[<a href="#4">4</a>] and <em>Reader Lite </em>but did not use their offerings. I suspect that there will be improvements from most e-book vendors with iPad optimisation in the jockeying for position that appears to be going on in the e-book world. We have yet to see how the commercial textbook vendors deal with e-books for the iPad.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw-2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review brian whalley alt alt-c apple bbc google queens university belfast adobe data drm ebook flash google scholar graphics html html5 hypertext ipad iphone itunes jpg podcast usb video wiki Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1558 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eBooks: Tipping or Vanishing Point? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> investigates ebooks and takes a look at recent technological and business developments in this area.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Due in large part to the appearance since mid-2006 of increasingly affordable devices making use of e-Ink technology (a monochrome display supporting a high-resolution image despite low battery use, since the screen consumes power only during page refreshes, which in the case of ebooks generally represent page turns), the ebook has gone from a somewhat limited market into a real, although presently still niche, contender. Amazon sold 500,000 Kindles in 2008 [<a href="#1">1</a>]; Sony sold 300,000 of its Reader Digital Book model between October 2006 and October 2009. In September 2009, ebooks represented between 1% and 3% of the total US publishing market [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Following the JISC National eBooks Observatory Study [<a href="#3">3</a>] in the UK, one participant, David Nicolas, was quoted as stating that ebooks have 'reached the tipping point' [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Keeping in mind Bohr's statement that, 'prediction is very difficult, especially about the future', it's nonetheless safe to say that publicity about these devices is currently at a high point. But for ebook readers, as Figure 1 shows, this is not their first time in the spotlight.</p> <blockquote><p>"A good book has no ending. ~R.D. Cumming"</p></blockquote> <p>This article marks the third time that <em>Ariadne</em> has discussed the subject of ebooks, namely "Ebooks in UK Libraries: Where are we now?" [<a href="#5">5</a>] and "e-Books for the Future: Here But Hiding?" [<a href="#6">6</a>]. There is something very beguiling about the idea of a book that has 'the marvelous chameleon-like quality that it can very quickly be made to substitute for a different printed work by simply loading different content' [<a href="#7">7</a>] - a book that can play the role of a <em>library</em>.</p> <p>As Striphas [<a href="#8">8</a>] points out, the concept of the electronic book, and the exploration of the interaction between the size of a container and the quantity of knowledge held, has an extraordinarily long history. He traces the idea back to the creation of miniature manuscript books, composed of 'tiny handwriting, or micrographia', in the late 15th century, which were functional objects and could be read by means of a magnifying glass.</p> <p>Striphas notes the development of microphotography techniques in the 19th century. This was initially pioneered by John Benjamin Dancer, an optical instrument-maker who combined microscope and camera in order to create the earliest example of microphotography on record [<a href="#9">9</a>]. Luther reports that 'the 21 May 1853 issue of Notes and Queries carried a letter from a Dublin scholar asking "May not photography be usefully applied to the making of catalogues of large libraries?' Microphotography led to the report in the British <em>Photographic Journal</em> of, 'A page of printing, from Quekett's "Treatise on the Microscope", reduced to such size that the whole of the volume of 560 pages could be contained in a space one inch long and half-an-inch broad ' [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin amazon american library association apple british library google international digital publishing forum iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology microsoft ukoln university of bath university of chicago wikipedia aac access control accessibility adobe android blog bmp cataloguing copyright data digital library doc document format drm ebook epub file format flac flash gif html hypertext infrastructure ipad iphone itunes jpeg jpg linux mis mobi mobile mobile phone mp3 ogg open access operating system plain text png research rtf search technology smartphone software standardisation standards tiff usb windows wireless Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1529 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Saving Energy in the Workplace http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/young <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue54/young#author1">Eddie Young</a> outlines some of the issues faced by a Systems Administrator when trying to save energy in the workplace.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue54/young" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue54 feature article eddie young apple bbc eduserv ukoln university of bath iwmw wikipedia blog data open source operating system podcast research second life software solaris usb video wiki windows Wed, 30 Jan 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1373 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Workshop on E-Research, Digital Repositories and Portals http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/escience-lancaster-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/escience-lancaster-rpt#author1">Rob Allan</a>, <a href="/issue49/escience-lancaster-rpt#author2">Rob Crouchley</a> and <a href="/issue49/escience-lancaster-rpt#author3">Caroline Ingram</a> report on a two-day workshop held at University of Lancaster over 6-7 September 2006</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/escience-lancaster-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 event report caroline ingram rob allan rob crouchley cclrc dcc edina google intute jisc mimas oai sherpa uk data archive university college london university of hull university of lancaster university of leeds university of nottingham university of oxford university of southampton claddier digimap iesr jisc information environment opendoar r4l romeo api archives browser data database digital curation digital repositories digitisation dissemination e-learning e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property internet explorer interoperability java metadata oai-pmh portal preservation rae repositories research resource discovery rss search technology service registry tagging uddi uportal usb virtual research environment web 2.0 web services wsrp Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1280 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 10th CETIS-TechDis Accessibility Special Interest Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/acc-sig-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue43/acc-sig-rpt#author1">Ann Chapman</a> reports on a one-day meeting that focused among other things on accessibility in virtual learning environments and personal learning profiles.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having recently joined the CETIS-TechDis Accessibility SIG (Special Interest Group), I attended the 10th meeting of the group in York on 16 March 2005. The meeting was held in the very new (opened that week) Higher Education Academy Building on the University of York campus where TechDis now has its offices. There was in interesting mix of digital artists, metadata officers, lecturers, project staff and programmers from both universities and colleges, along with people from Becta, JORUM and Key2Access Ltd.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue43/acc-sig-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue43 event report ann chapman becta cerlim cetis ibm ims loughborough university manchester metropolitan university rnib staffordshire university ukoln university of wales university of york w3c jorum accessibility data e-learning flash higher education html java metadata mobile passwords perl software usability usb vle Fri, 29 Apr 2005 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1153 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Web Focus: The Web on Your TV http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/web-focus <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue40/web-focus#author1">Brian Kelly</a> takes a look at a digital TV box which provides Web and email access in your living room.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The potential for use of television for accessing Web resources has been suggested for a number of years without having any significant impact. However the growth in use of digital TV technologies may provide another opportunity for accessing Web and other networked resources from the comfort of your living room.</p> <p>This article introduces the Netgem i-Player digital TV player and describes the implications for Web developers if such devices grow in popularity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/web-focus" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue40 tooled up brian kelly ukoln university of bath w3c accessibility blog browser css flash further education html javascript linux mp3 operating system standards streaming url usb web browser web resources web standards wiki windows xhtml Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1064 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk