Aims and Scope
Acceptance Rate
Open Access
Peer Review
Copyright
Indexing
Affiliation
Hosting

Aims and Scope

The Journal of Information Literacy (JIL) is an international  peer-reviewed journal and is aimed at librarians, information professionals and academics who teach and/or research all aspects of information literacy. The journal includes articles from established and new authors that investigate many different areas of information literacy, including school, academic and national libraries, health care settings, and the public sector such as the workplace and government. We actively encourage and support submissions from underrepresented groups -- such as by race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, disability -- in the information sector as well as the sharing of expertise between all information literacy professionals.

Acceptance Rate 

JIL has an acceptance rate of around 30% for articles submitted to the journal. The most common reason we decline submissions is because they do not match the journal's priorities and standards, which are extensively detailed in our guidelines for submission. Please read the guidelines carefully and consider sending a query letter at any stage of your research.  We are always happy to receive query letters and discuss with you the fit of your project with the goals of the journal.

Open Access 

JIL provides immediate open access to its content on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge. The journal is published under the Diamond/Platinum Open Access model, because the CILIP Information Literacy Group believes that knowledge should be shared. JIL is therefore free and requires no subscription. In addition authors are not required to pay a fee to be published in JIL

Peer Review

JIL follows a double-anonymous peer review process, meaning that articles are read by at least two reviewers who have no knowledge of the author’s identity

The role of the peer reviewer is twofold: Firstly, to advise the editor as to whether the paper is suitable for publication and, if so, what stage of development it has reached.  This is done by providing one of the following recommendations:

a. Accept with no changes

b. Minor revisions: accept if specified minor changes are made; no re-review is necessary

c. Resubmit for review: substantial changes are needed before the article is resubmitted for a second round of peer review with the same reviewers

d. Inappropriate for publication by JIL: this is generally because the scope of the article sits outside the journal’s remit or because the reviewer feels that no amount of editing would raise the article to the required standards.

Secondly, the peer reviewer will act as a constructively critical friend to the author, providing detailed and practical feedback on all the aspects of the article found in the review form. Where changes to an article are suggested, the rationale for the suggestion should be clearly explained and contextualised with reference to the field of information literacy research and its methods. Feedback should be constructive, comprehensive and courteous, particularly if changes to the article reviewed are suggested. The role of peer reviewer is a privileged one and must be undertaken with empathy and integrity. Dismissive language, insufficient engagement with the work, and one-sentence feedback are not acceptable.

Reviewers will assess an article from the perspective of JIL readers at large and not just from their own viewpoint. This means that even if they personally like the article they should ensure that the topic is of relevance to a wider audience. Reviewers will also ensure that authors use language that is accessible to readers without specialist knowledge (for example in technical fields such as mobile technology or gaming). If the article employs a register that is overly specialist or technical, reviewers should highlight this problem and make recommendations on how to address it. In order to provide comprehensive, structured and workable feedback reviewers should use the review form.

A reviewer should call to the editor's attention any substantial similarity or overlap between the paper being reviewed and any other published paper of which they have personal knowledge. Reviewers are also asked to identify and highlight relevant published work that has not been cited by the authors.

Copyright

By submitting their articles to JIL the author(s) retain the copyright, but grant the right of first publication to the journal (including publication in print and electronic media). From December 2015 articles published in JIL are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike Licence.

Indexing

JIL is freely available on the open web. Published works are also indexed in the following sources: 

  • DOAJ (Directory of Open Access Journals)
  • ERIC (Education Resources Information Center)
  • LISA (Library and Information Science Abstracts)
  • LISTA (Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts)
  • SCOPUS
  • And can be found through browsing in Browzine.

Affiliation

JIL is the professional journal of the CILIP Information Literacy Group. The group encourages debate and the exchange of knowledge in all aspects of information literacy. The group:

Hosting

Loughborough University Library kindly hosts the Journal of Information Literacy on behalf of the CILIP Information Literacy Group.