Overview of content related to 'mobi' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/6064/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Mobilising the Internet Detective http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/massam-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author1">Diana Massam</a>, <a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author2">Andrew Priest</a> and <a href="/issue63/massam-et-al#author3">Caroline Williams</a> describe a recent project to adapt the online Internet Detective tutorial, to deliver a user-friendly mobile site which reflects their market research into user preferences for mobile content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'The mobile phone is undoubtedly [a] strong driving force, a behaviour changer…Library users will soon be demanding that every interaction can take place via the cell phone' [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/massam-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article andrew priest caroline williams diana massam apple google intute jisc mimas ukoln university of manchester w3c devcsi jisc information environment mobile internet detective transcoder accessibility aggregation android blog browser css data e-learning facebook google docs higher education information architecture ipad iphone java linked data mobi mobile mobile learning mobile phone mp3 open source opera php podcast programming language repositories research search technology sms software stylesheet video web development wireless Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1540 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eBooks: Tipping or Vanishing Point? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> investigates ebooks and takes a look at recent technological and business developments in this area.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Due in large part to the appearance since mid-2006 of increasingly affordable devices making use of e-Ink technology (a monochrome display supporting a high-resolution image despite low battery use, since the screen consumes power only during page refreshes, which in the case of ebooks generally represent page turns), the ebook has gone from a somewhat limited market into a real, although presently still niche, contender. Amazon sold 500,000 Kindles in 2008 [<a href="#1">1</a>]; Sony sold 300,000 of its Reader Digital Book model between October 2006 and October 2009. In September 2009, ebooks represented between 1% and 3% of the total US publishing market [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Following the JISC National eBooks Observatory Study [<a href="#3">3</a>] in the UK, one participant, David Nicolas, was quoted as stating that ebooks have 'reached the tipping point' [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Keeping in mind Bohr's statement that, 'prediction is very difficult, especially about the future', it's nonetheless safe to say that publicity about these devices is currently at a high point. But for ebook readers, as Figure 1 shows, this is not their first time in the spotlight.</p> <blockquote><p>"A good book has no ending. ~R.D. Cumming"</p></blockquote> <p>This article marks the third time that <em>Ariadne</em> has discussed the subject of ebooks, namely "Ebooks in UK Libraries: Where are we now?" [<a href="#5">5</a>] and "e-Books for the Future: Here But Hiding?" [<a href="#6">6</a>]. There is something very beguiling about the idea of a book that has 'the marvelous chameleon-like quality that it can very quickly be made to substitute for a different printed work by simply loading different content' [<a href="#7">7</a>] - a book that can play the role of a <em>library</em>.</p> <p>As Striphas [<a href="#8">8</a>] points out, the concept of the electronic book, and the exploration of the interaction between the size of a container and the quantity of knowledge held, has an extraordinarily long history. He traces the idea back to the creation of miniature manuscript books, composed of 'tiny handwriting, or micrographia', in the late 15th century, which were functional objects and could be read by means of a magnifying glass.</p> <p>Striphas notes the development of microphotography techniques in the 19th century. This was initially pioneered by John Benjamin Dancer, an optical instrument-maker who combined microscope and camera in order to create the earliest example of microphotography on record [<a href="#9">9</a>]. Luther reports that 'the 21 May 1853 issue of Notes and Queries carried a letter from a Dublin scholar asking "May not photography be usefully applied to the making of catalogues of large libraries?' Microphotography led to the report in the British <em>Photographic Journal</em> of, 'A page of printing, from Quekett's "Treatise on the Microscope", reduced to such size that the whole of the volume of 560 pages could be contained in a space one inch long and half-an-inch broad ' [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin amazon american library association apple british library google international digital publishing forum iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology microsoft ukoln university of bath university of chicago wikipedia aac access control accessibility adobe android blog bmp cataloguing copyright data digital library doc document format drm ebook epub file format flac flash gif html hypertext infrastructure ipad iphone itunes jpeg jpg linux mis mobi mobile mobile phone mp3 ogg open access operating system plain text png research rtf search technology smartphone software standardisation standards tiff usb windows wireless Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1529 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk World Wide Web Conference 2004 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/www2004-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue40/www2004-rpt#author1">Dave Beckett</a> reports on the international WWW2004 conference held in New York, 19-21 May 2004.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www2004.org/">WWW2004</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the 13th conference in the series of international World Wide Web conferences organised by the IW3C2 (International World Wide Web Conference Committee). This was the annual gathering of Web researchers and technologists to present the latest work on the Web and Web standardisation at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue40/www2004-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue40 event report dave beckett amazon google ibm microsoft university of bristol university of southampton w3c algorithm blog browser cookie data dns hypertext lucene mobi mobile mobile phone ontologies open source owl privacy rdf repositories research rss search technology semantic web skos standardisation standards thesaurus uri web app web development wireless xml Thu, 29 Jul 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1066 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Evolution of Portable Electronic Books http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/wilson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue29/wilson#author1">Ruth Wilson</a> charts the development of portable electronic book hardware, from the first generation in 1980s to the range of handheld devices available today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Many months after reading and hearing about their introduction in the US, portable electronic books are now becoming available in the UK. Franklin’s eBookMan [<a href="#1">1</a>] is available online from bestbuy.com and amazon.com and from some high street retailers, the goReader is available for purchase via their Web site [<a href="#2">2</a>], a variety of ebook reading software can be downloaded to PDAs for free via the Internet, and some Pocket PCs are being sold pre-installed with Microsoft Reader [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/wilson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue29 feature article ruth wilson amazon apple bbc hewlett-packard information today jisc microsoft university of strathclyde dner eboni cd-rom copyright data digital library ebook graphics higher education html mobi mp3 multimedia research search technology software standards url usability windows wireless Tue, 02 Oct 2001 23:00:00 +0000 editor 824 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Newsline: News You Can Use http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="JISC_publishes_three_important_documents">JISC publishes three important documents</h3> <p>The Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) promotes the innovative application and use of information systems and information technology in Higher and Further education across the UK.</p> <p>The JISC has published three new documents. These are the draft 3-year Collection Strategy, the Collections Development Policy and the Final Report from the JCEI (JISC Committee for Electronic Information) Charging Working Group</p> <p><strong>Collection Strategy</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue29/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue29 news and events shirley keane jisc microsoft niso rnib south bank university ukoln university of bath dner adobe aggregation archives authentication content management copyright data set digitisation drm dublin core e-learning ebook further education identifier interoperability mac os metadata mobi portfolio research sgml software tei xml Tue, 02 Oct 2001 23:00:00 +0000 editor 838 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk