Overview of content related to 'augmented reality' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/6364/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Developing Adaptable, Efficient Mobile Library Services: Librarians as Enablers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/caperon#author1">Lizzie Caperon</a> describes how library resources can be targeted towards effective mobile services as mobile devices become increasingly prevalent in Higher Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Mobile devices such as smartphones, iPads and tablet computers are rapidly proliferating in society and changing the way information is organised, received and disseminated. Consequently the library world must adopt mobile services which maximise and adapt to these significant technological changes. What do library users want from mobile services? How can libraries adopt new, innovative mobile initiatives?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 feature article lizzie caperon british library google ieee information today jisc microsoft national university of ireland university of birmingham university of leeds university of manchester university of sheffield university of warwick android archives augmented reality bibliographic data cataloguing data database doi e-learning ebook framework geospatial data higher education instant messaging ipad lbs mobile mobile learning mobile phone modelling operating system podcast portal qr code research responsive design search technology smartphone social software tablet computer twitter usability video web 2.0 webinar wireless wordpress Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:33:54 +0000 lisrw 2532 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 71 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 71.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As I depart this chair after the preparation of what I thought would be the last issue of <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], I make no apology for the fact that I did my best to include as much material&nbsp; to her ‘swan song’ as possible. With the instruction to produce only one more issue this year, I felt it was important to publish as much of the content in the pipeline as I could.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 editorial richard waller amazon birmingham city university digital repository federation jisc loughborough university oclc oregon state university ukoln university for the creative arts university of huddersfield university of oxford university of sussex wellcome library jusp kaptur scarlet accessibility agile development api archives augmented reality authentication big data blog bs8878 cataloguing content management controlled vocabularies curation data data management data set database digital library digitisation diigo ebook educational data mining framework google docs higher education html html5 infrastructure jquery learning analytics metadata mets mobile native apps open access open source portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology software solr standardisation standards sushi tagging twitter url video wcag web 2.0 web app widget xml schema Wed, 17 Jul 2013 19:01:02 +0000 lisrw 2493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk KAPTUR the Highlights: Exploring Research Data Management in the Visual Arts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author1">Leigh Garrett</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author2">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author3">Carlos Silva</a> and <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author4">Anne Spalding</a> describe the exploration of the importance and nature of research data in the visual arts and requirements for their appropriate curation and preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>KAPTUR (2011-13) [<a href="#1">1</a>], funded by Jisc and led by the Visual Arts Data Service, was a collaborative project involving four institutional partners: the Glasgow School of Arts; Goldsmiths, University of London; University for the Creative Arts; and the University of the Arts London.&nbsp;Research data have in recent years become regarded as a valuable institutional resource and their appropriate collection, curation, publication and preservation as essential. This has been driven by a number of internal and external forces, and all UK Research Councils now require it as a condition of funding [<a href="#2">2</a>]. As a result, a network of data repositories has emerged [<a href="#3">3</a>], some funded by research councils and others by institutions themselves. However, at the outset of the project, research data management practice within the visual arts appeared to operate rather <em>ad hoc</em> with none of the specialist arts institutions within the UK having either implemented research data management policies [<a href="#4">4</a>] or established research data management systems.&nbsp; KAPTUR sought to:</p> <ul> <li>investigate the nature of visual arts research data;</li> <li>make recommendations for its effective management;</li> <li>develop a model of best practice applicable to both specialist institutions and arts departments within multidisciplinary institutions; and</li> <li>apply, test and refine the model of best practice across the four institutional partner institutions.</li> </ul> <p>This paper outlines the background and context of the project; explores the nature of visual arts research data; details the outcomes of the user and technical review; and describes the work which underwent within the partner institutions around policy formation and staff engagement.</p> <p>Led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), in collaboration with the Glasgow School of Art, Goldsmiths College, University of the Arts London and University for the Creative Arts, and funded by Jisc, KAPTUR [<a href="#1">1</a>] sought to ‘...discover, create and pilot a sectoral model of best practice in the management of research data in the [visual] arts.’ [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-garrett-et-al/logo-2.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 210px;" title="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" /></p> <p>Recent years have witnessed an increasing recognition across the Higher Education sector that research data are a valuable resource and therefore its appropriate curation and preservation are essential.&nbsp; In addition, wider societal and political forces meant that research councils, teams and researchers were coming under increasing pressure to make publicly funded data freely available.&nbsp; As such the publication of research data was increasingly becoming a requirement of funding, for example the Arts and Humanities Research Council [<a href="#6">6</a>] and Medical Research Council [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Equally important was the need for increased data transparency, and to enable researchers to access existing datasets to test the validity and reliability of the data and associated research methods; to reinterpret the data; and to preserve the data for future scrutiny. In response, many universities, for example the University of Edinburgh, had established institutional research data management systems to support the deposit and preservation of research data, whilst others were in the process of piloting services, for example the University of Leicester, and establishing policies and procedures which actively support researchers to manage their data effectively, such as Canterbury Christ Church University and Northumbria University. In addition, many of the research councils themselves had established repositories, for example the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex, which curates research data in the social sciences and humanities, and the Natural Environment Research Council, which supports a network of data centres across its disciplinary areas.</p> <p>However, given the emerging landscape, at the outset of the project it was clear that very little was known about the collection, curation and usage of research data in the visual arts:&nbsp;none of the specialist arts institutions had research data management policies or infrastructure in place and evidence collected at the time indicated that practice was at best, <em>ad hoc</em>, left to individual researchers and teams with limited support or guidance. Little work had been undertaken to understand the distinctive and varied nature of research data in the visual arts, and even less to understand how these data could be collected, curated, preserved and exploited, or their potential impact assessed.</p> <p>By its very nature, research in the visual arts is highly complex and varied, often comprising a wide variety of outputs and formats which present researchers, repository managers and institutions with many discipline-specific difficulties. The methods and processes which generate this research are just as varied and complex.&nbsp; Research endeavour in the visual arts relies heavily on the physical artefact: sketchbooks, logbooks, journals, and workbooks.&nbsp; Alongside these data, a wide range of related project documentation and protocols are also created.&nbsp; While technology may offer considerable potential to support the safe storage and preservation of research and related data, and to enhance access, the highly distinctive nature of the visual arts and its research methods also present enormous technical problems with regard to formats, standards, roles and responsibilities, and policies.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article anne spalding carlos silva leigh garrett marie-therese gramstadt ahrc canterbury christ church university courtauld institute of art datacite dcc falmouth university glasgow school of art goldsmiths college hefce jisc northumbria university uk data archive university for the creative arts university of bath university of birmingham university of edinburgh university of essex university of leicester university of london university of the arts london vads kaptur keepit mrc scarlet archives augmented reality blog cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set digitisation eprints framework higher education infrastructure metadata oer open access preservation repositories research semantic web software video Mon, 01 Jul 2013 17:50:23 +0000 lisrw 2461 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Augmented Reality in Education: The SCARLET+ Experience http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author1">Laura Skilton</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author2">Matt Ramirez</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author3">Guyda Armstrong</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author4">Rose Lock</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author5">Jean Vacher</a> and <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author6">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> describe augmented reality in education case studies from the University of Sussex and the University for the Creative Arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:36.0pt;">&nbsp;Augmented reality, a capability that has been around for decades, is shifting from what was once seen as a gimmick to a bona fide game-changer. [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> </blockquote> <p>Augmented Reality (AR) has been listed in the Horizon Reports, key predictors of the potential impact of new technology on education. The 2011 Report [<a href="#1">1</a>] sparked the idea for an innovative project - SCARLET: Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article guyda armstrong jean vacher laura skilton marie-therese gramstadt matt ramirez rose lock alt courtauld institute of art glasgow school of art jisc mimas museum of london university for the creative arts university of london university of manchester university of sussex university of the arts london vads jorum kaptur scarlet accessibility archives augmented reality blog copyright data data set digitisation e-learning firefox framework ftp graphics infrastructure internet explorer ipad mobile multimedia oer portal research search technology smartphone url video web browser windows wireless youtube Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:38:54 +0000 lisrw 2439 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk EMTACL12 (Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author1">Sarah Rayner</a> and <a href="/issue70/emtacl12-rpt#author2">Olivia Walsby</a> report on a three-day conference on Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries, hosted by NTNU (Norwegian University of Science and Technology) in Trondheim, Norway over 1 - 3 October 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Think_Different">Think Different</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>The three-day conference consisted of eight keynote presentations by invited speakers and a number of parallel sessions. The main themes set out for this year’s conference were supporting research, organisational change within the library, linked open data and other semantic web applications in the library, new literacies, and new services/old services in new clothes, along with other relevant perspectives on emerging technologies.</p> <p>We attended the conference to gain an overview of organisational changes happening across the sector in relation to technological developments and to gather opinion on the relevance of the academic library within a digital society. We also wanted to explore how the future exploitation of new technologies within libraries might have a positive impact on the quality of teaching and learning together with the student experience.</p> <p>This article will summarise a selection of keynote and parallel sessions from across the three days that addressed these issues.</p> <h3 id="October_2012:_Keynotes">1 October 2012: Keynotes</h3> <h2 id="Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner_Infrastructure">Paint-Yourself-in-the-Corner Infrastructure</h2> <h3 id="Herbert_Van_de_Sompel_Los_Alamos_National_Laboratory_USA">Herbert Van de Sompel, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA</h3> <p>The opening keynote presented by Herbert Van de Sompel from Los Alamos National Laboratory in the USA raised the issues brought about by changes to scholarly communication. Herbert spoke about an increase in dynamic scholarly records that are continually in flux, interdependent, and Web-based, and with which our current infrastructures are unable to cope. With the publication of interdependent and executable papers, research is now a native Web activity; supporting the re-execution of algorithms and the ability to add data at any time (i.e. <a href="http://topicpages.ploscompbiol.org/wiki/Topic_Pages">PLoS Topic Pages</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>] <a href="https://peerj.com/">PeerJ</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>]). Herbert pointed out that, as a consequence, we now need to be able to view the state of a scholarly record at certain moments in time; to track back in time to see where findings have come from, and to trace the workflow, and therein lies a challenge for academic libraries.</p> <p>Herbert explained that at present the archive infrastructure is only able to deal with static, non-fluxing research output, that, when using URIs, you will always come to the current version, not prior versions, and that Web archives are not integrated into the Web. As Herbert went on to point out, the key problem is that the Web was created without motion of time; existing in the ‘perpetual now’.</p> <p>Herbert believes that the challenges we face in this new environment are two-fold: archival approaches need to be changed to use a different infrastructure; and we need to reassess how we reference scholarly assets. We have CMS records, Web archives, and caches, but it would be better to trace the history or timeline of a URI. Therefore, Herbert offered some potential tools and solutions; <a href="http://mementoweb.org/">Memento</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>] (started in 2009) allows you to track back to a past version of an item in the Internet archive, bridging current URIs to old URIs from the Internet archive, using a time gate. <a href="http://mementoweb.github.com/SiteStory/" title="SiteStory">SiteStory</a> [<a href="#4">4</a>] is a tool which allows your Web server to take an active part in its own archiving; every request from a user is pushed back to an archive and stored. Therefore, every time material is accessed, it is archived, thereby providing a true history of an object in the archive.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure1-herbert-van-de-sempel-v3.jpg" style="width: 477px; height: 358px;" title="Herbert Van de Sompel (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Herbert Van de Sompel</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>In conclusion, Herbert suggested that archiving needs to be an ongoing activity, tracing every interaction, including archiving links at the time of publication to ensure that the context and history of an evolving piece of research will never be lost.</p> <h2 id="Think_Different">Think Different</h2> <h3 id="Karen_Coyle_Berkeley_CA_USA">Karen Coyle, Berkeley, CA, USA</h3> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-emtacl12-rpt/figure2-karen-coyle-v2.jpg" style="width: 500px; height: 375px;" title="Karen Coyle (Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Karen Coyle</strong> <small>(Photo courtesy of Lukas Koster, University of Amsterdam.)</small></p> <p>Karen opened by raising a challenge to the way in which libraries are still holding on to outdated practices, such as the librarian’s obsession with alphabetical order, describing it as essentially only ‘an accident of language’ and questioning its continuing relevance given the now pervasive ability to cross-search. Karen continued on this theme citing bibliographic hierarchies such as Dewey as ‘knowledge prevention systems’ which only serve to lock our users into a set view of what's out there.</p> <p>Karen’s introduction led nicely on to the main themes of her presentation: the current role of the library, the need to move away from the view that getting the book into the user’s hand is the end game, and the need to change our attitudes to bibliographic control and linear order. In effect, ‘the library should no longer be about volume and ownership!’. Karen talked about how we should instead focus on <em>how</em> resources are used and what resources should be used <em>together,</em> to inform how we approach provision in the future. Karen believes that the library must become connected to information on the Web, providing more context for our users and thus allowing greater information discovery. Karen argued that the library’s role is no longer simply to gather items into an inventory but to seek to organise information that until now has been inconveniently packaged. She suggested that we need to change our view, to focus on the information and its context, <em>not</em> the objects or books themselves. Karen noted in particular that currently we present nothing within the context of time, reiterating the theme of time travel covered in Herbert’s presentation. So, how can we do this? Karen proposed that we should be able to interrogate catalogues to provide items with context. She gave examples such as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/">WorldCat</a> [<a href="#5">5</a>], where you can view timelines on people, what they have published and what has been published about them, giving a relative image of their importance.<br /><br />Karen argued that although linked data could prove to be an answer, or could certainly help, we must nonetheless seek to find a range of solutions and technologies. She warned that the pitfall of having an answer is that it stops you asking questions! Karen talked about how libraries must now recognise that bibliographic data are available everywhere, and that what libraries have that is essential and unique are the details on holdings. She proposed that on searching the Web, part of the rich snippet should include information about what the library holds and whether it's available. The Web should be used to direct readers to their library holdings, as well as making use of data such as location information, already being sourced by search engines. Karen’s concluding remarks were that libraries need to look to this new approach (using tools such as <a href="http://Schema.org" target="_blank">Schema.org</a> [<a href="#6">6</a>]) or they will lose visitors, and that if we want to remain visible and relevant, we need to be where our users are - on the Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/emtacl12-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report olivia walsby sarah rayner jisc manchester metropolitan university mimas ukoln university of bath university of manchester internet archive memento scarlet schema.org worldcat algorithm api archives augmented reality bibliographic control bibliographic data cataloguing cloud computing content management data dissemination e-learning ebook framework google docs google maps information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer ipad linked data lod mobile open access research search technology social networks software uri web 2.0 web app windows Thu, 13 Dec 2012 14:42:26 +0000 lisrw 2410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Using Mobile Technology to Deliver Library Services http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/maclellan-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/maclellan-rvw#author1">Fiona MacLellan</a> reviews a practical guide to mobile technology and its use in delivering library services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My initial thought upon seeing <em>Using Mobile Technology to Deliver Library Services</em> was available for review was that it was a topic of which I have limited knowledge – but part of its appeal was that I could learn about a new subject.&nbsp; After I registered to review the book I then had second thoughts. I began to worry that the book would be too advanced for me.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/maclellan-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review fiona maclellan university of northampton augmented reality bibliographic data ebook licence mobile mobile phone qr code research rfid sms Sat, 15 Dec 2012 12:05:05 +0000 lisrw 2429 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Rewriting the Book: On the Move With the Library of Birmingham http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/gambles <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/gambles#author1">Brian Gambles</a> presents the Library of Birmingham vision and strategy for addressing the challenge of mobile digital services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Library of Birmingham (LoB) will open in 2013 as a world-class centre for culture, learning and knowledge, rewriting the book for public libraries in the 21st century. 'Rewriting the Book', which is integral to the new LoB brand, recognises and embraces the present and future challenge to libraries – it accepts that established means of accessing knowledge are changing rapidly and dynamically, with a significant digital dimension, and that increasingly radical responses to this challenge are demanded from leaders in the library sector.</p> <p>The LoB will seek to transform perceptions of Birmingham, redefining 'the library', with an outward focus, deeply embedded in partnership working, digitally connected to the world, and servicing both local and international audiences as a platform and cultural hub for knowledge and communal exchange. Fundamental to this change will be the delivery of digital services both inside and outside the new library with greater support for mobile communications with customers. Mobile is commonplace today, and opens up many opportunities to enhance customer experience both inside and external to the new library.</p> <p>This article describes the continuing journey of the LoB project in assessing the challenge of mobile, its relevance and how innovation could improve the visitor experience in the future.</p> <h2 id="Mobility:_An_Integral_Part_of_Living">Mobility: An Integral Part of Living</h2> <p>Mobile services are an integral part of our daily lives and embedded in our culture. This is never more apparent when we do not have them close to hand – a recent survey found that 40% of mobile phone users would rather lose their wallet than their mobile device. The choice may not be available for much longer: the mobile is very likely to become your wallet in the future!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/gambles" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article brian gambles amazon american museum of natural history apple google microsoft museum of london itunes u archives augmented reality cloud computing digital media digitisation ebook facebook framework ict information retrieval infrastructure ipad iphone itunes metadata mobile mobile phone qr code research sms software wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1561 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2010: The Mobile University http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt#author1">Shailey Minocha</a> reflects on the one-day symposium organised by Eduserv in May 2010. The aim of the event was to discuss whether and how mobile technology will play a significant role in the delivery of UK Higher Education in the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report shailey minocha blackboard canterbury christ church university edge hill university eduserv google massachusetts institute of technology open university oucs ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of wolverhampton itunes u accessibility ajax android augmented reality blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data e-learning facebook framework higher education html html5 infrastructure ipad iphone itunes junaio location-based services mobile mobile learning mobile phone open source operating system podcast qr code research search technology smartphone sms social software software twitter url usability video web 2.0 web services webkit wiki wikitude wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1573 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk e-Culture Horizons: from Digitisation to Creating Cultural Experiences http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/e-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue41/e-culture-rpt#author1">Andreas Strasser</a> reports on a two-day symposium hosted and organised by Salzburg Research in Salzburg, Austria, over 27-28 September 2004.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The eCulture symposium held for the second time in Salzburg from 27 - 28 September 2004, represents the annual gathering of leading thinkers brought together by the eCulture Group of Salzburg Research [<a href="#1">1</a>] to tackle specific themes in the area of research and technology development for the cultural heritage application field.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue41/e-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue41 event report andreas strasser austrian national library salzburg research accessibility archives augmented reality born digital cataloguing digital preservation digitisation e-learning framework graphics information society infrastructure learning objects location-based services marc metadata mobile multimedia national library ontologies preservation research semantic web software Fri, 29 Oct 2004 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1095 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk