Overview of articles in Ariadne http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/articles?article-type=&term=&organisation=&project=&author=&issue= en Editorial Introduction to Issue 72 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/editorial <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/editorial#author1">The new editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 72.</p> </div> </div> </div> <h2 id="Change_Is_the_Only_Constant">Change Is the Only Constant</h2> <p>Issue 72 is the product of a long period of almost constant change. In the last issue, Richard Waller waved adieu as the outgoing editor, explaining the circumstances around the change in the Editorial for Issue 71 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/editorial" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 editorial kara jones queensland university of technology sherpa-leap university of bath linkedup project altmetrics cataloguing copyright data data set digitisation dissemination eprints higher education lod metadata open access open data open education repositories research Wed, 26 Feb 2014 21:49:54 +0000 lisrw 2518 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Digitisation and e-Delivery of Theses from ePrints Soton http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author1">Julian Ball</a> and <a href="/issue72/ball-fowler#author2">Christine Fowler</a> describe the partnership between the University of Southampton’s Library Digitisation Unit and its institutional repository for digitising and hosting theses.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The Hartley Library at the University of Southampton has in excess of 15,000 bound PhD and MPhil theses on 340 linear metres of shelving. Consultation of the hard-copy version is now restricted to readers making a personal visit to the Library, as no further microfiche copies are being produced by the British Library and no master copies of theses are lent from the Library. Retrieval of theses from storage for readers and their subsequent return requires effort from a large number of staff.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ball-fowler" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article christine fowler julian ball abbyy british library jisc university of southampton uk theses digitisation project aggregation api archives cataloguing copyright data digitisation electronic theses eprints framework institutional repository jpeg jstor library management systems metadata oai-pmh ocr open access open archives initiative open source optical character recognition preservation repositories research search technology software url xml Tue, 30 Jul 2013 13:13:08 +0000 editor 2499 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk LinkedUp: Linking Open Data for Education http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author1">Marieke Guy</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author2">Mathieu d’Aquin</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author3">Stefan Dietze</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author4">Hendrik Drachsler</a>, <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author5">Eelco Herder</a> and <a href="/issue72/guy-et-al#author6">Elisabetta Parodi</a> describe the activities carried out by the LinkedUp Project looking at the promotion of open data in education.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the past, discussions around Open Education have tended to focus on content and primarily Open Educational Resources (OER), freely accessible, openly licensed resources that are used for teaching, learning, assessment and research purposes. However Open Education is a complex beast made up of many aspects, of which the opening up of data is one important element.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/guy-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article eelco herder elisabetta parodi hendrik drachsler marieke guy mathieu d’aquin stefan dietze bbc dcc elsevier knowledge media institute mimas open knowledge foundation open university ordnance survey ukoln university of bath university of manchester university of southampton w3c dbpedia europeana linkedup project wikipedia blog cataloguing cloud computing data data management data mining data set data visualisation dissemination facebook framework higher education hypertext ict identifier information retrieval infrastructure interoperability learning analytics learning management system linked data lod mashup metadata mobile mobile learning mooc oer open data open education personalisation portal privacy rdf remote working repositories research search technology semantic web sparql topic map twitter uri usability video visualisation web resources web standards xml Tue, 04 Feb 2014 13:12:30 +0000 editor 2503 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Realising the Potential of Altmetrics within Institutions http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author1">Jean Liu</a> and <a href="/issue72/liu-adie#author2">Euan Adie</a> of Altmetric take a look at the growing presence of altmetrics in universities, and consider some of the potential applications.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The concept of alternative metrics as indicators of non-traditional forms of research impact – better known as ‘altmetrics’ – has been gaining significant attention and support from both the scholarly publishing and academic communities. After being adopted by many publishing platforms and institutional repositories within the past year, altmetrics have entered into the scholarly mainstream, emerging as a relevant topic for academic consideration amidst mounting opposition to misuse of the Journal Impact Factor.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/liu-adie" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article euan adie jean liu altmetric llp carnegie mellon university indiana university london school of economics university of bath university of glasgow adobe aggregation altmetrics article-level metrics blog data data set digitisation doi identifier metadata open access passwords repositories research twitter url web services Wed, 29 Jan 2014 20:21:26 +0000 lisrw 2500 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Shared Repositories, Shared Benefits: Regional and Consortial Repositories in Japan http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author1">Takeo Ozono</a>, <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author2">Daisuke Ueda</a> and <a href="/issue72/ozono-et-al#author3">Fumiyo Ozaki</a> describe the work of the ShaRe Project and its influence upon the development of consortial repositories and the benefits they have brought to Japanese institutions.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The ShaRe Project (Shared Repository Project 2008-2009), which aimed to promote the concept of consortial repositories and facilitate their implementation, has made a significant contribution to the rapid growth of institutional repositories (IRs) in Japan. Following precedents including White Rose Research Online (UK) and SHERPA-LEAP (UK), 14 regional consortial repositories have been set up on a prefectoral basis across Japan<a href="#editor1">*</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/ozono-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 feature article daisuke ueda fumiyo ozaki takeo ozono digital repository federation hiroshima university kagawa university national institute of informatics sherpa sherpa-leap repositories support project rsp wikipedia archives cloud computing content management data database digitisation dspace eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository internet explorer open access operating system portal repositories research search technology software Sun, 28 Jul 2013 15:11:28 +0000 lisrw 2495 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Open Access and Research Conference 2013: Discovery, Impact and Innovation http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author1">Paula Callan</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author2">Stephanie Bradbury</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author3">Sarah Brown</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author4">Philippa Broadley</a>, <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author5">Emma Nelms</a> and <a href="/issue72/oar-2013-rpt#author6">Christopher Hart</a> report on Open Access and Research 2013 which focused on recent developments and the strategic advantages they bring to the research sector.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Brisbane, Queensland, Australia was the host location for the second Open Access and Research 2013 conference [<a href="#1">1</a>]. The conference was held at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Gardens Point campus over 31 October – 1 November 2013. QUT has over 45,000 students and has a wide range of specialist research areas.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/oar-2013-rpt" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 event report christopher hart emma nelms paula callan philippa broadley sarah brown stephanie bradbury apple badc elsevier griffith university massachusetts institute of technology niso queensland university of technology university of sydney victoria university aggregation altmetrics archives copyright creative commons curation data data citation data management data set dissemination doi e-research eprints framework higher education infrastructure institutional repository licence metadata open access open data open source portfolio rae repositories research search technology software video Sun, 16 Feb 2014 18:46:48 +0000 2507 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Book Review: Digital Dieting - From Information Obesity to Intellectual Fitness http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue72/sanders-rvw#author1">Kevin Sanders</a> examines Tara Brabazon’s latest analytical work which investigates the proliferation of low-quality information in the digital realm and the issues of excessive reliance on social tools for learning.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Following a body of work that includes <em>The University of Google: Education in the (post) Information Age</em> (2007) [<a href="#1">1</a>] and <em>Digital Hemlock: Internet Education and the Poisoning of Teaching</em> (2002), Brabazon has developed a central position within the debate surrounding technology and pedagogy, although there is very little that is centrist about Brabazon's writing.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue72/sanders-rvw" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue72 review kevin sanders apple google ibm university of bath university of cambridge heron blog facebook framework higher education ict internet explorer managerialism multimedia neoliberalism open access research search technology software youtube Mon, 03 Mar 2014 18:41:44 +0000 lisrw 2519 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial: Ariadne Carries On http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial1 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/editorial1#author1">The editor</a> writes of the next coils in <em>Ariadne</em>'s thread, and bids farewell.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Readers who have been conversant with the recent travails of UKOLN [<a href="#1">1</a>] will have been aware that <em>Ariadne</em> has been, to put it mildly, living in interesting times. The closure of the Jisc Innovation Support Centre at UKOLN at the end of July 2013 had signalled the demise of the publication with the total number of issues reaching 71, after a period of reduced numbers of issues per year.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial1" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 editorial richard waller jisc ukoln university of bath higher education repositories rss twitter Wed, 17 Jul 2013 21:44:57 +0000 lisrw 2494 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Editorial Introduction to Issue 71 http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2 <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/editorial2#author1">The editor</a> introduces readers to the content of <em>Ariadne</em> Issue 71.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>As I depart this chair after the preparation of what I thought would be the last issue of <em>Ariadne</em> [<a href="#1">1</a>], I make no apology for the fact that I did my best to include as much material&nbsp; to her ‘swan song’ as possible. With the instruction to produce only one more issue this year, I felt it was important to publish as much of the content in the pipeline as I could.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/editorial2" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 editorial richard waller amazon birmingham city university digital repository federation jisc loughborough university oclc oregon state university ukoln university for the creative arts university of huddersfield university of oxford university of sussex wellcome library jusp kaptur scarlet accessibility agile development api archives augmented reality authentication big data blog bs8878 cataloguing content management controlled vocabularies curation data data management data set database digital library digitisation diigo ebook educational data mining framework google docs higher education html html5 infrastructure jquery learning analytics metadata mets mobile native apps open access open source portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology software solr standardisation standards sushi tagging twitter url video wcag web 2.0 web app widget xml schema Wed, 17 Jul 2013 19:01:02 +0000 lisrw 2493 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Hita-Hita: Open Access and Institutional Repositories in Japan Ten Years On http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author1">Ikuko Tsuchide</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author2">Yui Nishizono</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author3">Masako Suzuki</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author4">Shigeki Sugita</a>, <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author5">Kazuo Yamamoto</a> and <a href="/issue71/tsuchide-et-al#author6">Hideki Uchijima</a> introduce a number of ideas and projects that have enhanced the progress of the Open Access movement and institutional repositories in Japan over the last ten years.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In Japan, Chiba University established the country's first institutional repository, CURATOR [<a href="#1">1</a>] in 2003. Since then, over the last 10 years or so, more than 300 universities and research institutions have set up repositories and the number of full-text items on repositories has exceeded one million [<a href="#2">2</a>]. All the contents are available on Japanese Institutional Repositories Online (JAIRO) [<a href="#3">3</a>] operated by the National Institute of Informatics (NII) [<a href="#4">4</a>] in Japan.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/tsuchide-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article hideki uchijima ikuko tsuchide kazuo yamamoto masako suzuki shigeki sugita yui nishizono asahikawa medical university cranfield university digital repository federation hokkaido university kagoshima university national institute of informatics osaka university otaru university of commerce sherpa sherpa-leap university of tokyo university of tsukuba repositories support project romeo rsp wikipedia archives bibliographic data blog cataloguing cloud computing copyright data database digitisation dissemination facebook higher education identifier infrastructure institutional repository metadata open access repositories research search technology standardisation twitter Wed, 10 Jul 2013 17:03:28 +0000 lisrw 2480 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/brewerton#author1">Gary Brewerton</a> takes us step by step through the various stages of implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System for your institution.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>This article takes you step by step through the various stages of implementing a Resource or Reading List Management System; from writing the business case to involving stakeholders, selecting a system, implementation planning, advocacy, training and data entry. It recognises the hard work required to embed such a system into your institution both during the implementation process and beyond.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton loughborough university sconul authentication blog cataloguing data e-learning freemium higher education intellectual property internet explorer ldap library management systems mooc open source podcast shibboleth software standards vle Mon, 17 Jun 2013 18:35:26 +0000 lisrw 2448 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Potential of Learning Analytics and Big Data http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/charlton-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author1">Patricia Charlton</a>, <a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author2">Manolis Mavrikis</a> and <a href="/issue71/charlton-et-al#author3">Demetra Katsifli</a> discuss how the emerging trend of learning analytics and big data can support and empower learning and teaching.</p> </div> </div> </div> <blockquote><p style="margin-left:18.0pt;">&nbsp;‘<em>Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted</em>.’ Attributed to Albert Einstein</p> </blockquote><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/charlton-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article demetra katsifli manolis mavrikis patricia charlton bbc google ieee jenzabar london knowledge lab algorithm big data browser cybernetics data data mining database doi e-learning educational data mining framework hadoop higher education identifier learning analytics learning design modelling mooc personalisation research search technology semantic web social networks software streaming video visualisation Mon, 08 Jul 2013 20:07:14 +0000 lisrw 2476 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Developing a Prototype Library WebApp for Mobile Devices http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author1">Jason Cooper</a> and <a href="/issue71/cooper-brewerton#author2">Gary Brewerton</a> describe the development of a prototype WebApp to improve access to Library systems at Loughborough University for mobile devices.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Reviewing Loughborough University Library’s Web site statistics over a 12-month period (October 2011 – September 2012) showed a monthly average of 1,200 visits via mobile devices (eg smart phones and tablet computers). These visits account for 4% of the total monthly average visits; but plotting the percentage of visits per month from such mobile devices demonstrated over the period a steady increase, rising from 2% to 8%. These figures were supported by comparison with statistics from the Library’s blog, where, over the same period, there was also a steady increase in the percentage of visits from mobile devices.&nbsp; This increase was on a smaller scale than the Web site, rising from 0.5% up to 4%.</p> <p>Having identified this increase in the usage of mobile devices, it was decided to investigate ways to support mobile access more effectively.&nbsp; As part of this investigation, the Library's Systems Team undertook the development of a prototype mobile app.</p> <h2 id="Deciding_the_Prototype-s_Features">Deciding the Prototype's Features</h2> <p>The first task undertaken was to produce a list of functionality that could be included in the Library WebApp.&nbsp; The list was based upon current Library services and consisted of the following:</p> <ul> <li>Support library catalogue searching</li> <li>Display opening hours (pulled from the Library Web site so data can be maintained in one location)</li> <li>Display current item loans, requests and holds <ul> <li>Indicate overdue items</li> <li>Indicate recalled items</li> <li>Offer option to renew loaned items</li> <li>Offer option to cancel requests for items</li> </ul> </li> <li>Reading lists <ul> <li>Ensure module list displays all modules for which the user is registered</li> <li>Should handle multiple levels of reading lists</li> <li>Include thumbnails</li> <li>Include library holding information</li> </ul> </li> <li>Display current room/PC bookings <ul> <li>Display list of bookings including resource name, start time and end time for each booking.</li> <li>Offer option to cancel a room/PC booking</li> <li>Offer option to make a room/PC booking</li> </ul> </li> <li>Display upcoming library events (pulled from the Library Web site) <ul> <li>Include both upcoming workshops and events</li> </ul> </li> <li>Display library news (taken as a feed from our Library blog)</li> <li>Offer feedback option</li> </ul> <p>After reviewing this list, it was decided to leave out the searching of the Library Catalogue feature as the Library's discovery tool (Ex Libris’s Primo [<a href="#1">1</a>]) was scheduled for a number of updates that would improve the support of mobile devices. Therefore it was decided to wait and see how the improved mobile interface performed before deciding how to integrate it into the mobile app.</p> <p>Additionally it was decided not to implement a number of the other features, those that would either require new APIs to be created for other systems or those that would alter the information stored in the other systems.&nbsp; These features would be carried forward for implementation in a future version of the mobile app.&nbsp; Consequently features excluded from the pilot version were:</p> <ul> <li>library catalogue searching</li> <li>the option to renew loaned items and cancel requested items</li> <li>the option to make or cancel a room/PC booking</li> </ul> <h2 id="WebApp_versus_Native_Apps">WebApp versus Native Apps</h2> <p>An important early decision was whether to create the Mobile App as a WebApp or as a number of native apps?&nbsp; A native app is one that is developed in the native language for the platform (Objective-C for iPhone/iPad devices, Java for Android devices, etc) and usually delivered via an app-store (iTunes for Apple, Google Play for Android, etc).&nbsp; A WebApp is developed in HTML5 and JavaScript, being delivered to the mobile device via the World Wide Web.</p> <p>There are pros and cons to developing a mobile app as a native app or as a WebApp. Native apps have full access to a mobile device's resources but need to be developed as a separate app for each platform on which they are to be made available.&nbsp; Conversely developing a mobile app as a WebApp restricts the resources that can be accessed to those available to the device's Web browser, although a single developed WebApp can work on multiple platforms.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/cooper-brewerton" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up gary brewerton jason cooper apple google loughborough university w3c adobe ajax android apache api authentication blog browser cache cataloguing content management cookie css data framework google books html html5 ipad iphone itunes java javascript jquery json library management systems local storage metadata mobile native app native apps open source passwords perl restful rss standards tablet computer url vocabularies web app web browser web development widget xhtml xml Mon, 10 Jun 2013 13:33:09 +0000 admin 2438 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Performance-based Funding Model: Creating New Research Databases in Sweden and Norway http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/eriksson#author1">Leif Eriksson</a> describes how the introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) has created new forms of research databases in Sweden and Norway.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>The introduction of Performance-based Research Funding Systems (PRFS) models has helped to set the focus on scientific publishing since this is one of the major indicators for measuring research output. As a secondary result, it has also forced the countries that have introduced a model that is not solely based on citations to create a new form of research database; the national portal for scientific literature.</p> <p>Even in countries that have not adapted a PRFS model, these forms of portals are common. In Sweden, the national database has been the result of local universities’ and Higher Education institutions’ efforts towards a mutual search interface to the different local repositories that have emerged.&nbsp; The repositories are sometimes created to support a local funding model, but the most common reason is simply to disseminate scientific publishing.</p> <p>The contribution of publications that cannot be found in the international citation indexes are substantial even for peer-reviewed publications especially for literature in the Humanities and the Social Sciences but also in Natural Sciences by adding a lot of conference papers that would otherwise not be recognised.&nbsp; This can be seen as a side-effect of the discussions on the introduction of PRFS models. Even if not all publications meet the criteria to be recognised as scientific, a significant number of them are still added to the base of publications that can be analysed from a PRFS perspective.</p> <p>The incentive to disseminate search results is the other driving force for the national catalogues and, in this case, the portals are playing an important role since many of the publications mainly written in domestic languages are otherwise seldom visible to other researchers and the public.</p> <h2 id="Background">Background</h2> <p>The change in the Higher Education landscape has been significant over the last decades. One of the major changes has been the introduction of performance-based research funding systems (PRFS) starting with the Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) in the United Kingdom in 1986 [<a href="#1">1</a>].</p> <p>The incentive offered by a PRFS model is that it overturns the allocation of funding often based on historical grounds which are no longer valid. It can also be considered as a part of an orientation towards more effective management of the public sector, based on principles derived from the private sector. The central idea in this transformation is the drive to increase productivity without adding resources to the system, while replacing traditional command-and-control systems with market-style incentives [<a href="#2">2</a>].</p> <p>Publications are playing a more and more important role in the process of evaluating research and also as an indicator in the performance-based research funding systems (PRFS). Of 14 countries which were identified as having PRFSs, at least 10 have publication output as an indicator of research quality [<a href="#3">3</a>].</p> <p>The reason why publications are used as a PRFS indicator is that the latter measures the output of research both quantitatively and qualitatively. Moreover, those publication data are easily found in bibliographic databases.&nbsp; However, the introduction of an indicator for publications has not been without controversy in the countries that have adopted PRFS. The resulting discussions have generally focused on two main issues:</p> <ol> <li>Should publications be used as a first-order or a second-order indicator?</li> <li>Which data source would best reflect the research output in a particular country?</li> </ol> <p>OECD launched a report on various PRFS models in 2010 including a systematic exposition of the different indicators being used [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Publications are often found among the first-order indicators which are aimed directly at measuring research performance. This can be done by simply counting publications in relation to the number of research staff of a certain institution but the common practice is to add a qualitative element, either by ranking of publication channels as occurs in Denmark and Norway, or by citation analysis as operates in Belgium, that is, in the Flemish community, and Sweden.</p> <p>Second-order indicators are based on indexes instead of direct measurements. These indexes are often created as a reaction to the methodological difficulties when dealing with citation analysis. The best known indexes are Journal Impact Factor (JIF) which measures a journal’s impact through the number of citations its articles receive, and H-index which is often used on an individual level when comparing the citation history of different authors. However, both indicators are simplifications of more complex structures and have been criticised when being used for research assessment purposes [<a href="#4">4</a>].</p> <p>The second question has created even more controversy in those countries which have adopted a PRFS model. When deciding on which database would best support the publication indicator, the issue as to which type of publications should be counted immediately comes to the fore.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/eriksson" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article leif eriksson oracle uppsala university worldcat aggregation bibliographic data bibliographic database cataloguing data database dissemination doi higher education national library open access portal rae repositories research search technology ssh visualisation Wed, 03 Jul 2013 17:38:13 +0000 lisrw 2465 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk KAPTUR the Highlights: Exploring Research Data Management in the Visual Arts http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author1">Leigh Garrett</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author2">Marie-Therese Gramstadt</a>, <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author3">Carlos Silva</a> and <a href="/issue71/garrett-et-al#author4">Anne Spalding</a> describe the exploration of the importance and nature of research data in the visual arts and requirements for their appropriate curation and preservation.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>KAPTUR (2011-13) [<a href="#1">1</a>], funded by Jisc and led by the Visual Arts Data Service, was a collaborative project involving four institutional partners: the Glasgow School of Arts; Goldsmiths, University of London; University for the Creative Arts; and the University of the Arts London.&nbsp;Research data have in recent years become regarded as a valuable institutional resource and their appropriate collection, curation, publication and preservation as essential. This has been driven by a number of internal and external forces, and all UK Research Councils now require it as a condition of funding [<a href="#2">2</a>]. As a result, a network of data repositories has emerged [<a href="#3">3</a>], some funded by research councils and others by institutions themselves. However, at the outset of the project, research data management practice within the visual arts appeared to operate rather <em>ad hoc</em> with none of the specialist arts institutions within the UK having either implemented research data management policies [<a href="#4">4</a>] or established research data management systems.&nbsp; KAPTUR sought to:</p> <ul> <li>investigate the nature of visual arts research data;</li> <li>make recommendations for its effective management;</li> <li>develop a model of best practice applicable to both specialist institutions and arts departments within multidisciplinary institutions; and</li> <li>apply, test and refine the model of best practice across the four institutional partner institutions.</li> </ul> <p>This paper outlines the background and context of the project; explores the nature of visual arts research data; details the outcomes of the user and technical review; and describes the work which underwent within the partner institutions around policy formation and staff engagement.</p> <p>Led by the Visual Arts Data Service (VADS), in collaboration with the Glasgow School of Art, Goldsmiths College, University of the Arts London and University for the Creative Arts, and funded by Jisc, KAPTUR [<a href="#1">1</a>] sought to ‘...discover, create and pilot a sectoral model of best practice in the management of research data in the [visual] arts.’ [<a href="#5">5</a>].</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-garrett-et-al/logo-2.jpg" style="width: 600px; height: 210px;" title="logo Visual Arts Data Service (VADS)" /></p> <p>Recent years have witnessed an increasing recognition across the Higher Education sector that research data are a valuable resource and therefore its appropriate curation and preservation are essential.&nbsp; In addition, wider societal and political forces meant that research councils, teams and researchers were coming under increasing pressure to make publicly funded data freely available.&nbsp; As such the publication of research data was increasingly becoming a requirement of funding, for example the Arts and Humanities Research Council [<a href="#6">6</a>] and Medical Research Council [<a href="#7">7</a>]. Equally important was the need for increased data transparency, and to enable researchers to access existing datasets to test the validity and reliability of the data and associated research methods; to reinterpret the data; and to preserve the data for future scrutiny. In response, many universities, for example the University of Edinburgh, had established institutional research data management systems to support the deposit and preservation of research data, whilst others were in the process of piloting services, for example the University of Leicester, and establishing policies and procedures which actively support researchers to manage their data effectively, such as Canterbury Christ Church University and Northumbria University. In addition, many of the research councils themselves had established repositories, for example the UK Data Archive at the University of Essex, which curates research data in the social sciences and humanities, and the Natural Environment Research Council, which supports a network of data centres across its disciplinary areas.</p> <p>However, given the emerging landscape, at the outset of the project it was clear that very little was known about the collection, curation and usage of research data in the visual arts:&nbsp;none of the specialist arts institutions had research data management policies or infrastructure in place and evidence collected at the time indicated that practice was at best, <em>ad hoc</em>, left to individual researchers and teams with limited support or guidance. Little work had been undertaken to understand the distinctive and varied nature of research data in the visual arts, and even less to understand how these data could be collected, curated, preserved and exploited, or their potential impact assessed.</p> <p>By its very nature, research in the visual arts is highly complex and varied, often comprising a wide variety of outputs and formats which present researchers, repository managers and institutions with many discipline-specific difficulties. The methods and processes which generate this research are just as varied and complex.&nbsp; Research endeavour in the visual arts relies heavily on the physical artefact: sketchbooks, logbooks, journals, and workbooks.&nbsp; Alongside these data, a wide range of related project documentation and protocols are also created.&nbsp; While technology may offer considerable potential to support the safe storage and preservation of research and related data, and to enhance access, the highly distinctive nature of the visual arts and its research methods also present enormous technical problems with regard to formats, standards, roles and responsibilities, and policies.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/garrett-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article anne spalding carlos silva leigh garrett marie-therese gramstadt ahrc canterbury christ church university courtauld institute of art datacite dcc falmouth university glasgow school of art goldsmiths college hefce jisc northumbria university uk data archive university for the creative arts university of bath university of birmingham university of edinburgh university of essex university of leicester university of london university of the arts london vads kaptur keepit mrc scarlet archives augmented reality blog cataloguing cloud computing curation data data management data set digitisation eprints framework higher education infrastructure metadata oer open access preservation repositories research semantic web software video Mon, 01 Jul 2013 17:50:23 +0000 lisrw 2461 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk The Wellcome Library, Digital http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author1">Christy Henshaw</a> and <a href="/issue71/henshaw-kiley#author2">Robert Kiley</a> describe how the Wellcome Library has transformed its information systems to support mass digitisation of historic collections.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Online access is now the norm for many spheres of discovery and learning. What benefits bricks-and-mortar libraries have to offer in this digital age is a subject of much debate and concern, and will continue to be so as learning resources and environments shift ever more from the physical to the virtual. In order to maintain a place in this dual environment, most research libraries strive to replicate their traditional offerings in the digital world.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/henshaw-kiley" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article christy henshaw robert kiley jisc wellcome library wellcome trust algorithm api archives authentication bibliographic data blog born digital cache cataloguing content management copyright creative commons data database digital archive digital asset management digital library digital preservation digital repositories digitisation facebook flash framework html html5 information architecture infrastructure javascript jpeg jpeg 2000 json library management systems licence metadata mets mobile passwords portal preservation preservation metadata repositories research search technology standards twitter url usability video web browser xml schema Tue, 18 Jun 2013 14:52:03 +0000 lisrw 2449 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk eMargin: A Collaborative Textual Annotation Tool http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author1">Andrew Kehoe</a> and <a href="/issue71/kehoe-gee#author2">Matt Gee</a> describe their Jisc-funded eMargin collaborative textual annotation tool, showing how it has widened its focus through integration with Virtual Learning Environments.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In the Research and Development Unit for English Studies (RDUES) at Birmingham City University, our main research field is Corpus Linguistics: the compilation and analysis of large text collections in order to extract new knowledge about language. We have previously developed the WebCorp [<a href="#1">1</a>] suite of software tools, designed to extract language examples from the Web and to uncover frequent and changing usage patterns automatically. eMargin, with its emphasis on <em>manual</em> annotation and analysis, was therefore somewhat of a departure for us.</p> <p>The eMargin Project came about in 2007 when we attempted to apply our automated Corpus Linguistic analysis techniques to the study of English Literature. To do this, we built collections of works by particular authors and made these available through our WebCorp software, allowing other researchers to examine, for example, how Dickens uses the word ‘woman’, how usage varies across his novels, and which other words are associated with ‘woman’ in Dickens’ works.</p> <p>What we found was that, although our tools were generally well received, there was some resistance amongst literary scholars to this large-scale automated analysis of literary texts. Our top-down approach, relying on frequency counts and statistical analyses, was contrary to the traditional bottom-up approach employed in the discipline, relying on the intuition of literary scholars. In order to develop new software to meet the requirements of this new audience, we needed to gain a deeper understanding of the traditional approach and its limitations.</p> <p style="text-align: center; "><img alt="logo: eMargin logo" src="http://ariadne-media.ukoln.info/grfx/img/issue71-kehoe-gee/emargin-logo.png" style="width: 250px; height: 63px;" title="logo: eMargin logo" /></p> <h2 id="The_Traditional_Approach">The Traditional Approach</h2> <p>A long-standing problem in the study of English Literature is that the material being studied – the literary text – is often many hundreds of pages in length, yet the teacher must encourage class discussion and focus this on particular themes and passages. Compounding the problem is the fact that, often, not all students in the class have read the text in its entirety.</p> <p>The traditional mode of study in the discipline is ‘close reading’: the detailed examination and interpretation of short text extracts down to individual word level. This variety of ‘practical criticism’ was greatly influenced by the work of I.A. Richards in the 1920s [<a href="#2">2</a>] but can actually be traced back to the 11<sup>th</sup> Century [<a href="#3">3</a>]. What this approach usually involves in practice in the modern study of English Literature is that the teacher will specify a passage for analysis, often photocopying this and distributing it to the students. Students will then read the passage several times, underlining words or phrases which seem important, writing notes in the margin, and making links between different parts of the passage, drawing out themes and motifs. On each re-reading, the students’ analysis gradually takes shape (see Figure 1). Close reading takes place either in preparation for seminars or in small groups during seminars, and the teacher will then draw together the individual analyses during a plenary session in the classroom.</p> <p></p><p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kehoe-gee" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up andrew kehoe matt gee ahrc amazon birmingham city university blackboard british library cetis d-lib magazine google ims global ims global learning consortium jisc niso university of leicester university of oxford wikipedia accessibility aggregation ajax api big data blog browser data database digital library ebook free software html interoperability intranet java javascript jquery metadata moodle plain text repositories research search technology software standards tag cloud tagging tei url vle web browser wiki windows xml Thu, 04 Jul 2013 17:20:45 +0000 lisrw 2467 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Bring Your Own Policy: Why Accessibility Standards Need to Be Contextually Sensitive http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author1">Brian Kelly</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author2">Jonathan Hassell</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author3">David Sloan</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author4">Dominik Lukeš</a>, <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author5">E A Draffan</a> and <a href="/issue71/kelly-et-al#author6">Sarah Lewthwaite</a> argue that rather than having a universal standard for Web accessibility, standardisation of Web accessibility practices and policies needs to be sufficiently flexible to cater for the local context.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Initiatives to enhance Web accessibility have previously focused on the development of guidelines which apply on a global basis. Legislation at national and international levels increasingly mandate conformance with such guidelines. However large scale surveys have demonstrated the failure of such approaches to produce any significant impact.</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/kelly-et-al" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article brian kelly david sloan dominik lukes ea draffan jonathan hassell sarah lewthwaite iso kings college london london metropolitan university oracle ukoln university of bath university of dundee university of southampton w3c web accessibility initiative accessibility agile development blog browser bs8878 cookie data doi e-learning ead framework ict mobile research responsive design social networks software standardisation standards usability video wcag web resources web services web standards youtube Mon, 08 Jul 2013 18:13:42 +0000 lisrw 2475 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk Improving Evaluation of Resources through Injected Feedback Surveys http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/reese <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/reese#author1">Terry Reese</a> suggests a novel approach for providing intercept survey functionality for librarians looking to simplify the gathering of user feedback for library-provided materials.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>Assessment of electronic resources has long proven a difficult challenge for librarians when looking to make collection development decisions.&nbsp; Often, these decisions are made by looking at usage statistics provided by the vendor, and through informal conversations with selected faculty within affected disciplines.&nbsp; The ability to capture point-of-use information from users remains a significant challenge for many institutions.&nbsp; The purpose of this paper will be to suggest a novel approach to providing intercept survey functionality for librarians looking to simplify the gath</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/reese" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 tooled up terry reese oclc ohio state university libraries oregon state university jusp worldcat apache api authentication cataloguing counting online usage of networked electronic resources css data data mining framework html infrastructure jquery metadata php research software standards sushi uri url visualisation Tue, 25 Jun 2013 19:12:22 +0000 lisrw 2450 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk DataFinder: A Research Data Catalogue for Oxford http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies <div class="field field-type-text field-field-teaser-article"> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <p><a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author1">Sally Rumsey</a> and <a href="/issue71/rumsey-jefferies#author2">Neil Jefferies</a> explain the context and the decisions guiding the development of DataFinder, a data catalogue for the University of Oxford.</p> </div> </div> </div> <p>In 2012 the University of Oxford Research Committee endorsed a university ‘Policy on the management of research data and records’ [<a href="#1">1</a>]. Much of the infrastructure to support this policy is being developed under the Jisc-funded Damaro Project [<a href="#2">2</a>]. The nascent services that underpin the University’s RDM (research data management) infrastructure have been divided into four themes:</p> <p><a href="http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue71/rumsey-jefferies" target="_blank">read more</a></p> issue71 feature article neil jefferies sally rumsey bodleian libraries datacite jisc orcid uk data archive university of oxford dmponline impact project aggregation algorithm api archives cataloguing controlled vocabularies curation data data citation data management data model data set database digital archive digital library eprints fedora commons identifier infrastructure jacs linked data metadata oai-pmh open access open archives initiative passwords preservation purl rdf repositories research research information management schema search technology semantic web software solr standards uri url vocabularies wireframe xml Thu, 13 Jun 2013 20:23:22 +0000 lisrw 2446 at http://www.ariadne.ac.uk