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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usage Trending factor Charts

optical character recognition

Optical character recognition, usually abbreviated to OCR, is the mechanical or electronic translation of scanned images of handwritten, typewritten or printed text into machine-encoded text. It is widely used to convert books and documents into electronic files, to computerize a record-keeping system in an office, or to publish the text on a website. OCR makes it possible to edit the text, search for a word or phrase, store it more compactly, display or print a copy free of scanning artifacts, and apply techniques such as machine translation, text-to-speech and text mining to it. OCR is a field of research in pattern recognition, artificial intelligence and computer vision. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Optical character recognition)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
16 25 16

information retrieval

Information retrieval (IR) is the area of study concerned with searching for documents, for information within documents, and for metadata about documents, as well as that of searching structured storage, relational databases, and the World Wide Web. There is overlap in the usage of the terms data retrieval, document retrieval, information retrieval, and text retrieval, but each also has its own body of literature, theory, praxis, and technologies. IR is interdisciplinary, based on computer science, mathematics, library science, information science, information architecture, cognitive psychology, linguistics, and statistics. Automated information retrieval systems are used to reduce what has been called "information overload". Many universities and public libraries use IR systems to provide access to books, journals and other documents. Web search engines are the most visible IR applications. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Information retrieval)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 7%.
121 229 15.6

owl

The Web Ontology Language (OWL) is a family of knowledge representation languages for authoring ontologies. The languages are characterised by formal semantics and RDF/XML-based serializations for the Semantic Web. OWL is endorsed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and has attracted academic, medical and commercial interest. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: OWL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
15 26 15.4

digital archive

An archive refers to a collection of historical records, as well as the physical place they are located. Archives contain primary source documents that have accumulated over the course of an individual or organization's lifetime, and are kept to show the function of an organization. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Archive)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4.5%.
78 169 15

topic map

Topic Maps is a standard for the representation and interchange of knowledge, with an emphasis on the findability of information. The ISO standard is formally known as ISO/IEC 13250:2003. A topic map represents information using: 1) topics, representing any concept, from people, countries, and organizations to software modules, individual files, and events; 2) associations, representing hypergraph relationships between topics; 3) occurrences representing information resources relevant to a particular topic. Topic Maps are similar to concept maps and mind maps in many respects, though only Topic Maps are standardized. Topic Maps are a form of semantic web technology, and some work has been undertaken on interoperability between the W3C's RDF/OWL/SPARQL family of semantic web standards and the ISO's family of Topic Maps standards. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Topic maps)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 7 14.3

librarything

LibraryThing is a social cataloging web application for storing and sharing book catalogs and various types of book metadata. It is used by individuals, authors, libraries and publishers. Based in Portland, Maine, LibraryThing was developed by Tim Spalding and went live on August 29, 2005. As of April 2011 it has over 1,300,000 users and more than 61 million books catalogued. The primary feature of LibraryThing is the cataloging of books by importing data from libraries through Z39.50 connections and from six Amazon.com stores. Library sources supply MARC and Dublin Core records to LT; users can import information from 690 libraries, including the Library of Congress, National Library of Australia, the Canadian National Catalogue, the British Library, and Yale University. Should a record not be available from any of these sources, it is also possible to add the book information by using a blank form. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: LibraryThing)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.6%.
11 28 14.2

tag cloud

A tag cloud (keyword cloud, or weighted list in visual design) is a visual depiction of user-generated tags, or simply the word content of a site, typically used to describe the content of web sites. Tags are usually single words and are normally listed alphabetically, and the importance of each tag is shown with font size or color. Thus, it is possible to find a tag alphabetically and by popularity. The tags are usually hyperlinks that lead to a collection of items that are associated with a tag. Sometimes, further visual properties are manipulated, such as the font color, intensity, or weight. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Tag cloud)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.9%.
16 28 14.2

browser

A web browser or Internet browser is a software application for retrieving, presenting, and traversing information resources on the World Wide Web. An information resource is identified by a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) and may be a web page, image, video, or other piece of content. Hyperlinks present in resources enable users to easily navigate their browsers to related resources. Although browsers are primarily intended to access the World Wide Web, they can also be used to access information provided by Web servers in private networks or files in file systems. Some browsers can also be used to save information resources to file systems. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: web browser)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 17.2%.
299 725 14

remote working

Telecommuting or telework is a work arrangement in which employees enjoy flexibility in working location and hours. In other words, the daily commute to a central place of work is replaced by telecommunication links. Many work from home, while others, occasionally also referred to as nomad workers or web commuters utilize mobile telecommunications technology to work from coffee shops or other locations. Telework is a broader term, referring to substituting telecommunications for any form of work-related travel, thereby eliminating the distance restrictions of telecommuting. A person who telecommutes is known as a "telecommuter". A frequently repeated motto is that "work is something you do, not something you travel to". (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Remote working)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.7%.
13 178 14

vle

A virtual learning environment (VLE) is a system designed to support teaching and learning in an educational setting, as distinct from a Managed Learning Environment (MLE), where the focus is on management.A VLE will normally work over the Internet and provide a collection of tools such as those for assessment (particularly of types that can be marked automatically, such as multiple choice), communication, uploading of content, return of students' work, peer assessment, administration of student groups, collecting and organizing student grades, questionnaires, tracking tools, etc. New features in these systems include wikis, blogs, RSS and 3D virtual learning spaces. VLEs are often used in schools and other educational establishments in order to make the learning experience more interactive. While originally created for distance education, VLEs are now most often used to supplement traditional face to face classroom activities, commonly known as Blended Learning. These systems usually run on servers, to serve the course to students Multimedia and/or web pages. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Virtual learning environment)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 4%.
69 259 13.8

data mining

Data mining (the analysis step of the "Knowledge Discovery in Databases" process, or KDD), an interdisciplinary subfield of computer science, is the computational process of discovering patterns in large data sets involving methods at the intersection of artificial intelligence, machine learning, statistics, and database systems. The overall goal of the data mining process is to extract information from a data set and transform it into an understandable structure for further use. Aside from the raw analysis step, it involves database and data management aspects, data pre-processing, model and inference considerations, interestingness metrics, complexity considerations, post-processing of discovered structures, visualization, and online updating. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Data Mining)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.8%.
48 116 13.6

multimedia

Multimedia is media and content that uses a combination of different content forms. The term can be used as a noun (a medium with multiple content forms) or as an adjective describing a medium as having multiple content forms. The term is used in contrast to media which only use traditional forms of printed or hand-produced material. Multimedia includes a combination of text, audio, still images, animation, video, and interactivity content forms. Multimedia is usually recorded and played, displayed or accessed by information content processing devices, such as computerized and electronic devices, but can also be part of a live performance. Multimedia (as an adjective) also describes electronic media devices used to store and experience multimedia content. Multimedia is distinguished from mixed media in fine art; by including audio, for example, it has a broader scope. The term "rich media" is synonymous for interactive multimedia. Hypermedia can be considered one particular multimedia application. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Multimedia)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 14.4%.
250 483 13.6

controlled vocabularies

Controlled vocabularies provide a way to organize knowledge for subsequent retrieval. They are used in subject indexing schemes, subject headings, thesauri and taxonomies. Controlled vocabulary schemes mandate the use of predefined, authorised terms that have been preselected by the designer of the vocabulary, in contrast to natural language vocabularies, where there is no restriction on the vocabulary. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Controlled vocabularies)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 3.1%.
54 121 13.2

html

HTML, which stands for HyperText Markup Language, is the predominant markup language for web pages. HTML is written in the form of HTML elements consisting of tags, enclosed in angle brackets. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: HTML)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 20%.
349 1609 12.6

rss

RSS (most commonly expanded as Really Simple Syndication) is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works - such as blog entries, news headlines, audio, and video - in a standardized format. An RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed", or "channel") includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. Web feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content automatically. They benefit readers who want to subscribe to timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place. RSS feeds can be read using software called an "RSS reader", "feed reader", or "aggregator", which can be web-based, desktop-based, or mobile-device-based. A standardized XML file format allows the information to be published once and viewed by many different programs. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RSS)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 8.2%.
143 632 12.6

mashup

In Web development, a mashup is a Web page or application that uses and combines data, presentation or functionality from two or more sources to create new services. The term implies easy, fast integration, frequently using open APIs and data sources to produce enriched results that were not necessarily the original reason for producing the raw source data. The main characteristics of the mashup are combination, visualization, and aggregation. It is important to make existing data more useful, moreover for personal and professional use. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Mashup)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.4%.
24 79 11.4

wireless

In telecommunications, wireless communication may be used to transfer information over short distances (a few meters as in television remote control) or long distances (thousands or millions of kilometers for radio communications). The term is often shortened to "wireless". It encompasses various types of fixed, mobile, and portable two-way radios, cellular telephones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and wireless networking. Other examples of wireless technology include GPS units, garage door openers and or garage doors, wireless computer mice, keyboards and headsets, satellite television and cordless telephones. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Wireless)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 2.8%.
48 80 11.4

responsive design

Responsive Web Design (RWD) essentially indicates that a web site is crafted to use Cascading Style Sheets 3 media queries, an extension of the @media rule , with fluid proportion-based grids (which use percentages and EMs instead of pixels) , to adapt the layout to the viewing environment, and probably also use flexible images. As a result, users across a broad range of devices and browsers will have access to a single source of content, laid out so as to be easy to read and navigate with a minimum of resizing, panning, and scrolling. "Mobile First" and "Progressive Enhancement / Unobtrusive JavaScript" (strategies for when a new site design is being considered) are related concepts that predated RWD: browsers of basic mobile phones do not understand media queries or Javascript, and it is wise to create a basic web site then enhance it for smart phones and PCs — rather than attempt "graceful degradation" to try to degrade a complex, image-heavy site to work on the most basic mobile phones. Browser detection and mobile device detection are two ways of deducing if Javascript and certain HTML and CSS features are supported, however Javascript libraries like Modernizr, jQuery, and jQuery Mobile that directly test for features/user agents are also popular. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Responsive design)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 9 11.1

cookie

A cookie, also known as an HTTP cookie, web cookie, or browser cookie, is used for an origin website to send state information to a user's browser and for the browser to return the state information to the origin site. The state information can be used for authentication, identification of a user session, user's preferences, shopping cart contents, or anything else that can be accomplished through storing text data on the user's computer. Cookies are not software. They cannot be programmed, cannot carry viruses, and cannot install malware on the host computer. However, they can be used by spyware to track user's browsing activities – a major privacy concern that prompted European and US law makers to take action. Cookies can also be stolen by hackers to gain access to a victim's web account. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: HTTP cookies)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.9%.
33 87 10.2

web standards

Web standards is a general term for the formal standards and other technical specifications that define and describe aspects of the World Wide Web. In recent years, the term has been more frequently associated with the trend of endorsing a set of standardized best practices for building web sites, and a philosophy of web design and development that includes those methods. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Web standards)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 1.3%.
22 39 10.2
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