Overview of content related to 'wikipedia' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/7068/0?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en LinkedUp: Linking Open Data for Education http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author1">Marieke Guy</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author2">Mathieu d’Aquin</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author3">Stefan Dietze</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author4">Hendrik Drachsler</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author5">Eelco Herder</a> and <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author6">Elisabetta Parodi</a> describe the activities carried out by the LinkedUp Project looking at the promotion of open data in education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the past, discussions around Open Education have tended to focus on content and primarily Open Educational Resources (OER), freely accessible, openly licensed resources that are used for teaching, learning, assessment and research purposes. However Open Education is a complex beast made up of many aspects, of which the opening up of data is one important element.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article eelco herder elisabetta parodi hendrik drachsler marieke guy mathieu d’aquin stefan dietze bbc dcc elsevier knowledge media institute mimas open knowledge foundation open university ordnance survey ukoln university of bath university of manchester university of southampton w3c dbpedia europeana linkedup project wikipedia blog cataloguing cloud computing data data management data mining data set data visualisation dissemination facebook framework higher education hypertext ict identifier information retrieval infrastructure interoperability learning analytics learning management system linked data lod mashup metadata mobile mobile learning mooc oer open data open education personalisation portal privacy rdf remote working repositories research search technology semantic web sparql topic map twitter uri usability video visualisation web resources web standards xml Tue, 04 Feb 2014 13:12:30 +0000 editor 2503 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Shared Repositories, Shared Benefits: Regional and Consortial Repositories in Japan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author1">Takeo Ozono</a>, <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author2">Daisuke Ueda</a> and <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author3">Fumiyo Ozaki</a> describe the work of the ShaRe Project and its influence upon the development of consortial repositories and the benefits they have brought to Japanese institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The ShaRe Project (Shared Repository Project 2008-2009), which aimed to promote the concept of consortial repositories and facilitate their implementation, has made a significant contribution to the rapid growth of institutional repositories (IRs) in Japan. Following precedents including White Rose Research Online (UK) and SHERPA-LEAP (UK), 14 regional consortial repositories have been set up on a prefectoral basis across Japan<a href="#editor1">*</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article daisuke ueda fumiyo ozaki takeo ozono digital repository federation hiroshima university kagawa university national institute of informatics sherpa sherpa-leap repositories support project rsp wikipedia archives cloud computing content management data database digitisation dspace eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer open access operating system portal repositories research search technology software Sun, 28 Jul 2013 15:11:28 +0000 lisrw 2495 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author1">Ikuko Tsuchide</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author2">Yui Nishizono</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author3">Masako Suzuki</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author4">Shigeki Sugita</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author5">Kazuo Yamamoto</a> and <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author6">Hideki Uchijima</a> introduce a number of ideas and projects that have enhanced the progress of the Open Access movement and institutional repositories in Japan over the last ten years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In Japan, Chiba University established the country's first institutional repository, CURATOR [<a href="#1">1</a>] in 2003. Since then, over the last 10 years or so, more than 300 universities and research institutions have set up repositories and the number of full-text items on repositories has exceeded one million [<a href="#2">2</a>]. All the contents are available on Japanese Institutional Repositories Online (JAIRO) [<a href="#3">3</a>] operated by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) [<a href="#4">4</a>] in Japan.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article hideki uchijima ikuko tsuchide kazuo yamamoto masako suzuki shigeki sugita yui nishizono asahikawa medical university cranfield university digital repository federation hokkaido university kagoshima university national institute of informatics osaka university otaru university of commerce sherpa sherpa-leap university of tokyo university of tsukuba repositories support project romeo rsp wikipedia archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data database digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access repositories research search technology standardisation twitter Wed, 10 Jul 2013 17:03:28 +0000 lisrw 2480 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Engaging Researchers with Social Media Tools: 25 Research Things@Huddersfield http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author1">Graham Stone</a> and <a href="/issue71/stone-collins#author2">Ellen Collins</a> investigate whether 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme, could help researchers understand the value of Web 2.0 tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article explores whether an online learning course can help academic researchers to become more familiar with social media tools, and seeks to understand how they can put them to use within their research and teaching activities. It does so by considering the development, implementation and evaluation of a pilot Web 2.0 course, 25 Research Things, an innovative online learning programme developed at the University of Huddersfield, which gives researchers a structured way to engage with selected Web 2.0 tools.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/stone-collins" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article ellen collins graham stone bbc blackboard british library cilip google jisc jisc collections research information network university of huddersfield citeulike myexperiment wikipedia aggregation archives blog creative commons data diigo dissemination e-learning facebook flickr framework further education google docs higher education identifier interoperability learning design learning objects librarything mashup metadata mobile phone open access podcast repositories research rss social networks software streaming tagging technorati twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress Thu, 27 Jun 2013 20:52:47 +0000 lisrw 2457 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 70 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 70.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Issue 70 of <em>Ariadne </em>which is full to the brim with feature articles and a wide range of event reports and book reviews.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 editorial richard waller alt amazon google hefce jisc portico rdwg ukoln university of oxford w3c ark project jisc information environment jusp liparm rdmrose web accessibility initiative wikipedia accessibility aggregation archives bs8878 controlled vocabularies data data management database digital curation digitisation ejournal framework higher education identifier internet explorer jstor licence metadata microsoft reporting services mobile open access perl portal preservation privacy raptor repositories research resource management schema search technology software standardisation standards sushi wcag web resources web services wiki xml xml schema Fri, 14 Dec 2012 14:20:23 +0000 lisrw 2417 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Seb Schmoller Replies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Stepping down from his pivotal role as CEO at ALT, <a href="/issue70/schmoller#author1">Seb Schmoller</a> kindly answers a few questions from <em>Ariadne</em> on his perspective on online learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Ariadne</em>: Seb, please tell us a little about yourself.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/schmoller" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article seb schmoller alt harvard university jisc sheffield college university of cambridge university of southampton yale university wikipedia adl archives blog content licence copyright course design e-learning further education higher education ict licence mooc research software twitter video Fri, 07 Dec 2012 12:27:42 +0000 lisrw 2404 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 21st-century Scholarship and Wikipedia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/thomas#author1">Amber Thomas</a> explores the ways in which emerging research practices and Wikipedia illustrate the changing boundaries of academic work.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia, the world’s fifth most-used Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>], is a good illustration of the growing credibility of online resources. In his article in <em>Ariadne </em>earlier this year, “Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Academic Acceptance” [<a href="#2">2</a>], Brian Whalley described the debates around accuracy and review, in the context of geology.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/thomas" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article amber thomas bbc becta british library jisc open university orcid ukoln university of warwick jorum myexperiment wikipedia archives blog data dewey decimal e-learning framework further education google scholar higher education identifier infrastructure linked data oer open access open education open source rdf repositories research search technology semantic web smartphone software uri web 2.0 wiki Fri, 30 Nov 2012 13:18:23 +0000 lisrw 2390 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache collection development content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Ariadne: Migrating and Enriching Content with Drupal http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/bunting <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/bunting#author1">Thom Bunting</a> explains some of the technology behind the migration of <em>Ariadne</em> (including more than 1600 articles from its back issues archive) onto a Drupal content management platform.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Tools and strategies for content management are a perennial topic in <em>Ariadne. </em> With&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=" title="Link to overview of articles including references to 'content management'">more than one hundred articles</a>&nbsp;touching on content management system (CMS) technologies or techniques since this online magazine commenced publication in 1996,&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;attests to continuing interest in this topic. Authors have discussed this topic within various contexts, from&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=intranet&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to articles discussing 'content management', within 'intranet' context">intranets</a> to&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/repositories?article-type=&amp;term=content+management&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to overview of articles referring to 'content management', within 'repositories' context">repositories</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=web+2.0&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to overview of articles discussing 'content management', within context of Web 2.0">Web 2.0</a>, &nbsp;with some notable&nbsp;<a href="/sites/all/datacharts/hc/72-chart-wp.html#timeline" title="Link to timeline: articles referring to 'content management'">surges in references to 'content management' between 2000 and 2005</a>&nbsp;(see Figure 1 below). &nbsp;Although levels of discussion are by no means trending, over recent years it is clear that&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em> authors have taken note of and written about content management tools and techniques on a regular basis.&nbsp;</p> <p>In the light of this long-established interest, it is noteworthy that&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em> itself migrated into a content management system only recently. Although the formatting of its articles did change a few times since 1996, <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;remained 'hand-coded' for more than fifteen years. &nbsp;None of its articles had been migrated into a database-driven content management system until March 2012, when&nbsp;<a href="/issue68" title="Link to table of contents for Ariadne issue 68">issue 68</a>&nbsp;was published.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As mentioned in the&nbsp;<a href="/issue68/editorial1" title="Editorial introduction: Welcome to New Ariadne">editorial introduction</a>&nbsp;to that first issue, launching the new content management arrangements, and as discussed in some more detail below (see 'Technical challenges in content migration'), the considerable size of&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em>'s archive of back issues was daunting. &nbsp;With <a href="/articles" title="Overview of more than 1600 articles in Ariadne">more than 1600 articles</a>&nbsp;in hand-coded 'flat'-html formats,&nbsp;the process of migration itself required careful planning to result in a seamless, graceful transition into an entirely new content management arrangement. &nbsp;Over time, the sheer size of the <em>Ariadne</em> corpus had made it both increasingly rich in content and increasingly more challenging to convert retrospectively into a database-driven CMS as the total number of articles published within this online magazine steadily expanded.&nbsp;</p> <p>In looking back over the recent process of migrating <em>Ariadne</em> onto a CMS platform, this article discusses some tools and techniques used to prepare content for transfer, testing, and then re-launch. &nbsp;After explaining some of the background to and objectives of this work, this article focuses on key features of content management supported by Drupal.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Timeline of references in Ariadne to content management" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-bunting/content%20management-timeline.png" style="height: 453px; width: 500px; " title="Figure 1: Timeline of references in Ariadne to content management" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Ariadne timeline of references to content management</strong></p> <h2 id="Requirements_Analysis:_Planning_the_Way_Forward">Requirements Analysis: Planning the Way Forward</h2> <p>Based on surveys of readers and authors conducted in late 2010, the <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;management team analysed the range of feedback, drew up sets of re-development requirements, and then considered the options available.</p> <p>The following table provides an overview of key findings regarding the range of enhanced functionality and features considered:</p> <table align="center" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" id="500wtable" style="width: 500px; "> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center; "><strong>Overview of findings derived from survey responses</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center; "><em>enhanced functionality or feature</em></td> <td style="text-align: center; "><em>interest recorded in surveys</em></td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by keywords</td> <td>73.4% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>updated look and feel</td> <td>62.3% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by title</td> <td>50.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>enhanced use of search engine</td> <td>48.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved display for portable devices</td> <td>34.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>more summative information on articles</td> <td>32.1% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved navigability from article level</td> <td>32.1% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved social media options</td> <td>29.5% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by author</td> <td>28.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved RSS feeds</td> <td>27.0% of respondents</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In addition to these findings derived from surveys, the management team also recognised the need for some other functionalities to support monitoring of <em>Ariadne</em>'s on-going engagement with various domains and institutions across the UK and beyond.</p> <table align="center" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" id="500wtable" style="width: 500px; "> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center; "><strong>Additional features to support monitoring of engagement</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: left; ">identification of author domains (higher education, further education, research, commercial, etc)</td> <td style="text-align: left; ">to support analysis of <em>Ariadne</em> connections and reach across various sectors</td> </tr> <tr> <td>identification of authors by organisation</td> <td>to support analysis of <em>Ariadne</em> connections and reach in UK and worldwide</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Taking into account the key findings derived from survey questions as well as the additional functionality identified as useful in monitoring UK and worldwide engagement, the <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;management team drew up sets of re-development requirements and considered how to proceed.&nbsp;Migration into a content management system represented the obvious way forward, as it became clear that <em>Ariadne</em>'s&nbsp;previous tradition of 'hand-coded' production (dating from the early days of the Web) had little chance of coping gracefully with the new sets of requirements.</p> <p>In a review of CMS options available, it also became clear that&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drupal" title="Wikipedia article: Drupal">Drupal</a>&nbsp;[<a href="#1">1</a>] was well positioned as a content management system (or, emphasising its highly modular and extensible design, <em>content management framework </em>&nbsp;[<a href="#2">2</a>] ) to supply required functionality and features.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/bunting" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up thom bunting ibm microsoft ukoln university of bath datagovuk gnu wikipedia apache api archives bibliographic data content licence content management css data data set database drupal framework further education graphics higher education html identifier jquery json licence linux metadata mysql open source perl php preservation python rdf repositories research rss search technology software sql server sqlite standards taxonomy usability video visualisation web 2.0 xml Fri, 27 Jul 2012 16:47:36 +0000 lisrw 2348 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JISC Research Information Management: CERIF Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> reports on a two-day workshop on research information management and CERIF held in Bristol over 27-28 June 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc1"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><p>A workshop on Research Information Management (RIM) and CERIF was held in Bristol on 27-28 June 2012, organised by the Innovation Support Centre [<a href="#1">1</a>] at UKOLN, together with the JISC RIM and RCSI (Repositories and Curation Shared Infrastructure) Programmes. It was a follow-up to the CERIF Tutorial and UK Data Surgery [<a href="#2">2</a>] held in Bath in February.</p> <h2 id="Workshop_Scope_and_Aims">Workshop Scope and Aims</h2> <p>The aim was to bring together people working on the various elements of the UK RIM jigsaw to share experience of using CERIF and explore ways of working together more closely. While the first day focused specifically on RIM, the second day widened to explore synergies with the repositories community. Participants therefore included JISC RIM and MRD projects and programme managers, support and evaluation projects, Research Councils, funders and repository infrastructure projects. There were around 30 participants [<a href="#3">3</a>] in total, with some variation across the two days, given the different content. The event was chaired by Josh Brown, RIM Programme Manager and Neil Jacobs, Programme Director, Digital Infrastructure, both at JISC. All presentations as well as breakout session outputs are available via the UKOLN ISC Events site [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <h2 id="The_New_CERIF_Support_Project_at_the_ISC_UKOLN">The New CERIF Support Project at the ISC, UKOLN</h2> <p>The UK community was pleased to welcome Brigitte Jörg [<a href="#5">5</a>] to the meeting, in the first week of her new role at UKOLN’s Innovation Support Centre as National Coordinator for the CERIF Support Project. Brigitte is already well known to British practitioners working with CERIF – both in her role as as CERIF Task Group Leader [<a href="#6">6</a>] at euroCRIS and as advisor to several existing JISC projects. We look forward to working with her on further initiatives – her CERIF expertise will be a huge asset for Research Information Management support and coordination in British Higher Education.</p> <h2 id="UK_CERIF_Landscape">UK CERIF Landscape</h2> <p>There is certainly extensive RIM-related activity in the UK currently, which looks set to continue. The landscape was outlined in the scene setting sessions by myself, based on the CERIF adoption study [<a href="#7">7</a>] carried out earlier this year. The rate of CRIS (Current Research Information System) procurement has increased very rapidly in the last few years, particularly during 2011. For example the first Pure system in the UK was procured jointly by the Universities of Aberdeen and St Andrews in May 2009; now there are 19 UK universities using Pure. Since all CRIS on the market are CERIF-compatible (to a greater or lesser extent) this means that a large number of UK institutions are CERIF users (again, to varying degrees) – around 31% [<a href="#7">7</a>]. The two other CERIF CRIS being used in the UK are CONVERIS (Avedas, Germany) and Symplectic Elements (UK-based); only one UK CERIF CRIS is being developed in-house, at the University of Huddersfield. There is therefore a significant potential user base for the many CERIF-based services discussed over the course of the workshop. Particularly as more institutions reach the end of their CRIS implementation phase, they are going to be looking for opportunities to exploit the interchange benefits offered by CERIF.</p> <h2 id="UK_Involvement_in_euroCRIS_and_Other_International_Initiatives">UK Involvement in euroCRIS and Other International Initiatives</h2> <p>As a reflection of the intensity of UK CRIS activity, the UK has the largest number of institutional members of euroCRIS – 25. The next country in terms of membership is Germany, with just 13 members (and then the Netherlands, with seven). It is also notable that there were six UK papers (up from three in 2010) at the recent euroCRIS conference in Prague (all openly accessible from the euroCRIS website [<a href="#8">8</a>]), reflecting the growing UK presence at international level. This indicates the significant impact of JISC programmes - both RIM and MRD (Managing Research Data). At euroCRIS meetings other European countries have expressed some envy of the resources currently available in the UK to support RIM development!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/jisc-rim-cerif-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report rosemary russell cornell university edina elsevier eurocris hefce imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath university of huddersfield university of oxford university of st andrews devcsi wikipedia blog cerif curation data data model data set dublin core file format framework higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata ontologies open access open source repositories research research information management schema software standards vocabularies xml Sun, 29 Jul 2012 19:46:13 +0000 lisrw 2367 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: I, Digital – A History Devoid of the Personal? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rusbridge-rvw#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> reviews an edited volume that aims to fill a gap in ‘literature designed specifically to guide archivists’ thinking about personal digital materials’.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We are all too familiar with the dire predictions of coming Digital Dark Ages, when All Shall be Lost because of the fragility of our digital files and the transience of the formats. We forget, of course, that loss was always the norm. The wonderful documents in papyrus, parchment and paper that we so admire and wonder at, are the few lucky survivors of their times. Sometimes they have been carefully nurtured, sometimes they have been accidentally preserved. But almost all were lost!</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review chris rusbridge british library dcc jisc national library of australia university of glasgow university of oxford university of virginia elib wikipedia archives bibliographic data curation data digital library digital preservation digital repositories ebook facebook internet explorer mis preservation privacy repositories research social web twitter web services wordpress youtube Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:17:27 +0000 lisrw 2365 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Third Annual edUi Conference 2011 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/edui-2011-rpt#author1">Danielle Cooley</a> reports on the third annual edUi Conference, held over 13-14 October 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA, an opportunity for Web professionals in colleges, universities, libraries, museums, etc to discuss the latest developments in Web trends and technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third annual edUi Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held October 13-14, 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The sold-out event saw 225 ‘Web professionals serving colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and beyond’ join together to discuss the latest and greatest in Web trends and technologies. The all-volunteer conference was presented by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and major sponsors included Microsoft, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University.</p> <p>The two-day event consisted of four tracks [<a href="#2">2</a>]:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report danielle cooley google happy cog kansas state university microsoft university of virginia wikipedia accessibility aggregation android archives blog browser cataloguing css data framework google docs google maps graphics higher education html html5 metadata mis mobile research responsive design search technology twitter usability video web standards widget windows xhtml youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 22:26:07 +0000 lisrw 2241 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: From Lending to Learning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/davies-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/davies-rvw#author1">Tim Davies</a> reviews a spirited defence of public libraries, which tries to define their core purpose and which argues for a re-positioning of their place in society.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those of us who work in public libraries these are, in the words of the old Chinese proverb, 'interesting times'. The service is under scrutiny at both local and national levels, with an intensity unknown in previous generations. Public libraries are in the news, with headline stories on the BBC's <em>Today</em> and <em>Newsnight</em>. They are the focus of demonstrations and read-ins, as councils struggle to balance severely reduced budgets.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/davies-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review tim davies bbc north lincolnshire library jisc information environment wikipedia dvd ebook information retrieval information society plain text research standards Sat, 18 Feb 2012 23:25:28 +0000 lisrw 2228 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 67: Changes Afoot http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 67.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>For readers who might have been wondering, I shall resist Mark Twain's remark about reports of his demise being exaggerated, and reassure you that while <em>Ariadne</em> has been undergoing changes to the way in which it will be delivered to the Web, it has been business as usual in the matter of the content, as you will see from the paragraphs that follow. Issue 67, while currently not looking any different, is in the process of being migrated to a new platform developed to enhance functionality and give a more user-friendly look and feel to the publication.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 editorial richard waller becta jisc jisc techdis meta-net ukoln university of bath university of derby devcsi homer multitext mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol wikipedia accessibility archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing curation data digital library digitisation elluminate eprints framework geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure interoperability librarything metadata mobile natural language processing preservation programming language repositories research rss semantic web software standards tagging twitter uima ulcc urn usability web 2.0 web services webinar Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1618 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Connecting Researchers at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author1">Jez Cope</a> and <a href="/issue67/cope-jones#author2">Geraldine Jones</a> describe a recent series of events introducing social media to research students at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Connected Researcher initiative is a response to both local and sector-wide events. At the University of Bath groups of postgraduate research students from Chemistry and Social Sciences separately expressed an interest in finding out how to profile their own research and establish links with other researchers in their fields.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/cope-jones" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article geraldine jones jez cope google research information network university of bath university of derby citeulike wikipedia bibliographic data blog curation database digital media dissemination doi e-learning hashtag higher education ict identifier microblogging mobile preservation research rss search technology social software social web syndication twitter video virtual research environment web 2.0 web services wiki wordpress Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1621 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Piloting Web Conferencing Software: Experiences and Challenges http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author1">Julian Prior</a> and <a href="/issue67/prior-salter#author2">Marie Salter</a> report on their experiences piloting Elluminate Live! at the University of Bath.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>In the current fiscal climate faced by educational institutions in the UK, elearning tools and technologies that promise efficiency savings as well as enhancing the quality and quantity of course offerings are gaining popularity. One such technology is Web conferencing where lectures, seminars, meetings or presentations take place online and allow for remote participation and collaboration via audio, video, instant chat and a virtual 'whiteboard.'[<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/prior-salter" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article julian prior marie salter alt alt-c aston university blackboard google jisc open university qik ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of exeter university of hertfordshire university of winchester samson wikipedia adobe blog browser data e-learning elluminate firefox further education higher education internet explorer java licence mobile moodle multimedia oer open access open source operating system portfolio safari software streaming usb video vle web browser webinar windows Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1623 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Retooling Special Collections Digitisation in the Age of Mass Scanning http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author1">Constance Rinaldo</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author2">Judith Warnement</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author3">Tom Baione</a>, <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author4">Martin R. Kalfatovic</a> and <a href="/issue67/rinaldo-et-al#author5">Susan Fraser</a> describe results from a study to identify and develop a cost-effective and efficient large-scale digitisation workflow for special collections library materials.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Biodiversity Heritage Library (BHL) [<a href="#1">1</a>] is a consortium of 12 natural history and botanical libraries that co-operate to digitise and make accessible the legacy literature of biodiversity held in their collections and to make that literature available for open access and responsible use as a part of a global 'biodiversity commons.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] The participating libraries hold more than two million volumes of biodiversity literature collected over 200 years to support the work of scientists, researchers and students in their home insti</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/rinaldo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article constance rinaldo judith warnement martin r. kalfatovic susan fraser tom baione american museum of natural history california digital library harvard university ifla library of congress new york botanical garden oclc smithsonian institution university of cambridge university of oxford internet archive open library wikipedia archives bibliographic data cataloguing csv data database digital library digitisation dublin core framework infrastructure intellectual property librarything metadata opac open access repositories research tagging url video web services wiki z39.50 Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1624 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk UK Reading Experience Database http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt#author1">Bethan Ruddock</a> reports from the launch event for the UK Reading Experience Database, held at the Betty Boothroyd Library, the Open University, Milton Keynes, on 24 February 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><!-- v.3 with author's final edits rew --><p>I was invited down to the Open University (OU) Betty Boothroyd Library in Milton Keynes for the launch of the UK Reading Experience Database (UK RED) [<a href="#1">1</a>]. I had been asked to attend to talk about the LOCAH Project and Linked Data, but I was also looking forward to learning about the RED Project.</p> <p>This was the first of two launch days, and was designed for librarians, archivists, and information managers. A second launch day for teachers in Higher Education was to be held in London the next day.</p> <h2 id="What_Is_UK_RED">What Is UK RED?</h2> <p>The tagline for UK RED is 'the experience of reading in Britain from 1450 to 1945', and the database brings together reading experiences, making them both searchable and browsable. What is a reading experience? It is evidence of anyone alive between the mid-15th and 20thcenturies having read and interacted with a book or other piece of writing, such as magazines, newspapers, letters - even playbills and advertisements. Ownership alone is not enough; there must be something to show that the person in question actually read the work or at least part of it.</p> <p>This information can be found in a number of places - a printed book review would be an obvious example. The RED team also find many entries in diaries. Such entries can range from simple lists of books that someone has read over the course of a year, to detailed descriptions of when and where they read a particular book, and how they felt about it. Often diary entries are not actually about the book; it is mentioned in passing and in the context of a number of other activities.</p> <p>While the owner's name on the flyleaf is not itself enough to justify a 'reading experience', annotations to the text are, as they show that the person has actually interacted with the text. Of course, you then have to consider whether the person whose name is on the flyleaf is the same as the person doing the annotating!</p> <p>RED is much more than a list of 'people who have read books'. The database aims to bring out as much information as possible about the reading experience. The interface to submit a new entry allows you to specify where the reading was taking place, all the way down to a particular room in a particular house. It also aims to identify if the reading was silent or aloud, alone or with other people; whether the book was owned by the reader, a library book, borrowed, or even stolen. All these data are then used to build up a rich database of information on who was reading what (and how!) in Britain.</p> <p>UK RED is not just concerned with reading experiences within Britain: team members also look at the reading experiences of citizens abroad. <strong>Edmund King</strong>, Research Associate, Reading Experience Database, OU, told us that, as a consequence, there are fascinating examples of what captured British soldiers were reading in prisoner-of-war (POW) camps as well as examples of what they were not allowed to read. Books in Welsh and Pakistani were banned, as well as atlases and anything about the Russian revolution. I do not know if there are corresponding records for what prisoners in UK POW camps were forbidden to read, but it would be very interesting to find out.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/reading-exp-db-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report bethan ruddock ahrc eduserv jisc mimas newcastle university open university talis ukoln university of manchester university of oxford archives hub dbpedia locah lucero wikipedia apache archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copac copyright data data set database dissemination flickr higher education intellectual property linked data linux open source php provenance research software sparql sql twitter video Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1629 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author1">Marion Tattersall</a>, <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author2">Carmen O'Dell</a> and <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author3">John Lewis</a> report on Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade, organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) in partnership with the White Rose University Consortium and held 1-3 March 2011 at the University of Sheffield.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report carmen odell john lewis marion tattersall dcc jisc national grid service national science foundation queensland university of technology uk data archive ukoln university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of leeds university of manchester university of melbourne university of oxford university of sheffield university of york beginners guide to digital preservation data train project dmtpsych jisc information environment wikipedia yodl archives blog cloud computing copyright creative commons curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation e-research fedora commons foi framework infrastructure licence metadata multimedia open data portal preservation privacy repositories research resource discovery software taxonomy usb video visualisation vle Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1631 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Characterising and Preserving Digital Repositories: File Format Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> and <a href="/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant#author2">David Tarrant</a> show how file format profiles, the starting point for preservation plans and actions, can also be used to reveal the fingerprints of emerging types of institutional repositories.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/hitchcock-tarrant" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article david tarrant steve hitchcock amazon google harvard university jisc microsoft mpeg the national archives university of illinois university of northampton university of southampton university of the arts london wellcome library jisc information environment keepit wikipedia accessibility adobe archives bibliographic data blog cloud computing css csv curation data data management database digital curation digital preservation digital repositories dissemination document format droid eprints file format flash flash video framework gif graphics html hypertext identifier institutional repository java jpeg latex linked data metadata mpeg-1 open access open source photoshop php plain text preservation quicktime repositories research schema semantic web software standards vector graphics video web 2.0 wiki windows windows media xml xml schema Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1608 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Never Waste a Good Crisis: Innovation and Technology in Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt#author1">Tore Hoel</a> reports on the CETIS 2010 Conference, 15 - 16 November 2010 at the National College for Leadership of Schools and Childrens' Services Conference Centre, Nottingham.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'I get a feeling that we are on a...' [The hands make a gesture to show the stern of a sinking ship].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/cetis-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report tore hoel cetis iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology national university of ireland oslo university college university of bristol university of nottingham university of southampton e-framework wikipedia archimate blog cloud computing creative commons data e-learning facebook framework higher education ict identifier linked data lod machine learning mashup metadata mobile oer open data open source passwords rdf rdfa research search technology semantic web social software sparql standardisation standards uri wiki windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1612 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk What Is a URI and Why Does It Matter? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/thompson-hs#author1">Henry S. Thompson</a> describes how recent developments in Web technology have affected the relationship between URI and resource representation and the related consequences.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>URI stands for Uniform Resource Identifier, the official name for those things you see all the time on the Web that begin <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'http:'</font> or <font face="Courier New, Courier, monospace">'mailto:'</font>, for example <span class="style1">http://<em>www.w3.org</em>/</span>, which is the URI for the home page of the World Wide Web Consortium [<a href="#1">1</a>]. (These things were called URLs (Uniform Resource Locators) in the early days of the Web, and the change from URL to URI is either hugely significant or completely irrelevant, depending on who is talking—I have nothing to say about this issue in this article. If you have never heard of URIs (or IRIs, the even more recent fully internationalised version), but are familiar with URLs, just think 'URL' whenever you see 'URI' below.)</p> <p>Historically, URIs were mostly seen as simply the way you accessed Web pages. These pages were hand-authored, relatively stable and simply shipped out on demand. More and more often that is no longer the case; in at least three different ways:</p> <ul> <li>Web pages for reading have been complemented by pictures for viewing, videos for watching and music for listening;</li> <li>The Web is now more than a conduit for information, it is a means to a variety of ends; we use it to <em>do</em> things: purchase goods and services, contribute to forums, play games;</li> <li>The things we access on the Web are often not hand-authored or stable, but are automatically synthesised from 'deeper' data sources on demand. Furthermore, that synthesis is increasingly influenced by aspects of the way we initiate the access.</li> </ul> <p>It is against this background that I think it is worth exploring with some care what URIs were meant to be, and how they are being used in practice. In particular, I want to look at what is to be gained from a better understanding of how other kinds of identifiers work.</p> <h2 id="The_Official_Version">The Official Version</h2> <p>Insofar as there are definitive documents about all this, they all agree that URIs are, as the third initial says, <strong>identifiers</strong>, that is, names. They identify <strong>resources</strong>, and often (although not always) allow you to access <strong>representations</strong> of those resources. (Words in <strong>bold</strong> are used as technical terms—their ordinary language meaning is in many cases likely to be more confusing than helpful.)</p> <p>'Resource' names a role in a story, not an intrinsically distinguishable subset of things, just as 'referent' does in ordinary language. Things are resources because someone created a URI to identify them, not because they have some particular properties in and of themselves.</p> <p>'Representation' names a pair: a character sequence and a media type. The <strong>media type</strong> specifies how the character string should be interpreted. For example JPG or HTML or MP3 would be likely media types for representations of an image of an apple, a news report about an orchard or a recording of a Beatles song, respectively.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/thompson-hs" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article henry s. thompson apple google ietf university of edinburgh w3c wikipedia aggregation ajax algorithm browser cataloguing cookie data framework gif google maps html hypertext identifier javascript jpg metadata mp3 png rfc search technology semantic web uri url web 2.0 web app xhtml Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1589 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Repository Fringe 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt#author1">Martin Donnelly</a> (and friends) report on the Repository Fringe "unconference" held at the National e-Science Centre in Edinburgh, Scotland, over 2-3 September 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>2010 was the third year of Repository Fringe, and slightly more formally organised than its antecedents, with an increased number of discursive presentations and less in the way of organised chaos! The proceedings began on Wednesday 1 September with a one-day, pre-event SHERPA/RoMEO API Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] run by the Repositories Support Project team.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/repos-fringe-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report martin donnelly cetis dcc duraspace edina google jisc open university sherpa ukoln university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of hull university of southampton university of st andrews addressing history crispool datashare depositmo hydra jorum memento repomman reposit repositories support project romeo sharegeo sneep wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data blog content management content negotiation csv curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi dspace eprints fedora commons file format framework geospatial data gis google maps hashtag html hypertext identifier infrastructure institutional repository ipad kml learning objects mashup metadata national library oer ontologies open access open source preservation repositories research rss search technology social networks solr standards tagging twitter uri video visualisation wordpress yahoo pipes Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1592 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc6"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> looks at a student survival aid in the information age that should also be valuable for tutors.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies' is an example of an ever-increasing range of 'self-help' books for students on a variety of topics relating skills, tips and education. Such books range from 'Critical thinking skills' [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the quite specific, for example, 'Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and more' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This offering from Gower/Ashgate comes somewhere in between. It introduces students to the main current technologies and some of the pedagogic devices they might find in modern education.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review brian whalley apple google microsoft queens university belfast wikipedia blog data e-learning ebook higher education ict linux mobile open source openoffice png podcast repositories software usb wiki youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1601 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intute Reflections at the End of an Era http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author1">Angela Joyce</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author2">Linda Kerr</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author3">Tim Machin</a>, <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author4">Paul Meehan</a> and <a href="/issue64/joyce-et-al#author5">Caroline Williams</a> look back at the history and achievements of Intute, and reflect on lessons learned as the service enters its final year.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/joyce-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article angela joyce caroline williams linda kerr paul meehan tim machin ahrc bbc british library google hea heriot-watt university intute jisc linden lab mimas ukoln university of bristol university of glamorgan university of huddersfield university of manchester university of oxford wellcome trust automatic metadata generation eevl elib jisc information environment mobile internet detective sosig wikipedia blog cataloguing collection development curation data database digitisation dissemination google scholar higher education metadata mobile personalisation research resource discovery search technology second life software tagging twitter vim vocabularies web 2.0 web browser web resources widget Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1564 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk 23 Things in Public Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/leech#author1">Helen Leech</a> describes a collaborative project to increase front-line staff's understanding and use of Web 2.0 in public libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you know that:</p> <ul> <li>Of the Generation Y – the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s – 96% are members of a social network</li> <li>There are some 200 million blogs on the World Wide Web</li> <li>One in eight couples who married in the USA in 2009 met over the Internet</li> <li>If Facebook were a country, it would be the fourth largest by population in the world after China, the USA and India</li> </ul> <p>All the statistics emanate from Socialnomics [<a href="#1">1</a>]. They are designed to be attention-grabbers, and they will no doubt provoke ferocious debate. However, what is unarguable is that some seismic shifts have taken place on the Internet in the past ten years, and social media and user-generated content now play a huge role in the way many people create and share information and how they communicate with each other.</p> <p>These changes have crept up on public libraries. Ten years ago, we became Internet experts when the People's Network initiative put 30,000 computers into our buildings. We became used to the new role of teaching people how to use a mouse, what a search engine is, how to create an email account. But when it came to content, we tended to leave that to our customers. Friends Reunited came along, followed by Myspace, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, and we were dimly aware of them as social phenomena, but we did not have much to do with them in our day-to-day work.</p> <h2 id="Changes_in_Public_Libraries">Changes in Public Libraries</h2> <p>So what has changed and why do we need to know about them now? The list below is by no means exhaustive but represents some of the main drivers behind changes emerging within public libraries in the UK.</p> <ol> <li>The need to help people get online. As I write, every public library in the UK is being asked to sign up to Race Online [<a href="#2">2</a>], the initiative to get 100% of the population clued up by the time the Olympics happens. The reappointed UK Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox launched the Race Online 2012 campaign in March 2010. The initiative reports that more than 600 partners have pledged to help more than 1.7 million new people to get online by the end of 2012. Its rationale is "to build a UK of near-universal web literacy by the time of the Olympics, with access as easy and affordable as water, electricity or gas and skills considered as fundamental as literacy and numeracy: [its] ambition is to get everyone of working-age online by the end of this Parliament." People need to know the key skills for getting around online, and a large part of these skills involves social networking.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>Changes in the way people communicate. There is a subtle shift taking place in electronic communication, moving onwards from email towards more collaborative methods: file sharing and cloud computing, social media that include information 'walls,' instant messaging and mobile apps. There is growing evidence that Generation Y and the Millenials – the generations born after the late 1980s – are moving towards very different methods of communication. It is important that library staff understand these technologies, since they are going to become as mainstream as email very shortly.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><em>Communities in Control</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>]: you might recognise this as the title of a recent government paper, looking at the need to pass control over political processes to local communities, and how this could be achieved. The principle is being reinforced through the new administration's Big Society initiative [<a href="#4">4</a>]. New technologies are allowing people to mobilise in a way that simply has not been possible before, to create and share content, and to become involved in the running of public libraries in radical new ways. It is also worth looking at the International Association for Public Participation's <em>Spectrum of Public Participation </em>[<a href="#5">5</a>] which gives some idea of the range of ways in which we need to work with our communities, from providing them with information all the way up to acting as facilitators so that they can manage and run services themselves. It is also worth watching the film <em>Us Now</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], which gives a glimpse of the way that new technologies might affect people's relationships with central government and public services. It highlights the way that social networking applications allow huge numbers of people to collaborate to do previously unthinkable things, like run a bank. If communities can make the day-to-day decisions necessary to run a bank or a second division football club, then it starts to become possible that they could do the same for political processes or delivery of public services. Library staff need to understand this culture of engagement, and to understand the tools that facilitate it.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>The economic environment. The next four years, 2010-14, are going to be the hardest public services have seen, and we are going to have to make cost savings everywhere we can. There are clear benefits in collaboration, and the tools that are available for this are improving rapidly. Which is where <em>23 Things</em> comes in.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article helen leech bbc google imperial college london university of huddersfield wikipedia archives blog cataloguing cloud computing database facebook file sharing flickr google wave instant messaging librarything mobile podcast rss search technology social networks software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1565 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt#author1">Keith Doyle</a> provides a personal perspective on a conference organised by UKOLN for those involved in the provision of institutional Web services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This was the 13th Institutional Web Management Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] to be organised by UKOLN [<a href="#2">2</a>] held at the University of Sheffield from 12 to 14 July 2010.&nbsp;The theme was 'The Web in Turbulent Times' [<a href="#3">3</a>]. As such, there was a healthy balance of glass-half-empty-doom-and-gloom, and glass-half-full-yes-we-can.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report keith doyle canterbury christ church university eduserv google ilrt oxford university computing services terminalfour ukoln university college london university of bristol university of cambridge university of oxford university of salford university of sheffield university of the west of england w3c iwmw memento mobile campus assistant wikipedia accessibility apache blog browser cocoa content management css curation data data visualisation datamining facebook firefox framework geospatial data gis hashtag higher education html html5 hypertext information architecture linked data mashup metadata mobile mobile phone opera plone portal qr code rdfa research rss search technology sharepoint smartphone social web software taxonomy twitter usability video videoconferencing visualisation web app web development web services webkit widget wookie wordpress xcri xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1569 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Turning on the Lights for the User: NISO Discovery to Delivery Forum http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt#author1">Laura Akerman</a> and <a href="/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt#author2">Kim Durante</a> report on Discovery to Delivery, Creating a First-Class User Experience, a NISO Forum on today's information seekers and current standards developments held in March 2010 at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/niso-d2d-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report kim durante laura akerman amazon blackboard coalition for networked information cornell university emory university georgia institute of technology google library of congress niso oai oclc serials solutions internet archive wikipedia aggregation api application profile archives atom authentication cataloguing data database digital library digitisation drm dublin core ebook framework google books google scholar identifier interoperability jstor knowledge base marc metadata oai-pmh onix open archives initiative openurl qr code research resource sharing rss schema search technology sfx shibboleth software standardisation standards tagging video visualisation xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1548 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Approximately 97 Things http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/cliff-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/cliff-rvw#author1">Pete Cliff</a> learns something new in this 'Open Source' book every time he makes the tea.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. 2010-05-25-18-28 implementing Pete's edits -REW --><!-- v2. 2010-05-25-18-28 implementing Pete's edits -REW --><p><em>97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know.</em> From the title it should be pretty clear what we're getting, but the creation of this book is a little different. The editor goes so far as to state this is an Open Source book and likens its creation to Open Source Software development. It contains (you guessed it) 97 short (2-page) essays ('axioms'), each one contributed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Each presents a single pearl of wisdom from an expert in the field of Software Architecture.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/cliff-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review pete cliff bbc bodleian libraries oreilly university of oxford wikipedia creative commons licence open source software Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1554 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Supporting Research Students http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a work which helps Library and Information Science Staff at Higher Education Institutions to support their research students.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The purpose of this book is to support Library and Information Science (LIS) professionals at Higher Education institutions (HEIs) who may be involved with doctoral students. <em>Supporting Research Students</em> emanates from Dr Allan's own experience in gaining a PhD and as a Senior Lecturer in Student Learning and Management Learning at the University of Hull. She thus has considerable expertise in seeing postgraduate research from the student point of view and from support provision by LIS staff. I came to this review with interest and I should lay out my own credentials.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review brian whalley google microsoft queens university belfast university of hull wikipedia bibliographic data data gis google scholar higher education hypertext multimedia ontologies open source refworks research virtual research environment web 2.0 Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1557 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Towards a Toolkit for Implementing Application Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/chaudhri-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author1">Talat Chaudhri</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author2">Julian Cheal</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author3">Richard Jones</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author4">Mahendra Mahey</a> and <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author5">Emma Tonkin</a> propose a user-driven methodology for the iterative development, testing and implementation of Dublin Core Application Profiles in diverse repository software environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/chaudhri-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin julian cheal mahendra mahey richard jones talat chaudhri cetis jisc oai ukoln university of bath geospatial application profile gnu iemsr images application profile jisc information environment lmap opendoar tbmap wikipedia application profile archives blog cerif data data model database dcap dcmi digital repositories domain model dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-government eprints fedora commons framework frbr geospatial data gis higher education identifier information architecture institutional repository interoperability metadata metadata model oai-ore open access open archives initiative open source rdf repositories research resource description ruby schema scholarly works application profile search technology software standards sword protocol uri usability virtual research environment vocabularies xml Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1522 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Targets: Web Preservation and Reference Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/davis <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/davis#author1">Richard Davis</a> discusses the role of Web preservation in reference management. This article is based on a presentation given at the Innovations in Reference Management workshop, January 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3: amended in light of author's further final-read revisions 2010-02-12-11-11 rew --><!-- v3: amended in light of author's further final-read revisions 2010-02-12-11-11 rew --><p>It seems fair to say that the lion's share of work on developing online tools for reference and citation management by students and researchers has focused on familiar types of publication. They generally comprise resources that can be neatly and discretely bound in the covers of a book or journal, or their electronic analogues, like the Portable Document Format (PDF): objects in established library or database systems, with ISBNs and ISSNs underwritten by the authority of formal publication and legal deposit.</p> <p>Yet, increasingly, native Web resources are also becoming eminently citable, and managing both the resources, and references to them, is an ongoing challenge. Moreover, the issues associated with referencing this kind of material have received comparatively little attention, beyond introducing the convention that includes the URL and the date it was accessed in bibliographies. While it may be hard to quantify the "average lifespan of a web page" [<a href="#1">1</a>], what is undeniable is that Web resources are highly volatile and prone to deletion or amendment without warning.</p> <p>Web Preservation is one field of endeavour which attempts to counter the Web's transient tendency, and a variety of approaches continue to be explored. The aim of this article is to convey the fairly simple message that many themes and concerns of Web preservation are equally relevant in the quest for effective reference management in academic research, particularly given the rate at which our dependence on Web-delivered resources is growing.</p> <p>Digital preservation is, naturally, a strong theme in the work of the University of London Computer Centre (ULCC)'s Digital Archives Department, and Web preservation has featured particularly strongly in recent years. This article will draw upon several initiatives with which we have been involved recently. These include: the 2008 JISC Preservation of Web Resources Project (JISC-PoWR) [<a href="#2">2</a>], on which we worked with Brian Kelly and Marieke Guy of UKOLN; our work for the UK Web Archiving Consortium; and the ongoing JISC ArchivePress Project [<a href="#3">3</a>] (itself, in many ways, a sequel to JISC-PoWR).</p> <p>Another perspective that I bring is as a part-time student myself, on the MSc E-Learning programme at Edinburgh University. As a consequence I have papers to read, and write, and a dissertation imminent. So for this reason too I have a stake in making it easier to keep track of information for reading lists, footnotes and bibliographies, whether with desktop tools or Web-based tools, or through features in online VLEs, databases and repositories.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/davis" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article richard davis british library dcc digital preservation coalition google intute jisc leiden university the national archives ukoln university of edinburgh university of london wellcome trust internet archive jisc information environment powr wikipedia archives atom blog browser cache content management cool uri copyright data database digital archive digital curation digital preservation document format e-learning framework higher education identifier metadata open access open source preservation repositories research rss standards ulcc uri url wayback machine web 2.0 web app web resources web standards wiki wordpress Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1523 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk An Attack on Professionalism and Scholarship? Democratising Archives and the Production of Knowledge http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/flinn <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/flinn#author1">Andrew Flinn</a> describes some recent developments in democratising the archive and asks whether these developments really deserve to be viewed as a threat to professional and academic standards.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 2, based on author responses to edited version; 2010-02-12-17-27-rew --><!-- version 2, based on author responses to edited version; 2010-02-12-17-27-rew --><p>This article was originally delivered as a paper for the 'Archives 2.0: Shifting Dialogues Between Users and Archivists' conference organised by the University of Manchester's ESRC Centre for Research on Socio-Cultural Change (CRESC) in March 2009. The paper came at an opportune time. I was absorbed in a research project examining independent and community archival initiatives in the UK and exploring the possibilities of user- (or community-)generated and contributed content for archives and historical research [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Furthermore I had just received referees' comments on a proposed research project examining the potential impact of the latter developments on professional archival practice. Whilst two of the reports were very positive, one was more than a little hostile. The reviewer was scathing about the focus of the proposed research on the democratisation of knowledge production, dismissing the notion as part of a short-term political agenda that was detrimental to the idea of scholarship and one with which the archive profession should not concern itself. In particular, scorn was reserved for the idea that, in future archive catalogues, many 'voices' might be enabled 'to supplement or even supplant the single, authoritative, professional voice', an idea which was described as being, <em>in extremis</em>, 'a frontal attack on professionalism, standards and scholarship'.</p> <p>At the time of receiving this review and considering my response, I was also beginning to write my paper for the conference and had already decided that my theme would be democratising the archive. However I realised that these comments neatly encapsulated a powerful and genuine strand of thinking within the archive profession and academia more generally, which one might loosely term 'traditional'. Although there are now many user-generated content archive and heritage projects in existence, and terms such as participatory archives, Archives 2.0 and even History 2.0 are an increasingly common part of professional discourse [<a href="#2">2</a>], some, perhaps many, archivists and scholars remain deeply sceptical about the need for a democratisation of the archive and of scholarship.</p> <p>In the end the research project was supported by the AHRC despite the critical review and has now commenced [<a href="#3">3</a>]. However, in this brief article I will try to respond to this strand of thinking by, first identifying what is meant by the democratisation of the archive and why advocates of such a thing believe it to be important. I will then briefly introduce two different but linked developments (independent or community archives and user- or community-generated content), which in harness with new technologies might play a role in such a democratisation, and in so doing challenge aspects of traditional archival thinking and practice. Finally I will offer a few thoughts on the shifts in our understanding of the archive and the resistance to those shifts. Ultimately, I will suggest that rather than viewing this debate as one between the expert (or the academic or the professional) and the crowd, it is in the concept of communities that the key might be found. A successful democratised and participatory archive is one which recognises that all those who come into contact with the archive (directly or indirectly), the 'community of the record', can and do affect our understanding and knowledge of that archive.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/flinn" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article andrew flinn ahrc alt mla smithsonian institution the national archives university college london university of manchester university of oxford archives hub wikipedia archives blog cataloguing curation data digitisation dissemination framework identifier preservation repositories research web 2.0 wiki Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1524 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk