Overview of content related to 'itunes' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/7278/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Developing a Prototype Library WebApp for Mobile Devices http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author1">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author2">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the development of a prototype WebApp to improve access to Library systems at Loughborough University for mobile devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Reviewing Loughborough University Library’s Web site statistics over a 12-month period (October 2011 – September 2012) showed a monthly average of 1,200 visits via mobile devices (eg smart phones and tablet computers). These visits account for 4% of the total monthly average visits; but plotting the percentage of visits per month from such mobile devices demonstrated over the period a steady increase, rising from 2% to 8%.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper apple google loughborough university w3c adobe ajax android apache api authentication blog browser cache cataloguing content management cookie css data framework google books html html5 ipad iphone itunes java javascript jquery json library management systems local storage metadata mobile native app native apps open source passwords perl restful rss standards tablet computer url vocabularies web app web browser web development widget xhtml xml Mon, 10 Jun 2013 13:33:09 +0000 admin 2438 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Survive or Thrive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt#author1">Ed Fay</a> reports on a two-day conference organised by UKOLN on behalf of JISC to consider growth and use of digital content on the Web, which was held in Manchester in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Survive or Thrive [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the punchy title given to an event intended to stimulate serious consideration amongst digital collections practitioners about future directions in our field - opportunities but also potential pitfalls. The event, which focused on content in HE, comes at a time of financial uncertainty when proving value is of increasing importance in the sector and at a point when significant investment has already been made in the UK into content creation, set against a backdrop of increasingly available content on the open Web from a multitude of sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report ed fay apple bbc california digital library cerlim edina eduserv google jisc jisc digital media london school of economics massachusetts institute of technology ordnance survey rdtf talis the national archives university of huddersfield accessibility aggregation agile development api archives blog cataloguing data digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dissemination domain model e-learning flickr geospatial data gis html identifier information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository interoperability itunes javascript linked data mashup metadata mobile personalisation preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks software solr standards tagging text mining twitter usability widget Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1593 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 64: Supporting the Power of Research Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 64.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In these cash-strapped times among all the admonitions to save money here, and resources there, I rather hope to hear much about the necessity of protecting and building the knowledge economy if the UK is to make its way in the globalised world, since we cannot pretend to compete easily in other areas of endeavour. Hence research has to be regarded as one of the aces remaining to us, and thus I hope the importance of gathering, managing and preserving for long-term access research outcomes will be widely appreciated and supported.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 editorial richard waller bbc cerlim google ifla intute national library of australia rnib automatic metadata generation itunes u archives bibliographic data bibliographic record big data blog cataloguing curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories digitisation drupal dspace e-science electronic theses fedora commons framework frbr google scholar higher education infrastructure interoperability ipad iphone itunes metadata mobile national library preservation repositories research search technology social networks software standards twitter vim web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1559 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Rewriting the Book: On the Move With the Library of Birmingham http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/gambles <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/gambles#author1">Brian Gambles</a> presents the Library of Birmingham vision and strategy for addressing the challenge of mobile digital services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Library of Birmingham (LoB) will open in 2013 as a world-class centre for culture, learning and knowledge, rewriting the book for public libraries in the 21st century. 'Rewriting the Book', which is integral to the new LoB brand, recognises and embraces the present and future challenge to libraries – it accepts that established means of accessing knowledge are changing rapidly and dynamically, with a significant digital dimension, and that increasingly radical responses to this challenge are demanded from leaders in the library sector.</p> <p>The LoB will seek to transform perceptions of Birmingham, redefining 'the library', with an outward focus, deeply embedded in partnership working, digitally connected to the world, and servicing both local and international audiences as a platform and cultural hub for knowledge and communal exchange. Fundamental to this change will be the delivery of digital services both inside and outside the new library with greater support for mobile communications with customers. Mobile is commonplace today, and opens up many opportunities to enhance customer experience both inside and external to the new library.</p> <p>This article describes the continuing journey of the LoB project in assessing the challenge of mobile, its relevance and how innovation could improve the visitor experience in the future.</p> <h2 id="Mobility:_An_Integral_Part_of_Living">Mobility: An Integral Part of Living</h2> <p>Mobile services are an integral part of our daily lives and embedded in our culture. This is never more apparent when we do not have them close to hand – a recent survey found that 40% of mobile phone users would rather lose their wallet than their mobile device. The choice may not be available for much longer: the mobile is very likely to become your wallet in the future!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/gambles" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article brian gambles amazon american museum of natural history apple google microsoft museum of london itunes u archives augmented reality cloud computing digital media digitisation ebook facebook framework ict information retrieval infrastructure ipad iphone itunes metadata mobile mobile phone qr code research sms software wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1561 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2010: The Mobile University http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt#author1">Shailey Minocha</a> reflects on the one-day symposium organised by Eduserv in May 2010. The aim of the event was to discuss whether and how mobile technology will play a significant role in the delivery of UK Higher Education in the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report shailey minocha blackboard canterbury christ church university edge hill university eduserv google massachusetts institute of technology open university oucs ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of wolverhampton itunes u accessibility ajax android augmented reality blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data e-learning facebook framework higher education html html5 infrastructure ipad iphone itunes junaio location-based services mobile mobile learning mobile phone open source operating system podcast qr code research search technology smartphone sms social software software twitter url usability video web 2.0 web services webkit wiki wikitude wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1573 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: iPad - The Missing Manual http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a manual to help support your use of an iPad - 'the book that should have been in the box'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Missing Manual Series, originally written and published by David Pogue has expanded and is now published by O'Reilly, who deal mainly with computer books. Like many other publishers, they have jumped on the 'ibandwagon'. A quick count on Amazon Books gave a dozen similar offerings (excluding developers' guides).</p> <p>This is a review therefore of just one of these paperbacks, and is not a comparative review – with one exception which I shall come to below.</p> <h2 id="Comments">Comments</h2> <p>For writing this review I settled down with the IPad on my knee, Bluetooth keyboard below that and glass of chenin blanc at my right hand – but wondered where to place the volume under review. As yet, nobody has produced a 'skyhook' to hold one or the other. <em>IPad: The Missing Manual (<em>MM</em>)</em> is a little smaller than the iPad itself, about as thick and uses glossy paper with colour illustrations on most pages. In general, each page has a new topic and is organised by basic chapters. <em>Get to know your iPad, Interact with your iPad</em>, etc. They are logical and you can easily flick between them to find the section you need. Not that, with an iPad, you really need to find much. Just plug in applications (apps) and play to find your own way around. This, of course, is typical for Macs of whatever kind. With the iPad however, there is less freedom to find new ways of doing things than with the usual Linux-based Mac OS. The main difficulty is to link up with a computer; fire up iTunes and use this to get started. The basic leaflet that comes with the iPad will tell you all this. Even if you have not used a Mac before, it is fairly intuitive. If you are unsure about the basic operations and included apps, the Apple Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>] gives some short, but informative videos. The Missing Manual elaborates on them. If you have not used an iPhone, or perhaps an IPod before, then the <em>MM</em> helps a bit. If you want to do something, for example, move around the icons of apps on the screen and you don't know what to do, then a brief incursion to the <em>MM</em> is undoubtedly helpful. There is a substantial index to help matters but you may well have picked up the basics from Apple's video tours.</p> <p>At this stage I wanted a 'top up' and went into the kitchen, but I also did an experiment. The weight of iPad on the kitchen scales was 856g; weight of the <em>MM</em> was 427g, ratio, almost exactly 2:1. By a volumetric comparison this is approximately 1: 0.8. The <em>MM</em> is by no means small, so what about information content per volume or mass? Here is another experiment if you have just bought an iPad. First, download the app <em>iCabMobile</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>], this is another browser that can be used instead of, and is rather better than, the bundled Safari. Now download the app <em>GoodReader</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] and then into the browser type: manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iPad_User_Guide.pdf [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Lo and behold you have the 'true' missing manual from Apple. Now, in the browser, insert the letter g before http:// of the target URL of the pdf and press 'return'. This downloads the iPad_User_Guide pdf into <em>GoodReader</em>. It is 19MB but should come down easily. You can then browse Apple's free manual in <em>GoodReader</em> as an e-book.</p> <p>Steve Jobs boasts that there are 8,500 apps for the iPad [<a href="#5">5</a>] but which ones are necessary for your Personal Learning Environment? Well, this review (via <em>MacUser</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], thank you) suggests two very good ones. <em>GoodReader</em> is excellent, you can leaf through the pdf as a book, search it, and so on, so put all your downloaded pdfs there. If you do not use <em>Mobile Me</em> [<a href="#7">7</a>] and if you want to get hold of a pdf (or other) file from your office machine, then use<em> Dropbox</em> [<a href="#8">8</a>] for your office machine and iPad. Upload it in the office and download it to your iPad at leisure. Some apps are mentioned at various places in the <em>MM</em>, but of course more are added all the time so a print-on-paper book is not a good venue for them.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review brian whalley amazon apple oreilly queens university belfast browser ebook ipad iphone itunes linux mac os mobile safari search technology video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1582 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a></p> <h3 id="Engagement_Impact_Value_Workshop">Engagement, Impact, Value Workshop</h3> <p>University of Manchester<br />Monday 24 May 2010<br /><a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/engagement-impact-value-201005/">http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/engagement-impact-value-201005/</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 news and events richard waller austrian national library bnf british library cilip cni datacite ibm jisc library of congress loughborough university microsoft mimas oclc surffoundation tilburg university ukoln university of exeter university of illinois university of manchester university of sheffield europeana iwmw lis research coalition worldcat archives cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital library digital preservation dissemination doi dublin core ebook ejournal further education higher education ipad itunes knowledge management linked data metadata mobile national library portal preservation privacy repositories research resource description and access search technology semantic web software standardisation twitter usability visualisation web 2.0 web development web services Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1553 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Product Review: The IPad and the Educator, First Impressions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw-2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/whalley-rvw-2#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reports on his initial impressions of the new Apple iPad in the first three weeks since its release in the USA and what it has to offer the mobile educator.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Triumph_of_Design_over_Function">Triumph of Design over Function?</h2> <p>So, you have seen and read the hype about the iPad [<a href="#1">1</a>]; the world release has been delayed until the US appetite has been satiated and it will be the end of May for the rest of the world. Should you buy one or is this an example of the triumph of elegant design over function? What follows is an initial view of an iPad bought in the US in April and the results of some playing around with it in the USA and then the UK. It is not a comparative test with 'netbooks' or other e-book readers (such as Kindle and Sony), although I shall make some discrete comparisons because this review stems from an earlier discussion about e-books in <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Main_Impressions">Main Impressions</h2> <p>One complaint about existing e-book readers was, and is, that they do not have colour screens. I want to view Web pages with images and text at a decent size and read e-books with coloured (and preferably hypertext) material. I'd like my students to have this capability too. The e-ink technology in a Kindle cannot currently offer anything other than greyscale so the iPad is immediately a 'wow' when you turn it on. The touch screen is excellent and a size that can be used to read books as well as Web pages without lots of scrolling. This was my main reason for trying the iPad as, apart of my desire to have students use a Personal Learning Environment (PLE, device plus appropriately chosen applications), the screen was a major consideration. Netbooks fill the bill to a limited extent but with the 9.7" diagonal (19.5 x 15 cm screen, portrait or landscape conversion in 1 second) the iPad is more than good. All my colleagues who have paid me £5 just to touch it have remarked on this. Have a look at the (<em>Guardian</em>) Eyewitness app [<a href="#3">3</a>] to see what it can do. The screen also provides a keyboard (scaling for the orientation) that can be used for typing rather than prodding with a finger or stylus but, as with the iPhone, you can only get numerals by shifting a key. A separate Apple Bluetooth keyboard is available which is very neat, light and allows proper typing. This review was initially typed on the iPad Notes application ('app' now of course), I have not yet tried the Apple iWorks suite and at this stage I am not using the iPad as a laptop replacement; but rather, as a lightweight device that can be used for basic notebook functionality with the ability to read text and view Web pages without strain or undue scrolling.</p> <p>The 3G version of the iPad is not yet out but, for the moment, this does not concern me; I can 'synch' my iPhone and Macbook Pro when needed and my iPhone gives me some iPhone applications of usefully increased screen size (there are lots more to come specifically for the iPad of course). Music and video (4:3 ratio) come over smoothly - and video is at a reasonable size to view rather than squinting myopically at an iPhone. The iPad was useful on a Transatlantic flight (steerage with restricted lapspace) for typing, music and film. When necessary, you can slip it beside you and need not worry about slopping your gin and tonic over a keyboard. Convenience is a great selling point about the iPad, battery life is excellent, a claimed 10 hours. It took about 6 hours to recharge from 4% capacity to full. The same power connector-USB cable (used also for data connectivity) works for the iPod and iPhone as well so you can easily charge from laptop, external AC sources, car adapter as well, as a <em>PowerMonkey </em>or similar external power source. Power efficiency is mainly due to the type of computer architecture the machine uses. It is the same Apple custom CPU (known as A4) that is used by the iPhone and so, from this point of view, the iPad is indeed a large iPhone. The architecture differs from that used on most netbooks, which are really stripped down and relatively slow and power-hungry versions of (x86 architecture) laptops. We should really think of the iPad as a new generation of small computer and it remains to be seen what Apple will develop in the future.</p> <p>Unfortunately, Digital Rights Management (DRM) meant that I could not access iTunes myself in the USA so I had to rely on my son's access to try a few things out. I now have a list of applications to experiment with but I shall not report on those here, they will have to wait until the App Store opens for iPad use in the UK. At present, you can only have one app open at a time (plus audio on the iPod application). Apple have already indicated that the next version of the OS will have multiple-tasking, that is, keeping two applications open at the same time; currently you have to switch using the discrete 'home' button. This button is on the screen, the on/off and volume controls are around the rim together with docking connector, earpiece jack socket, aperture for microphone (so you can use the iDictaphone app) and a switch to lock/unlock the screen orientation.</p> <p>I mentioned DRM earlier so the only iBooks downloaded so far are <em>Winnie the Pooh</em> and <em>Twelfth Night</em>. The former is really very good with the original E.H. Shepard coloured illustrations. They are text-searchable (did you know that the word 'hunny' only occurs three times in <em>Winnie the Pooh</em>?), there is a dictionary and the ability to change to one of five different typefaces and two sizes. The text is very clear and readable in either mode and the graphics can give you a page turn as slow or as fast as you like, neat. I also tried <em>Alice's Adventures in Wonderland</em> downloaded from <em>Stanza</em> where there is more flexibility with fonts but the text is less crisp. I downloaded apps for <em>Kindle </em>[<a href="#4">4</a>] and <em>Reader Lite </em>but did not use their offerings. I suspect that there will be improvements from most e-book vendors with iPad optimisation in the jockeying for position that appears to be going on in the e-book world. We have yet to see how the commercial textbook vendors deal with e-books for the iPad.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/whalley-rvw-2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review brian whalley alt alt-c apple bbc google queens university belfast adobe data drm ebook flash google scholar graphics html html5 hypertext ipad iphone itunes jpg podcast usb video wiki Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1558 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eBooks: Tipping or Vanishing Point? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/tonkin#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> investigates ebooks and takes a look at recent technological and business developments in this area.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Due in large part to the appearance since mid-2006 of increasingly affordable devices making use of e-Ink technology (a monochrome display supporting a high-resolution image despite low battery use, since the screen consumes power only during page refreshes, which in the case of ebooks generally represent page turns), the ebook has gone from a somewhat limited market into a real, although presently still niche, contender. Amazon sold 500,000 Kindles in 2008 [<a href="#1">1</a>]; Sony sold 300,000 of its Reader Digital Book model between October 2006 and October 2009. In September 2009, ebooks represented between 1% and 3% of the total US publishing market [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Following the JISC National eBooks Observatory Study [<a href="#3">3</a>] in the UK, one participant, David Nicolas, was quoted as stating that ebooks have 'reached the tipping point' [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Keeping in mind Bohr's statement that, 'prediction is very difficult, especially about the future', it's nonetheless safe to say that publicity about these devices is currently at a high point. But for ebook readers, as Figure 1 shows, this is not their first time in the spotlight.</p> <blockquote><p>"A good book has no ending. ~R.D. Cumming"</p></blockquote> <p>This article marks the third time that <em>Ariadne</em> has discussed the subject of ebooks, namely "Ebooks in UK Libraries: Where are we now?" [<a href="#5">5</a>] and "e-Books for the Future: Here But Hiding?" [<a href="#6">6</a>]. There is something very beguiling about the idea of a book that has 'the marvelous chameleon-like quality that it can very quickly be made to substitute for a different printed work by simply loading different content' [<a href="#7">7</a>] - a book that can play the role of a <em>library</em>.</p> <p>As Striphas [<a href="#8">8</a>] points out, the concept of the electronic book, and the exploration of the interaction between the size of a container and the quantity of knowledge held, has an extraordinarily long history. He traces the idea back to the creation of miniature manuscript books, composed of 'tiny handwriting, or micrographia', in the late 15th century, which were functional objects and could be read by means of a magnifying glass.</p> <p>Striphas notes the development of microphotography techniques in the 19th century. This was initially pioneered by John Benjamin Dancer, an optical instrument-maker who combined microscope and camera in order to create the earliest example of microphotography on record [<a href="#9">9</a>]. Luther reports that 'the 21 May 1853 issue of Notes and Queries carried a letter from a Dublin scholar asking "May not photography be usefully applied to the making of catalogues of large libraries?' Microphotography led to the report in the British <em>Photographic Journal</em> of, 'A page of printing, from Quekett's "Treatise on the Microscope", reduced to such size that the whole of the volume of 560 pages could be contained in a space one inch long and half-an-inch broad ' [<a href="#8">8</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/tonkin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin amazon american library association apple british library google international digital publishing forum iso jisc massachusetts institute of technology microsoft ukoln university of bath university of chicago wikipedia aac access control accessibility adobe android blog bmp cataloguing copyright data digital library doc document format drm ebook epub file format flac flash gif html hypertext infrastructure ipad iphone itunes jpeg jpg linux mis mobi mobile mobile phone mp3 ogg open access operating system plain text png research rtf search technology smartphone software standardisation standards tiff usb windows wireless Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1529 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Why Are Users So Useful? User Engagement and the Experience of the JISC Digitisation Programme http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/marchionni#author1">Paola Marchionni</a> discusses the importance of user engagement in the creation of digitised scholarly resources with case studies from the JISC Digitisation Programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do we know enough about what our users' needs are when creating online digitised scholarly resources? What are the benefits of engaging users? In what way can they be useful to the process?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article paola marchionni british library google jisc oxford internet institute university college london university of oxford asr2 first world war poetry wikipedia archives blog cataloguing content management data digital archive digitisation dissemination facebook flickr google search higher education ict identifier itunes metadata multimedia podcast research search technology twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1512 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Librarians' Information Literacy Annual Conference (LILAC) 2009 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt#author1">Rosie Jones</a> reports on a three-day conference about Information Literacy held by CILIP CSG Information Literacy Group at Cardiff University over 30 March - 1 April 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>LILAC celebrated its fifth birthday in style in what proved to be a fantastic venue, Cardiff University. This occasion was commemorated with tour t-shirts available for all the delegates. The conference proved more popular than ever with a record number of presentations submitted and over 240 delegates from across the UK and worldwide. There were also seven funded places for Library students to attend, a fantastic investment in the profession for the future.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 event report rosie jones american library association cardiff university college of new jersey google imperial college london jisc london metropolitan university loughborough university manchester metropolitan university princeton university sconul university of birmingham university of cambridge university of leeds university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of the west of england university of worcester argosi itunes u jorum wikipedia aac blog database e-learning flash framework higher education information retrieval itunes learning objects marc multimedia podcast refworks research search technology social software twitter video vle youtube Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1474 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Being Wired Or Being Tired: 10 Ways to Cope With Information Overload http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/houghton-jan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/houghton-jan#author1">Sarah Houghton-Jan</a> explores different strategies for managing and coping with various types of informational overload.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>What is information overload? 27 instant messages. 4 text messages. 17 phone calls. 98 work emails. 52 personal emails. 76 email listserv messages. 14 social network messages. 127 social network status updates. 825 RSS feed updates. 30 pages from a book. 5 letters. 11 pieces of junk mail. 1 periodical issue. 3 hours of radio. 1 hour of television. <em>That</em>, my friends, is information overload.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/houghton-jan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article sarah houghton google harvard university microsoft san jose public library university of london archives blog cataloguing data digital media facebook instant messaging itunes microsoft office mobile mobile phone mp3 multimedia podcast research rss search technology social networks software twitter video Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1410 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Video Active Consortium: Europe's Television History Online http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras#author1">Johan Oomen</a> and <a href="/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras#author2">Vassilis Tzouvaras</a> provide an insight into the background and development of the Video Active Portal which offers access to television heritage material from leading archives across Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Europe's audiovisual heritage contains both a record and a representation of the past and as such it demonstrates the development of the 'audiovisual culture' we inhabit today. In this article we hope to offer an insight into the development of the Video Active Portal [<a href="#1">1</a>] which provides access broadcast heritage material retained by archives across Europe. We will explain how Video Active needed to find solutions for managing intellectual property rights, semantic and linguistic interoperability and the design of a meaningful user experience.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/ooman-tzouvaras" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 feature article johan oomen vassilis tzouvaras apple google iso mpeg national technical university of athens netherlands institute for sound and vision oai royal holloway university of london university of utrecht w3c api archives data data management database digital archive digital library digitisation dublin core dublin core metadata initiative dvd flash framework hypertext ict information architecture infrastructure intellectual property interoperability itunes java jena learning objects metadata multimedia mysql oai-pmh ontologies open archives initiative open source owl portal preservation rdf rdfs repositories research resource description schema search technology semantic web sesame sparql standardisation standards streaming thesaurus video vocabularies web app web services windows windows media xml xml schema youtube Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1348 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Cambridge History of Libraries in Britain and Ireland http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/maccoll-dempsey-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue53/maccoll-dempsey-rvw#author1">Lorcan Dempsey</a> reviews Volume III of a landmark collection on the history of libraries in 'Britain and Ireland' from 1850 to 2000.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>First, a note about this reviewer. I am not a library historian although I am interested in our professional and institutional development. I received my library education in Ireland, although I have worked for much of my career in the UK and am now in the US. I observed the developments discussed in the latter parts of this volume and have contributed to the literature about them. I have met many of the contributors and am familiar with the writings of others.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue53/maccoll-dempsey-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue53 review lorcan dempsey amazon british library british museum cilip google jisc leeds metropolitan university national library of wales oclc queens university belfast university college dublin university of london university of nottingham archives bibliographic data cataloguing copac curation data digitisation higher education identifier information society infrastructure itunes national library repositories research resource sharing search technology Tue, 30 Oct 2007 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1359 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hold It, Hold It ... Start Again: The Perils of Project Video Production http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/hitchcock <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>It's not like writing a paper. Film production, when the camera points at you, can challenge all sorts of sensitivities. <a href="/issue51/hitchcock#author1">Steve Hitchcock</a> survived the ordeal to tell the story of the Preserv Project video.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/hitchcock" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 feature article steve hitchcock apple british library dcc jisc the national archives university of oxford university of southampton preserv archives cataloguing curation digital curation digital preservation dissemination eprints itunes mobile mobile phone open access podcast preservation repositories software video youtube Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1313 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Blogging and RSS - A Librarian's Guide http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/jones-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue51/jones-rvw#author1">Kara Jones</a> reviews a practical guide to blogs and RSS written for librarians, packed with library-specific examples.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At the time of review, Amazon UK had over fifty different titles for sale on weblogs and RSS feeds. How do you choose which to read? When faced with a new technology or service, it's useful to have instruction designed specifically with you in mind as the reader and learner. In 'Blogging and RSS: A Librarian's Guide', Michael Sauers does exactly that and pitches directly to a specific audience. Those interested in this book will presumably be librarians and information professionals and will probably already have an idea of what a blog is, and some knowledge of RSS feeds.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue51/jones-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue51 review kara jones amazon university of bath perseus aggregation blog content syndication file format itunes podcast rss software syndication Sun, 29 Apr 2007 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1323 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk e-Books for the Future: Here but Hiding? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue49/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> outlines some developments in e-book technologies and links them to existing ways of presenting textbook information.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue49 feature article brian whalley bbc cetis google hewlett-packard jisc massachusetts institute of technology queens university of belfast eboni jorum ples project gutenberg wikipedia wikisource aggregation archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing copyright creative commons data database digital asset management digital library digital repositories dspace e-learning ebook ejournal exif file format flash google books higher education hypertext internet explorer interoperability itunes learning objects licence mac os metadata mobile mp3 multimedia open source podcast portal rae repositories research rss scorm search technology software sql standards syndication thesaurus vle widget wiki wireless youtube Mon, 30 Oct 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1271 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Library Catalogue in the New Discovery Environment: Some Thoughts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/dempsey <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue48/dempsey#author1">Lorcan Dempsey</a> explores how the library catalogue will develop alongside evolving network discovery systems.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue48/dempsey" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue48 feature article lorcan dempsey amazon d-lib magazine google oclc university of huddersfield worldcat aggregation authentication bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing data database digitisation ebook frbr google scholar institutional repository itunes library management systems librarything marc metadata network service opac repositories research resource management resource sharing rss search technology software srw syndication tagging web 2.0 web resources web services z39.50 Sat, 29 Jul 2006 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1249 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The (Digital) Library Environment: Ten Years After http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/dempsey <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue46/dempsey#author1">Lorcan Dempsey</a> considers how the digital library environment has changed in the ten years since Ariadne was first published.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have recently come through several decennial celebrations: the W3C, the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative, <em>D-Lib Magazine</em>, and now <em>Ariadne</em>. What happened clearly in the mid-nineties was the convergence of the Web with more pervasive network connectivity, and this made our sense of the network as a shared space for research and learning, work and play, a more real and apparently achievable goal.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue46/dempsey" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue46 feature article lorcan dempsey amazon bldsc british library california digital library d-lib magazine dest google harvard university iso jisc microsoft national library of australia oai oclc research information network sakai university of virginia w3c archives hub bath information and data services dner e-framework ebank uk elib irra jisc information environment worldcat aggregation api archives authentication authentication service bibliographic data blog born digital browser cache cataloguing content management copac copyright crm curation data data set database digital asset management digital curation digital identity digital library digital preservation digitisation dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-learning e-research eportfolio firefox flickr framework google scholar higher education html infrastructure instant messaging institutional repository itunes learning management system library management systems metadata national library netvibes network service oai-pmh ontologies open access open source openurl personalisation portal portfolio preservation programmable web rae repositories research resource description resource discovery resource management resource sharing rss schema search technology service registry software sru standardisation tagging taxonomy uportal url visualisation vle vocabularies web 2.0 web resources web services wiki wireless z39.50 Wed, 08 Feb 2006 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1207 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk