Overview of content related to 'youtube' http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/7907/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Book Review: Digital Dieting - From Information Obesity to Intellectual Fitness http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/sanders-rvw#author1">Kevin Sanders</a> examines Tara Brabazon’s latest analytical work which investigates the proliferation of low-quality information in the digital realm and the issues of excessive reliance on social tools for learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Following a body of work that includes <em>The University of Google: Education in the (post) Information Age</em> (2007) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and <em>Digital Hemlock: Internet Education and the Poisoning of Teaching</em> (2002), Brabazon has developed a central position within the debate surrounding technology and pedagogy, although there is very little that is centrist about Brabazon's writing.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 review kevin sanders apple google ibm university of bath university of cambridge heron blog facebook framework higher education ict internet explorer managerialism multimedia neoliberalism open access research search technology software youtube Mon, 03 Mar 2014 18:41:44 +0000 lisrw 2519 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Bring Your Own Policy: Why Accessibility Standards Need to Be Contextually Sensitive http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author2">Jonathan Hassell</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author3">David Sloan</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author4">Dominik Lukeš</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author5">E A Draffan</a> and <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author6">Sarah Lewthwaite</a> argue that rather than having a universal standard for Web accessibility, standardisation of Web accessibility practices and policies needs to be sufficiently flexible to cater for the local context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Initiatives to enhance Web accessibility have previously focused on the development of guidelines which apply on a global basis. Legislation at national and international levels increasingly mandate conformance with such guidelines. However large scale surveys have demonstrated the failure of such approaches to produce any significant impact.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article brian kelly david sloan dominik lukes ea draffan jonathan hassell sarah lewthwaite iso kings college london london metropolitan university oracle ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of southampton w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility agile development blog browser bs8878 cookie data doi e-learning ead framework ict mobile research responsive design social networks software standardisation standards usability video wcag web resources web services web standards youtube Mon, 08 Jul 2013 18:13:42 +0000 lisrw 2475 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Augmented Reality in Education: The SCARLET+ Experience http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author1">Laura Skilton</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author2">Matt Ramirez</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author3">Guyda Armstrong</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author4">Rose Lock</a>, <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author5">Jean Vacher</a> and <a href="/issue71/skilton-et-al#author6">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> describe augmented reality in education case studies from the University of Sussex and the University for the Creative Arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:36.0pt;">&nbsp;Augmented reality, a capability that has been around for decades, is shifting from what was once seen as a gimmick to a bona fide game-changer. [<a href="#1">1</a>]</p> </blockquote> <p>Augmented Reality (AR) has been listed in the Horizon Reports, key predictors of the potential impact of new technology on education. The 2011 Report [<a href="#1">1</a>] sparked the idea for an innovative project - SCARLET: Special Collections using Augmented Reality to Enhance Learning and Teaching.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/skilton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article guyda armstrong jean vacher laura skilton marie-therese gramstadt matt ramirez rose lock alt courtauld institute of art glasgow school of art jisc mimas museum of london university for the creative arts university of london university of manchester university of sussex university of the arts london vads jorum kaptur scarlet accessibility archives augmented reality blog copyright data data set digitisation e-learning firefox framework ftp graphics infrastructure internet explorer ipad mobile multimedia oer portal research search technology smartphone url video web browser windows wireless youtube Tue, 11 Jun 2013 17:38:54 +0000 lisrw 2439 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Case Studies in Web Sustainability http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/turner <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/turner#author1">Scott Turner</a> describes issues around making Web resources sustainable.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>At the moment organisations often make significant investments in producing Web-based material, often funded through public money, for example from JISC. But what happens when some of those organisations are closed or there&nbsp; is no longer any money or resources to host the site? We are seeing cuts in funding or changes in governmental policy, which is resulting in the closure of some of these organisations.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/turner" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 feature article scott turner amazon google jisc university of northampton amazon web services archives blog cloud computing css geospatial data google analytics google docs html infrastructure internet explorer mac os passwords research search engine optimisation search technology standards twitter url web resources web services youtube Mon, 10 Dec 2012 15:09:03 +0000 lisrw 2405 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Online Information 2012 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/online-2012-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the largest gathering of information professionals in Europe.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online Information [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an interesting conference as it brings together information professionals from both the public and the private sector. The opportunity to share experiences from these differing perspectives doesn’t happen that often and brings real benefits, such as highly productive networking. This year’s Online Information, held between 20 - 21 &nbsp;November, felt like a slightly different event to previous years.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/online-2012-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 event report marieke guy amazon dcc google jisc microsoft mimas oclc ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of sussex datashare dmponline rdmrose scarlet schema.org wikipedia worldcat algorithm augmented reality bibliographic data big data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data data management data set database digital curation digital library digital repositories facebook flickr framework higher education identifier interoperability junaio library data licence linked data marc metadata mobile oer open data open source operating system privacy qr code rdfa remote working repositories research search technology software streaming twitter uri video vocabularies youtube Sun, 16 Dec 2012 17:10:56 +0000 lisrw 2437 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: I, Digital – A History Devoid of the Personal? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/rusbridge-rvw#author1">Chris Rusbridge</a> reviews an edited volume that aims to fill a gap in ‘literature designed specifically to guide archivists’ thinking about personal digital materials’.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We are all too familiar with the dire predictions of coming Digital Dark Ages, when All Shall be Lost because of the fragility of our digital files and the transience of the formats. We forget, of course, that loss was always the norm. The wonderful documents in papyrus, parchment and paper that we so admire and wonder at, are the few lucky survivors of their times. Sometimes they have been carefully nurtured, sometimes they have been accidentally preserved. But almost all were lost!</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/rusbridge-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 review chris rusbridge british library dcc jisc national library of australia university of glasgow university of oxford university of virginia elib wikipedia archives bibliographic data curation data digital library digital preservation digital repositories ebook facebook internet explorer mis preservation privacy repositories research social web twitter web services wordpress youtube Sun, 29 Jul 2012 18:17:27 +0000 lisrw 2365 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Welsh Libraries and Social Media: A Survey http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/tyler#author1">Alyson Tyler</a> outlines the results of a survey of Welsh libraries, their access to, and use of, social media, and offers a sample business case.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians are, in general, often quick to pick up and experiment with new technologies, integrating them into their work to improve the library service. Social media are no exception. This article seeks to show how the adoption of social media by different library sectors in Wales is helping to deliver and promote their library services.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/tyler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article alyson tyler cymal ukoln welsh government aggregation archives blog ebook facebook file sharing flickr foi further education higher education instant messaging internet explorer moodle multimedia netvibes pageflakes repositories rss social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2227 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of the Past of the Web http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/fpw11-rpt#author1">Matthew Brack</a> reports on the one-day international workshop 'The Future of the Past of the Web' held at the British Library Conference Centre, London on 7 October, 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We have all heard at least some of the extraordinary statistics that attempt to capture the sheer size and ephemeral nature of the Web. According to the Digital Preservation Coalition (DPC), more than 70 new domains are registered and more than 500,000 documents are added to the Web every minute [<a href="#1">1</a>]. This scale, coupled with its ever-evolving use, present significant challenges to those concerned with preserving both the content and context of the Web.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/fpw11-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report matthew brack bbc british library bsi dcc digital preservation coalition google hanzo archives institute of historical research iso jisc kings college london library of congress nhs oxford internet institute the national archives university of oxford university of sheffield wellcome library arcomem internet archive memento uk government web archive aggregation algorithm api archives big data blog browser cache curation data data mining data model digital asset management digital curation digital library digital preservation digitisation dissemination doi flickr identifier interoperability library data lod metadata preservation repositories research search technology social web software tag cloud twitter ulcc uri url visualisation warc wayback machine web resources wordpress youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 12:06:52 +0000 lisrw 2236 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Third Annual edUi Conference 2011 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/edui-2011-rpt#author1">Danielle Cooley</a> reports on the third annual edUi Conference, held over 13-14 October 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA, an opportunity for Web professionals in colleges, universities, libraries, museums, etc to discuss the latest developments in Web trends and technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third annual edUi Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held October 13-14, 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The sold-out event saw 225 ‘Web professionals serving colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and beyond’ join together to discuss the latest and greatest in Web trends and technologies. The all-volunteer conference was presented by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and major sponsors included Microsoft, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University.</p> <p>The two-day event consisted of four tracks [<a href="#2">2</a>]:</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report danielle cooley google happy cog kansas state university microsoft university of virginia wikipedia accessibility aggregation android archives blog browser cataloguing css data framework google docs google maps graphics higher education html html5 metadata mis mobile research responsive design search technology twitter usability video web standards widget windows xhtml youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 22:26:07 +0000 lisrw 2241 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The Future of Archives and Recordkeeping http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/azzolini-rvw#author1">John Azzolini</a> reviews an anthology of perceptive essays on the challenges presented to archival thought and practice by Web 2.0, postmodern perspectives, and cross-disciplinary interchanges.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Librarians, archivists, and records managers do not share identical challenges or controversies in their practical endeavours or theoretical queries. However, a common issue for all the information professions and a dominating topic of discussion in their literature is the fundamental change in the structure and distribution of knowledge caused by mass digitisation. The proliferation of daily digital content, in quantity, reach, and manifestation, is confronting them all with a disquieting role ambiguity. The expanding tools and expectations of Web 2.0 have made this self-questioning a recurrent one, but they have also stimulated invigorating debate on the purpose and direction of these fields. The perception is one of extraordinary change initiated by emerging technologies, unprecedented knowledge production and dissemination, and a new centralised role for the information user. In these galvanising changes leading library and archives practitioners are sensing opportunities for confirming the professions’ relevance, in the estimation of other scholarly disciplines and of society at large, but, perhaps most of all, in their own eyes as well.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/azzolini-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review john azzolini clifford chance archives blog cataloguing digital library digitisation dissemination facebook flickr framework knowledge management metadata personalisation preservation provenance research semiotic twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Tue, 08 Nov 2011 14:50:08 +0000 lisrw 1689 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Being an Information Innovator http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/paschoud-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/paschoud#author1">John Paschoud</a> reviews a book which formalises the processes of being what many of us would like to be within our information-based organisations - innovators and entrepreneurs of the Information Age.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="For_Learners..._and_Practitioners">For Learners... and Practitioners?</h2> <p>Superficially at least, this book seems to be very clearly designed for students on a structured course at first degree or masters level for would-be information management professionals. In terms of structure I’m sure it’s ideally suited to that audience, with each of five chapters including learning objectives, review questions to test understanding, and group discussion topics.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/paschoud-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 review john paschoud google london school of economics manchester metropolitan university archives research youtube Tue, 01 Nov 2011 13:22:06 +0000 lisrw 1677 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Open Educational Resources Hack Day http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt#author1">Kirsty Pitkin</a> reports on a two-day practical hack event focusing on Open Educational Resources (OER), held by DevCSI and JISC CETIS in Manchester on 31 March - 1 April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>The Open Educational Resources Hack Day event was designed to bring together those interested in rapidly developing tools and prototypes to solve problems related to OER. Whilst there is a growing interest in the potential for learning resources created and shared openly by academics and teachers, a number of technical challenges still exist, including resource retrieval, evaluation and reuse. This event aimed to explore some of these problem areas by partnering developers with the creators and users of OER to identify needs and potential solutions.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/oer-hackday-2011-03-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report kirsty pitkin cetis google harper adams university college jisc leeds metropolitan university oai open university ukoln university of bolton university of oxford w3c devcsi jorum oerbital xpert accessibility aggregation api authentication blog browser cataloguing creative commons data data set doi drupal facebook identifier infrastructure interoperability learning objects licence linked data metadata mobile moodle oai-pmh oer open source openoffice portal provenance repositories resource sharing rss search engine optimisation search technology software storify sword protocol ukoer url video visualisation vle widget wiki wookie wordpress youtube Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1630 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk 10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> describes new tools and services that can help you get your event heard.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><!-- v2, being the digitally edited version of the article 2011-02-19-21-05 REW --><p>In 2007 Lorcan Dempsey coined the phrase 'the amplified conference' [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He used the term to refer to how event outputs (such as talks and presentations) were being amplified 'through a variety of network tools and collateral communications'.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article marieke guy eduserv google jisc mpeg qik ukoln university of bath beginners guide to digital preservation internet archive jisc powr project powr amplified event archives avi blog copyright creative commons digital preservation dissemination elluminate facebook flickr hashtag intellectual property licence metadata mobile mobile phone mp4 netvibes odp open source opml pageflakes podcast preservation remote working research rss search technology software storify streaming tagging twitter usb ustream video web development webinar wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1607 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Beyond the PDF http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt#author1">Jodi Schneider</a> reports on a three-day workshop about the future of scientific communication, held in San Diego CA, USA, in January 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Beyond the PDF' brought together around 80 people to the University of California San Diego to discuss scholarly communication, primarily in the sciences. The main topic: How can we apply emergent technologies to improve measurably the way that scholarship is conveyed and comprehended? The group included domain scientists, researchers and software developers, librarians, funders, publishers, journal editors - a mix which organiser <strong>Phil Bourne</strong> described as 'visionaries, developers, consumers, and conveyors' of scholarship.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/beyond-pdf-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 event report jodi schneider deri elsevier google microsoft national university of ireland science and technology facilities council w3c archives blog cloud computing copyright data data citation data set dexy epub framework git google scholar html html5 identifier intellectual property linked data metadata open access opm persistent identifier provenance repositories research semantic web social networks software standards streaming text mining twitter video visualisation wiki wordpress youtube Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1613 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Locating Image Presentation Technology Within Pedagogic Practice http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/gramstadt#author1">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a> contextualises image presentation technology and methods within a pedagogic framework for the visual arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/gramstadt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 feature article marie-therese gramstadt apple blackboard bournemouth university edinburgh college of art google imperial college london jisc jisc digital media microsoft oreilly university for the creative arts university of brighton university of london university of sheffield university of surrey university of the arts london vads pictiva accessibility adobe archives blog browser cataloguing data database digital media e-learning elluminate facebook flash flickr google maps gotomeeting higher education html5 ipad learning design learning objects mac os microsoft office multimedia operating system photoshop podcast portal portfolio research safari screencast software standards usb video vle web 2.0 web resources wiki windows youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1585 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Internet Librarian International Conference 2010 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author1">Claire Tylee</a>, <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author2">Katrin Flemming</a> and <a href="/issue65/ili-2010-rpt#author3">Elly Cope</a> report on the two-day Internet Librarian International Conference focusing on innovation and technology in the information profession, held in London on 14-15 October 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <script type="text/javascript">toc_collapse=0;</script><div class="toc" id="toc"> <div class="toc-title">Table of Contents<span class="toc-toggle-message">&nbsp;</span></div> <div class="toc-list"> <ol> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Thursday_14_October">Thursday 14 October</a></li> <li class="toc-level-1"><a href="#Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value">Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</a></li> </ol> </div> </div><h2 id="Thursday_14_October"><a id="thursday" name="thursday"></a>Thursday 14 October</h2> <h2 id="Track_A:_Looking_Ahead_to_Value"><a id="thursday-track-a" name="thursday-track-a"></a>Track A: Looking Ahead to Value</h2> <h3 id="A102:_Future_of_Academic_Libraries"><a id="a102" name="a102"></a>A102: Future of Academic Libraries</h3> <h4 id="Mal_Booth_University_of_Technology_Sydney_Australia">Mal Booth, University of Technology Sydney (Australia)</h4> <h4 id="Michael_Jubb_Research_Information_Network_UK">Michael Jubb, Research Information Network (UK)</h4> <p>Mal Booth from the University of Technology Sydney started the session by giving an insight into current plans and projects underway to inform a new library building due to open in 2015 as part of a major redeveloped city campus.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/ili-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report claire tylee elly cope katrin flemming amazon british library cornell university edina google iso jisc mimas open university portico research information network university of bath university of california berkeley university of cambridge university of manchester peprs wikipedia zetoc android archives bibliographic data blog browser cataloguing content management copyright curation data database digital library digitisation dissemination ejournal facebook flickr frbr higher education identifier infrastructure iphone library data library management systems licence linked data mac os marc mashup metadata microblogging mobile opac open access open source pode preservation qr code research rfid rss search technology semantic web software standards tagging twitter video web 2.0 web browser web portal wiki wordpress youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1596 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> looks at a student survival aid in the information age that should also be valuable for tutors.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Learning with Online and Mobile Technologies' is an example of an ever-increasing range of 'self-help' books for students on a variety of topics relating skills, tips and education. Such books range from 'Critical thinking skills' [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the quite specific, for example, 'Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts and more' [<a href="#2">2</a>]. This offering from Gower/Ashgate comes somewhere in between. It introduces students to the main current technologies and some of the pedagogic devices they might find in modern education.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 review brian whalley apple google microsoft queens university belfast wikipedia blog data e-learning ebook higher education ict linux mobile open source openoffice png podcast repositories software usb wiki youtube Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1601 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Public Library 2.0: Culture Change? http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/hammond#author1">Sarah Hammond</a> explores UK public libraries' growing participation in social media to reach their audiences online, with a focus on blogging.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Beginning in the mid 2000s I began keeping an eye on how libraries have been getting involved with social software - I started this haphazardly just out of interest but then I started to be more systematic when I needed to explore online resources for my organisation, the National Railway Museum. When I left to pursue my MA in Librarianship at the University of Sheffield I took the opportunity to do some serious research into the subject with a focus on UK public libraries as it seemed to me that they were hugely under-represented online.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/hammond" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article sarah hammond bbc british library information today nhs oxford university press robert gordon university university of oxford university of sheffield university of the west of england archives blog doi facebook flickr framework higher education librarything microblogging mobile netvibes opac podcast research search technology social software software standards twitter web 2.0 wiki wordpress youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1562 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk 23 Things in Public Libraries http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/leech#author1">Helen Leech</a> describes a collaborative project to increase front-line staff's understanding and use of Web 2.0 in public libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Did you know that:</p> <ul> <li>Of the Generation Y – the generation born in the 1980s and 1990s – 96% are members of a social network</li> <li>There are some 200 million blogs on the World Wide Web</li> <li>One in eight couples who married in the USA in 2009 met over the Internet</li> <li>If Facebook were a country, it would be the fourth largest by population in the world after China, the USA and India</li> </ul> <p>All the statistics emanate from Socialnomics [<a href="#1">1</a>]. They are designed to be attention-grabbers, and they will no doubt provoke ferocious debate. However, what is unarguable is that some seismic shifts have taken place on the Internet in the past ten years, and social media and user-generated content now play a huge role in the way many people create and share information and how they communicate with each other.</p> <p>These changes have crept up on public libraries. Ten years ago, we became Internet experts when the People's Network initiative put 30,000 computers into our buildings. We became used to the new role of teaching people how to use a mouse, what a search engine is, how to create an email account. But when it came to content, we tended to leave that to our customers. Friends Reunited came along, followed by Myspace, Wikipedia, Youtube, Facebook, and we were dimly aware of them as social phenomena, but we did not have much to do with them in our day-to-day work.</p> <h2 id="Changes_in_Public_Libraries">Changes in Public Libraries</h2> <p>So what has changed and why do we need to know about them now? The list below is by no means exhaustive but represents some of the main drivers behind changes emerging within public libraries in the UK.</p> <ol> <li>The need to help people get online. As I write, every public library in the UK is being asked to sign up to Race Online [<a href="#2">2</a>], the initiative to get 100% of the population clued up by the time the Olympics happens. The reappointed UK Digital Champion Martha Lane Fox launched the Race Online 2012 campaign in March 2010. The initiative reports that more than 600 partners have pledged to help more than 1.7 million new people to get online by the end of 2012. Its rationale is "to build a UK of near-universal web literacy by the time of the Olympics, with access as easy and affordable as water, electricity or gas and skills considered as fundamental as literacy and numeracy: [its] ambition is to get everyone of working-age online by the end of this Parliament." People need to know the key skills for getting around online, and a large part of these skills involves social networking.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>Changes in the way people communicate. There is a subtle shift taking place in electronic communication, moving onwards from email towards more collaborative methods: file sharing and cloud computing, social media that include information 'walls,' instant messaging and mobile apps. There is growing evidence that Generation Y and the Millenials – the generations born after the late 1980s – are moving towards very different methods of communication. It is important that library staff understand these technologies, since they are going to become as mainstream as email very shortly.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li><em>Communities in Control</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>]: you might recognise this as the title of a recent government paper, looking at the need to pass control over political processes to local communities, and how this could be achieved. The principle is being reinforced through the new administration's Big Society initiative [<a href="#4">4</a>]. New technologies are allowing people to mobilise in a way that simply has not been possible before, to create and share content, and to become involved in the running of public libraries in radical new ways. It is also worth looking at the International Association for Public Participation's <em>Spectrum of Public Participation </em>[<a href="#5">5</a>] which gives some idea of the range of ways in which we need to work with our communities, from providing them with information all the way up to acting as facilitators so that they can manage and run services themselves. It is also worth watching the film <em>Us Now</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], which gives a glimpse of the way that new technologies might affect people's relationships with central government and public services. It highlights the way that social networking applications allow huge numbers of people to collaborate to do previously unthinkable things, like run a bank. If communities can make the day-to-day decisions necessary to run a bank or a second division football club, then it starts to become possible that they could do the same for political processes or delivery of public services. Library staff need to understand this culture of engagement, and to understand the tools that facilitate it.<br />&nbsp;</li> <li>The economic environment. The next four years, 2010-14, are going to be the hardest public services have seen, and we are going to have to make cost savings everywhere we can. There are clear benefits in collaboration, and the tools that are available for this are improving rapidly. Which is where <em>23 Things</em> comes in.<br /> </li></ol><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/leech" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article helen leech bbc google imperial college london university of huddersfield wikipedia archives blog cataloguing cloud computing database facebook file sharing flickr google wave instant messaging librarything mobile podcast rss search technology social networks software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1565 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: iPad - The Missing Manual http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/whalley-rvw#author1">Brian Whalley</a> reviews a manual to help support your use of an iPad - 'the book that should have been in the box'.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Missing Manual Series, originally written and published by David Pogue has expanded and is now published by O'Reilly, who deal mainly with computer books. Like many other publishers, they have jumped on the 'ibandwagon'. A quick count on Amazon Books gave a dozen similar offerings (excluding developers' guides).</p> <p>This is a review therefore of just one of these paperbacks, and is not a comparative review – with one exception which I shall come to below.</p> <h2 id="Comments">Comments</h2> <p>For writing this review I settled down with the IPad on my knee, Bluetooth keyboard below that and glass of chenin blanc at my right hand – but wondered where to place the volume under review. As yet, nobody has produced a 'skyhook' to hold one or the other. <em>IPad: The Missing Manual (<em>MM</em>)</em> is a little smaller than the iPad itself, about as thick and uses glossy paper with colour illustrations on most pages. In general, each page has a new topic and is organised by basic chapters. <em>Get to know your iPad, Interact with your iPad</em>, etc. They are logical and you can easily flick between them to find the section you need. Not that, with an iPad, you really need to find much. Just plug in applications (apps) and play to find your own way around. This, of course, is typical for Macs of whatever kind. With the iPad however, there is less freedom to find new ways of doing things than with the usual Linux-based Mac OS. The main difficulty is to link up with a computer; fire up iTunes and use this to get started. The basic leaflet that comes with the iPad will tell you all this. Even if you have not used a Mac before, it is fairly intuitive. If you are unsure about the basic operations and included apps, the Apple Web site [<a href="#1">1</a>] gives some short, but informative videos. The Missing Manual elaborates on them. If you have not used an iPhone, or perhaps an IPod before, then the <em>MM</em> helps a bit. If you want to do something, for example, move around the icons of apps on the screen and you don't know what to do, then a brief incursion to the <em>MM</em> is undoubtedly helpful. There is a substantial index to help matters but you may well have picked up the basics from Apple's video tours.</p> <p>At this stage I wanted a 'top up' and went into the kitchen, but I also did an experiment. The weight of iPad on the kitchen scales was 856g; weight of the <em>MM</em> was 427g, ratio, almost exactly 2:1. By a volumetric comparison this is approximately 1: 0.8. The <em>MM</em> is by no means small, so what about information content per volume or mass? Here is another experiment if you have just bought an iPad. First, download the app <em>iCabMobile</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>], this is another browser that can be used instead of, and is rather better than, the bundled Safari. Now download the app <em>GoodReader</em> [<a href="#3">3</a>] and then into the browser type: manuals.info.apple.com/en_US/iPad_User_Guide.pdf [<a href="#4">4</a>]. Lo and behold you have the 'true' missing manual from Apple. Now, in the browser, insert the letter g before http:// of the target URL of the pdf and press 'return'. This downloads the iPad_User_Guide pdf into <em>GoodReader</em>. It is 19MB but should come down easily. You can then browse Apple's free manual in <em>GoodReader</em> as an e-book.</p> <p>Steve Jobs boasts that there are 8,500 apps for the iPad [<a href="#5">5</a>] but which ones are necessary for your Personal Learning Environment? Well, this review (via <em>MacUser</em> [<a href="#6">6</a>], thank you) suggests two very good ones. <em>GoodReader</em> is excellent, you can leaf through the pdf as a book, search it, and so on, so put all your downloaded pdfs there. If you do not use <em>Mobile Me</em> [<a href="#7">7</a>] and if you want to get hold of a pdf (or other) file from your office machine, then use<em> Dropbox</em> [<a href="#8">8</a>] for your office machine and iPad. Upload it in the office and download it to your iPad at leisure. Some apps are mentioned at various places in the <em>MM</em>, but of course more are added all the time so a print-on-paper book is not a good venue for them.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/whalley-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 review brian whalley amazon apple oreilly queens university belfast browser ebook ipad iphone itunes linux mac os mobile safari search technology video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1582 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 63: Consider the Users in the Field http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 63.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those who can either remember or are battling still to make the technology work, be it coding, integration or test, it is easy and understandable enough if the technology assumes an overwhelming profile on the horizon of one's project and daily work. It is very understandable when they privately grumble that colleagues unburdened with the minutiae of such work display a breath-taking insouciance to the consequences of asking for a change in spec because there has been an unexpected development in the requirements of the users.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 editorial richard waller apple eifl intute iso jisc michigan state university mimas wellcome library archives hub identity management toolkit identity project mobile internet detective ux2.0 aggregation archives blog born digital data digital archive digital identity digital library digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier interoperability ipad mashup metadata mis mobile national library podcast repositories research search technology software standards ukad usability video web 2.0 youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1539 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Archives in Web 2.0: New Opportunities http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/nogueira <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/nogueira#author1">Marta Nogueira</a> describes how three Web 2.0 applications (Facebook, Flickr, YouTube) can work as a virtual extension for archives and other cultural organisations, by identifying benefits obtained from the use of Web 2.0 applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Archives are using Web 2.0 applications in a context that allows for new types of interaction, new opportunities regarding institutional promotion, new ways of providing their services and making their heritage known to the community. Applications such as Facebook (online social network), Flickr (online image-sharing community) and YouTube (online video sharing community) are already used by cultural organisations that interact in the informal context of Web 2.0.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/nogueira" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article marta nogueira google library of congress new university of lisbon the national archives university of lisbon archives blog data database e-government facebook flickr geospatial data gis information retrieval institutional repository national library ontologies portal privacy repositories rss search technology social networks tagging twitter video web 2.0 web services youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1541 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Volcanic Eruptions Fail to Thwart Digital Preservation - the Planets Way http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author1">Matthew Barr</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author2">Amir Bernstein</a>, <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author3">Clive Billenness</a> and <a href="/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt#author4">Manfred Thaller</a> report on the final Planets training event Digital Preservation - The Planets Way held in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div align="center"> <p style="text-align: left;">In far more dramatic circumstances than expected, the Planets Project [<a href="#1">1</a>] held its 3-day training event<em> Digital Preservation – The Planets Way</em> in Rome over 19 - 21 April 2010. This article reports its proceedings.</p> </div><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/planets-2010-rome-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 event report amir bernstein clive billenness manfred thaller matthew barr austrian national library british library national library of the netherlands oais open planets foundation opf swiss federal archives university of cologne university of glasgow archives bibliographic data browser cataloguing cloud computing data database digital preservation digital repositories digitisation file format framework graphics identifier interoperability java metadata national library operating system preservation repositories research software usb visualisation web browser web services xml youtube zip Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1549 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Information Science in Transition http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/day-rvw#author1">Michael Day</a> reviews an edited volume published to commemorate the founding of the Institute of Information Scientists in 1958.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><!-- v3. 2010-05-19-13-35 REW updating with minor edits from author --><p>Until it joined with the Library Association in 2002 to form the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), the Institute of Information Scientists was a professional organisation for those primarily working in scientific and technical information work. The chapters in this volume were first published in 2008 as a special issue of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> to commemorate the founding of the institute in 1958. In accordance with this, many of the chapters provide a retrospective - sometimes even anecdotal - overview of developments in information science in the UK since the 1950s. While the approach of the volume is thematic, a major focus is on key initiatives and individuals, the latter including such luminaries as Jason Farradane, Cyril Cleverden and Karen Spärk Jones.</p> <p>Following a guest editorial by Brian Vickery, there are sixteen chapters in the book. While each chapter stands alone, conceptually the volume moves - with some exceptions - from largely retrospective reviews of past progress in information science by scholars of the older generation to overviews of current trends and technologies by their younger colleagues. Vickery's editorial tries to place information science in its historical context, explaining how the advent of digital computers and the Internet has transformed the discipline dramatically while simultaneously making its future more uncertain. This is also a view articulated by several of the volume contributors.</p> <p>The opening chapter is an attempt by Jack Meadows to discern the main research themes in UK information science over the past 50 years. A survey of the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> and other journals showed that the predominant theme was information retrieval, but that there was also important research being undertaken into information seeking, communication and bibliometrics. The chapter also tries to delineate some of the factors affecting information science research in the UK, for example noting the negative consequences of the demise of the old British Library Research and Development Department in the 1990s [<a href="#1">1</a>]. He concludes, however, on a positive note, pointing out that 'activities that were relatively marginal decades ago - such as automated information retrieval - are now at the heart of major growth industries' (p. 17). He also notes that the widening interest in information science concepts has brought in researchers from other disciplines - which is probably one of the key lessons of the whole book. In the second chapter, David Bawden (City University) again uses the <em>Journal of Information Science</em> as a means of exploring the development of the information science discipline itself, focusing on the underlying philosophical bases of the subject proposed by scholars like Bertie Brookes and Jason Farradane.</p> <p>The third chapter is by Stella Dextre Clarke. This is a retrospective of fifty years of knowledge organisation work in the information science domain that takes a partly anecdotal approach, attempting to illustrate 'how it felt to work in those times' (p. 45). Perhaps the best aspect of this is that it enables Dextre Clarke to give the reader a feel for what information retrieval could be like in the card-based pre-computer age. The chapter opens with a brief overview of the state of subject classification in the late 1950s, noting the continued practical predominance of enumerative schemes like the Dewey Decimal Classification while the theoreticians S. R. Ranganathan and Henry E. Bliss were still working away developing their (then) revolutionary ideas of 'faceted classification.' The focus then changes to the development of thesauri, noting the importance of Jean Aitchison's pioneering work on thesaurus construction. Dextre Clarke then provides a very brief overview of the role of controlled vocabularies in the early information retrieval tests conducted as part of the Aslib-Cranfield Research Project, a topic covered in more detail in the following chapter. Finally, moving to the present day, Dextre Clarke notes the continued importance of controlled vocabularies in the form of taxonomies and provides some pointers for a future Semantic Web.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/day-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 review michael day british library cilip edinburgh napier university indiana university library association london school of economics loughborough university microsoft stm ukoln university of bath university of brighton university of cambridge university of edinburgh university of manchester university of sheffield university of wolverhampton citeulike bibliographic data bibliometrics blog controlled vocabularies copyright data data mining data set database dewey decimal digital library ejournal facebook flickr ict information retrieval institutional repository metadata national library open access privacy repositories research rss second life semantic web social software standards thesaurus twitter vocabularies web 2.0 wiki youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1555 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Fedora UK & Ireland / EU Joint User Group Meeting http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the first coming together of two regional user groups for the Fedora digital repository system, hosted by the University of Oxford in December 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><p>The Fedora digital repository system [<a href="#1">1</a>] (as opposed to the Fedora Linux distribution, with which there is no connection) is an open source solution for the management of all types of digital content. Its development is managed through DuraSpace [<a href="#2">2</a>], the same organisation that now oversees DSpace, and carried out by developers around the world. The developers, alongside the extensive body of Fedora users, form the community that sustains Fedora.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report chris awre bbc duraspace ieee jisc kings college london stanford university technical university of denmark university of edinburgh university of hull university of oxford university of southampton university of virginia bril datashare hydra idmb cloud computing content management data data management database digital repositories dspace e-research e-science eprints fedora commons flickr framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository linux metadata mobile open source portal qr code rdbms rdf repositories research search technology software usability virtual research environment wiki xml youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1531 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="events1"></a></p> <h3 id="UKeiG_Intranet-s_Forum:_ERM-s_Knowledge_Sharing_Platform_February_2010">UKeiG Intranet's Forum: ERM's Knowledge Sharing Platform – February 2010</h3> <p>UKeiG Intranet's Forum: ERM's Knowledge Sharing Platform:<br />A chance to see one of the world's top 10 best intranets<br />Free informal Intranets Forum meeting for UKeiG members</p> <p>ERM, 2/F Exchequer Court, 33 St. Mary Axe, London EC3A 8AA<br />Friday 26 February 2010, 4.00 - 5.30 p.m.<br /><a href="http://www.ukeig.org.uk/">http://www.ukeig.org.uk/</a></p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 news and events richard waller british library cetis cilip coalition for networked information cornell university dcc georgia institute of technology imperial college london jisc loughborough university mla niso oclc serials solutions surffoundation ucisa uk data archive ukoln university college london university of london university of manchester university of utrecht europeana internet archive accessibility archives authentication bibliographic data blog cataloguing copyright curation data data management data set database digital repositories dissemination e-government facebook flickr foi framework further education google analytics higher education ict infrastructure intellectual property interoperability intranet knowledge base knowledge management marc21 metadata ontologies open access openurl podcast portal preservation privacy repositories research resource description and access resource sharing second life social networks software standards twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1535 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Share. Collaborate. Innovate. Building an Organisational Approach to Web 2.0 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/bevan <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/bevan#author1">Paul Bevan</a> outlines the National Library of Wales' development of a strategic approach to meeting user needs in a post-Web 2.0 world.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The National Library of Wales has recently published a new Strategy for the Web [<a href="#1">1</a>] which integrates Web 2.0 with the existing Web portfolio and seeks to provide an approach to Web 2.0 which is focused on the organisation. Rather than centring on technical developments, this paper outlines a strategic research approach and discusses some of the outcomes which may speak to others seeking to engage with emerging Web technologies and approaches.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/bevan" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article paul bevan bbc google national library of wales archives blog cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data digital media digitisation facebook flickr framework google analytics html ict infrastructure licence metadata mobile mobile phone national library open source portfolio research search engine optimisation search technology software tagging twitter url video web 2.0 web app web services windows youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1506 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Search Engines: Real-time Search http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> looks at the concept of real-time search and points to some of the functionality that users can and should expect to find when exploring these engines.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article phil bradley google microsoft archives avatar blog cloud computing data database facebook flickr hashtag html microblogging rss search technology tag cloud twitter url ustream video windows youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1507 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Why Are Users So Useful? User Engagement and the Experience of the JISC Digitisation Programme http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue61/marchionni#author1">Paola Marchionni</a> discusses the importance of user engagement in the creation of digitised scholarly resources with case studies from the JISC Digitisation Programme.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Do we know enough about what our users' needs are when creating online digitised scholarly resources? What are the benefits of engaging users? In what way can they be useful to the process?</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue61/marchionni" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue61 feature article paola marchionni british library google jisc oxford internet institute university college london university of oxford asr2 first world war poetry wikipedia archives blog cataloguing content management data digital archive digitisation dissemination facebook flickr google search higher education ict identifier itunes metadata multimedia podcast research search technology twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki youtube Fri, 30 Oct 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1512 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Collecting Evidence in a Web 2.0 Context http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/chapman-russell <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue60/chapman-russell#author1">Ann Chapman</a> and <a href="/issue60/chapman-russell#author2">Rosemary Russell</a> describe the challenge of collecting evidence for a study of how Web 2.0 is being used in the UK HE sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue60/chapman-russell" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue60 feature article ann chapman rosemary russell google jisc ukoln university of bath citeulike good apis jorum sharegeo wikipedia archives blog cataloguing data database facebook flickr geospatial data gis google scholar google search higher education librarything mashup netvibes pageflakes passwords podcast repositories research rss search technology second life social networks software standards twitter video vle web 2.0 web app web development wiki wordpress youtube Wed, 29 Jul 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1488 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Encouraging More Open Educational Resources With Southampton's EdShare http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/morris <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/morris#author1">Debra Morris</a> describes the EdSpace Institutional Exemplar Project and the early development of EdShare for sharing learning and teaching materials within and beyond the institution.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- Version 3: Accommodating new reference from Debra Morris and ++1 reference list; 20090611 REW --><!-- Version 3: Accommodating new reference from Debra Morris and ++1 reference list; 20090611 REW --><p>The University of Southampton has around 22,000 students across six campuses: five in the city of Southampton and one in Winchester. It is a broad-based, research-intensive institution, a member of the Russell Group of UK Universities.</p> <p>The University comprises three Faculties: Faculty of Engineering, Science and Maths; Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences, and the Faculty of Law, Arts and Social Sciences.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/morris" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 feature article debra morris blackboard cilip google ieee jisc university of southampton edspace jorum accessibility bibliometrics blackboard learning system content management copyright creative commons curation e-learning eprints facebook flickr framework infrastructure intellectual property managed learning environment metadata oer open access open source portal repositories research search technology software tagging url usability vle web 2.0 webct wiki youtube Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1468 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk The Librarians' Information Literacy Annual Conference (LILAC) 2009 http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt#author1">Rosie Jones</a> reports on a three-day conference about Information Literacy held by CILIP CSG Information Literacy Group at Cardiff University over 30 March - 1 April 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>LILAC celebrated its fifth birthday in style in what proved to be a fantastic venue, Cardiff University. This occasion was commemorated with tour t-shirts available for all the delegates. The conference proved more popular than ever with a record number of presentations submitted and over 240 delegates from across the UK and worldwide. There were also seven funded places for Library students to attend, a fantastic investment in the profession for the future.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue59/lilac-2009-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue59 event report rosie jones american library association cardiff university college of new jersey google imperial college london jisc london metropolitan university loughborough university manchester metropolitan university princeton university sconul university of birmingham university of cambridge university of leeds university of manchester university of nottingham university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of the west of england university of worcester argosi itunes u jorum wikipedia aac blog database e-learning flash framework higher education information retrieval itunes learning objects marc multimedia podcast refworks research search technology social software twitter video vle youtube Wed, 29 Apr 2009 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1474 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk dev8D: JISC Developer Happiness Days http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/jisc-dev8d-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue58/jisc-dev8d-rpt#author1">Julian Cheal</a> reports on the 5-day JISC's Developer Happiness Days event held at Birckbeck College, London over 16 - 21 February 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Firstly some background as to why dev8D came about. David Flanders (JISC) and Ben O'Steen (Oxford University Library Services) over the years have attended many conferences: what they found were that the places and talks from which they benefited most were outside the programmed seminars and presentations. It was during conversations between sessions at these events with other developers, managers, delegates that they felt learned most.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue58/jisc-dev8d-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue58 event report julian cheal bbc british museum jisc microsoft open university ukoln university of bath university of liverpool university of oxford university of southern queensland blog data dspace eprints fedora commons firefox higher education interoperability json open source programming language python repositories rss screencast search technology software twitter url video youtube Fri, 30 Jan 2009 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1456 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Get Tooled Up: Staying Connected: Technologies Supporting Remote Workers http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Having considered organisational issues in her previous article, <a href="/issue57/guy#author1">Marieke Guy</a> takes a look at the many technologies that support remote working, from broadband to Web 2.0 social networking tools.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/guy" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article marieke guy bbc google jisc microsoft ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of london internet archive powr wikipedia adobe archives authentication blog browser data database dissemination e-learning eportfolio facebook flickr google docs higher education infrastructure jabber microblogging mobile mobile phone mp3 multimedia operating system passwords podcast portfolio preservation remote working repositories research search technology smartphone social networks software standards streaming twitter usability video videoconferencing web 2.0 web app web development web resources wiki windows wireless wordpress youtube Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1430 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk A Selection of Social Media Search Engines http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> takes a look at how social media output is being indexed, sorted and made available for searching by looking at some representative samples.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 feature article phil bradley google blog data diigo facebook flickr iphone microblogging mobile pageflakes research rss search technology twitter video web 2.0 youtube Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1433 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Against the Machine http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/mahey-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue57/mahey-rvw#author1">Mahendra Mahey</a> reviews a book which examines popular Internet culture and how it may be having negative effects on many of us.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- 2008-11-11 REW final editing from author: v5 --><!-- 2008-11-11 REW final editing from author: v5 --><p>As I spend a large part of my day (as I have for the last 12 years) in front of a computer screen connected to the Internet, I wondered what I was going to learn about a book that examines the effect that this technology has had on our culture, our minds and the way we socialise.</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue57/mahey-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue57 review mahendra mahey bbc google intute ukoln university of bath wikipedia bibliographic data blog facebook metadata repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks video web 2.0 web resources youtube Thu, 30 Oct 2008 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1447 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk New Schemas for Mapping Pedagogies and Technologies http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/conole <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/conole#author1">Grainne Conole</a> reflects on the implications of Web 2.0 for education and offers two new schemas for thinking about harnessing the potential of technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/conole" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article grainne conole open university ples archives blog data digital media dissemination e-learning eportfolio framework higher education infrastructure learning design library management systems moodle oer open access personalisation portfolio repositories research schema search technology social networks visualisation vle web 2.0 web services wiki youtube Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1406 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Search Engines: Google Still Growing http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/search-engines <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/search-engines#author1">Phil Bradley</a> finds it difficult to ignore some of the latest developments from Google - particularly the ones that are actually quite good.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/search-engines" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 feature article phil bradley google microsoft wikipedia adobe archives ark blog cataloguing creative commons data database digital media flash flickr google docs google maps google search html search technology url video web 2.0 youtube Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1412 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2008: The Great Debate http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt#author1">Adrian Tribe</a> reports on a three-day conference designed for professionals involved in the provision of institutional Web services, organised by UKOLN and held at King's College, University of Aberdeen in July 2008.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>'Aberdeen??!! Make sure you take some woolly jumpers and a sou'wester then.'</p> <p><a href="http://live.ariadne.ac.uk/issue56/iwmw-2008-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue56 event report adrian tribe british antarctic survey edge hill university eduserv google jisc microsoft ukoln university of aberdeen university of bath university of birmingham university of bradford university of glasgow university of kent university of london university of southampton iwmw accessibility api archives blog browser content management css data facebook flash flickr framework google analytics google docs google maps higher education institutional repository javascript mashup microformats mobile open source personalisation php portal preservation repositories research rss schema search technology second life social networks software twitter usability video web 2.0 web app web development web services wiki wordpress xcri xcri-cap xml xml schema youtube Tue, 29 Jul 2008 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1414 at http://live.ariadne.ac.uk