Overview of content related to 'usability' http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/taxonomy/term/80/all?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= RSS feed with Ariadne content related to specified tag en Developing Adaptable, Efficient Mobile Library Services: Librarians as Enablers http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue73/caperon#author1">Lizzie Caperon</a> describes how library resources can be targeted towards effective mobile services as mobile devices become increasingly prevalent in Higher Education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Mobile devices such as smartphones, iPads and tablet computers are rapidly proliferating in society and changing the way information is organised, received and disseminated. Consequently the library world must adopt mobile services which maximise and adapt to these significant technological changes. What do library users want from mobile services? How can libraries adopt new, innovative mobile initiatives?</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue73/caperon" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue73 feature article lizzie caperon british library google ieee information today jisc microsoft national university of ireland university of birmingham university of leeds university of manchester university of sheffield university of warwick android archives augmented reality bibliographic data cataloguing data database doi e-learning ebook framework geospatial data higher education instant messaging ipad lbs mobile mobile learning mobile phone modelling operating system podcast portal qr code research responsive design search technology smartphone social software tablet computer twitter usability video web 2.0 webinar wireless wordpress Thu, 17 Jul 2014 16:33:54 +0000 lisrw 2532 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk LinkedUp: Linking Open Data for Education http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author1">Marieke Guy</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author2">Mathieu d’Aquin</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author3">Stefan Dietze</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author4">Hendrik Drachsler</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author5">Eelco Herder</a> and <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author6">Elisabetta Parodi</a> describe the activities carried out by the LinkedUp Project looking at the promotion of open data in education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the past, discussions around Open Education have tended to focus on content and primarily Open Educational Resources (OER), freely accessible, openly licensed resources that are used for teaching, learning, assessment and research purposes. However Open Education is a complex beast made up of many aspects, of which the opening up of data is one important element.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article eelco herder elisabetta parodi hendrik drachsler marieke guy mathieu d’aquin stefan dietze bbc dcc elsevier knowledge media institute mimas open knowledge foundation open university ordnance survey ukoln university of bath university of manchester university of southampton w3c dbpedia europeana linkedup project wikipedia blog cataloguing cloud computing data data management data mining data set data visualisation dissemination facebook framework higher education hypertext ict identifier information retrieval infrastructure interoperability learning analytics learning management system linked data lod mashup metadata mobile mobile learning mooc oer open data open education personalisation portal privacy rdf remote working repositories research search technology semantic web sparql topic map twitter uri usability video visualisation web resources web standards xml Tue, 04 Feb 2014 13:12:30 +0000 editor 2503 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Bring Your Own Policy: Why Accessibility Standards Need to Be Contextually Sensitive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author2">Jonathan Hassell</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author3">David Sloan</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author4">Dominik Lukeš</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author5">E A Draffan</a> and <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author6">Sarah Lewthwaite</a> argue that rather than having a universal standard for Web accessibility, standardisation of Web accessibility practices and policies needs to be sufficiently flexible to cater for the local context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Initiatives to enhance Web accessibility have previously focused on the development of guidelines which apply on a global basis. Legislation at national and international levels increasingly mandate conformance with such guidelines. However large scale surveys have demonstrated the failure of such approaches to produce any significant impact.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article brian kelly david sloan dominik lukes ea draffan jonathan hassell sarah lewthwaite iso kings college london london metropolitan university oracle ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of southampton w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility agile development blog browser bs8878 cookie data doi e-learning ead framework ict mobile research responsive design social networks software standardisation standards usability video wcag web resources web services web standards youtube Mon, 08 Jul 2013 18:13:42 +0000 lisrw 2475 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Mining the Archive: eBooks http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/white#author1">Martin White</a> looks through the <em>Ariadne</em> archive to track the development of ebooks.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>My definition of being rich is being able to buy a book without looking at the price. I have long since lost count of the number of books in my house. The reality is that if I did carry out a stock-take I might be seriously concerned about both the total number and the last known time I can remember reading a particular book. Nevertheless I have few greater pleasures than being asked a question and knowing in which of our two lofts one or more books will be found with the answer. On many occasions I have found a definitive answer much more quickly than using Google.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article martin white amazon apple google intranet focus ltd jisc oclc ukoln university of aberdeen university of sheffield university of strathclyde eboni jisc information environment data digital library e-science ebook epub ipad mobile search technology standards usability wireless Wed, 12 Jun 2013 19:21:11 +0000 lisrw 2445 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk ECLAP 2013: Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eclap-rpt#author1">Marieke Guy</a> reports on the second international conference held by ECLAP, the e-library for performing arts.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The beautiful city of Porto was the host location for ECLAP 2013 [<a href="#1">1</a>], the 2nd International Conference on Information Technologies for Performing Arts, Media Access and Entertainment. &nbsp;Porto is the second largest city in Portugal after Lisbon and home of the Instituto Politécnico do Porto (IPP), the largest polytechnic in the country, with over 18,500 students.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eclap-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report marieke guy bbc coventry university dcc microsoft oais ukoln university of leeds university of lisbon w3c europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data blog copyright creative commons data data management digital archive digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dublin core dvd ebook epub foaf framework geospatial data haptics higher education ict internet explorer interoperability knowledge base lod metadata multimedia ontologies open data owl preservation rdf remote working repositories research schema social networks software standards streaming usability video vocabularies Thu, 04 Jul 2013 20:46:57 +0000 lisrw 2471 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Tablet Symposium http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tablet-symp-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tablet-symp-rpt#author1">Ryan Burns</a> reports on a one-day symposium on tablet computers, e-readers and other new media objects held at the University of Sussex on 10 April 2013.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Tablet Symposium [<a href="#1">1</a>] brought together researchers and practitioners to examine questions about uses of tablet computers and e-readers across many walks of life, including academic, artistic, pedagogical, corporate and everyday contexts.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tablet-symp-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 event report ryan burns apple open university university college london university of hertfordshire university of melbourne university of oregon university of sussex university of sydney android curation data ebook facebook ipad mobile multimedia operating system research social networks standards tablet computer taxonomy usability video wireless Tue, 09 Jul 2013 14:32:10 +0000 lisrw 2477 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: The New Digital Scholar - Exploring and Enriching the Research and Writing Practices of NextGen Students http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/robinson-rvw#author1">Julia Robinson</a> reviews a substantial and timely collection of essays related to the research and writing practices of NextGen students. Expressing a call for change in the way educators approach Information Literacy teaching, this book invites the reader to redefine, re-evaluate and reflect on what we think we know about students’ research practices today.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>McClure and Purdy bring together a mix of perspectives, from librarians and lecturers to professors and programmers, to give voice to the very timely concern in Information Literacy (IL) teaching, that we are not equipping our students for the future as we hoped. So-called NextGen students are engaging with information online in their personal, social and educational lives in ways that are shaping new approaches to and conceptions of research. At the same time, those teaching IL, whether librarians or writing instructors, are basing lesson plans and interventions on traditional pedagogies, arguably unfit for a research landscape so altered by the pace and change of information technologies. Students, IL instructors and academics occupy different spaces in the digital environment and work at cross-purposes. Traditional IL instruction has encouraged students to understand information sources in binary terms, right or wrong, leaving them disoriented and disengaged as they undertake research. Students should instead be encouraged to see research as a recursive conversation. IL instructors need to collaborate with academics to reposition themselves in this conversation and join students in their digital space at the point of need.</p> <h2 id="Structure_and_Content">Structure and Content</h2> <p>The book is divided into four parts and sixteen chapters (see <a href="#appendix">Appendix</a> for full Table of Contents). In the introduction ‘Understanding the NextGen Researcher’, McClure and Purdy set out their premise that NextGen students are prolific writers, readers and researchers, using a multitude of digital technologies to engage in these activities simultaneously, and:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Because digital technologies intertwine research and writing, this book takes as its premise that we – as professionals from a variety of fields – cannot ignore, marginalize </em>(sic)<em>, or leave to others the commitment to understand and help the new digital scholar. In its four parts, this collection explores the facets of that commitment.</em> (p.2)</p> <p>Part One: NextGen Students and the Research Writing ‘Problem’ moves through defining <em>Information Behaviour</em> (Chapter 1), giving a history of the research paper (Chapter 2), identifying key IL frameworks (Chapter 3) and introducing <em>deep learning</em> (Chapter 4). All of these chapters set the scene by providing a broad theoretical basis and shared language with which the reader can access the rest of the book.</p> <p>Most interestingly, McClure defines <em>Information Behaviour</em> as separate and distinct from Information Literacy. He bases his argument on the American Library Association definition of IL, where information-literate people ‘recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, he reframes the ALA’s definition, instead describing it as:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><strong><em>A set of abilities requiring individuals to</em></strong> (my emphasis)<em> recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.</em> (p.20)</p> <p>McClure goes on to argue that if IL is a finite set of skills or abilities then <em>Information Behaviour </em>‘is concerned with the complex processes and influences on the information seeker’ (p.20). Whilst his intention to highlight behaviour is laudable, he adapts the definition of IL to make his point. Indeed, many readers in the UK would see a focus on behaviour and influence as inherent to IL, and already accounted for within the term. For example, the SCONUL Seven Pillars Model of Information Literacy states that:</p> <p style="margin-left:36.0pt;"><em>Information literate people will demonstrate an awareness of how they gather, use, manage, synthesise and create information and data in an ethical manner and will have the information skills to do so effectively.</em> [<a href="#2">2</a>]</p> <p>Information skills are separate here too, but they are part of IL, they do not constitute IL itself. The focus on how accounts for behaviour. Conceptions of IL are detailed and discussed throughout the book along with related but distinct terms such as <em>Digital Literacy</em>,<em> Multiliteracies</em> (both Chapter 7), <em>Digital Agency</em> (Chapter 9), <em>Hyperliteracy</em> (Chapter 13) and <em>Technological Literacy</em> (Chapter 16).</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/robinson-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review julia robinson american library association google newcastle university sconul born digital copyright data database framework open access research search technology usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 20:34:48 +0000 lisrw 2472 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Crisis Information Management http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tonkin-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tonkin-rvw#author1">Emma Tonkin</a> offers a review of a thought-provoking overview of crisis informatics.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In her introduction to this collection, Hagar [<a href="#1">1</a>] – who coined the term ‘crisis informatics’ [<a href="#2">2</a>] - begins by providing the following definition of the term ‘crisis’ (taken from Johnston, <em>The Dictionary of Human Geography</em>,&nbsp; 2002 [<a href="#3">3</a>]) - ‘an interruption in the reproduction of economic, cultural, social and/or political life’. This book discusses crises as diverse as wartime disruption, earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, viruses and terrorist activity.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tonkin-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review emma tonkin american library association bbc jisc library of congress ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of oxford jisc information environment data management data visualisation dissemination dublin core framework infrastructure metadata preservation repositories research search technology tagging twitter usability Sat, 06 Jul 2013 21:26:52 +0000 lisrw 2474 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Powering Search - The Role of Thesauri in New Information Environments http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/will-rvw#author1">Leonard Will</a> reviews a comprehensive survey of the literature on the use of thesauri in information search processes and interfaces.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>Powering Search</em> is a comprehensive review and synthesis of work that has been done over the past 50 years on the use of thesauri to make searching for information more effective. The book does not discuss the principles and practice of construction of information retrieval thesauri in any detail, but concentrates on the search process and on the user interface through which a searcher interacts with a body of information resources. It is written clearly: each chapter begins and ends with a summary of its content, and the first and last chapters summarise the whole book. There are copious references throughout and a full index.</p> <p>As the author says in his conclusion:</p> <blockquote><p>'This book has taken a new approach to thesauri by critiquing the relevant literatures of a variety of communities who share an interest in thesauri and their functions but who are not, it should be noted, closely collaborating at this time – research communities such as library and information science, information retrieval, knowledge organization, human-computer interaction, information architecture, information search behavior, usability studies, search user interface, metadata-enabled information access, interactive information retrieval, and searcher education.'</p> </blockquote> <p>One consequence of these disparate approaches is that terminology varies across communities: there are many interpretations of the meaning of <em>facet, category, keyword </em>or<em> taxonomy</em>, for example, which the author acknowledges, but he then uses these terms without saying precisely what definition he gives them.</p> <h2 id="Information_Search_Processes">Information Search Processes</h2> <p>Chapters 2 and 3 review studies on how people go about searching for information, leading to the perhaps self-evident conclusion that there are two types of approach. If a specific and well-defined piece of information is sought, people will amend and refine their queries in the light of initial results to get closer to what they seek. On the other hand, if the search requirement is less well defined, a browsing or 'berrypicking' approach is adopted to explore a subject area, picking up and assembling pieces of information and changing the destination as the exploration progresses. Both these approaches use an iterative procedure, within which a thesaurus can serve to make a search more precise, in the first case, or to show the broader context, in the second.</p> <p>Chapter 4 deals with thesauri in Web-based search systems, and gives several examples of thesauri in digital libraries, subject gateways and portals, digital archives and linked data repositories. This is one way of grouping these examples, but it is not clear that there is any distinction in principle between the way thesauri can be used in each of them, or indeed in search interfaces to other types of document collections. The main distinction, which is not fully addressed, is whether the information resources being searched have been indexed with terms from the thesaurus being used, or whether the thesaurus is just a source of possible terms for searching the text, and possibly the metadata, of documents. More weight needs to be given to the statement in the introduction to ISO 25964 -1:</p> <blockquote><p>'If both the indexer and the searcher are guided to choose the same term for the same concept, then relevant documents will be retrieved. This is the main principle underlying thesaurus design ...'</p> </blockquote> <p>In fact the book generally talks about <em>terms</em> rather than the approach taken by the current standards of considering unambiguously defined <em>concepts</em>, with terms just serving as convenient labels for these. Each concept may have many labels by which it can be retrieved, including one chosen as <em>preferred</em> for each language covered by the thesaurus.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/will-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 review leonard will ansi cilip iso niso willpower information accessibility controlled vocabularies dewey decimal digital archive digital library graphics information architecture information retrieval interoperability lcsh linked data metadata repositories research search technology standards taxonomy thesaurus url usability visualisation vocabularies Wed, 26 Jun 2013 18:00:00 +0000 lisrw 2451 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: User Studies for Digital Library Development http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue70/aytac-rvw#author1">Selenay Aytac</a> reviews a collection of essays on user studies and digital library development that provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><em>User Studies for Digital Library Development</em> provides a concise overview of a variety of digital library projects and examines major research trends relating to digital libraries. While there are many books on user studies and digital library development, this work operates at the junction of these two domains and stands out for its insights, balance, and quality of its case-based investigations. The book brings together points of view from different professional communities, including practitioners as well as researchers.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue70/aytac-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue70 review selenay aytac bbc glasgow caledonian university library of congress long island university manchester metropolitan university national library of australia university of edinburgh university of glasgow university of malta university of oxford university of sheffield university of strathclyde europeana accessibility archives bibliographic data course design creative commons data digital library digital preservation e-learning framework information society metadata mobile multimedia national library open access research resource discovery usability web 2.0 Thu, 13 Dec 2012 22:10:17 +0000 lisrw 2412 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 69 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/editorial#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 69.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Never blessed with any sporting acumen, I have to confess to a degree of ambivalence towards the London Olympics unfolding around this issue as it publishes. That does not mean that I do not wish all the participants well in what after all is an enormous achievement just to be able to compete there at all. While I admit to not watching every team walk and wave, I cannot deny that the beginning and end of the Opening Ceremony [<a href="#1">1</a>] did grab my attention. Who could blame me? I suspect we sat as a nation terrified to discover what this would say about us all.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 editorial richard waller bbc blackboard jisc jisc collections loughborough university ukoln university of bath university of glamorgan university of pretoria devcsi wikipedia accessibility aggregation api archives authentication blog cache collection development content management data database digital preservation drupal ebook framework internet explorer json knowledge management licence metadata ocr opac open source perl refworks repositories research schema search technology shibboleth standards usability visualisation wiki xml Tue, 31 Jul 2012 11:45:13 +0000 lisrw 2372 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Ariadne: Migrating and Enriching Content with Drupal http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/bunting <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/bunting#author1">Thom Bunting</a> explains some of the technology behind the migration of <em>Ariadne</em> (including more than 1600 articles from its back issues archive) onto a Drupal content management platform.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Tools and strategies for content management are a perennial topic in <em>Ariadne. </em> With&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=" title="Link to overview of articles including references to 'content management'">more than one hundred articles</a>&nbsp;touching on content management system (CMS) technologies or techniques since this online magazine commenced publication in 1996,&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;attests to continuing interest in this topic. Authors have discussed this topic within various contexts, from&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=intranet&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to articles discussing 'content management', within 'intranet' context">intranets</a> to&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/repositories?article-type=&amp;term=content+management&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to overview of articles referring to 'content management', within 'repositories' context">repositories</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="/category/buzz/content-management?article-type=&amp;term=web+2.0&amp;organisation=&amp;project=&amp;author=&amp;issue=#content-overview" title="Link to overview of articles discussing 'content management', within context of Web 2.0">Web 2.0</a>, &nbsp;with some notable&nbsp;<a href="/sites/all/datacharts/hc/72-chart-wp.html#timeline" title="Link to timeline: articles referring to 'content management'">surges in references to 'content management' between 2000 and 2005</a>&nbsp;(see Figure 1 below). &nbsp;Although levels of discussion are by no means trending, over recent years it is clear that&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em> authors have taken note of and written about content management tools and techniques on a regular basis.&nbsp;</p> <p>In the light of this long-established interest, it is noteworthy that&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em> itself migrated into a content management system only recently. Although the formatting of its articles did change a few times since 1996, <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;remained 'hand-coded' for more than fifteen years. &nbsp;None of its articles had been migrated into a database-driven content management system until March 2012, when&nbsp;<a href="/issue68" title="Link to table of contents for Ariadne issue 68">issue 68</a>&nbsp;was published.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As mentioned in the&nbsp;<a href="/issue68/editorial1" title="Editorial introduction: Welcome to New Ariadne">editorial introduction</a>&nbsp;to that first issue, launching the new content management arrangements, and as discussed in some more detail below (see 'Technical challenges in content migration'), the considerable size of&nbsp;<em>Ariadne</em>'s archive of back issues was daunting. &nbsp;With <a href="/articles" title="Overview of more than 1600 articles in Ariadne">more than 1600 articles</a>&nbsp;in hand-coded 'flat'-html formats,&nbsp;the process of migration itself required careful planning to result in a seamless, graceful transition into an entirely new content management arrangement. &nbsp;Over time, the sheer size of the <em>Ariadne</em> corpus had made it both increasingly rich in content and increasingly more challenging to convert retrospectively into a database-driven CMS as the total number of articles published within this online magazine steadily expanded.&nbsp;</p> <p>In looking back over the recent process of migrating <em>Ariadne</em> onto a CMS platform, this article discusses some tools and techniques used to prepare content for transfer, testing, and then re-launch. &nbsp;After explaining some of the background to and objectives of this work, this article focuses on key features of content management supported by Drupal.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="Figure 1: Timeline of references in Ariadne to content management" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue69-bunting/content%20management-timeline.png" style="height: 453px; width: 500px; " title="Figure 1: Timeline of references in Ariadne to content management" /></p> <p style="text-align: center; "><strong>Figure 1: Ariadne timeline of references to content management</strong></p> <h2 id="Requirements_Analysis:_Planning_the_Way_Forward">Requirements Analysis: Planning the Way Forward</h2> <p>Based on surveys of readers and authors conducted in late 2010, the <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;management team analysed the range of feedback, drew up sets of re-development requirements, and then considered the options available.</p> <p>The following table provides an overview of key findings regarding the range of enhanced functionality and features considered:</p> <table align="center" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" id="500wtable" style="width: 500px; "> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center; "><strong>Overview of findings derived from survey responses</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center; "><em>enhanced functionality or feature</em></td> <td style="text-align: center; "><em>interest recorded in surveys</em></td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by keywords</td> <td>73.4% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>updated look and feel</td> <td>62.3% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by title</td> <td>50.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>enhanced use of search engine</td> <td>48.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved display for portable devices</td> <td>34.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>more summative information on articles</td> <td>32.1% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved navigability from article level</td> <td>32.1% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved social media options</td> <td>29.5% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>browsing by author</td> <td>28.0% of respondents</td> </tr> <tr> <td>improved RSS feeds</td> <td>27.0% of respondents</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In addition to these findings derived from surveys, the management team also recognised the need for some other functionalities to support monitoring of <em>Ariadne</em>'s on-going engagement with various domains and institutions across the UK and beyond.</p> <table align="center" border="1" cellpadding="1" cellspacing="1" id="500wtable" style="width: 500px; "> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center; "><strong>Additional features to support monitoring of engagement</strong></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: left; ">identification of author domains (higher education, further education, research, commercial, etc)</td> <td style="text-align: left; ">to support analysis of <em>Ariadne</em> connections and reach across various sectors</td> </tr> <tr> <td>identification of authors by organisation</td> <td>to support analysis of <em>Ariadne</em> connections and reach in UK and worldwide</td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Taking into account the key findings derived from survey questions as well as the additional functionality identified as useful in monitoring UK and worldwide engagement, the <em>Ariadne</em>&nbsp;management team drew up sets of re-development requirements and considered how to proceed.&nbsp;Migration into a content management system represented the obvious way forward, as it became clear that <em>Ariadne</em>'s&nbsp;previous tradition of 'hand-coded' production (dating from the early days of the Web) had little chance of coping gracefully with the new sets of requirements.</p> <p>In a review of CMS options available, it also became clear that&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drupal" title="Wikipedia article: Drupal">Drupal</a>&nbsp;[<a href="#1">1</a>] was well positioned as a content management system (or, emphasising its highly modular and extensible design, <em>content management framework </em>&nbsp;[<a href="#2">2</a>] ) to supply required functionality and features.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/bunting" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up thom bunting ibm microsoft ukoln university of bath datagovuk gnu wikipedia apache api archives bibliographic data content licence content management css data data set database drupal framework further education graphics higher education html identifier jquery json licence linux metadata mysql open source perl php preservation python rdf repositories research rss search technology software sql server sqlite standards taxonomy usability video visualisation web 2.0 xml Fri, 27 Jul 2012 16:47:36 +0000 lisrw 2348 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Walk-in Access to e-Resources at the University of Bath http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author1">Kate Robinson</a>, <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author2">Lizz Jennings</a> and <a href="/issue69/robinson-et-al#author3">Laurence Lockton</a> outline a low-cost solution to walk-in (visitor) access to licensed e-journals, drawing on their practice at the University of Bath with a wiki ERM and OPAC terminals.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Although the move from print to electronic journals over the last two decades has been enormously beneficial to academic libraries and their users, the shift from owning material outright to renting access has restricted the autonomy of librarians to grant access to these journals.</p> <h2 id="The_Problem">The Problem</h2> <p>Licence restrictions imposed by publishers define and limit access rights and librarians have increasingly taken on the role of restricting access on behalf of the publisher, rather than granting access on behalf of their institution.&nbsp; In other words, librarians and their institutions are no longer free to decide who may read this material as they no longer own it.&nbsp;</p> <p>This situation has been the subject of negotiation for some time, and it is fair to say that an accommodation has been reached in many cases through less restrictive licensing terms.&nbsp; Some clearer definition of groups who can use e-journals has eased the situation for 'authorised users', such as those teaching students of an institution who are not directly employed by the institution itself, for example, through franchised courses.&nbsp; However, there is still a group of potential users who do not have a relationship with an institution other than a wish to access the Library's holdings to further their research or their curiosity.&nbsp; In the past, such access was at the discretion of the Librarian but with regard to e-journals it is now set out in publishers’ licences, usually under the terms of 'walk-in access' to these resources.&nbsp; This in itself is a positive move and seemingly restores some access control to the Librarian.&nbsp; In practice, however, it has not proved to be straightforward to implement.</p> <p>In general terms e-journal access, although via the Web, piggybacks on established University IT systems and safeguards which have not always been specifically designed to support the licence restrictions of publishers.&nbsp; The definition of an authorised user for walk-in access is usually one who has been granted access to the Library building.&nbsp; This requirement for e-journal material to be restricted to the actual library building, not just University premises, presents a technical challenge.&nbsp; It is not reasonable to expect a University's IT infrastructure to be redesigned to accommodate the needs of those who are not part of the institution.&nbsp; However, there is a balance to be struck as a tipping point has been reached, with journal holdings become increasingly e-only and widening participation becoming increasingly important to institutions.&nbsp;</p> <p>There are a growing number of groups who would like would and benefit from walk-in access.&nbsp;&nbsp; In recent years requests for access to e-journals have become more frequent from library users, such as researchers who already use and borrow hard-copy materials through the SCONUL Access scheme, and school/college students undertaking Extended Project or International Baccalaureate qualifications.&nbsp; Clearly it is desirable to support the research community of which we are part, and to encourage EP/IB students whose next steps may well be into Higher Education.&nbsp; Visits for school/college groups are increasingly encouraged at institutional level and often include teaching and other intensive support from library staff; support which increases as the range of material they are authorised to access decreases.&nbsp; Research areas and subjects for these pieces of work are diverse and cannot be easily satisfied through textbook material or residual hard-copy journal holdings.&nbsp; In this climate, we need to look again at how to implement walk-in access to open up resources wherever possible.&nbsp; To do this we first need to take two steps: to identify which online material we can allow access to and to facilitate access through a route which meets licence terms, that is, to this material only within the library building.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue69/robinson-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue69 tooled up kate robinson laurence lockton lizz jennings cilip robert gordon university sconul ucisa university of bath access control accessibility authentication browser cataloguing collection development data database dublin core ejournal firefox higher education infrastructure institutional repository intranet ldap library management systems licence opac open source opera operating system passwords research resource discovery resource management smartphone solaris url usability web browser wiki windows Fri, 27 Jul 2012 19:10:21 +0000 lisrw 2349 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Has Second Life Lived up to Expectations? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/gorman#author1">Paul Gorman</a> examines to what degree Second Life has justified the claims made for it by its evangelists with particular regard to education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Second Life (SL) is a virtual world created and owned by a company called Linden Lab and was launched in 2003. By 2006, SL was increasingly visible in the UK media and by 2007 SL had secured over 600 mentions in UK newspapers and magazines [<a href="#1">1</a>]. However, media interest in SL evaporated rapidly with references to it dropping by more than 40% in 2008 and even further since. During this peak period SL attracted large investment in virtual land from multi-national corporations, businesses and also attracted significant interest from educational institutions.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/gorman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 feature article paul gorman bbc city of glasgow college glasgow caledonian university harvard university jisc linden lab university of edinburgh avatar blog e-learning facebook graphics instant messaging research second life twitter usability video web 2.0 wiki Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2224 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Adapting VuFind as a Front-end to a Commercial Discovery System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/seaman <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/seaman#author1">Graham Seaman</a> describes the adaptation of an open source discovery tool, VuFind, to local needs, discusses the decisions which needed to be made in the process, and considers the implications of this process for future library discovery systems.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>VuFind is an open source discovery system originally created by Villanova University near Philadelphia [<a href="#1">1</a>] and now supported by Villanova with the participation in development of libraries around the world. It was one of the first next-generation library discovery systems in the world, made possible by the open source Solr/Lucene text indexing and search system which lies at the heart of VuFind (Solr also underlies several of the current commercial offerings, including Serials Solutions' Summon and ExLibris' Primo).</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/seaman" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 tooled up graham seaman google minnesota state colleges and universities national library of australia royal holloway serials solutions university of london villanova university western michigan university worldcat ajax api archives authentication cataloguing data database ejournal free software identifier institutional repository library catalogs library management systems lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh opac open source openurl php repositories resource discovery restful ruby search technology sfx software solr standards usability vufind wiki Fri, 09 Mar 2012 14:06:59 +0000 lisrw 2226 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Third Annual edUi Conference 2011 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue68/edui-2011-rpt#author1">Danielle Cooley</a> reports on the third annual edUi Conference, held over 13-14 October 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA, an opportunity for Web professionals in colleges, universities, libraries, museums, etc to discuss the latest developments in Web trends and technologies.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The third annual edUi Conference [<a href="#1">1</a>] was held October 13-14, 2011, in Richmond, Virginia, USA. The sold-out event saw 225 ‘Web professionals serving colleges, universities, libraries, museums, and beyond’ join together to discuss the latest and greatest in Web trends and technologies. The all-volunteer conference was presented by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities, and major sponsors included Microsoft, the University of Richmond, and Virginia Commonwealth University.</p> <p>The two-day event consisted of four tracks [<a href="#2">2</a>]:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue68/edui-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue68 event report danielle cooley google happy cog kansas state university microsoft university of virginia wikipedia accessibility aggregation android archives blog browser cataloguing css data framework google docs google maps graphics higher education html html5 metadata mis mobile research responsive design search technology twitter usability video web standards widget windows xhtml youtube Mon, 27 Feb 2012 22:26:07 +0000 lisrw 2241 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 67: Changes Afoot http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 67.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>For readers who might have been wondering, I shall resist Mark Twain's remark about reports of his demise being exaggerated, and reassure you that while <em>Ariadne</em> has been undergoing changes to the way in which it will be delivered to the Web, it has been business as usual in the matter of the content, as you will see from the paragraphs that follow. Issue 67, while currently not looking any different, is in the process of being migrated to a new platform developed to enhance functionality and give a more user-friendly look and feel to the publication.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 editorial richard waller becta jisc jisc techdis meta-net ukoln university of bath university of derby devcsi homer multitext mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol wikipedia accessibility archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing curation data digital library digitisation elluminate eprints framework geospatial data gis identifier infrastructure interoperability librarything metadata mobile natural language processing preservation programming language repositories research rss semantic web software standards tagging twitter uima ulcc urn usability web 2.0 web services webinar Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1618 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk MyMobileBristol http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author1">Mike Jones</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author2">Simon Price</a>, <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author3">Nikki Rogers</a> and <a href="/issue67/jones-et-al#author4">Damian Steer</a> describe the rationale, aims and progress of MyMobileBristol, highlighting some of the challenges and opportunities that have arisen during the project.</p> </div> </div> </div> The MyMobileBristol Project is managed and developed by the Web Futures group at the Institute for Learning and Research Technology (ILRT), University of Bristol [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The project has a number of broad and ambitious aims and objectives, including collaboration with Bristol City Council on the development or adoption of standards with regard to the exchange of time- and location-sensitive data within the Bristol region, with particular emphasis on transport, the environment and sustainability. <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/jones-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 feature article damian steer mike jones nikki rogers simon price ilrt jisc jisc techdis ordnance survey ukoln university of bristol w3c web futures datagovuk devcsi mca mobile campus assistant mymobilebristol apache api atom authentication blog browser bsd cataloguing content management data data set database dissemination e-research e-science framework geospatial data gis higher education html intellectual property java javascript jena ldap licence machine learning mobile mobile phone native app native applications open data open source operating system portal portfolio rdf research resource description restful rss search technology semantic web smartphone software sparql sql standards usability web app web browser web services wiki wireless xml Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1622 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataCite UK User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt#author1">Alex Ball</a> reports on the 2nd UK User Group meeting for DataCite, held at the British Library in London, in April 2011.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="top" id="top"></a></p> <!-- start main content --><!-- start main content --><p>DataCite [<a href="#1">1</a>] is an international not-for-profit organisation dedicated to making research data a normal, citable part of the scientific record. It is made up of a membership of 15 major libraries and data centres, which, along with four associate members, represent 11 different countries across four continents. The approach taken by DataCite currently centres on assigning Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to datasets; it is a member of the International DOI Foundation and one of a handful of DOI registration agencies.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue67/datacite-2011-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue67 event report alex ball badc british library d-lib magazine datacite dcc google mimas orcid science and technology facilities council uk data archive ukoln university of bath university of birmingham university of leicester university of oxford erim fishnet sagecite accessibility api archives bibliographic data cataloguing curation data data set digital curation digital preservation doi framework guid higher education identifier metadata national library open data preservation repositories research schema usability web resources Sun, 03 Jul 2011 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1627 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 66: Sanity Check http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 66.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>With institutions searching to increase the impact of the work they do, and conscious of the immediate impact of any event they organise, many will be interested to read of <a href="/issue66/guy/">10 Cheap and Easy Ways to Amplify Your Event</a> in which <strong>Marieke Guy</strong> provides a raft of suggestions to enhance the participants' experience of and involvement in, the event they are attending.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 editorial richard waller british library google jisc ukoln university of pretoria e-curator keepit zetoc aggregation archives blog browser copyright curation data database digital audio digital preservation digital repositories file format flickr framework geospatial data gis identifier institutional repository learning objects metadata mobile mobile phone netvibes open access open source personalisation podcast preservation privacy refworks repositories research resource description and access rss search technology software streaming tagging twitter usability video web 2.0 web portal Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1602 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Reading Van Gogh Online? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue66/boot#author1">Peter Boot</a> shows how log analysis can be employed to assess a site's usability, usage, and users, using the Van Gogh letter edition as an example.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><!-- v5 author edits, revised images and new table 4 : 2011-02-21-17-21 REW --><p>Large amounts of money are spent building scholarly resources on the web. Unlike online retailers, large publishers and banks, scholarly institutions tend not to monitor very closely the way visitors use their web sites. In this article I would like to show that a look at the traces users leave behind in the Web servers' log files can teach us much about our sites' usability and about the way visitors use them.</p> <p>In 2009 the <a href="http://www.huygensinstituut.knaw.nl/">Huygens Institute</a> [<a href="#1">1</a>], together with the <a href="http://www.vangoghmuseum.nl/">Van Gogh Museum</a> [<a href="#2">2</a>], published a new edition of the letters of Vincent van Gogh. The complete edition was <a href="http://vangoghletters.org/vg/">published online</a> [<a href="#3">3</a>], and is accessible for free; there is also a six-volume book edition [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The online edition was reviewed in a number of publications [<a href="#5">5</a>][<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>]. I will use the server logs of the Van Gogh edition as an example of what we can learn about our visitors. I will focus not on the simple quantities, but try to assess the visitors' access patterns. When we created the edition, our assumption was that researchers would use the web site, while people who wanted to read the letters would favour the book. The desire to test that assumption was one of the reasons for embarking on this investigation.</p> <p>When users view, or read, editions online, busy traffic is going on between their browser (e.g. Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari), and the web server where the edition is located. Web servers keep logs of this traffic, and inspecting the logs gives us an opportunity to see how people are actually using the editions that we create. When people buy a book, this shows their intention to use it, in some sense. When people go to a web site, the server registers their visit, including, depending on the design of the site, every page they read and every search they do.</p> <p>Most of the work on log analysis in scholarly environments has been done in the context of libraries researching use of electronic journals [<a href="#8">8</a>]. The financial interest in accurate knowledge about usage patterns in that context is obviously important. The LAIRAH (Log Analysis of Digital Resources in the Arts and Humanities) study [<a href="#9">9</a>] used log analysis on portal sites in order to assess usage of digital resources in the arts and humanities. I believe the present article is the first reported study on actual usage data of a scholarly digital edition.</p> <p>First I will discuss why these log data deserve investigation. I then will show what the data that we collect looks like and discuss both their potential and their limitations. I will give a brief overview of the edition site, as the log data can only be understood in the context of the site's structure and navigational facilities. Then I'll show a number of the things that can be done on the basis of the log files.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue66/boot" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue66 feature article peter boot google huygens institute for dutch history university college london archives bibliographic data blog browser cache data digital library firefox graphics internet explorer operating system portal research safari search technology usability visualisation windows Sun, 30 Jan 2011 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1603 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Survive or Thrive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt#author1">Ed Fay</a> reports on a two-day conference organised by UKOLN on behalf of JISC to consider growth and use of digital content on the Web, which was held in Manchester in June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Survive or Thrive [<a href="#1">1</a>] is the punchy title given to an event intended to stimulate serious consideration amongst digital collections practitioners about future directions in our field - opportunities but also potential pitfalls. The event, which focused on content in HE, comes at a time of financial uncertainty when proving value is of increasing importance in the sector and at a point when significant investment has already been made in the UK into content creation, set against a backdrop of increasingly available content on the open Web from a multitude of sources.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue65/survive-thrive-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue65 event report ed fay apple bbc california digital library cerlim edina eduserv google jisc jisc digital media london school of economics massachusetts institute of technology ordnance survey rdtf talis the national archives university of huddersfield accessibility aggregation agile development api archives blog cataloguing data digital curation digital library digital media digital preservation digitisation dissemination domain model e-learning flickr geospatial data gis html identifier information retrieval infrastructure institutional repository interoperability itunes javascript linked data mashup metadata mobile personalisation preservation repositories research resource discovery search technology social networks software solr standards tagging text mining twitter usability widget Fri, 29 Oct 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1593 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Trove: Innovation in Access to Information in Australia http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/holley#author1">Rose Holley</a> describes a major development in the Australian national digital information infrastructure.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In late 2009 the National Library of Australia released version 1 of Trove [<a href="#1">1</a>] to the public. Trove is a free search engine. It searches across a large aggregation of Australian content. The treasure is over 90 million items from over 1000 libraries, museums, archives and other organisations which can be found at the click of a button. Finding information just got easier for many Australians. Exploring a wealth of resources and digital content like never before, including full-text books, journals and newspaper articles, images, music, sound, video, maps, Web sites, diaries, letters, archives, people and organisations has been an exciting adventure for users and the service has been heavily used. Finding and retrieving instantly information in context; interacting with content and social engagement are core features of the service. This article describes Trove features, usage, content building, and its applications for contributors and users in the national context.</p> <h2 id="Opportunities_for_Libraries">Opportunities for Libraries</h2> <p>I see tremendous opportunities for libraries this year because of advances in technology. The changes in technology mean that anyone can create, describe or recommend content, which means that many people and organisations are becoming librarians or libraries in their own way. Librarians should not be threatened or dismayed by this but rather encouraged, since it means that society is retaining its ongoing interest in the creation, organisation and dissemination of content, and we have an integral role to play in these developments. Libraries and librarians are relevant more than ever in this environment because we have vast amounts of data and information to share, a huge amount of information expertise, and an understanding of how technology can assist us in making information more accessible.</p> <p>We need to have new ideas and re-examine our old ideas to see how technology can help us. What things have we always wanted to do that we couldn't before, like providing a single point of access to all Australian information? Is this still pie in the sky or can we now achieve it? Libraries need to think big. As Charles Leadbeater would say 'Libraries need to think they are leading a mass movement, not just serving a clientele.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] Librarians are often thought of as gatekeepers with the emphasis being on closed access, but technology enables gatekeepers to open doors as well as close them and this is the opportunity I see. However many institutions will need to change their strategic thinking from control/shut to free/open before they can make this transition, and take a large dose of courage as well. The American author Harriet Rubin says, 'Freedom is actually a bigger game than power. Power is about what you can control. Freedom is about what you can unleash.' [<a href="#3">3</a>] The National Library of Australia already took this step forward in 2008 with the advent of the Australian Newspapers beta service, which opened up the raw text of digitised Australian newspapers to the public for improvement, without moderation on a mass scale [<a href="#4">4</a>]. With a long history of collaboration across the Australian cultural heritage sector [<a href="#5">5</a>] with regard to digitisation, storage, and service delivery, the National Library of Australia is well placed to take the lead with innovation in access to information.</p> <p>Some people may say, 'But isn't Google doing that, so why do we still need libraries?' There is no question in my mind that libraries are fundamentally different from Google and other similar services. Libraries are different to Google for these reasons: they commit to provide long-term preservation, curation and access to their content; they have no commercial motives in the provision of information (deemed by various library acts); they aim for universal access to everyone in society; and they are 'free for all'. To summarise: libraries are always and forever. Who can say that of a search engine, or of any commercial organisation, regardless of size?</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/holley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article rose holley amazon british library google national library of australia oai open library wikipedia aggregation api archives bibliographic data bibliographic database browser copyright curation data database digitisation dissemination doc dublin core facebook flickr ftp google books identifier infrastructure lucene marc metadata mysql national library oai-pmh ocr open archives initiative persistent identifier preservation research resource sharing rss search technology tagging twitter usability video youtube Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1563 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Data Services for the Sciences: A Needs Assessment http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/westra#author1">Brian Westra</a> describes a data services needs assessment for science research staff at the University of Oregon.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Computational science and raw and derivative scientific data are increasingly important to the research enterprise of higher education institutions. Academic libraries are beginning to examine what the expansion of data-intensive e-science means to scholarly communication and information services, and some are reshaping their own programmes to support the digital curation needs of research staff. These changes in libraries may involve repurposing or leveraging existing services, and the development or acquisition of new skills, roles, and organisational structures [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>Scientific research data management is a fluid and evolving endeavour, reflective of the high rate of change in the information technology landscape, increasing levels of multi-disciplinary research, complex data structures and linkages, advances in data visualisation and analysis, and new tools capable of generating or capturing massive amounts of data.</p> <p>These factors can create a complex and challenging environment for managing data, and one in which libraries can have a significant positive role supporting e-science. A needs assessment can help to characterise scientists' research methods and data management practices, highlighting gaps and barriers [<a href="#2">2</a>], and thereby improve the odds for libraries to plan appropriately and effectively implement services in the local setting [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Methods">Methods</h2> <p>An initiative to conduct a science data services needs assessment was developed and approved in early 2009 at the University of Oregon. The initiative coincided with the hiring of a science data services librarian, and served as an initial project for the position. A researcher-centric approach to the development of services was a primary factor in using an assessment to shape services [<a href="#4">4</a>]. The goals of the project were to:</p> <ul> <li>define the information services needs of science research staff;</li> <li>inform the Libraries and other stakeholders of gaps in the current service structures; and</li> <li>identify research groups or staff who would be willing to participate in, and whose datasets would be good subjects for, pilot data curation projects.</li> </ul> <p>The library took the lead role on the assessment, consulting with other stakeholders in its development and implementation. Campus Information Services provided input on questions regarding campus information technology infrastructure, and to avoid unnecessary overlap with other IT service activities focused on research staff. The Vice President for Research and other organisational units were advised of the project and were asked for referrals to potential project participants. These units provided valuable input in the selection of staff contacts. Librarian subject specialists also suggested staff who might be working with data and interested in participating. Librarians responsible for digital collections, records management, scholarly communications, and the institutional repository were involved in the development of the assessment questions and project plan.</p> <p>The questions used in the assessment were developed through an iterative process. A literature and Web review located several useful resources and examples. These included the University of Minnesota Libraries' study of scientists' research behaviours [<a href="#3">3</a>], and a study by Henty, et al. on the data management practices of Australian researchers [<a href="#5">5</a>]. The Data Audit Framework (DAF - now called the Data Asset Framework) methodology was considered to provide the most comprehensive set of questions with a field-tested methodology and guidelines [<a href="#6">6</a>][<a href="#7">7</a>][<a href="#8">8</a>][<a href="#9">9</a>][<a href="#10">10</a>][<a href="#11">11</a>]. The stages outlined in the DAF methodology were also instructive, although we elected not to execute a process for identifying and classifying assets (DAF Stage 2), since the organisational structure of our departments and institutes are not conducive to that level of investigation. From the beginning it was recognised that recruitment of scientists was based as much on their willingness to participate as their responsibility for any specific class or type of research-generated data.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/westra" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 feature article brian westra arl edina imperial college london jisc johns hopkins university microsoft uk data archive university of edinburgh university of essex university of glasgow university of illinois university of oregon university of oxford university of washington archives authentication csv curation data data management data set data visualisation database digital curation digital library drupal e-research e-science file format framework gis higher education infrastructure institutional repository metadata mysql open access provenance repositories research usability visualisation Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1568 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Institutional Web Management Workshop 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt#author1">Keith Doyle</a> provides a personal perspective on a conference organised by UKOLN for those involved in the provision of institutional Web services.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This was the 13th Institutional Web Management Workshop [<a href="#1">1</a>] to be organised by UKOLN [<a href="#2">2</a>] held at the University of Sheffield from 12 to 14 July 2010.&nbsp;The theme was 'The Web in Turbulent Times' [<a href="#3">3</a>]. As such, there was a healthy balance of glass-half-empty-doom-and-gloom, and glass-half-full-yes-we-can.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/iwmw-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report keith doyle canterbury christ church university eduserv google ilrt oxford university computing services terminalfour ukoln university college london university of bristol university of cambridge university of oxford university of salford university of sheffield university of the west of england w3c iwmw memento mobile campus assistant wikipedia accessibility apache blog browser cocoa content management css curation data data visualisation datamining facebook firefox framework geospatial data gis hashtag higher education html html5 hypertext information architecture linked data mashup metadata mobile mobile phone opera plone portal qr code rdfa research rss search technology sharepoint smartphone social web software taxonomy twitter usability video videoconferencing visualisation web app web development web services webkit widget wookie wordpress xcri xml Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1569 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Evidence, Value and Impact: The LIS Research Landscape in 2010 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/lisrc10-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/lisrc10-rpt#author1">Stephanie Kenna</a> reports on the Library and Information Science Research Coalition conference, held at the British Library on 28 June 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Having been involved in developing the concept of a coalition for research in Library and Information Science (LIS) since 2006, it was with both pride and excitement that I took my place in the British Library's auditorium on Monday 28 June. There was a buzz of anticipation. We were not disappointed.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/lisrc10-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report stephanie kenna british library cilip edinburgh napier university jisc loughborough university mla research information network university college london lis research coalition archives blog data e-learning framework higher education information architecture information retrieval iphone research search technology twitter usability video wiki Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1572 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Eduserv Symposium 2010: The Mobile University http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt#author1">Shailey Minocha</a> reflects on the one-day symposium organised by Eduserv in May 2010. The aim of the event was to discuss whether and how mobile technology will play a significant role in the delivery of UK Higher Education in the future.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/eduserv-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report shailey minocha blackboard canterbury christ church university edge hill university eduserv google massachusetts institute of technology open university oucs ukoln university of bath university of bristol university of edinburgh university of oxford university of plymouth university of sheffield university of wolverhampton itunes u accessibility ajax android augmented reality blog browser cataloguing cloud computing data e-learning facebook framework higher education html html5 infrastructure ipad iphone itunes junaio location-based services mobile mobile learning mobile phone open source operating system podcast qr code research search technology smartphone sms social software software twitter url usability video web 2.0 web services webkit wiki wikitude wireless Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1573 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk International UPA 2010 Conference User Experience Design for the World http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/upa-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue64/upa-2010-rpt#author1">Liza Zamboglou</a> and <a href="/issue64/upa-2010-rpt#author2">Lorraine Paterson</a> report on the Usability Professionals' Association's International Conference held in Munich, Germany in May 2010.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>We were fortunate enough to attend the UPA 2010 International Conference [<a href="#2">2</a>] which was recently held in the Bayerischer Hof Hotel in Munich, a beautiful hotel which has accommodated numerous famous guests in the past ranging from Paris Hilton to the Dalai Lama. The conferences main focus this year was on how UX professionals can create great user experiences across different cultures.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue64/upa-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue64 event report liza zamboglou lorraine paterson jisc national e-science centre oracle university of edinburgh aquabrowser ux2.0 avatar data digital library e-science mobile research resource discovery search technology smartphone usability video Thu, 29 Jul 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1578 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 63: Consider the Users in the Field http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/editorial#author1">Richard Waller</a> introduces Ariadne issue 63.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>For those who can either remember or are battling still to make the technology work, be it coding, integration or test, it is easy and understandable enough if the technology assumes an overwhelming profile on the horizon of one's project and daily work. It is very understandable when they privately grumble that colleagues unburdened with the minutiae of such work display a breath-taking insouciance to the consequences of asking for a change in spec because there has been an unexpected development in the requirements of the users.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 editorial richard waller apple eifl intute iso jisc michigan state university mimas wellcome library archives hub identity management toolkit identity project mobile internet detective ux2.0 aggregation archives blog born digital data digital archive digital identity digital library digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier interoperability ipad mashup metadata mis mobile national library podcast repositories research search technology software standards ukad usability video web 2.0 youtube Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1539 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Usability Inspection of Digital Libraries http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author1">Lorraine Paterson</a> and <a href="/issue63/paterson-low#author2">Boon Low</a> highlight findings from the usability inspection report conducted for the UX2.0 research project.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/paterson-low" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article boon low lorraine paterson american library association british library iso jisc national e-science centre oreilly university of edinburgh aquabrowser europeana jisc information environment ux2.0 worldcat accessibility ajax cataloguing digital library e-science facebook framework ict interoperability personalisation research resource discovery search technology social networks software standardisation standards tag cloud twitter usability web 2.0 Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1543 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Balancing Stakeholder Needs: Archive 2.0 As Community-centred Design http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/ridolfo-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author1">Jim Ridolfo</a>, <a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author2">William Hart-Davidson</a> and <a href="/issue63/ridolfo-et-al#author3">Michael McLeod</a> present a case example on building a digital archive with cultural and scholarly stakeholder groups - to provide a model for balancing stakeholder needs.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v5. 2010-05-25 revised to accommodate improved images figs 1 & 2 REW --><!-- v5. 2010-05-25 revised to accommodate improved images figs 1 & 2 REW --><p>Archive 2.0 is relatively new concept for us, one that we have only worked with since 2007 and the beginning of our Samaritan Digital Archive Project at Michigan State University (MSU). Our project started with the intention of building a digital archive; the Archive 2.0 nature of the project surfaced when we realised that in order to build a useful archive, we would need to engage multiple stakeholder communities. In our project this meant working with the cultural stakeholders, the Samaritans, as well as academic stakeholders, including Samaritan and Biblical scholars. Initially we thought that applying Web 2.0 technologies such as social networking, image tagging, etc, to a digital archive would be our most important contribution to the project. As the project unfolded and we identified stakeholder needs more precisely however, we realised that our role was as much about balancing stakeholders' representational needs as much as it was about the application of Web 2.0 technologies.</p> <p>The project began in December of 2007 when Writing in Digital Environments (WIDE) Research Center [<a href="#1">1</a>] Research Assistant Jim Ridolfo was browsing the digital MSU Special Collections catalogue, and discovered the library index for the MSU Chamberlain-Warren collection of Samaritan texts. While investigating the history of the collection, Ridolfo learnt that in 2003 a Samaritan elder had travelled to MSU and had spoken to the Board of Trustees. The elder, Binyamim Tsedaka, had 'encouraged the university to utilise the collection to promote Samaritan studies.' [<a href="#2">2</a>] On learning of Tsedaka's speech, Ridolfo e-mailed Tsedaka and enquired about the community's possible interest in collaborating on a digitisation project. Tsedaka responded with his full blessing and an offer of collaboration [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <h2 id="Who_Are_the_Samaritans">Who Are the Samaritans?</h2> <p>The Samaritans have existed as a community for thousands of years. They are an ancient biblical people living primarily in Holon, Israel and Mt. Gerizim, West Bank. Their Torah is similar in content to that of Jewish people, but with several major theological differences. For example, the Samaritan Torah maintains that Mt. Gerizim rather than Jerusalem is holy. The Samaritan Pentateuch also contains thousands of textual differences from the Masoretic Hebrew text; consequently, their theological interpretations and practices differ from common Jewish interpretations and traditions. In addition, the script of the Samaritan Torah is written in Samaritan Hebrew, which includes a unique script, pronunciation scheme, and grammar. Starting at a very early age, all Samaritan children learn to read, write, and chant in Samaritan Hebrew.</p> <p>The Samaritan community includes 712 members, with approximately half the population living in Holon, Israel, and the other half living in the Mt. Gerizim village of Kiryat Luza. The community in Holon speaks Modern Hebrew as a first language, while the community in Kiryat Luza speaks Palestinian Arabic as a first language. The Samaritans living in Kiryat Luza maintain a delicate relationship with the Israeli government and the Palestinian Authority. Being few in number and vulnerable to larger political trends, they seek a peaceful relationship with both authorities. For example, the residents of Kiryat Luza possess both Palestinian Authority and Israeli passports, vote in both elections, and work, travel, and study on both sides of the Green Line. Since the Samaritans of Holon and Kiryat Luza commemorate all festivals, holidays, and life cycle celebrations together on Mt. Gerizim, they are very keen to maintain contact between both communities [<a href="#4">4</a>][<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/ridolfo-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article jim ridolfo michael mcleod william hart-davidson michigan state university university of cincinnati archives cataloguing database digital archive digitisation facebook framework metadata mysql php portal research software tagging usability web 2.0 web portal Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1544 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Moving Towards Interoperability: Experiences of the Archives Hub http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/stevenson-ruddock <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue63/stevenson-ruddock#author1">Jane Stevenson</a> and <a href="/issue63/stevenson-ruddock#author2">Bethan Ruddock</a> describe the work that the Archives Hub team has been doing to promote the sharing of content.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/stevenson-ruddock" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 feature article bethan ruddock jane stevenson courtauld institute of art jisc mimas university of london university of manchester archives hub dealing with data aggregation archives cataloguing data database digital archive ead interoperability portal repositories research resource discovery search technology software standards thesaurus ukad usability xml Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1546 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk News and Events http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/newsline <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p>Ariadne presents a brief summary of news and events.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a name="headlines"></a></p> <h3 id="Engagement_Impact_Value_Workshop">Engagement, Impact, Value Workshop</h3> <p>University of Manchester<br />Monday 24 May 2010<br /><a href="http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/engagement-impact-value-201005/">http://www.ukoln.ac.uk/web-focus/events/workshops/engagement-impact-value-201005/</a></p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue63/newsline" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue63 news and events richard waller austrian national library bnf british library cilip cni datacite ibm jisc library of congress loughborough university microsoft mimas oclc surffoundation tilburg university ukoln university of exeter university of illinois university of manchester university of sheffield europeana iwmw lis research coalition worldcat archives cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set database digital library digital preservation dissemination doi dublin core ebook ejournal further education higher education ipad itunes knowledge management linked data metadata mobile national library portal preservation privacy repositories research resource description and access search technology semantic web software standardisation twitter usability visualisation web 2.0 web development web services Thu, 29 Apr 2010 23:00:00 +0000 editor 1553 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Towards a Toolkit for Implementing Application Profiles http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/chaudhri-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author1">Talat Chaudhri</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author2">Julian Cheal</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author3">Richard Jones</a>, <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author4">Mahendra Mahey</a> and <a href="/issue62/chaudhri-et-al#author5">Emma Tonkin</a> propose a user-driven methodology for the iterative development, testing and implementation of Dublin Core Application Profiles in diverse repository software environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/chaudhri-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article emma tonkin julian cheal mahendra mahey richard jones talat chaudhri cetis jisc oai ukoln university of bath geospatial application profile gnu iemsr images application profile jisc information environment lmap opendoar tbmap wikipedia application profile archives blog cerif data data model database dcap dcmi digital repositories domain model dspace dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-government eprints fedora commons framework frbr geospatial data gis higher education identifier information architecture institutional repository interoperability metadata metadata model oai-ore open access open archives initiative open source rdf repositories research resource description ruby schema scholarly works application profile search technology software standards sword protocol uri usability virtual research environment vocabularies xml Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1522 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Uncovering User Perceptions of Research Activity Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/loureiroKoechlin <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/loureiroKoechlin#author1">Cecilia Loureiro-Koechlin</a> discusses the outcomes and lessons learned from user tests performed on the Oxford Blue Pages, a tool designed to display information about researchers and their activities at the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Competition, complex environments and needs for sophisticated resources and collaborations compel Higher Education institutions (HEIs) to look for innovative ways to support their research processes and improve the quality and dissemination of their research outcomes. Access, management and sharing of information about research activities and researchers (who, what, when and where) lie at the heart of all these needs and driving forces for improvements.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/loureiroKoechlin" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article cecilia loureiro-koechlin jisc microsoft university of oxford brii aggregation api archives blog data database ddc dissemination e-government e-research higher education identifier infrastructure metadata mis ontologies privacy research search technology semantic web software usability web services Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1526 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Intranet Management: Divine Comedy or Strategic Imperative? http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/white#author1">Martin White</a> suggests that a failure to recognise the value of intranets is a symptom of a failure to recognise information as a strategic asset.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>According to Dante in his Divine Comedy the inscription above the door to Hades reads "Abandon hope all ye who enter here". For many this could also be the sign on the home page of their organisation's intranet as, with business-critical decisions to make, they begin the daily hunt for information that they are sure should be somewhere in the application. It could just as easily be the sign on the door of the intranet manager of the organisation, though this door usually also carries a number of other job descriptions, all of which seem to be given more priority by the organisation than the care and development of the intranet. Most organisations of any size will have a full-time web manager, often with a support team, but this is rarely the case with the intranet.</p> <p>There are a substantial number of intranets in the UK. Statistics from the Office for National Statistics indicate that 22% of all businesses have an intranet [<a href="#1">1</a>]. As the size of the business increases so does the level of penetration, and most businesses of more than 500 people will now have some form of intranet. Given the number of businesses in the UK the author estimates that there are probably around 300,000 intranets in the commercial sector, and at a guess a further 100,000 in the public sector, charities, Higher Education institutions (HEIs) and other organisations. Only over the last few years has any reliable statistical information become available on intranet use and development, and this is a in-depth global survey of only around 300 intranets [<a href="#2">2</a>]. In the UK HEI sector a major opportunity was lost in a survey commissioned in 2009 by Eduserv into the management of web content in the HEI sector as no account of intranet use of CMS applications was included in the scope of the survey [<a href="#3">3</a>]. A survey of SharePoint use in HEIs undertaken for Eduserv in late 2009 [<a href="#4">4</a>] did indicate that a number of institutions were using SharePoint for intranet applications but the survey did not look in detail at intranet implementation.</p> <p>It is also only over the last few years have forums been set up in which intranet managers are able to share experiences and challenges with others. The work of the Intranet Benchmark Forum [<a href="#5">5</a>] is focused on providing services to large organisations, but there are also other virtual and physical discussion forums, such as the Intranet Forum [<a href="#6">6</a>] run by UKeiG for its members. It is probably reasonable to suggest that the majority of intranet managers have seen very few intranets from which to gain a sense of good practice, whereas web managers have an almost unlimited supply of sites from which to gain ideas for their own use. This is as true in the HEI sector as in other sectors. Given the installed base of intranets in the UK it is also surprising that there is no 'intranet conference' event even though intranet management does feature in events such as Online Information [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Most countries in northern Europe have an intranet conference [<a href="#8">8</a>], often with several hundred delegates, so why there is no equivalent in the UK is a mystery.</p> <h2 id="Intranets_Are_Different">Intranets Are Different</h2> <p>All too often an intranet is regarded as an internal web site. The reality is that about the only commonality between an intranet and a web site is the use of web browser technology. Many very successful intranets do not even use a web content management application but instead are based on Notes technology or portal applications. Intranet content contribution is usually highly distributed, with individual members of staff publishing content direct to the intranet perhaps only a few times a year. This means that the web content management system has to be highly intuitive, and enable Word documents to be rendered into clean HTML code to create web pages. The teams supporting public web sites are using the systems every working day, working often in HTML and having a much more limited range of content to cope with. Many of the problems that arise in keeping content current on an intranet are a result of staff having to use a complex Web publishing system that was specified for Web site management and not intranet management.</p> <p>Another factor to be considered is that increasingly intranets are federated applications [<a href="#9">9</a>]. This is often the situation in HEIs where each department wants to have its own intranet, and on top of all these individual intranets there is some form of top-level 'corporate' home page and navigation. Often there is no central coordination of these intranets, and so each adopts some or none of the visual design standards of the HEI.</p> <p>As far as enterprise applications are concerned, intranets are different because they are not based on business processes or work-flow. Finance, registry, personnel and most other applications support well-defined processes, usually within a specific department, and where the content requirements are usually specified in database terms. Anything approaching text content is usually relegated to a single field in the database. Intranets exist because there is a substantial amount of information in any organisation that is not based on business processes and cannot be managed within a formal database structure, such as policies, procedures, campus maps, events, staff notices and hundreds of other information formats produced by every department and location within the organisation.</p> <p>As a result the intranet becomes an information dumping ground. Under-resourced intranet managers do not have the resources to maintain content quality, and so multiple versions of documents with no visible ownership or provenance proliferate. Employees leave or change responsibility but the intranet is based on a 'file-and-forget' principle and no effort is taken to ensure that document ownership is transferred to another member of staff. Very quickly the information architecture of the intranet, based usually on the structure of the organisation at the time of the last WCMS (Web content management system) deployment, is not fit for purpose. The decision is taken to implement a search engine, and only then does the scale of the problem of information decay become apparent. It can also be an interesting exercise to search for 'Confidential' and see just how many documents are returned!</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/white" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 feature article martin white eduserv google harvard university ibm intranet focus ltd jisc microsoft open university university of sheffield adobe blog content management creative commons data database dissemination document management drupal foi higher education html ict information architecture intellectual property intranet knowledge management licence metadata mobile open source passwords portal privacy provenance repositories research rss schema search technology sharepoint standards taxonomy usability web 2.0 web browser wiki Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1530 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Fedora UK & Ireland / EU Joint User Group Meeting http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt#author1">Chris Awre</a> reports on the first coming together of two regional user groups for the Fedora digital repository system, hosted by the University of Oxford in December 2009.</p> </div> </div> </div> <!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><!-- v2. edits from author incorporated into this version - 2010-02-12-22-47 rew --><p>The Fedora digital repository system [<a href="#1">1</a>] (as opposed to the Fedora Linux distribution, with which there is no connection) is an open source solution for the management of all types of digital content. Its development is managed through DuraSpace [<a href="#2">2</a>], the same organisation that now oversees DSpace, and carried out by developers around the world. The developers, alongside the extensive body of Fedora users, form the community that sustains Fedora.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/fedora-eu-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report chris awre bbc duraspace ieee jisc kings college london stanford university technical university of denmark university of edinburgh university of hull university of oxford university of southampton university of virginia bril datashare hydra idmb cloud computing content management data data management database digital repositories dspace e-research e-science eprints fedora commons flickr framework geospatial data gis infrastructure institutional repository linux metadata mobile open source portal qr code rdbms rdf repositories research search technology software usability virtual research environment wiki xml youtube Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1531 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Future of Interoperability and Standards in Education: A JISC CETIS Event http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/cetis-stds-2010-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/cetis-stds-2010-rpt#author1">Sarah Currier</a> reports on an international working meeting involving a range of educational interoperability standards bodies and communities, organised by JISC CETIS.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The stated intention of this working meeting organised by JISC CETIS, and held at the University of Bolton, UK, on 12 January 2010 was to:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/cetis-stds-2010-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report sarah currier apple becta bsi cetis ieee ietf ims ims glc ims global learning consortium iso jisc oai ukoln university of bolton adl agile development apache archives atom blog data dcmi dublin core dublin core metadata initiative e-business e-learning hashtag higher education identifier interoperability linked data metadata oai-pmh open archives initiative open source repositories rss scorm search technology semantic web sru standardisation standards sword protocol twitter url usability web 2.0 wiki xcri Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1532 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt#author1">Dave Puplett</a> reports on the conference Subject Repositories: European Collaboration in the International Context held at the British Library in January 2010. The conference launched Economists Online (EO), an innovative economics subject repository.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Institutional repositories are now common in Higher Education, but successful examples of subject repositories, which cater to an entire discipline, are much rarer. The Subject Repositories conference taught some key lessons about the role of transnational collaboration in setting up a subject repository. The conference drew on the expertise of renowned specialists in the field and the two and a half-year-long development process of Economists Online [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue62/bl-subject-repos-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue62 event report dave puplett cni coalition for networked information google harvard university jisc london school of economics monash university tilburg university university college london repec bibliographic data data data management data set database digital preservation digitisation e-research framework google scholar higher education information society infrastructure institutional repository intellectual property interoperability metadata national library open access portal preservation repositories research research information management resource discovery search technology software sword protocol usability video Sat, 30 Jan 2010 00:00:00 +0000 editor 1534 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk