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Overview of keyword tags

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This page provides an overview of 595 keyword tags, ordered by trending factor. Column headings allow re-sorting by other criteria. In the expanding tab below you can adjust filters to display sub-sets of keywords and narrow the focus to specific terms of interest (see FAQs on filtering for usage tips). Select this link to remove all filters.

Term Brief description Total articles Total usagesort icon Trending factor Charts

pode

The Pode-project looks at new ways of using metadata found in library catalogues, in particular ways of mashing the catalogue content with other 'mashable' resources. In addition, the project looks into the possibilities and challenges the web technologies provide in relation to today's systems and practices. This project uses traditional protocols provided by the ILS vendors as well as converting and finetuning data for frbrization and provision of Linked library data. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 5

terminology service

A terminology service is a structured network service that offers terminolgy-related services, for example mapping a term from one controlled vocabulary to another or expanding terms within a thesaurus (Excerpt from JISC Information Environment Glossary)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 5

vra

The Visual Resources Association (also known as VRA) is an international organization for image media professionals, VRA was founded in 1982 by slide librarians (visual resources curators) who were members of the College Art Association (CAA), the South Eastern Art Conference (SECAC), the Art Libraries Society of North America (ARLIS/NA), and the Mid-America College Art Association (MACAA). The association is concerned with creating, describing, and distributing digital images and other media; educating image professionals; and developing standards. The Visual Resources Association Foundation, a 501 C-3 organization created by the VRA, supports research and education in visual resources, and provides educational, literary, and scientific outreach to the archival and library community and the general public. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VRA)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 5

vra core

Since the 1980s, Visual Resources Association has worked on creating standards to describe images. To replace the earlier widely varying practices, the association created a common standard, the VRA Core Categories. Somewhat based on the Dublin Core model, the Core has grown from a list of elements describing art and architectural images to a data standard (with an XML schema to promote the sharing of records) for describing images. The first version was published in 1996, with revisions in 1998, 2002, 2004, and 2007 (resulting in the current version, 4.0.). In November 2010, the Network Development and MARC Standards Office of the Library of Congress began hosting VRA Core 4 in partnership with the VRA. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: VRA Core)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 5

wookie

Apache Wookie is a solution for adding W3C Widgets to web applications incubated at the Apache Software Foundation. Apache Wookie is based on the W3C Widgets specification, and enables widgets to be embedded in web applications using plugins. A number of plugins have been developed for popular web applications such as Wordpress. Apache Wookie also implements the Google Wave Gadget API, enabling synchronous, collaborative Widgets such as games, chats and surveys. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 5

x.500

X.500 is a series of computer networking standards covering electronic directory services. The X.500 series was developed by ITU-T, formerly known as CCITT, and first approved in 1988. The directory services were developed in order to support the requirements of X.400 electronic mail exchange and name lookup. ISO was a partner in developing the standards, incorporating them into the Open Systems Interconnection suite of protocols. ISO/IEC 9594 is the corresponding ISO identification. The protocols defined by X.500 includeL DAP (Directory Access Protocol); DSP (Directory System Protocol); DISP (Directory Information Shadowing Protocol); DOP (Directory Operational Bindings Management Protocol). Because these X.500 protocols used the OSI networking stack, a number of alternatives to DAP were developed to allow Internet clients to access to the X.500 Directory using the TCP/IP networking stack. The most well-known alternative to DAP is Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). While DAP and the other X.500 protocols can now use the TCP/IP networking stack, LDAP remains a popular directory access protocol. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: X.500)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 5

asf

The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) is a non-profit corporation (classified as 501(c)(3) in the United States) to support Apache software projects, including the Apache HTTP Server. The ASF was formed from the Apache Group and incorporated in Delaware, U.S., in June 1999. The Apache Software Foundation is a decentralized community of developers. The software they produce is distributed under the terms of the Apache License and is therefore free and open source software (FOSS). The Apache projects are characterized by a collaborative, consensus-based development process and an open and pragmatic software license. Each project is managed by a self-selected team of technical experts who are active contributors to the project. The ASF is a meritocracy, implying that membership to the foundation is granted only to volunteers who have actively contributed to Apache projects. The ASF is considered a second generation open-source organization. Among the ASF's objectives are to provide legal protection to volunteers working on Apache projects, and to prevent the Apache brand name from being used by other organizations without permission. The ASF also holds several ApacheCon conferences each year, highlighting Apache projects, related technology, and encouraging Apache developers to gather together. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Apache Software Foundation)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 6

bpel

Business Process Execution Language (BPEL), short for Web Services Business Process Execution Language (WS-BPEL) is an OASIS standard executable language for specifying actions within business processes with web services. Processes in Business Process Execution Language export and import information by using web service interfaces exclusively. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: BPEL)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 6

cidoc-crm

The CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CRM) provides an extensible ontology for concepts and information in cultural heritage and museum documentation. It is the international standard (ISO 21127:2006) for the controlled exchange of cultural heritage information. Archives, libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions are encouraged to use the CIDOC CRM to enhance accessibility to museum-related information and knowledge. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 6

cql

Contextual Query Language (CQL), previously known as Common Query Language, is a formal language for representing queries to information retrieval systems such as search engines, bibliographic catalogs and museum collection information. Based on the semantics of Z39.50, its design objective is that queries be human readable and writable, and that the language be intuitive while maintaining the expressiveness of more complex query languages. It is being developed and maintained by the Z39.50 Maintenance Agency, part of the Library of Congress. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Contextual Query Language)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 6

freemium

Freemium is a business model by which a proprietary product or service (typically a digital offering such as software, media, games or web services) is provided free of charge, but money (premium) is charged for advanced features, functionality, or virtual goods. The word "freemium" is a portmanteau neologism combining the two aspects of the business model: "free" and "premium". (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Freemium)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 6 600

ims content packaging

A content package is a file containing content and metadata. A content package is used in e-learning to define some learning content or an assessment that can be delivered, for example by a Learning Management System. It's a standard way of describing learning content that can be read by many programs. The most widely used content packaging format is that defined by IMS Global, which uses an XML manifest file called imsmanifest.xml wrapped up inside a zip file. The learning content itself is either included in the zip file if it is HTML or other media that can run on its own, or else is referenced as a URL from within the manifest. The IMS format was used by SCORM to define their packaging format, and typically every SCORM content object (SCO) is defined by a content package. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Content package)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

instructional design

Instructional Design (also called Instructional Systems Design (ISD)) is the practice of maximizing the effectiveness, efficiency and appeal of instruction and other learning experiences. The process consists broadly of determining the current state and needs of the learner, defining the end goal of instruction, and creating some "intervention" to assist in the transition. Ideally the process is informed by pedagogically (process of teaching) and andragogically (adult learning) tested theories of learning and may take place in student-only, teacher-led or community-based settings. The outcome of this instruction may be directly observable and scientifically measured or completely hidden and assumed. There are many instructional design models but many are based on the ADDIE model with the five phases: 1) analysis, 2) design, 3) development, 4) implementation, and 5) evaluation. As a field, instructional design is historically and traditionally rooted in cognitive and behavioral psychology. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Instructional design)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 6

lgpl

The GNU Lesser General Public License (formerly the GNU Library General Public License) or LGPL is a free software license published by the Free Software Foundation (FSF). It was designed as a compromise between the strong-copyleft GNU General Public License or GPL and permissive licenses such as the BSD licenses and the MIT License. The GNU Library General Public License (as the LGPL was originally named) was published in 1991, and was the version number 2 for parity with GPL version 2. The LGPL was revised in minor ways in the 2.1 point release, published in 1999, when it was renamed the GNU Lesser General Public License to reflect the FSF's position that not all libraries should use it. Version 3 of the LGPL was published in 2007 as a list of additional permissions applied to GPL version 3. The LGPL places copyleft restrictions on the program itself but does not apply these restrictions to other software that merely links with the program. There are, however, certain other restrictions on this software. The LGPL is primarily used for software libraries, although it is also used by some stand-alone applications, most notably Mozilla and OpenOffice.org and sometimes media as well. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: GNU Lesser General Public License)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
1 6

native app

A native application (native app) is an application program that has been developed for use on a particular platform or device. Because native apps are written for a specific platform, they can interact with and take advantage of operating system features and other software that is typically installed on that platform. Because a native app is built for a particular device and its operating system, it has the ability to use device-specific hardware and software, meaning that native apps can take advantage of the latest technology available on mobile devices such as a global positioning system (GPS) and camera. This can be construed as an advantage for native apps over Web apps or mobile cloud apps. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
3 6 150

object database

An object database (also object-oriented database management system or OODBMS) is a database management system in which information is represented in the form of objects as used in object-oriented programming. Object databases are a niche field within the broader database management system (DBMS) market dominated by relational database management systems. Object databases have been considered since the early 1980s and 1990s, but they have made little impact on mainstream commercial data processing, though there is some usage in specialized areas. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Object database)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

prince2

PRINCE2 (PRojects IN Controlled Environments) is a process-based method for effective project management. PRINCE2 is a de facto standard used extensively by the UK Government and is widely recognised and used in the private sector, both in the UK and internationally. (Excerpt from this source)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.1%.
2 6

rdfs

RDF Schema (variously abbreviated as RDFS, RDF(S), RDF-S, or RDF/S) is an extensible knowledge representation language, providing basic elements for the description of ontologies, otherwise called Resource Description Framework (RDF) vocabularies, intended to structure RDF resources. The first version was published by the World-Wide Web Consortium (W3C) in April 1998, and the final W3C recommendation was released in February 2004. Many RDFS components are included in the more expressive language Web Ontology Language (OWL). (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: RDFS)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
4 6

samba

Samba is a free software re-implementation, originally developed by Australian Andrew Tridgell, of the SMB/CIFS networking protocol. As of version 3, Samba provides file and print services for various Microsoft Windows clients and can integrate with a Windows Server domain, either as a Primary Domain Controller (PDC) or as a domain member. It can also be part of an Active Directory domain. Samba runs on most Unix and Unix-like systems, such as GNU / Linux, Solaris, AIX and the BSD variants, including Apple's Mac OS X Server (which was added to the Mac OS X client in version 10.2). Samba is standard on nearly all distributions of Linux and is commonly included as a basic system service on other Unix-based operating systems as well. Samba is released under the GNU General Public License. The name Samba comes from SMB (Server Message Block), the name of the standard protocol used by the Microsoft Windows network file system. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Samba)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.3%.
5 6

storify

Storify is a website that creates and preserves stories or timelines using social media such as Twitter, photos and videos. It was launched in 2010, and has been open to the public since April 2011. Users search multiple social networks from one place, and then drag individual elements into stories. Users can re-order the elements and also add text to help give context to the readers. Media organizations have used Storify in coverage of ongoing news stories such as elections and meetings and events. (Excerpt from Wikipedia article: Storify)

Percentage of Ariadne articles tagged with this term: 0.2%.
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