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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 596 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Termsort icon Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

web storage

Web Storage and DOM Storage (Document Object Model) are web application software methods and protocols used for storing data in a web browser. Web storage supports persistent data storage, similar to cookies, as well as window-local storage. Web storage is being standardized by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). It was originally part of the HTML 5 specification, but is now in a separate specification. It is supported by Internet Explorer 8, Mozilla-based browsers (e.g., Firefox 2+, officially from 3.5), Safari 4, Google Chrome 4 (sessionStorage is from 5), and Opera 10.50. As of 14 July 2010 only Opera supports the storage events (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web storage)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

web standards

Web standards is a general term for the formal standards and other technical specifications that define and describe aspects of the World Wide Web. In recent years, the term has been more frequently associated with the trend of endorsing a set of standardized best practices for building web sites, and a philosophy of web design and development that includes those methods. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web standards)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.3%.
22 39 2.6

web services

A web service is a method of communication between two electronic devices over a network. The W3C defines a "web service" as "a software system designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network. It has an interface described in a machine-processable format (specifically Web Services Description Language WSDL). Other systems interact with the web service in a manner prescribed by its description using SOAP messages, typically conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization in conjunction with other Web-related standards." The W3C also states, "We can identify two major classes of web services, REST-compliant Web services, in which the primary purpose of the service is to manipulate XML representations of Web resources using a uniform set of "stateless" operations; and arbitrary Web services, in which the service may expose an arbitrary set of operations. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web service)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 11.4%.
199 659 0.2

web resources

The concept of resource is primitive in the Web architecture, and is used in the definition of its fundamental elements. The term was first introduced to refer to targets of Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), but its definition has been further extended to include the referent of any Uniform Resource Identifier (RFC 3986), or Internationalized Resource Identifier (RFC 3987). In the Semantic Web, abstract resources and their semantic properties are described using the family of languages based on Resource Description Framework (RDF). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web resource)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 6.9%.
121 234 0.4

web portal

A web portal or links page is a web site that function as a point of access to information on the World Wide Web. A portal presents information from diverse sources in a unified way. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web portal)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.2%.
21 35

web development

Web development (or web management) is a broad term for the work involved in developing a web site for the Internet (World Wide Web) or an intranet (a private network). This can include web design, web content development, client liaison, client-side / server-side scripting, web server and network security configuration, and e-commerce development. However, among web professionals, "web development" usually refers to the main non-design aspects of building web sites: writing markup and coding. Web development can range from developing the simplest static single page of plain text to the most complex web-based internet applications, electronic businesses, or social network services. For larger organizations and businesses, web development teams can consist of hundreds of people (web developers). Smaller organizations may only require a single permanent or contracting webmaster, or secondary assignment to related job positions such as a graphic designer and/or information systems technician. Web development may be a collaborative effort between departments rather than the domain of a designated department. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web development)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4.9%.
86 244

web browser

A web browser or Internet browser is a software application for retrieving, presenting, and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web. An information resource is identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) and may be a web page, image, video, or other piece of content. Hyperlinks present in resources enable users to easily navigate their browsers to related resources. Although browsers are primarily intended to access the World Wide Web, they can also be used to access information provided by Web servers in private networks or files in file systems. Some browsers can also be used to save information resources to file systems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: web browser)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 9.1%.
158 292

web app

A web application is an application that is accessed by users over a network such as the Internet or an intranet. The term may also mean a computer software application that is coded in a browser-supported programming language (such as JavaScript, combined with a browser-rendered markup language like HTML) and reliant on a common web browser to render the application executable. Web applications are popular due to the ubiquity of web browsers, and the convenience of using a web browser as a client, sometimes called a thin client. The ability to update and maintain web applications without distributing and installing software on potentially thousands of client computers is a key reason for their popularity, as is the inherent support for cross-platform compatibility. Common web applications include webmail, online retail sales, online auctions, wikis and many other functions. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web application)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.6%.
46 97 1

web 2.0

The term Web 2.0 is associated with web applications that facilitate participatory information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design, and collaboration on the World Wide Web. A Web 2.0 site allows users to interact and collaborate with each other in a social media dialogue as creators (prosumers) of user-generated content in a virtual community, in contrast to websites where users (consumers) are limited to the passive viewing of content that was created for them. Examples of Web 2.0 include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, hosted services, web applications, mashups and folksonomies. The term is closely associated with Tim O'Reilly because of the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in late 2004. Although the term suggests a new version of the World Wide Web, it does not refer to an update to any technical specification, but rather to cumulative changes in the ways software developers and end-users use the Web. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web 2.0)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 9.3%.
163 740 0.1

wcag

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) are part of a series of Web accessibility guidelines published by the W3C's Web Accessibility Initiative. They consist of a set of guidelines on making content accessible, primarily for disabled users, but also for all user agents, including highly limited devices, such as mobile phones. The current version is 2.0. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG))

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
16 85

wayf

The Shibboleth 'where are you from service' (WAYF) provides the user with a list of institutional identity providers (IdPs) and allows them to choose at which one they wish to authenticate. The WAYF then redirects the user to the chosen IdP. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1

wayback machine

The Wayback Machine is a digital time capsule created by the Internet Archive non-profit organization, based in San Francisco, California. It is maintained with content from Alexa Internet. This service enables users to see archived versions of web pages across time - what the Archive calls a "three dimensional index." Internet Archive bought the domain waybackmachine.org for their own site. It is currently in beta test. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wayback Machine)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.7%.
12 20

wav

Waveform Audio File Format (WAVE, or more commonly known as WAV due to its filename extension), (also, but rarely, named, Audio for Windows) is a Microsoft and IBM audio file format standard for storing an audio bitstream on PCs. It is an application of the RIFF bitstream format method for storing data in "chunks", and thus is also close to the 8SVX and the AIFF format used on Amiga and Macintosh computers, respectively. It is the main format used on Windows systems for raw and typically uncompressed audio. The usual bitstream encoding is the linear pulse-code modulation (LPCM) format. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: WAV)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.4%.
7 9

warc

The Web ARChive (WARC) archive format specifies a method for combining multiple digital resources into an aggregate archive file together with related information. The WARC format is a revision of the Internet Archive's ARC File Format [ARC_IA] that has traditionally been used to store "web crawls" as sequences of content blocks harvested from the World Wide Web. The WARC format generalizes the older format to better support the harvesting, access, and exchange needs of archiving organizations. Besides the primary content currently recorded, the revision accommodates related secondary content, such as assigned metadata, abbreviated duplicate detection events, and later-date transformations. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web ARChive)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

vufind

VuFind is an open source library search engine that allows users to search and browse beyond the resources of a traditional OPAC. Developed by Villanova University, version 1.0 was released in July 2010 after two years in beta. VuFind operates with a simple, Google-like interface and offers flexible keyword searching. While most commonly used for searching catalog records, VuFind can be extended to search other library resources including but not limited to: locally cached journals, digital library items, and institutional repository and bibliography. The software is also modular and highly configurable, allowing implementers to choose system components to best fit their needs. As of March 2012, a total of 64 institutions are running live instances of Vufind including the Georgia Tech Library, the London School of Economics, the National Library of Ireland, Yale University, and the DC Public Library. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VuFind)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 87

vt100

VT100 is a video terminal that was made by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). Its detailed attributes became the de facto standard for terminal emulators. It was introduced in August 1978, following its predecessor, the VT52, and communicated with its host system over serial lines using the ASCII character set and control sequences (a.k.a. escape sequences) standardized by ANSI. The VT100 was also the first Digital mass-market terminal to incorporate "graphic renditions" (blinking, bolding, reverse video, and underlining) as well as a selectable 80 or 132 column display. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VT100)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

vra core

Since the 1980s, Visual Resources Association has worked on creating standards to describe images. To replace the earlier widely varying practices, the association created a common standard, the VRA Core Categories. Somewhat based on the Dublin Core model, the Core has grown from a list of elements describing art and architectural images to a data standard (with an XML schema to promote the sharing of records) for describing images. The first version was published in 1996, with revisions in 1998, 2002, 2004, and 2007 (resulting in the current version, 4.0.). In November 2010, the Network Development and MARC Standards Office of the Library of Congress began hosting VRA Core 4 in partnership with the VRA. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VRA Core)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 5

vra

The Visual Resources Association (also known as VRA) is an international organization for image media professionals, VRA was founded in 1982 by slide librarians (visual resources curators) who were members of the College Art Association (CAA), the South Eastern Art Conference (SECAC), the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA), and the Mid-America College Art Association (MACAA). The association is concerned with creating, describing, and distributing digital images and other media; educating image professionals; and developing standards. The Visual Resources Association Foundation, a 501 C-3 organization created by the VRA, supports research and education in visual resources, and provides educational, literary, and scientific outreach to the archival and library community and the general public. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VRA)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 5

vocabularies

Controlled vocabularies provide a way to organize knowledge for subsequent retrieval. They are used in subject indexing schemes, subject headings, thesauri and taxonomies. Controlled vocabulary schemes mandate the use of predefined, authorised terms that have been preselected by the designer of the vocabulary, in contrast to natural language vocabularies, where there is no restriction on the vocabulary. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Controlled vocabularies)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 8.5%.
148 313 0.3

vml

Vector Markup Language (VML) is a deprecated XML language used to produce vector graphics. VML was submitted as a proposed standard to the W3C in 1998 by Autodesk, Hewlett-Packard, Macromedia, Microsoft, and Visio. Around the same time other competing W3C submissions were received in the area of web vector graphics, such as PGML from Adobe Systems, Sun Microsystems, and others. As a result of these submissions, a new W3C working group was created, which produced Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG). SVG became a W3C Recommendation in 2001 as a language for describing two-dimensional vector and mixed vector/raster graphics in XML. VML has been largely deprecated in favor of other formats, such as SVG. SVG is not compatible with VML. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 1
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by Dr. Radut