Overview of content related to 'portal' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/73/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Developing Adaptable, Efficient Mobile Library Services: Librarians as Enablers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/caperon#author1">Lizzie Caperon</a> describes how library resources can be targeted towards effective mobile services as mobile devices become increasingly prevalent in Higher Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Mobile devices such as smartphones, iPads and tablet computers are rapidly proliferating in society and changing the way information is organised, received and disseminated. Consequently the library world must adopt mobile services which maximise and adapt to these significant technological changes. What do library users want from mobile services? How can libraries adopt new, innovative mobile initiatives?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 feature article lizzie caperon british library google ieee information today jisc microsoft national university of ireland university of birmingham university of leeds university of manchester university of sheffield university of warwick android archives augmented reality bibliographic data cataloguing data database doi e-learning ebook framework geospatial data higher education instant messaging ipad lbs mobile mobile learning mobile phone modelling operating system podcast portal qr code research responsive design search technology smartphone social software tablet computer twitter usability video web 2.0 webinar wireless wordpress Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:33:54 +0000 lisrw 2532 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk LinkedUp: Linking Open Data for Education http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author1">Marieke Guy</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author2">Mathieu d’Aquin</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author3">Stefan Dietze</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author4">Hendrik Drachsler</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author5">Eelco Herder</a> and <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author6">Elisabetta Parodi</a> describe the activities carried out by the LinkedUp Project looking at the promotion of open data in education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the past, discussions around Open Education have tended to focus on content and primarily Open Educational Resources (OER), freely accessible, openly licensed resources that are used for teaching, learning, assessment and research purposes. However Open Education is a complex beast made up of many aspects, of which the opening up of data is one important element.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article eelco herder elisabetta parodi hendrik drachsler marieke guy mathieu d’aquin stefan dietze bbc dcc elsevier knowledge media institute mimas open knowledge foundation open university ordnance survey ukoln university of bath university of manchester university of southampton w3c dbpedia europeana linkedup project wikipedia blog cataloguing cloud computing data data management data mining data set data visualisation dissemination facebook framework higher education hypertext ict identifier information retrieval infrastructure interoperability learning analytics learning management system linked data lod mashup metadata mobile mobile learning mooc oer open data open education personalisation portal privacy rdf remote working repositories research search technology semantic web sparql topic map twitter uri usability video visualisation web resources web standards xml Tue, 04 Feb 2014 13:12:30 +0000 editor 2503 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Shared Repositories, Shared Benefits: Regional and Consortial Repositories in Japan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author1">Takeo Ozono</a>, <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author2">Daisuke Ueda</a> and <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author3">Fumiyo Ozaki</a> describe the work of the ShaRe Project and its influence upon the development of consortial repositories and the benefits they have brought to Japanese institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The ShaRe Project (Shared Repository Project 2008-2009), which aimed to promote the concept of consortial repositories and facilitate their implementation, has made a significant contribution to the rapid growth of institutional repositories (IRs) in Japan. Following precedents including White Rose Research Online (UK) and SHERPA-LEAP (UK), 14 regional consortial repositories have been set up on a prefectoral basis across Japan<a href="#editor1">*</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article daisuke ueda fumiyo ozaki takeo ozono digital repository federation hiroshima university kagawa university national institute of informatics sherpa sherpa-leap repositories support project rsp wikipedia archives cloud computing content management data database digitisation dspace eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer open access operating system portal repositories research search technology software Sun, 28 Jul 2013 15:11:28 +0000 lisrw 2495 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 71 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 71.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As I depart this chair after the preparation of what I thought would be the last issue of <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], I make no apology for the fact that I did my best to include as much material&nbsp; to her ‘swan song’ as possible. With the instruction to produce only one more issue this year, I felt it was important to publish as much of the content in the pipeline as I could.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 editorial richard waller amazon birmingham city university digital repository federation jisc loughborough university oclc oregon state university ukoln university for the creative arts university of huddersfield university of oxford university of sussex wellcome library jusp kaptur scarlet accessibility agile development api archives augmented reality authentication big data blog bs8878 cataloguing content management controlled vocabularies curation data data management data set database digital library digitisation diigo ebook educational data mining framework google docs higher education html html5 infrastructure jquery learning analytics metadata mets mobile native apps open access open source portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology software solr standardisation standards sushi tagging twitter url video wcag web 2.0 web app widget xml schema Wed, 17 Jul 2013 19:01:02 +0000 lisrw 2493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Performance-based Funding Model: Creating New Research Databases in Sweden and Norway http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eriksson#author1">Leif Eriksson</a> describes how the introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) has created new forms of research databases in Sweden and Norway.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) models has helped to set the focus on scientific publishing since this is one of the major indicators for measuring research output. As a secondary result, it has also forced the countries that have introduced a model that is not solely based on citations to create a new form of research database; the national portal for scientific literature.</p> <p>Even in countries that have not adapted a PRFS model, these forms of portals are common. In Sweden, the national database has been the result of local universities’ and Higher Education institutions’ efforts towards a mutual search interface to the different local repositories that have emerged.&nbsp; The repositories are sometimes created to support a local funding model, but the most common reason is simply to disseminate scientific publishing.</p> <p>The contribution of publications that cannot be found in the international citation indexes are substantial even for peer-reviewed publications especially for literature in the Humanities and the Social Sciences but also in Natural Sciences by adding a lot of conference papers that would otherwise not be recognised.&nbsp; This can be seen as a side-effect of the discussions on the introduction of PRFS models. Even if not all publications meet the criteria to be recognised as scientific, a significant number of them are still added to the base of publications that can be analysed from a PRFS perspective.</p> <p>The incentive to disseminate search results is the other driving force for the national catalogues and, in this case, the portals are playing an important role since many of the publications mainly written in domestic languages are otherwise seldom visible to other researchers and the public.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The change in the Higher Education landscape has been significant over the last decades. One of the major changes has been the introduction of performance-based research funding systems (PRFS) starting with the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) in the United Kingdom in 1986 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The incentive offered by a PRFS model is that it overturns the allocation of funding often based on historical grounds which are no longer valid. It can also be considered as a part of an orientation towards more effective management of the public sector, based on principles derived from the private sector. The central idea in this transformation is the drive to increase productivity without adding resources to the system, while replacing traditional command-and-control systems with market-style incentives [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Publications are playing a more and more important role in the process of evaluating research and also as an indicator in the performance-based research funding systems (PRFS). Of 14 countries which were identified as having PRFSs, at least 10 have publication output as an indicator of research quality [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>The reason why publications are used as a PRFS indicator is that the latter measures the output of research both quantitatively and qualitatively. Moreover, those publication data are easily found in bibliographic databases.&nbsp; However, the introduction of an indicator for publications has not been without controversy in the countries that have adopted PRFS. The resulting discussions have generally focused on two main issues:</p> <ol> <li>Should publications be used as a first-order or a second-order indicator?</li> <li>Which data source would best reflect the research output in a particular country?</li> </ol> <p>OECD launched a report on various PRFS models in 2010 including a systematic exposition of the different indicators being used [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Publications are often found among the first-order indicators which are aimed directly at measuring research performance. This can be done by simply counting publications in relation to the number of research staff of a certain institution but the common practice is to add a qualitative element, either by ranking of publication channels as occurs in Denmark and Norway, or by citation analysis as operates in Belgium, that is, in the Flemish community, and Sweden.</p> <p>Second-order indicators are based on indexes instead of direct measurements. These indexes are often created as a reaction to the methodological difficulties when dealing with citation analysis. The best known indexes are Journal Impact Factor (JIF) which measures a journal’s impact through the number of citations its articles receive, and H-index which is often used on an individual level when comparing the citation history of different authors. However, both indicators are simplifications of more complex structures and have been criticised when being used for research assessment purposes [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <p>The second question has created even more controversy in those countries which have adopted a PRFS model. When deciding on which database would best support the publication indicator, the issue as to which type of publications should be counted immediately comes to the fore.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article leif eriksson oracle uppsala university worldcat aggregation bibliographic data bibliographic database cataloguing data database dissemination doi higher education national library open access portal rae repositories research search technology ssh visualisation Wed, 03 Jul 2013 17:38:13 +0000 lisrw 2465 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Augmented Reality in Education: The SCARLET+ Experience http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author1">Laura Skilton</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author2">Matt Ramirez</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author3">Guyda Armstrong</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author4">Rose Lock</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author5">Jean Vacher</a> and <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author6">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> describe augmented reality in education case studies from the University of Sussex and the University for the Creative Arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:36.0pt;">&nbsp;Augmented reality, a capability that has been around for decades, is shifting from what was once seen as a gimmick to a bona fide game-changer. [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> </blockquote> <p>Augmented Reality (AR) has been listed in the Horizon Reports, key predictors of the potential impact of new technology on education. The 2011 Report [<a href="#1">1</a>] sparked the idea for an innovative project - SCARLET: Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article guyda armstrong jean vacher laura skilton marie-therese gramstadt matt ramirez rose lock alt courtauld institute of art glasgow school of art jisc mimas museum of london university for the creative arts university of london university of manchester university of sussex university of the arts london vads jorum kaptur scarlet accessibility archives augmented reality blog copyright data data set digitisation e-learning firefox framework ftp graphics infrastructure internet explorer ipad mobile multimedia oer portal research search technology smartphone url video web browser windows wireless youtube Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:38:54 +0000 lisrw 2439 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk JABES 2013 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/jabes-rpt#author1">Marlène Delhaye</a> reports on the two-day annual conference organised by the French Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES) held in Montpellier, France over 14-15 May 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In what has now become something of a tradition, the ‘Corum’ Congress Centre in Montpellier, France, hosted the twelfth in the series of the Journées de l’Agence Bibliographique de l’Enseignement Supérieur (ABES - Higher Education Bibliographic Agency) [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/jabes-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marlene delhaye bnf editeur google jisc jisc collections national library of australia oclc orcid universite d’aix-marseille open library worldcat api archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing collection development controlled vocabularies data digital object identifier digitisation dissemination doi ebook epub freemium hashtag higher education html identifier infrastructure internet explorer interoperability knowledge base library management systems licence metadata mooc national library open access open data portal privacy repositories research resource description and access standards sushi tagging text mining twitter video web app Mon, 01 Jul 2013 12:11:53 +0000 lisrw 2459 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 70 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 70.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Welcome to Issue 70 of <em>Ariadne </em>which is full to the brim with feature articles and a wide range of event reports and book reviews.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 editorial richard waller alt amazon google hefce jisc portico rdwg ukoln university of oxford w3c ark project jisc information environment jusp liparm rdmrose web accessibility initiative wikipedia accessibility aggregation archives bs8878 controlled vocabularies data data management database digital curation digitisation ejournal framework higher education identifier internet explorer jstor licence metadata microsoft reporting services mobile open access perl portal preservation privacy raptor repositories research resource management schema search technology software standardisation standards sushi wcag web resources web services wiki xml xml schema Fri, 14 Dec 2012 14:20:23 +0000 lisrw 2417 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Motivations for the Development of a Web Resource Synchronisation Framework http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author1">Stuart Lewis</a>, <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author2">Richard Jones</a> and <a href="/issue70/lewis-et-al#author3">Simeon Warner</a> explain some of the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article describes the motivations behind the development of the ResourceSync Framework. The Framework addresses the need to synchronise resources between Web sites. &nbsp;Resources cover a wide spectrum of types, such as metadata, digital objects, Web pages, or data files. &nbsp;There are many scenarios in which the ability to perform some form of synchronisation is required. Examples include aggregators such as Europeana that want to harvest and aggregate collections of resources, or preservation services that wish to archive Web sites as they change.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/lewis-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 tooled up richard jones simeon warner stuart lewis aberystwyth university cornell university imperial college london jisc library of congress niso oai oclc ukoln university of edinburgh university of oxford dbpedia europeana opendoar wikipedia access control aggregation api archives atom cache cataloguing data data management data set database digital library doi dspace dublin core eprints framework ftp higher education html hypertext identifier interoperability knowledge base linked data metadata namespace national library oai-ore oai-pmh open access open archives initiative open source passwords portal portfolio preservation provenance repositories research rfc rss search technology service oriented architecture software sru srw standards sword protocol syndication twitter uri url web app web resources web services xml z39.50 Mon, 03 Dec 2012 15:58:46 +0000 lisrw 2392 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk SUSHI: Delivering Major Benefits to JUSP http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author1">Paul Meehan</a>, <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author2">Paul Needham</a> and <a href="/issue70/meehan-et-al#author3">Ross MacIntyre</a> explain the enormous time and cost benefits in using SUSHI to support rapid gathering of journal usage reports into the JUSP service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>A full-scale implementation of the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) would not be possible without the automated data harvesting afforded by the Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol. Estimated time savings in excess of 97% compared with manual file handling have allowed JUSP to expand its service to more than 35 publishers and 140 institutions by September 2012. An in-house SUSHI server also allows libraries to download quality-checked data from many publishers via JUSP, removing the need to visit numerous Web sites. The protocol thus affords enormous cost and time benefits for the centralised JUSP service and for all participating institutions. JUSP has also worked closely with many publishers to develop and implement SUSHI services, pioneering work to benefit both the publishers and the UK HE community.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/jusp-logo.png" style="width: 145px; height: 133px;" title="Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP)" /></p> <h2 id="JUSP:_Background_to_the_Service">JUSP: Background to the Service</h2> <p>The management of journal usage statistics can be an onerous task at the best of times. The introduction of the COUNTER [<a href="#1">1</a>] Code of Practice in 2002 was a major step forward, allowing libraries to collect consistent, audited statistics from publishers. By July 2012, 125 publishers offered the JR1 report, providing the number of successful full-text downloads. In the decade since COUNTER reports became available, analysis of the reports has become increasingly important, with library managers, staff and administrators increasingly forced to examine journal usage to inform and rationalise purchasing and renewal decisions.</p> <p>In 2004, JISC Collections commissioned a report [<a href="#2">2</a>] which concluded that there was a definite demand for a usage statistics portal for the UK HE community; with some sites subscribing to more than 100 publishers, just keeping track of access details and downloading reports was becoming a significant task in itself, much less analysing the figures therein. There followed a report into the feasibility of establishing a ‘Usage Statistics Service’ carried out by Key Perspectives Limited and in 2008 JISC issued an ITT (Invitation To Tender). By early 2009 a prototype service, known as the Journal Usage Statistics Portal (JUSP) had been developed by a consortium including Evidence Base at Birmingham City University, Cranfield University, JISC Collections and Mimas at The University of Manchester; the prototype featured a handful of publishers and three institutions. However, despite a centralised service appearing feasible [<a href="#3">3</a>], the requirement to download and process data in spreadsheet format, and the attendant time taken, still precluded a full-scale implementation across UK HE.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="COUNTER" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue70-meehan-et-al/counter-header.png" style="width: 640px; height: 45px;" title="COUNTER" /></p> <p>Release 3 of the COUNTER Code of Practice in 2009 however mandated the use of the newly-introduced Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative (SUSHI) protocol [<a href="#4">4</a>], a mechanism for the machine-to-machine transfer of COUNTER-compliant reports; this produced dramatic efficiencies of time and cost in the gathering of data from publishers. The JUSP team began work to implement SUSHI for a range of publishers and expanded the number of institutions. By September 2012, the service had grown significantly, whilst remaining free at point of use, and encompassed 148 participating institutions, and 35 publishers. To date more than 100 million individual points of data have been collected by JUSP, all via SUSHI, a scale that would have been impossible without such a mechanism in place or without massive additional staff costs.</p> <p>JUSP offers much more than basic access to publisher statistics, however; the JUSP Web site [<a href="#5">5</a>] details the numerous reports and analytical tools on offer, together with detailed user guides and support materials. The cornerstone of the service though is undeniably its SUSHI implementation, both in terms of gathering the COUNTER JR1 and JR1a data and - as developed more recently - its own SUSHI server, enabling institutions to re-harvest data into their own library management tools for local analysis.</p> <h2 id="JUSP_Approach_to_SUSHI_Development_and_Implementation">JUSP Approach to SUSHI Development and Implementation</h2> <p>Once the decision was made to scale JUSP into a full service, the development of SUSHI capability became of paramount importance. The team had been able to handle spreadsheets of data on a small scale, but the expected upscale to 100+ institutions and multiple publishers within a short time frame meant that this would very quickly become unmanageable and costly in staff time and effort - constraints that were proving to be a source of worry at many institutions too: while some sites could employ staff whose role revolved around usage stats gathering and analysis, this was not possible at every institution, nor especially straightforward for institutions juggling dozens, if not hundreds, of publisher agreements and deals.</p> <p>Two main issues were immediately apparent in the development of the SUSHI software. Firstly, there was a lack of any standard SUSHI client software that we could use or adapt, and, more worryingly, the lack of SUSHI support at a number of major publishers. While many publishers use an external company or platform such as Atypon, MetaPress or HighWire to collect and provide usage statistics, others had made little or no progress in implementing SUSHI support by late 2009 - where SUSHI servers were in place these were often untested or unused by consumers.</p> <p>An ultimate aim for JUSP was to develop a single piece of software that would seamlessly interact with any available SUSHI repository and download data for checking and loading into JUSP. However, the only client software available by 2009 was written and designed to work in the Windows environment, or used Java, which can be very complex to work with and of which the JUSP team had limited expertise. The challenge therefore became to develop a much simpler set of code using Perl and/or PHP, common and simple programming languages which were much more familiar to the JUSP team.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/meehan-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article paul meehan paul needham ross macintyre birmingham city university cranfield university elsevier intute jisc jisc collections mimas niso university of manchester university of oxford jusp nesli pirus2 zetoc archives authentication csv data data set database digital library dublin core html identifier interoperability java multimedia openurl passwords perl php portal raptor repositories research shibboleth software standards sushi windows xml Wed, 05 Dec 2012 17:54:19 +0000 lisrw 2396 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk euroCRIS Membership Meeting, Madrid http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author1">Rosemary Russell</a> and <a href="/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt#author2">Brigitte Jörg</a> report on the bi-annual euroCRIS membership and Task Groups meetings which took place in Madrid on 5-6 November 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>euroCRIS membership meetings [<a href="#1">1</a>] are held twice a year, providing members and invited participants with updates on strategic and Task Group progress and plans, as well as the opportunity to share experience of Current Research Information System (CRIS)-related developments and seek feedback. A CERIF (<em>Common European Research Information Format</em>) tutorial is usually included on the first morning for those new to the standard, and the host country reports on local CRIS initiatives in the ‘national’ session.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/eurocris-2012-11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report brigitte jorg rosemary russell codata elsevier eurocris imperial college london jisc orcid ukoln university of bath reposit adobe aggregation bibliometrics blog cerif data data model data set database digital repositories dublin core framework identifier infrastructure institutional repository interoperability lod ontologies open access open source portal preservation rdf repositories research research information management software standards visualisation vocabularies xml Thu, 13 Dec 2012 09:07:57 +0000 lisrw 2408 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Wikipedia: Reflections on Use and Acceptance in Academic Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>In the light of a workshop run by the Geological Society of London and Wikimedia UK, <a href="/issue69/whalley#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reflects on the attitudes and practice of academia in respect of present-day Wikipedia content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Wikipedia has become internationally known as an online encyclopaedia ('The Free Encyclopedia'). Developed by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger and launched in 2001 it has, to date, editions in 285 languages. Wikipedia is but one subset of the Web-based applications known as 'wikis'. The original wiki (as wikiwikiweb) was developed by Ward Cunningham in the 1990s as the least complex way of rapidly sharing and communicating 'information'. Wiki is Hawaiian for 'quick'; repeating the word is equivalent to adding 'very'.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/whalley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 feature article brian whalley amazon bbc hea jisc massachusetts institute of technology oxford university press university of exeter university of oxford university of sheffield wikipedia algorithm augmented reality creative commons data database ebook further education higher education ipad iphone metadata mobile oer open access portal research search technology semantic web software web 2.0 wiki Sat, 28 Jul 2012 20:26:22 +0000 lisrw 2357 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Second British Library DataCite Workshop http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on a one-day workshop on metadata supporting the citation of research data, held at the British Library, London, on 6 July 2012.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>On Friday, 6 July 2012 I made my way to the British Library Conference Centre for the second in a series of DataCite workshops [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The theme was <em>Describe, Disseminate, Discover: Metadata for Effective Data Citation</em>. In welcoming us to the event, <strong>Lee-Ann Coleman</strong>, Head of Scientific, Technical and Medical Information at the British Library, said there had been some doubt as to whether anyone would turn up to an event about metadata, but as it happened there were 36 of us, drawn from across the UK and beyond.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/datacite-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 event report alex ball british library datacite dcc iso oais science and technology facilities council ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of oxford apache application profile archives cataloguing content management data data citation data management data set database digital curation doi dublin core foaf identifier infrastructure intellectual property marc metadata ontologies portal preservation prism rdf repositories research schema software standards url Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:54:47 +0000 lisrw 2366 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Data Science Professionals: A Global Community of Sharing http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/iassist-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p align="left"><a href="/issue68/iassist-2011-rpt#author1">Sylvie Lafortune</a> reports on the 37th annual conference of the International Association for Social Science Information Services and Technology (IASSIST), held over 30 May – 3 June 2011 in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The IASSIST [<a href="#1">1</a>] Conference is a long-standing annual event which brings together researchers, statistical analysts as well as computer and information professionals interested in all aspects of research data, from discovery to reuse. This 37<sup>th</sup> meeting spanned five days where participants could attend workshops, IASSIST business meetings and a myriad of presentations. This year, the event focused on the sharing of tools and techniques which ‘improves capabilities across disciplines and along the entire data life cycle’.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/iassist-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report sylvie lafortune association of research libraries cessda datacite dcc iassist laurentian university massachusetts institute of technology national science foundation simon fraser university university of alberta yale university data without boundaries ddi algorithm archives controlled vocabularies data data citation data management data set digital repositories e-science framework gis identifier infrastructure lod metadata microdata ms word nesstar ontologies open data open source portal rdf repositories research schema software standards visualisation xml Mon, 27 Feb 2012 19:36:45 +0000 lisrw 2238 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk MyMobileBristol http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author1">Mike Jones</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author2">Simon Price</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author3">Nikki Rogers</a> and <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author4">Damian Steer</a> describe the rationale, aims and progress of MyMobileBristol, highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities that have arisen during the project.</p> </div> </div> </div> The MyMobileBristol Project is managed and developed by the Web Futures group at the Institute for Learning and Research Technology (ILRT), University of Bristol [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The project has a number of broad and ambitious aims and objectives, including collaboration with Bristol City Council on the development or adoption of standards with regard to the exchange of time- and location-sensitive data within the Bristol region, with particular emphasis on transport, the environment and sustainability. <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article damian steer mike jones nikki rogers simon price ilrt jisc jisc techdis ordnance survey ukoln university of bristol w3c web futures datagovuk devcsi mca mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol apache api atom authentication blog browser bsd cataloguing content management data data set database dissemination e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis higher education html intellectual property java javascript jena ldap licence machine learning mobile mobile phone native app native applications open data open source operating system portal portfolio rdf research resource description restful rss search technology semantic web smartphone software sparql sql standards usability web app web browser web services wiki wireless xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1622 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Educational Resources Hack Day http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on a two-day practical hack event focusing on Open Educational Resources (OER), held by DevCSI and JISC CETIS in Manchester on 31 March - 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Open Educational Resources Hack Day event was designed to bring together those interested in rapidly developing tools and prototypes to solve problems related to OER. Whilst there is a growing interest in the potential for learning resources created and shared openly by academics and teachers, a number of technical challenges still exist, including resource retrieval, evaluation and reuse. This event aimed to explore some of these problem areas by partnering developers with the creators and users of OER to identify needs and potential solutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report kirsty pitkin cetis google harper adams university college jisc leeds metropolitan university oai open university ukoln university of bolton university of oxford w3c devcsi jorum oerbital xpert accessibility aggregation api authentication blog browser cataloguing creative commons data data set doi drupal facebook identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects licence linked data metadata mobile moodle oai-pmh oer open source openoffice portal provenance repositories resource sharing rss search engine optimisation search technology software storify sword protocol ukoer url video visualisation vle widget wiki wookie wordpress youtube Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1630 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author1">Marion Tattersall</a>, <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author2">Carmen O'Dell</a> and <a href="/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt#author3">John Lewis</a> report on Institutional Challenges in the Data Decade, organised by the Digital Curation Centre (DCC) in partnership with the White Rose University Consortium and held 1-3 March 2011 at the University of Sheffield.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/dcc-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report carmen odell john lewis marion tattersall dcc jisc national grid service national science foundation queensland university of technology uk data archive ukoln university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of leeds university of manchester university of melbourne university of oxford university of sheffield university of york beginners guide to digital preservation data train project dmtpsych jisc information environment wikipedia yodl archives blog cloud computing copyright creative commons curation data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital preservation e-research fedora commons foi framework infrastructure licence metadata multimedia open data portal preservation privacy repositories research resource discovery software taxonomy usb video visualisation vle Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1631 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Reading Van Gogh Online? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/boot#author1">Peter Boot</a> shows how log analysis can be employed to assess a site's usability, usage, and users, using the Van Gogh letter edition as an example.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><p>Large amounts of money are spent building scholarly resources on the web. Unlike online retailers, large publishers and banks, scholarly institutions tend not to monitor very closely the way visitors use their web sites. In this article I would like to show that a look at the traces users leave behind in the Web servers' log files can teach us much about our sites' usability and about the way visitors use them.</p> <p>In 2009 the <a href="http://www.huygensinstituut.knaw.nl/">Huygens Institute</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>], together with the <a href="http://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/">Van Gogh Museum</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>], published a new edition of the letters of Vincent van Gogh. The complete edition was <a href="http://vangoghletters.org/vg/">published online</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>], and is accessible for free; there is also a six-volume book edition [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The online edition was reviewed in a number of publications [<a href="#5">5</a>][<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>]. I will use the server logs of the Van Gogh edition as an example of what we can learn about our visitors. I will focus not on the simple quantities, but try to assess the visitors' access patterns. When we created the edition, our assumption was that researchers would use the web site, while people who wanted to read the letters would favour the book. The desire to test that assumption was one of the reasons for embarking on this investigation.</p> <p>When users view, or read, editions online, busy traffic is going on between their browser (e.g. Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari), and the web server where the edition is located. Web servers keep logs of this traffic, and inspecting the logs gives us an opportunity to see how people are actually using the editions that we create. When people buy a book, this shows their intention to use it, in some sense. When people go to a web site, the server registers their visit, including, depending on the design of the site, every page they read and every search they do.</p> <p>Most of the work on log analysis in scholarly environments has been done in the context of libraries researching use of electronic journals [<a href="#8">8</a>]. The financial interest in accurate knowledge about usage patterns in that context is obviously important. The LAIRAH (Log Analysis of Digital Resources in the Arts and Humanities) study [<a href="#9">9</a>] used log analysis on portal sites in order to assess usage of digital resources in the arts and humanities. I believe the present article is the first reported study on actual usage data of a scholarly digital edition.</p> <p>First I will discuss why these log data deserve investigation. I then will show what the data that we collect looks like and discuss both their potential and their limitations. I will give a brief overview of the edition site, as the log data can only be understood in the context of the site's structure and navigational facilities. Then I'll show a number of the things that can be done on the basis of the log files.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article peter boot google huygens institute for dutch history university college london archives bibliographic data blog browser cache data digital library firefox graphics internet explorer operating system portal research safari search technology usability visualisation windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1603 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Saving the Sounds of the UK in the UK SoundMap http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author1">Maureen Pennock</a> and <a href="/issue66/pennock-clark#author2">Chris Clark</a> introduce an innovative initiative from the British Library to map a 12-month soundscape of the UK.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><!-- v3, being the digitally edited version now with normalised text 2011-02-19-20-46 REW --><p>The impact of the digital age upon libraries has been profound, changing not only the back office, services, and the range of materials available to users, but also the public face of libraries and the relationship between the library and its users. Within this changed relationship, collaboration, participation, and online social networks play an increasingly important role in the user experience, especially in large university and national libraries. At the same time, a shift is taking place in the type of collection items held in libraries, and the percentage of born-digital materials acquired is increasing on a daily basis.</p> <p>The British Library is no exception, making use of a wide range of online services and tools to engage with users and enhance access to the collections, both digitised and born-digital. Numerous initiatives are currently taking place across the Library to engage with users and address these changes, and one in particular has sought to capitalise on both the increase in participatory networks and the opportunities afforded by born-digital material. This initiative is the <em>UK SoundMap</em>, an online crowd-sourcing activity driven by the British Library in partnership with the Noise Futures Network to engage and build the community in development of a new born-digital audio-visual research resource [<a href="#1">1</a>][<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <h2 id="Unlocking_and_Integrating_Audio-Visual_Content_at_the_British_Library">Unlocking and Integrating Audio-Visual Content at the British Library</h2> <p>The UK SoundMap is being carried out as part of a wider project by the British Library's Sound &amp; Vision Department: Unlocking &amp; Integrating Audio Visual Content (UIAVC). The UIAVC project seeks to address changing user needs in a multi-media research environment by establishing the building blocks for a redefined and integrated sound and moving image service within the Library. Other, complementary initiatives in the project include:</p> <ul> <li>Modernising and enhancing interactive features in the existing Archival Sound Recordings (ASR) portal, which currently provides access to over 45,000 selected recordings of music, spoken word, and human and natural environments [<a href="#3">3</a>].</li> <li>Establishing a New Music Network to select and capture content from musicians whose work is produced outside the usual commercial channels</li> <li>Exploring and piloting new R&amp;D Tools to improve resource discovery through new search and analysis tools for speech and music [<a href="#4">4</a>]</li> <li>Increasing the amount of digital audio and video content accessible to users at the Library (i.e. onsite), and remotely</li> </ul> <p>Overall, the project is key to meeting the Library's audio-visual strategy, which aims to unlock and integrate audio-visual content across the library according to user needs. The initiatives interrelate to a significant degree as they each follow the content path from acquisition to curation to integrated delivery. They each focus on digital content (both born-digital and digitised analogue content), they embrace both onsite and remote (Web) access, and collectively they express the commitment the Library now has towards integrating audio-visual media within the research experience.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/pennock-clark" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article chris clark maureen pennock british library google android archives browser copyright curation data data set digital audio flac geospatial data gis google maps iphone metadata mobile mobile phone mp3 portal preservation privacy research resource discovery rss search technology sms social networks twitter video Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1609 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing Infrastructure for Research Data Management at the University of Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author1">James A. J. Wilson</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author2">Michael A. Fraser</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author3">Luis Martinez-Uribe</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author4">Paul Jeffreys</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author5">Meriel Patrick</a>, <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author6">Asif Akram</a> and <a href="/issue65/wilson-et-al#author7">Tahir Mansoori</a> describe the approaches taken, findings, and issues encountered while developing research data management services and infrastructure at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><!-- v4., incorporating late edits and reference increment by ++1; 2010-11-26-11-57 rew --><p>The University of Oxford began to consider research data management infrastructure in earnest in 2008, with the 'Scoping Digital Repository Services for Research Data' Project [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Two further JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee)-funded pilot projects followed this initial study, and the approaches taken by these projects, and their findings, form the bulk of this article.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/wilson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article asif akram james a. j. wilson luis martinez-uribe meriel patrick michael a. fraser paul jeffreys tahir mansoori ahds dcc google hefce ibm jisc microsoft oxford university computing services research information network uk data archive university of east anglia university of essex university of melbourne university of oxford university of southampton datashare eidcsr jisc information environment sudamih algorithm archives bibliographic data browser cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital asset management digital curation digital repositories e-research flash framework geospatial data gis google maps ict identifier infrastructure infrastructure service intellectual property interoperability j2ee jpeg metadata multimedia open access portal preservation provenance qt repositories research research information management schema search technology sharepoint software standards visualisation web 2.0 web portal xml xml schema Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1590 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Europeana Open Culture 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author1">David Fuegi</a> and <a href="/issue65/open-culture-rpt#author2">Monika Segbert-Elbert</a> report on the annual Europeana Conference, held at the Westergasfabriek in Amsterdam in October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Europeana Conference is a free annual event which highlights current challenges for libraries, museums, archives and audio-visual archives and which looks for practical solutions for the future. It connects the main actors in cultural and scientific heritage in order to build networks and establish future collaborations. The Europeana Open Culture 2010 Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was the third annual conference and the biggest so far. It focused on how the cultural institutions can create public value by making digital, cultural and scientific information openly available.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/open-culture-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report david fuegi monika elbert bbc british museum google europeana wikipedia aggregation archives authentication blog copyright creative commons data database digital library digitisation dissemination flickr framework geospatial data gis google books information society intellectual property linked data metadata open access open data open source portal provenance semantic web standards video web 2.0 Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1594 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt#author1">Keith Doyle</a> provides a personal perspective on a conference organised by UKOLN for those involved in the provision of institutional Web services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This was the 13th Institutional Web Management Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] to be organised by UKOLN [<a href="#2">2</a>] held at the University of Sheffield from 12 to 14 July 2010.&nbsp;The theme was 'The Web in Turbulent Times' [<a href="#3">3</a>]. As such, there was a healthy balance of glass-half-empty-doom-and-gloom, and glass-half-full-yes-we-can.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report keith doyle canterbury christ church university eduserv google ilrt oxford university computing services terminalfour ukoln university college london university of bristol university of cambridge university of oxford university of salford university of sheffield university of the west of england w3c iwmw memento mobile campus assistant wikipedia accessibility apache blog browser cocoa content management css curation data data visualisation datamining facebook firefox framework geospatial data gis hashtag higher education html html5 hypertext information architecture linked data mashup metadata mobile mobile phone opera plone portal qr code rdfa research rss search technology sharepoint smartphone social web software taxonomy twitter usability video videoconferencing visualisation web app web development web services webkit widget wookie wordpress xcri xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1569 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Making Datasets Visible and Accessible: DataCite's First Summer Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt#author1">Tom J Pollard</a> and <a href="/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt#author2">J Max Wilkinson</a> report on DataCite's First Summer Meeting, a two-day event focused on making datasets visible and accessible, held in Hannover, Germany, in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/datacite-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report j max wilkinson tom pollard british library datacite elsevier harvard university microsoft open planets foundation university of the west of england ddi archives blog browser cataloguing copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data mining data set digital repositories doi e-research facebook foi framework graphics infrastructure interoperability java mashup metadata open access open source portal privacy repositories research search technology standards syndication visualisation vocabularies Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1574 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Emerging Technologies in Academic Libraries (emtacl10) http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/emtacl10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/emtacl10-rpt#author1">Andrew Walsh</a> reports on a new international conference on emerging technologies within academic libraries organised by the library of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and held in Trondheim, Norway in April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/emtacl10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report andrew walsh amazon google heriot-watt university oclc talis university of huddersfield university of nottingham journaltocs api blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data database facebook google books google docs google scholar infrastructure internet explorer library management systems linked data mashup mobile mp4 open data portal repositories research rss search technology semantic web sms social networks software video web 2.0 Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1576 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Archives in Web 2.0: New Opportunities http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/nogueira <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/nogueira#author1">Marta Nogueira</a> describes how three Web 2.0 applications (Facebook, Flickr, YouTube) can work as a virtual extension for archives and other cultural organisations, by identifying benefits obtained from the use of Web 2.0 applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Archives are using Web 2.0 applications in a context that allows for new types of interaction, new opportunities regarding institutional promotion, new ways of providing their services and making their heritage known to the community. Applications such as Facebook (online social network), Flickr (online image-sharing community) and YouTube (online video sharing community) are already used by cultural organisations that interact in the informal context of Web 2.0.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/nogueira" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article marta nogueira google library of congress new university of lisbon the national archives university of lisbon archives blog data database e-government facebook flickr geospatial data gis information retrieval institutional repository national library ontologies portal privacy repositories rss search technology social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 web services youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1541 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Balancing Stakeholder Needs: Archive 2.0 As Community-centred Design http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/ridolfo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author1">Jim Ridolfo</a>, <a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author2">William Hart-Davidson</a> and <a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author3">Michael McLeod</a> present a case example on building a digital archive with cultural and scholarly stakeholder groups - to provide a model for balancing stakeholder needs.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5. 2010-05-25 revised to accommodate improved images figs 1 & 2 REW --><!-- v5. 2010-05-25 revised to accommodate improved images figs 1 & 2 REW --><p>Archive 2.0 is relatively new concept for us, one that we have only worked with since 2007 and the beginning of our Samaritan Digital Archive Project at Michigan State University (MSU). Our project started with the intention of building a digital archive; the Archive 2.0 nature of the project surfaced when we realised that in order to build a useful archive, we would need to engage multiple stakeholder communities. In our project this meant working with the cultural stakeholders, the Samaritans, as well as academic stakeholders, including Samaritan and Biblical scholars. Initially we thought that applying Web 2.0 technologies such as social networking, image tagging, etc, to a digital archive would be our most important contribution to the project. As the project unfolded and we identified stakeholder needs more precisely however, we realised that our role was as much about balancing stakeholders' representational needs as much as it was about the application of Web 2.0 technologies.</p> <p>The project began in December of 2007 when Writing in Digital Environments (WIDE) Research Center [<a href="#1">1</a>] Research Assistant Jim Ridolfo was browsing the digital MSU Special Collections catalogue, and discovered the library index for the MSU Chamberlain-Warren collection of Samaritan texts. While investigating the history of the collection, Ridolfo learnt that in 2003 a Samaritan elder had travelled to MSU and had spoken to the Board of Trustees. The elder, Binyamim Tsedaka, had 'encouraged the university to utilise the collection to promote Samaritan studies.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] On learning of Tsedaka's speech, Ridolfo e-mailed Tsedaka and enquired about the community's possible interest in collaborating on a digitisation project. Tsedaka responded with his full blessing and an offer of collaboration [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Who_Are_the_Samaritans">Who Are the Samaritans?</h2> <p>The Samaritans have existed as a community for thousands of years. They are an ancient biblical people living primarily in Holon, Israel and Mt. Gerizim, West Bank. Their Torah is similar in content to that of Jewish people, but with several major theological differences. For example, the Samaritan Torah maintains that Mt. Gerizim rather than Jerusalem is holy. The Samaritan Pentateuch also contains thousands of textual differences from the Masoretic Hebrew text; consequently, their theological interpretations and practices differ from common Jewish interpretations and traditions. In addition, the script of the Samaritan Torah is written in Samaritan Hebrew, which includes a unique script, pronunciation scheme, and grammar. Starting at a very early age, all Samaritan children learn to read, write, and chant in Samaritan Hebrew.</p> <p>The Samaritan community includes 712 members, with approximately half the population living in Holon, Israel, and the other half living in the Mt. Gerizim village of Kiryat Luza. The community in Holon speaks Modern Hebrew as a first language, while the community in Kiryat Luza speaks Palestinian Arabic as a first language. The Samaritans living in Kiryat Luza maintain a delicate relationship with the Israeli government and the Palestinian Authority. Being few in number and vulnerable to larger political trends, they seek a peaceful relationship with both authorities. For example, the residents of Kiryat Luza possess both Palestinian Authority and Israeli passports, vote in both elections, and work, travel, and study on both sides of the Green Line. Since the Samaritans of Holon and Kiryat Luza commemorate all festivals, holidays, and life cycle celebrations together on Mt. Gerizim, they are very keen to maintain contact between both communities [<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/ridolfo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article jim ridolfo michael mcleod william hart-davidson michigan state university university of cincinnati archives cataloguing database digital archive digitisation facebook framework metadata mysql php portal research software tagging usability web 2.0 web portal Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1544 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Towards Interoperability: Experiences of the Archives Hub http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/stevenson-ruddock <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/stevenson-ruddock#author1">Jane Stevenson</a> and <a href="/issue63/stevenson-ruddock#author2">Bethan Ruddock</a> describe the work that the Archives Hub team has been doing to promote the sharing of content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/stevenson-ruddock" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article bethan ruddock jane stevenson courtauld institute of art jisc mimas university of london university of manchester archives hub dealing with data aggregation archives cataloguing data database digital archive ead interoperability portal repositories research resource discovery search technology software standards thesaurus ukad usability xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1546 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a></p> <h3 id="Engagement_Impact_Value_Workshop">Engagement, Impact, Value Workshop</h3> <p>University of Manchester<br />Monday 24 May 2010<br /><a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/engagement-impact-value-201005/">http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/engagement-impact-value-201005/</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 news and events richard waller austrian national library bnf british library cilip cni datacite ibm jisc library of congress loughborough university microsoft mimas oclc surffoundation tilburg university ukoln university of exeter university of illinois university of manchester university of sheffield europeana iwmw lis research coalition worldcat archives cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital library digital preservation dissemination doi dublin core ebook ejournal further education higher education ipad itunes knowledge management linked data metadata mobile national library portal preservation privacy repositories research resource description and access search technology semantic web software standardisation twitter usability visualisation web 2.0 web development web services Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1553 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Xerxes at Royal Holloway, University of London http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/grigson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author1">Anna Grigson</a>, <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author2">Peter Kiely</a>, <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author3">Graham Seaman</a> and <a href="/issue62/grigson-et-al#author4">Tim Wales</a> describe the implementation of an open source front end to the MetaLib federated search tool.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v4. completion of author details: institution - 2010-02-22-10-30- rew --><!-- v4. completion of author details: institution - 2010-02-22-10-30- rew --><p>Rarely is software a purely technical issue, though it may be marketed as 'technology'. Software is embedded in work, and work patterns become moulded around it. Thus the use of a particular package can give rise to an inertia from which it can be hard to break free.</p> <p>Moreover, when this natural inertia is combined with data formats that are opaque or unique to a particular system, the organisation can become locked in to that system, a potential victim of the pricing policies or sluggish adaptability of the software provider. The speed of change in the information world in recent years, combined with the actual or expected crunch in library funding, has made this a particular issue for library management system (LMS) users. While there is general agreement on the direction to take - more 'like Google' - LMS suppliers' moves in this direction can prove both slow and expensive for the user.</p> <p>Open source software has often been suggested as an alternative, but the nature of lock-in means that the jump from proprietary to open system can be all or nothing; in effect too big (and complex) a risk to take. No major UK university libraries have yet moved to Koha, Evergreen, or indeed any open source LMS [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The alternative, which brings its own risks, is to take advantage of the pressures on LMS suppliers to make their own systems more open, and to use open source systems 'around the edges' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This has the particular benefit of creating an overall system which follows the well-established design practice of creating a clean separation of 'view' (typically the Web interface) from 'model' (here the LMS-managed databases) and 'controller' (the LMS core code). The 'view' is key to the user experience of the system, and this separation gives the ability to make rapid changes or to integrate Web 2.0 features quickly and easily, independently of the system back-end. The disadvantage of this approach is that it is relatively fragile, being dependent on the willingness of the LMS supplier to provide a detailed and stable application programming interface (API).</p> <p>There are several current examples of this alternative approach. Some, like the Vufind OPAC, allow the use of plug-ins which adapt the software to a range of different LMSs. Others, like Xerxes, are specialised front-ends to a single system (MetaLib from ExLibris [<a href="#3">3</a>]). This has an impact on evaluating the software: in particular, the pool of active developers is likely to be smaller in the latter case.</p> <h2 id="Royal_Holloway_Library_Services">Royal Holloway Library Services</h2> <p>Within this general context, Royal Holloway Library Services were faced with a specific problem. The annual National Student Survey had given ratings to the Library well below those expected, with many criticisms centred on the difficulty in using the Library's MetaLib federated search system.</p> <p>MetaLib is a key access point to the Library's e-resources, incorporating both A-Z lists of major online databases available to library users, and a federated search tool. Feedback showed that many users found the interface less than satisfactory, with one user commenting that:</p> <blockquote><p><em>'MetaLib is possibly the worst and most confusing library interface I have ever come across'</em></p></blockquote> <p>The Library Management Team decided to remedy this as a matter of urgency and set a deadline of the start of the 2009 Autumn term. There was no funding available to acquire an alternative discovery system so the challenge was to identify a low-cost, quick-win solution for the existing one. With this work in mind, the incoming Associate Director (E-Strategy) had already recruited two new colleagues over the Summer vacation: a systems officer with Web development experience, the other an experienced e-resources manager.</p> <p>The first possible route to the improvement of MetaLib was modification of the existing MetaLib Web interface. This was technically possible but presented several major difficulties: the underlying ExLibris designs were based on the old HTML 4.0 and pre-dated current stylesheet-based design practice; the methods to adapt the designs were opaque and poorly documented, based on numbered variables with semantics that changed depending on context; and perhaps most importantly, the changes were to be made over the summer months, giving no time for user feedback on the details of the changes to be made.</p> <p>The second possibility was the use of Xerxes [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Xerxes offered the advantage of an interface design which had been user-tested on a range of (US) campuses, partially solving the user feedback issue. It was not, however, entirely cost-free, as ExLibris charges an annual maintenance fee for the MetaLib X-server API on which Xerxes depends.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/grigson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article anna grigson graham seaman peter kiely tim wales google jisc jisc collections kingston university microsoft royal holloway sconul university of london gnu api authentication data database ebook ejournal free software gpl html interoperability library management systems licence linux mysql opac open source php portal refworks repositories research search technology sfx software solaris standards stylesheet vufind web 2.0 web development web services wiki xml xslt Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1525 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intranet Management: Divine Comedy or Strategic Imperative? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/white#author1">Martin White</a> suggests that a failure to recognise the value of intranets is a symptom of a failure to recognise information as a strategic asset.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to Dante in his Divine Comedy the inscription above the door to Hades reads "Abandon hope all ye who enter here". For many this could also be the sign on the home page of their organisation's intranet as, with business-critical decisions to make, they begin the daily hunt for information that they are sure should be somewhere in the application. It could just as easily be the sign on the door of the intranet manager of the organisation, though this door usually also carries a number of other job descriptions, all of which seem to be given more priority by the organisation than the care and development of the intranet. Most organisations of any size will have a full-time web manager, often with a support team, but this is rarely the case with the intranet.</p> <p>There are a substantial number of intranets in the UK. Statistics from the Office for National Statistics indicate that 22% of all businesses have an intranet [<a href="#1">1</a>]. As the size of the business increases so does the level of penetration, and most businesses of more than 500 people will now have some form of intranet. Given the number of businesses in the UK the author estimates that there are probably around 300,000 intranets in the commercial sector, and at a guess a further 100,000 in the public sector, charities, Higher Education institutions (HEIs) and other organisations. Only over the last few years has any reliable statistical information become available on intranet use and development, and this is a in-depth global survey of only around 300 intranets [<a href="#2">2</a>]. In the UK HEI sector a major opportunity was lost in a survey commissioned in 2009 by Eduserv into the management of web content in the HEI sector as no account of intranet use of CMS applications was included in the scope of the survey [<a href="#3">3</a>]. A survey of SharePoint use in HEIs undertaken for Eduserv in late 2009 [<a href="#4">4</a>] did indicate that a number of institutions were using SharePoint for intranet applications but the survey did not look in detail at intranet implementation.</p> <p>It is also only over the last few years have forums been set up in which intranet managers are able to share experiences and challenges with others. The work of the Intranet Benchmark Forum [<a href="#5">5</a>] is focused on providing services to large organisations, but there are also other virtual and physical discussion forums, such as the Intranet Forum [<a href="#6">6</a>] run by UKeiG for its members. It is probably reasonable to suggest that the majority of intranet managers have seen very few intranets from which to gain a sense of good practice, whereas web managers have an almost unlimited supply of sites from which to gain ideas for their own use. This is as true in the HEI sector as in other sectors. Given the installed base of intranets in the UK it is also surprising that there is no 'intranet conference' event even though intranet management does feature in events such as Online Information [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Most countries in northern Europe have an intranet conference [<a href="#8">8</a>], often with several hundred delegates, so why there is no equivalent in the UK is a mystery.</p> <h2 id="Intranets_Are_Different">Intranets Are Different</h2> <p>All too often an intranet is regarded as an internal web site. The reality is that about the only commonality between an intranet and a web site is the use of web browser technology. Many very successful intranets do not even use a web content management application but instead are based on Notes technology or portal applications. Intranet content contribution is usually highly distributed, with individual members of staff publishing content direct to the intranet perhaps only a few times a year. This means that the web content management system has to be highly intuitive, and enable Word documents to be rendered into clean HTML code to create web pages. The teams supporting public web sites are using the systems every working day, working often in HTML and having a much more limited range of content to cope with. Many of the problems that arise in keeping content current on an intranet are a result of staff having to use a complex Web publishing system that was specified for Web site management and not intranet management.</p> <p>Another factor to be considered is that increasingly intranets are federated applications [<a href="#9">9</a>]. This is often the situation in HEIs where each department wants to have its own intranet, and on top of all these individual intranets there is some form of top-level 'corporate' home page and navigation. Often there is no central coordination of these intranets, and so each adopts some or none of the visual design standards of the HEI.</p> <p>As far as enterprise applications are concerned, intranets are different because they are not based on business processes or work-flow. Finance, registry, personnel and most other applications support well-defined processes, usually within a specific department, and where the content requirements are usually specified in database terms. Anything approaching text content is usually relegated to a single field in the database. Intranets exist because there is a substantial amount of information in any organisation that is not based on business processes and cannot be managed within a formal database structure, such as policies, procedures, campus maps, events, staff notices and hundreds of other information formats produced by every department and location within the organisation.</p> <p>As a result the intranet becomes an information dumping ground. Under-resourced intranet managers do not have the resources to maintain content quality, and so multiple versions of documents with no visible ownership or provenance proliferate. Employees leave or change responsibility but the intranet is based on a 'file-and-forget' principle and no effort is taken to ensure that document ownership is transferred to another member of staff. Very quickly the information architecture of the intranet, based usually on the structure of the organisation at the time of the last WCMS (Web content management system) deployment, is not fit for purpose. The decision is taken to implement a search engine, and only then does the scale of the problem of information decay become apparent. It can also be an interesting exercise to search for 'Confidential' and see just how many documents are returned!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article martin white eduserv google harvard university ibm intranet focus ltd jisc microsoft open university university of sheffield adobe blog content management creative commons data database dissemination document management drupal foi higher education html ict information architecture intellectual property intranet knowledge management licence metadata mobile open source passwords portal privacy provenance repositories research rss schema search technology sharepoint standards taxonomy usability web 2.0 web browser wiki Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1530 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Fedora UK & Ireland / EU Joint User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the first coming together of two regional user groups for the Fedora digital repository system, hosted by the University of Oxford in December 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><p>The Fedora digital repository system [<a href="#1">1</a>] (as opposed to the Fedora Linux distribution, with which there is no connection) is an open source solution for the management of all types of digital content. Its development is managed through DuraSpace [<a href="#2">2</a>], the same organisation that now oversees DSpace, and carried out by developers around the world. The developers, alongside the extensive body of Fedora users, form the community that sustains Fedora.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report chris awre bbc duraspace ieee jisc kings college london stanford university technical university of denmark university of edinburgh university of hull university of oxford university of southampton university of virginia bril datashare hydra idmb cloud computing content management data data management database digital repositories dspace e-research e-science eprints fedora commons flickr framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository linux metadata mobile open source portal qr code rdbms rdf repositories research search technology software usability virtual research environment wiki xml youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1531 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt#author1">Dave Puplett</a> reports on the conference Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context held at the British Library in January 2010. The conference launched Economists Online (EO), an innovative economics subject repository.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Institutional repositories are now common in Higher Education, but successful examples of subject repositories, which cater to an entire discipline, are much rarer. The Subject Repositories conference taught some key lessons about the role of transnational collaboration in setting up a subject repository. The conference drew on the expertise of renowned specialists in the field and the two and a half-year-long development process of Economists Online [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report dave puplett cni coalition for networked information google harvard university jisc london school of economics monash university tilburg university university college london repec bibliographic data data data management data set database digital preservation digitisation e-research framework google scholar higher education information society infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability metadata national library open access portal preservation repositories research research information management resource discovery search technology software sword protocol usability video Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1534 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events1"></a></p> <h3 id="UKeiG_Intranet-s_Forum:_ERM-s_Knowledge_Sharing_Platform_February_2010">UKeiG Intranet's Forum: ERM's Knowledge Sharing Platform – February 2010</h3> <p>UKeiG Intranet's Forum: ERM's Knowledge Sharing Platform:<br />A chance to see one of the world's top 10 best intranets<br />Free informal Intranets Forum meeting for UKeiG members</p> <p>ERM, 2/F Exchequer Court, 33 St. Mary Axe, London EC3A 8AA<br />Friday 26 February 2010, 4.00 - 5.30 p.m.<br /><a href="http://www.ukeig.org.uk/">http://www.ukeig.org.uk/</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 news and events richard waller british library cetis cilip coalition for networked information cornell university dcc georgia institute of technology imperial college london jisc loughborough university mla niso oclc serials solutions surffoundation ucisa uk data archive ukoln university college london university of london university of manchester university of utrecht europeana internet archive accessibility archives authentication bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set database digital repositories dissemination e-government facebook flickr foi framework further education google analytics higher education ict infrastructure intellectual property interoperability intranet knowledge base knowledge management marc21 metadata ontologies open access openurl podcast portal preservation privacy repositories research resource description and access resource sharing second life social networks software standards twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1535 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h3 id="th_International_Digital_Curation_Conference_Moving_to_Multi-Scale_Science:_Managing_Complexity_and_Diversity">5th International Digital Curation Conference – Moving to Multi-Scale Science: Managing Complexity and Diversity</h3> <p>Millennium Gloucester Hotel, Kensington, London<br />2-4 December 2009<br /><a href="http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/">http://www.dcc.ac.uk/events/dcc-2009/</a></p> <p>The International Digital Curation Conference is an established annual event reaching out to individuals, organisations and institutions across all disciplines and domains involved in curating data for e-science and e-research.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 news and events richard waller american library association arl association of research libraries bbc british library coalition for networked information dcc digital preservation coalition harvard university jisc library of congress london school of economics mla monash university national library of finland national library of wales national science foundation northumbria university oclc research information network talis uk data archive ukoln university college dublin university of bath university of edinburgh university of essex university of strathclyde europeana aggregation archives blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation e-learning e-research e-science framework higher education infrastructure interoperability iphone mashup metadata mets mobile moodle national library open access open source podcast portal preservation remote working repositories research search technology semantic web social networks software standards url video web development xml Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1517 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Norwegian National Digital Library http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/takle <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/takle#author1">Marianne Takle</a> describes the National Library of Norway's digitisation strategy and how the National Library is taking on a key role in the country's digital library service.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/takle" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article marianne takle alt google library association europeana archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright data digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digital repositories digitisation dissemination framework infrastructure licence metadata national library portal preservation privacy repositories research search technology web services Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events1"></a></p> <h2 id="JISC_Digital_Media_Course:_Introduction_to_Image_Metadata">JISC Digital Media Course: Introduction to Image Metadata</h2> <p>ILRT, 8-10 Berkeley Square, Bristol, BS8 1HH<br />Wednesday 9 December 2009<br />Full-day course: 10.00 - 16.30<br /><a href="http://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/training/courses/introduction-to-image-metadata/">http://www.jiscdigitalmedia.ac.uk/training/courses/introduction-to-image-metadata/</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 news and events richard waller american library association british library cni coalition for networked information elsevier google hefce ifla ilrt information today intranet focus ltd jisc jisc digital media loughborough university massachusetts institute of technology ukoln university of cambridge university of oxford university of sussex archives bibliographic data cataloguing controlled vocabularies copyright database digital media digitisation drm dspace google wave higher education intellectual property intranet licence metadata multimedia ogg open source operating system owl portal preservation privacy repositories research search technology semantic web sharepoint software streaming tagging video vle vocabularies xml Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1501 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Encouraging More Open Educational Resources With Southampton's EdShare http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/morris <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/morris#author1">Debra Morris</a> describes the EdSpace Institutional Exemplar Project and the early development of EdShare for sharing learning and teaching materials within and beyond the institution.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- Version 3: Accommodating new reference from Debra Morris and ++1 reference list; 20090611 REW --><!-- Version 3: Accommodating new reference from Debra Morris and ++1 reference list; 20090611 REW --><p>The University of Southampton has around 22,000 students across six campuses: five in the city of Southampton and one in Winchester. It is a broad-based, research-intensive institution, a member of the Russell Group of UK Universities.</p> <p>The University comprises three Faculties: Faculty of Engineering, Science and Maths; Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences, and the Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/morris" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article debra morris blackboard cilip google ieee jisc university of southampton edspace jorum accessibility bibliometrics blackboard learning system content management copyright creative commons curation e-learning eprints facebook flickr framework infrastructure intellectual property managed learning environment metadata oer open access open source portal repositories research search technology software tagging url usability vle web 2.0 webct wiki youtube Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1468 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk To VRE Or Not to VRE?: Do South African Malaria Researchers Need a Virtual Research Environment? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer#author1">Heila Pienaar</a> and <a href="/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer#author2">Martie van Deventer</a> identify the requirements of a Virtual Research Environment (VRE) for malaria researchers in South Africa.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- version 4: 200906051150 to accommodate final table correction and fuller conclusion; awaitng ref 12 content-REW --><!-- version 4: 200906051150 to accommodate final table correction and fuller conclusion; awaitng ref 12 content-REW --><p>Worldwide, the research paradigm is in the process of expanding into eResearch and open scholarship. This implies new ways of collaboration, dissemination and reuse of research results, specifically via the Web. Developing countries are also able to exploit the opportunity to make their knowledge output more widely known and accessible and to co-operate in research partnerships.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/pienaar-vandeventer" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article heila pienaar martie van deventer british library google jisc microsoft university of oxford university of pretoria bvreh ibvre mrc myexperiment algorithm blog browser curation data data management data set database dissemination document management e-learning e-research e-science framework google scholar graphics identifier infrastructure intellectual property java knowledge management ms word open source passwords portal portfolio repositories research search technology social networks software video virtual research environment web 2.0 wiki Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1469 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk