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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 596 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usagesort icon Trending factor Charts

wayf

The Shibboleth 'where are you from service' (WAYF) provides the user with a list of institutional identity providers (IdPs) and allows them to choose at which one they wish to authenticate. The WAYF then redirects the user to the chosen IdP. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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web storage

Web Storage and DOM Storage (Document Object Model) are web application software methods and protocols used for storing data in a web browser. Web storage supports persistent data storage, similar to cookies, as well as window-local storage. Web storage is being standardized by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). It was originally part of the HTML 5 specification, but is now in a separate specification. It is supported by Internet Explorer 8, Mozilla-based browsers (e.g., Firefox 2+, officially from 3.5), Safari 4, Google Chrome 4 (sessionStorage is from 5), and Opera 10.50. As of 14 July 2010 only Opera supports the storage events (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web storage)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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wms

Windows Media Services (WMS) is a streaming media server from Microsoft that allows an administrator to generate streaming media (audio/video). Only Windows Media, JPEG, and MP3 formats are supported. WMS is the successor of NetShow Services. In addition to streaming, WMS also has the ability to cache and record streams, enforce authentication, impose various connection limits, restrict access, use multiple protocols, generate usage statistics, and apply forward error correction (FEC). It can also handle a high number of concurrent connections making it ideal[weasel words] for content providers. Streams can also be distributed between servers as part of a distribution network where each server ultimately feeds a different network/audience. Both unicast and multicast streams are supported (multicast streams also utilize a proprietary and partially encrypted Windows Media Station (*.nsc) file for use by a player.) Typically, Windows Media Player is used to decode and watch/listen to the streams, but other players are also capable of playing unencrypted Windows Media content (Microsoft Silverlight, VLC, MPlayer, etc.). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Windows Media Services)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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xmpp

Extensible Messaging and Presence Protocol (XMPP) is an open-standard communications protocol for message-oriented middleware based on XML (Extensible Markup Language). The protocol was originally named Jabber, and was developed by the Jabber open-source community in 1999 for, originally, near-real-time, extensible instant messaging (IM), presence information, and contact list maintenance. Designed to be extensible, the protocol today also finds application in VoIP and file transfer signaling. Unlike most instant messaging protocols, XMPP uses an open systems approach of development and application, by which anyone may implement an XMPP service and interoperate with other organizations' implementations. The software implementation and many client applications are distributed as free and open source software. XMPP-based software is deployed widely across the Internet and by 2003 was used by over ten million people worldwide, according to the XMPP Standards Foundation. Apache Wave's federation protocol is an extension to the XMPP protocol. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: XMPP)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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z39.87

ANSI/NISO Z39.87 is a standard which defines a set of metadata elements for raster digital images. The purpose is to help in the development, exchange and interpretation of digital images. The dictionary functions of this standard assist in the interoperability between systems, services, and software. It is also an aid in the long-term management of and continuing access to digital image collections. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Z39.87)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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zend framework

Zend Framework (ZF) is an open source, object-oriented web application framework implemented in PHP 5 and licensed under the New BSD License. Code contributions to Zend Framework are subject to rigorous code, documentation, and test standards. All code must meet ZF’s coding standards and unit tests must reach 80% code coverage before the corresponding code may be moved to the release branch. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Zend Framework)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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aac

Advanced Audio Coding (AAC) is a standardized, lossy compression and encoding scheme for digital audio. Designed to be the successor of the MP3 format, AAC generally achieves better sound quality than MP3 at similar bit rates. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: AAC)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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aiff

Audio Interchange File Format (AIFF) is an audio file format standard used for storing sound data for personal computers and other electronic audio devices. The format was co-developed by Apple Computer in 1988 based on Electronic Arts' Interchange File Format (IFF, widely used on Amiga systems) and is most commonly used on Apple Macintosh computer systems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: AIFF)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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blackboard learning system

The Blackboard Learning System is a virtual learning environment and course management system developed by Blackboard Inc. Features include course management, a customizable open architecture, and a scalable design that allows for integration with student information systems and authentication protocols. It may be installed on local servers or hosted by Blackboard ASP Solutions. Its main purposes are to add online elements to courses traditionally delivered face-to-face and to develop completely online courses with few or no face-to-face meetings. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Blackboard Learning System)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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bpmn

Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) is a graphical representation for specifying business processes in a business process model. BPMN was developed by Business Process Management Initiative (BPMI), and is currently maintained by the Object Management Group since the two organizations merged in 2005. As of March 2011, the current version of BPMN is 2.0. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Business Process Modeling Notation)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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business process modelling

Business Process Modeling (BPM) in systems engineering and hardware engineering is the activity of representing processes of an enterprise, so that the current process may be analyzed and improved. BPM is typically performed by business analysts and managers who are seeking to improve process efficiency and quality. The process improvements identified by BPM may or may not require Information Technology involvement, although that is a common driver for the need to model a business process, by creating a process master. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Business process modelling)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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communications protocol

A communications protocol (also known as a network protocol) is a formal description of digital message formats and the rules for exchanging those messages in or between computing systems and in telecommunications. Protocols may include signaling, authentication and error detection and correction capabilities. A protocol describes the syntax, semantics, and synchronization of communication and may be implemented in hardware or software, or both. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Network protocol)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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content syndication

Web syndication is a form of syndication in which website material is made available to multiple other sites. Most commonly, web syndication refers to making web feeds available from a site in order to provide other people with a summary or update of the website's recently added content (for example, the latest news or forum posts). The term can also be used to describe other kinds of licensing website content so that other websites can use it. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content syndication)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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counting online usage of networked electronic resources

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data compression

In computer science and information theory, data compression, source coding or bit-rate reduction is the process of encoding information using fewer bits than the original representation would use. Compression is useful because it helps reduce the consumption of expensive resources, such as hard disk space or transmission bandwidth. On the downside, compressed data must be decompressed to be used, and this extra processing may be detrimental to some applications. For instance, a compression scheme for video may require expensive hardware for the video to be decompressed fast enough to be viewed as it is being decompressed (the option of decompressing the video in full before watching it may be inconvenient, and requires storage space for the decompressed video). The design of data compression schemes therefore involves trade-offs among various factors, including the degree of compression, the amount of distortion introduced (if using a lossy compression scheme), and the computational resources required to compress and uncompress the data. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Data compression)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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ecmascript

ECMAScript is the scripting language standardized by Ecma International in the ECMA-262 specification and ISO/IEC 16262. The language is widely used for client-side scripting on the web, in the form of several well-known dialects such as JavaScript, JScript, and ActionScript. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: ECMAScript)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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flac

Free Lossless Audio Codec (FLAC) is an audio compression codec primarily authored by Josh Coalson. FLAC employs a lossless data compression algorithm. A digital audio recording compressed by FLAC can be decompressed into an identical copy of the original audio data. Audio sources encoded to FLAC are typically reduced to 50-60% of their original size. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: FLAC)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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genetic algorithm

A genetic algorithm (GA) is a search heuristic that mimics the process of natural evolution. This heuristic is routinely used to generate useful solutions to optimization and search problems. Genetic algorithms belong to the larger class of evolutionary algorithms (EA), which generate solutions to optimization problems using techniques inspired by natural evolution, such as inheritance, mutation, selection, and crossover. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Genetic algorithm)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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git

Git is a distributed revision control system with an emphasis on speed. Git was initially designed and developed by Linus Torvalds for Linux kernel development. Every Git working directory is a full-fledged repository with complete history and full revision tracking capabilities, not dependent on network access or a central server. Git's current software maintenance is overseen by Junio Hamano. Git is free software distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License version 2. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Git)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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gnome

GNOME is a desktop environment / graphical user interface that runs on top of a computer operating system. It is composed entirely of free and open source software and was created by two Mexican programmers, Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena. It is an international project that includes creating software development frameworks, selecting application software for the desktop, and working on the programs that manage application launching, file handling, and window and task management. GNOME is part of the GNU Project and can be used with various Unix-like operating systems, most notably Linux and as part of the Java Desktop System in Solaris. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Gnome)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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by Dr. Radut