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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articlessort icon Total usage Trending factor Charts

finereader

ABBYY FineReader is an optical character recognition (OCR) application developed by ABBYY. FineReader was designed as a professional-level application for converting scanned images, photographs of documents and PDF files into editable and searchable formats such as Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Powerpoint, Rich Text Format, HTML, PDF/A, searchable PDF, CSV and text files. ABBYY FineReader is in competition with Nuance OmniPage as well as free software for optical character recognition. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: FineReader)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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gnu lesser general public license

The GNU Lesser General Public License (formerly the GNU Library General Public License) or LGPL is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation (FSF). It was designed as a compromise between the strong-copyleft GNU General Public License or GPL and permissive licenses such as the BSD licenses and the MIT License. The GNU Library General Public License (as the LGPL was originally named) was published in 1991, and was the version number 2 for parity with GPL version 2. The LGPL was revised in minor ways in the 2.1 point release, published in 1999, when it was renamed the GNU Lesser General Public License to reflect the FSF's position that not all libraries should use it. Version 3 of the LGPL was published in 2007 as a list of additional permissions applied to GPL version 3. The LGPL places copyleft restrictions on the program itself but does not apply these restrictions to other software that merely links with the program. There are, however, certain other restrictions on this software. The LGPL is primarily used for software libraries, although it is also used by some stand-alone applications, most notably Mozilla and OpenOffice.org and sometimes media as well. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GNU Lesser General Public License)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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google refine

Google Refine is a standalone desktop application provided by Google for data cleanup and transformation to other formats. It has now been renamed to OpenRefine and is hosted as an opensource project on Github. It is similar to spreadsheet applications (and can work with spreadsheet file formats), however acts more like database. It operates on rows of data which have cells under columns, which is very similar to relational database tables. One Refine project is one table. User can filter rows to display using facets that define filtering criteria (for example, showing rows where given column is not empty). Unlike spreadsheets, most operations in Refine are done on all visible rows: transformation of all cells in all rows under one column, creation of new column based on existing column data, etc. All actions that were done on dataset are stored in project and can be replayed on another dataset. Unlike spreadsheets, no formulas are stored in cells, but formulas are used to transform data, and transformation is done only once. Transformation expressions are written in proprietary GREL language. Also Jython can be used to write expressions. The program has a web user interface, however it is not hosted by the software developer (SAAS), but is available for download and use on local machine. When starting Refine, it starts a web server and starts browser to open web UI powered by this webserver. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Google Refine)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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gotomeeting

GoToMeeting is a Web-hosted service created and marketed by Citrix Online, a division of Citrix Systems. It is a remote meeting and desktop sharing software that enables the user to meet with other computer users, customers, clients or colleagues via the Internet in real-time. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GoToMeeting)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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h.263

H.263 is a video compression standard originally designed as a low-bitrate compressed format for videoconferencing. It was developed by the ITU-T Video Coding Experts Group (VCEG) in a project ending in 1995/1996 as one member of the H.26x family of video coding standards in the domain of the ITU-T. H.263 has since found many applications on the internet: much Flash Video content (as used on sites such as YouTube, Google Video, MySpace, etc.) used to be encoded in Sorenson Spark format (an incomplete implementation of H.263), though many sites now use VP6 or H.264 encoding. The original version of the RealVideo codec was based on H.263 up until the release of RealVideo 8. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: H.263)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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h.264

H.264 / MPEG-4 Part 10 or AVC (Advanced Video Coding) is a standard for video compression, and is currently one of the most commonly used formats for the recording, compression, and distribution of high definition video. The final drafting work on the first version of the standard was completed in May 2003. H.264 is perhaps best known as being one of the codec standards for Blu-ray Discs; all Blu-ray players must be able to decode H.264. It is also widely used by streaming internet sources, such as videos from Vimeo, YouTube, and the iTunes Store, web software such as the Adobe Flash Player and Microsoft Silverlight, broadcast services for DVB and SBTVD, direct-broadcast satellite television services, cable television services, and real-time videoconferencing. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: H.264)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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haptics

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i-mode

NTT DoCoMo's i-mode is a mobile internet (as opposed to wireless internet) service popular in Japan. Unlike Wireless Application Protocol or WAP, i-mode encompasses a wider variety of internet standards, including web access, e-mail and the packet-switched network that delivers the data. i-mode users have access to various services such as e-mail, sports results, weather forecast, games, financial services and ticket booking. Content is provided by specialized services, typically from the mobile carrier, which allows them to have tighter control over billing. Like WAP, i-mode delivers only those services that are specifically converted for the service, or are converted through gateways. This has placed both systems at a disadvantage against handsets that use "real" browser software, and generally use a flat pricing structure for data. Even i-mode's creator, Takeshi Natsuno, has stated "I believe the iPhone (a phone that uses the traditional TCP/IP model) is closer to the mobile phone of the future, compared with the latest Japanese mobile phones." (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: i-mode)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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i18n

In computing, internationalization and localization (also spelled internationalisation and localisation, see spelling differences) are means of adapting computer software to different languages, regional differences and technical requirements of a target market. Internationalization is the process of designing a software application so that it can be adapted to various languages and regions without engineering changes. Localization is the process of adapting internationalized software for a specific region or language by adding locale-specific components and translating text. The terms are frequently abbreviated to the numeronyms i18n (where 18 stands for the number of letters between the first i and last n in internationalization, a usage coined at DEC in the 1970s or 80s) and L10n respectively, due to the length of the words. The capital L in L10n helps to distinguish it from the lowercase i in i18n. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Internationalization and localization)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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icalendar

iCalendar is a computer file format which allows Internet users to send meeting requests and tasks to other Internet users, via email, or sharing files with an extension of .ics. Recipients of the iCalendar data file (with supporting software, such as an email client or calendar application) can respond to the sender easily or counter propose another meeting date/time. iCalendar is used and supported by a large number of products, including Google Calendar, Apple iCal, GoDaddy Online Group Calendar, IBM Lotus Notes, Yahoo! Calendar and partially also by Microsoft Outlook. iCalendar is designed to be independent of the transport protocol. For example, certain events can be sent by traditional email or whole calendar files can be shared and edited by using a WebDav server, or SyncML. Simple web servers (using just the HTTP protocol) are often used to distribute iCalendar data about an event and to publish busy times of an individual. Publishers can embed iCalendar data in web pages using hCalendar, a 1:1 microformat representation of iCalendar in semantic (X)HTML. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: iCalendar)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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iconclass

Iconclass is a specialized library classification designed for art and iconography. It was originally conceived by Henri van de Waal, and was further developed by a group of scholars after his death. The Iconclass system is probably the largest classification system for cultural content. Initially designed for historical imagery, it is now also used to create subject access to texts and to classify a wide range of images, including modern photography. At the moment it contains over 28,000 unique concepts (classification types) and has an entry vocabulary of 14,000 keywords. It can be consulted with the help of the freely available Iconclass 2100 browser. Iconclass was developed in the Netherlands as a standard classification for recording collections, with the idea of assembling huge databases that will allow the retrieval of images featuring particular details, subjects or other common factors. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Iconclass)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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ims common cartridge

The Common Cartridge defines a new package interchange format for learning content, able to run on any compliant LMS platform. Version 1.0 supports the following features: rich content (html, xml, web links, media files); integrated assessments; discussion forums; authorisation for protected content. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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kis

Key Information Sets (KIS) are comparable sets of information about full or part time undergraduate courses and are designed to meet the information needs of prospective students. From September 2012 all KIS information will be published on the Unistats web-site and will also be accessed via a small advert, or ‘widget’, on the course web pages of universities and colleges.?The development of Key Information Sets (KIS) forms part of HEFCE work to enhance the information that is available about higher education. It will give prospective students access to robust, reliable and comparable information in order to help them make informed decisions about what and where to study. KIS will contain information which prospective students have identified as useful, such as student satisfaction, graduate outcomes, learning and teaching activities, assessment methods, tuition fees and student finance, accommodation and professional accreditation. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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kml

Keyhole Markup Language (KML) is an XML notation for expressing geographic annotation and visualization within Internet-based, two-dimensional maps and three-dimensional Earth browsers. KML was developed for use with Google Earth, which was originally named Keyhole Earth Viewer. It was created by Keyhole, Inc, which was acquired by Google in 2004. The name "Keyhole" is an homage to the KH reconnaissance satellites, the original eye-in-the-sky military reconnaissance system first launched in 1976. KML is an international standard of the Open Geospatial Consortium. Google Earth was the first program able to view and graphically edit KML files. Other projects such as Marble have also started to develop KML support.[ (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: KML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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learning platforms

A learning platform is an integrated set of interactive online services that provide teachers, learners, parents and others involved in education with information, tools and resources to support and enhance educational delivery and management. The term learning platform refers to a range of tools and services often described using terms such as educational extranet, VLE, LMS, ILMS and LCMS providing learning and content management. The term learning platform also includes the personal learning environment (PLE) or personal online learning space (POLS), including tools and systems that allow the development and management of eportfolios. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Learning platform)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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lgpl

The GNU Lesser General Public License (formerly the GNU Library General Public License) or LGPL is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation (FSF). It was designed as a compromise between the strong-copyleft GNU General Public License or GPL and permissive licenses such as the BSD licenses and the MIT License. The GNU Library General Public License (as the LGPL was originally named) was published in 1991, and was the version number 2 for parity with GPL version 2. The LGPL was revised in minor ways in the 2.1 point release, published in 1999, when it was renamed the GNU Lesser General Public License to reflect the FSF's position that not all libraries should use it. Version 3 of the LGPL was published in 2007 as a list of additional permissions applied to GPL version 3. The LGPL places copyleft restrictions on the program itself but does not apply these restrictions to other software that merely links with the program. There are, however, certain other restrictions on this software. The LGPL is primarily used for software libraries, although it is also used by some stand-alone applications, most notably Mozilla and OpenOffice.org and sometimes media as well. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GNU Lesser General Public License)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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lzw

Lempel-Ziv-Welch (LZW) is a universal lossless data compression algorithm created by Abraham Lempel, Jacob Ziv, and Terry Welch. It was published by Welch in 1984 as an improved implementation of the LZ78 algorithm published by Lempel and Ziv in 1978. The algorithm is simple to implement, and has the potential for very high throughput in hardware implementations. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: LZW)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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machine-readable data

Machine-readable data is data (or metadata) which is in a format that can be understood by a computer. There are two types; human-readable data that is marked up so that it can also be read by machines (examples; microformats, RDFa) or data file formats intended principally for machines (RDF, XML, JSON). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Machine-readable data)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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muves

MUVE (plural MUVEs) refers to online, multi-user virtual environments, sometimes called virtual worlds. While this term has been used previously to refer to a generational change in MUDs, MOOs, and MMORPGs, it is most widely used to describe MMOGs that are not necessarily game-specific. The term was first used in Chip Morningstar's 1990 paper The Lessons of Lucasfilm's Habitat. A number of the most popular and well-known MUVEs are listed below, although there are a number of others. Modern MUVEs have 3D third-person graphics, are accessed over the Internet, allow for some dozens of simultaneous users to interact, and represent a persistent virtual world. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: MUVE)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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native applications

A native application (native app) is an application program that has been developed for use on a particular platform or device. Because native apps are written for a specific platform, they can interact with and take advantage of operating system features and other software that is typically installed on that platform. Because a native app is built for a particular device and its operating system, it has the ability to use device-specific hardware and software, meaning that native apps can take advantage of the latest technology available on mobile devices such as a global positioning system (GPS) and camera. This can be construed as an advantage for native apps over Web apps or mobile cloud apps. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
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